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BROWN COUNTY, OHIO
History & Genealogy

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BIOGRAPHIES

Source::
HISTORY OF BROWN COUNTY, OHIO
A History of the County; Its Townships, Towns, Churches,
Schools, Etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of
Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the
Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of
Brown County; Constitution of the
United States, Miscellaneous
Matters, Etc., Etc.
ILLUSTRATED
Published:  Chicago:  W. H. Beers & Co.
1883
 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M
N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

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  Jefferson Twp. -
ALBERT M. BAIRD, farmer, P. O. Russellville, was born May 27, 1849, in Jefferson Township, Brown Co., Ohio.  He is the son of James and Martha Baird, of whom we have made mention in this work.  He was reared on a farm and received the rudiments of an education in a district school, which was located across the creek from his father's homestead.  On Sept. 19, 1878, he married Miss Alice Potts, daughter of Matthew (deceased) and Polly A. Potts.  Matthew Potts was born in Ireland and when quite young his parents emigrated to America.  They came to Adams County, probably in the year 1817.  Matthew remained at home until the date of his marriage to Polly A. Smith, by whom he had eleven children, eight of whom are still living.  Several years after his marriage he moved to Byrd Township, Brown County, where he remained several years, engaged in the milling business, on Eagle Creek.  He then moved to a farm in the southern portion of Jackson Township, where he remained until his death, Mar. 11, 1876.  His widow still survives him, and at present is residing at Carlisle, Jackson Township.  After their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Baird lived in Jackson Township for perhaps one year.  In December, 1880, they moved to the farm on which they still reside, in the eastern portion of Jefferson Township near Eagle Creek.  Mrs. Baird is a lady of culture and taste, and a member of the M. E. Church.  He is a man of industrious habits and the owner of seventy-one acres of land.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 232
  Jefferson Twp. -
GEORGE BAIRD, farmer, P. O. Russellville.  John Baird, father of our subject, was born in May, 1807, in what is now known as Jefferson Township, Brown Co., Ohio.  His parents were George and Jane Baird who were among the pioneers of this county, and of whom we have made mention in another portion of this work.  John was reared to manhood on a farm and received but a rudimentary education.  In May, 1832, he married Mary Fenton, daughter of Jeremiah and Rosanna Fenton.  This union has been blessed with eight children seven of whom are still living - Jeremiah, George, Sarah A54s, Rosanna, John J., Mary and Rufus T.  He has been very successful during life as an agriculturist, and is at present residing with the subject of this sketch, his wife having died in 1874.  George Baird, our subject, was born in March, 1835, in Jefferson Township, Brown Co., Ohio.  In his youth, he had not the opportunities of obtaining more than a rudimentary education.  Having selected Miss Mary Smith, born September, 1842, for his betrothed, their nuptials were celebrated in April, 1873.  She is the daughter of John S. and Ruth Smith  This union has been blessed with three children, two of whom are still living.  He is a member of the Presbyterian Church at Russellville, a Republican and the owner of about 463 acres of land.  He resides about two miles nearly due east of Russellville on his farm, which iis in a high state of cultivation, and pleasantly located.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 233
  Jackson Twp.
GEORGE N. BAIRD, farmer, P. O. Russellville, was born in April, 1843, in Jefferson Township, Brown County.  His parents are James and Martha Baird, of Jefferson Township, whose sketch appears in this work.  He was reared to man's estate on a farm, and received but a limited education.  In November, 1880, he married Miss Stella Day daughter of Ellis and Miriam Day.  This union has been blessed with three children, one of whom is still living - Angy N.  Mr. Baird is a man of good judgment, agreeable, a liberal supporter of all enterprises which tend to the rise and progress of the county and the elevation of humanity.  He is a member of the Presbyterian Church at Russellville, a Republican, and the owner of eighty-eight acres of land located in the southern portion of Jackson Township.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 274
  Jefferson Twp. -
JAMES BAIRD, farmer, P. O. Russellville.  Among the pioneer families of Brown County, there are but few whose names are so well known and who are as highly esteemed by the community as are the Bairds.  George Baird, the pioneer, was born June 15, 1771, in Pennsylvania.  His father, William Baird, was an old Revolutionary soldier, who settled in Virginia some time after the close of the war.  On Sept.15, 1796, were celebrated the nuptials of George and Jane (Moore) Baird.  By this union there were born ten children, five in Virginia, and subsequently five in Ohio.  In the year 1803 - 04, they emigrated to Ohio, and settled in what is now known as Jefferson Township, Brown Co., Ohio, on 300 acres of land about where James, their son, at present resides.  He built his log cabin and prepared himself for the more arduous task of clearing the land.  He served during the war of 1812 for about thirty days, but was not under fire.  About the year 1817, he built a large two story hewed-long house, which was more commodious and better adapted to the wants of his family.  The family continued to occupy this building till about the year 1835-36, when James, his son, the subject of this sketch, built a new brick house near the site first occupied by the log cabin, in which house he remained for perhaps two years, when he died in December, 1838, his wife having died in October, 1820.  The cares of the household were then devolved upon his daughters, who performed them for the greater part of the time.  His daughter Elizabeth, being the last one at home, having married, he was obliged to substitute in her stead foreign domestics.  This state of affairs existed until the marriage of  his son James, whose wife then took charge of affairs.  Mr. Baird was of a kind and generous nature, given to hospitality, especially to the poor and needy.  IN his transactions with his fellow-men, he was always strictly honorable, and his death was the occasion of considerable sorrow and regret.  James Baird, our subject, was born in June, 1809, in Brown County, Ohio, and received but a limited education.  On Nov. 8, 1832, he married Miss Martha Bowar, who emigrated from Pennsylvania to Brown County about 1812.  After remaining in the neighborhood of Ripley for a short time, they (Mr. Bowar and family) moved into the neighborhood of Pilson's Mill, where they became permanently settled.  Mr. Baird claims that from the time his wife's parents settled there to the present time, "they have not lived one-half mile apart."  To them have been born nine children - William S., George N., Robert B. (deceased, who enlisted in the Seventieth Ohio Volunteer Infantry during the war of the rebellion, and participated in the battle of Pittsburg Landing, in the attack on Fort McAllister, and subsequently was with Sherman in his grand march to the sea), Lewis W. (who enlisted in the Seventieth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and continued in the service until the close of the war, and participated in the attack on Fort McAllister; carried into the ramparts, facing shot and bayonets, the first Union flag), James A., Albert M., Sarah E., Jesse L. and Jane (deceased, who married William B. Carey).  Mr. Carey was a soldier in the Union Army, was captured by the rebels in Virginia and thrown into different Southern prisons until he was sent to Andersonville, where he met with the fate of starvation.  Mr. Baird has also reared three of his grandchildren from infancy - George B., Ella C. Carey (deceased) and William C. son of James A. Baird.  Mr. Baird states that since the new house has been built on the homestead, it has never been left a night without an occupant, which is an uncommon occurrence.  He has served as Trustee for Jefferson Township, and is a member of the Presbyterian Church, in which denomination he has acted as Elder for perhaps thirty-nine years.  He received from his father eighty acres of land as his inheritance, and by his industry, perseverance and good management had at one time about three hundred acres.  He is still hale and hearty, of a pleasant nature and veryentertaining.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 232
  Eagle Twp. -
JESSE J. BAIRD, physician, Fincastle, was born Mar. 1, 1854, in Jefferson Township, Brown Co., Ohio.  His parents are James and Martha Baird, of whom we have made mention in this work.  After receiving a rudimentary education, in the fall of 1872, he entered the Miami University, where he pursued his studies until the following June.  In the fall of 1874, he again entered the Miami University, this time pursuing a classical course until the following June.  In September, 1875, he entered Hamilton College, N. Y., where he continued his studies until date of graduation, June, 1877.  He then returned home and for one year studied medicine with Dr. Salisbury, of Russellville, this county.  Having received his diploma from a proper medical institute, he located in October, 1880, at Fincastle, and began the practice of medicine.  Although a young physician, he has secured a good patronage, and which is continually on the increase.  Mr. Baird is of a sociable, clear disposition, and is a rising young physician.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  223
  Washington Twp. -
HUSTON BARE, farmer, P. O. Sardinia, a native of Franklin Township, was born Apr. 14, 1814.  His father, William Bare, was a son of William and Margaret Bare, who emigrated from Ireland in 1783, and settled in Mason County, Ky., where they both ended their lives.  His grandparents, on his mother's side, Robert and Jane Ewing, also natives of the Emerald Isle, came across the waters in the same boat with William Bare and family, and subsequently settled in Franklin Township, where they were among the first settlers.  Mrs. Bare, nee Miss Esther Ewing, was born in Ireland, and came to this country with her parents.  In 1808, William Bare the father of our subject, came and located in Franklin Township.  He died in Montgomery, Mo., in 1848.  Mrs. B. departed this life in 1822.  Huston the third son of the family, was reared to manhood on a farm.  In 1840, he moved to Sardinia, and was a partner with Moses B. Riggs in merchandising till 1850, when he removed to his present farm.  He is the oldest and most successful merchant of Sardinia.  Apr. 30, 1835, he was married to Miss Jane McKinney, who died Dec. 2, 1862.  Mr. Bare celebrated his second marriage, Aug. 27, 1863, with Miss Elizabeth J. Fieke, a daughter of Francis and Nancy M. Feike.  Mrs. Bare was born in this county, Oct. 23, 1836.  Five children were the fruits of this union, of these two are living, viz.:  Orlan E., born July 10, 1864, and Francis A., born July 11, 1867.  Effie M., born July 31, 1869, died July 4, 1874; Stephen F. born Nov. 16, 1871, died May 11, 1875, and an infant daughter also died.  Mr. Bare is a member of the Baptist Church and Mrs. B. of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  Politically, Mr. Bare is a Republican.  In 1841, he was elected Justice of the Peace, and served twenty-seven years consecutively.  He was Trustee of Washington Township six years and Treasurer ten years.  In 1864, he was chosen a candidate for County Commissioner and was elected by a handsome majority - receiving a popular vote from the opposite party.  When fourteen years of age, he started out to fight the battles of life.  He first began by working by the month, going from good to better salary till he made a small competency, which he judiciously applied, and, combined with unceasing industry and rigid economy, he has accumulated large and valuable property, owing at the present time 600 acres of land.  For the last thirty-two years, he has dealt extensively in cattle and Poland-China hogs, and has been eminently successful in its pursuits.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  283
  Clark Twp. -
ROBERT A. BARNES, P. O. Hamersville, a prominent land-holder of Clark Township, was born in this township Dec. 5, 1837.  He is a son of Joseph and Asenath (Peddicord) Barnes, the former a native of Kentucky, of Irish descent, and the latter of Ohio, of German parentage.  Joseph Barnes came to Brown County when twenty-two years of age, and lived there many years.  He now resides in Smith County, Kan., in his seventieth year.  Our subject was reared on a farm, and has always been engaged in agricultural pursuits and the raising of stock.  He is well known throughout the township and well respected by all.  Mr. Barnes' political principles are purely Democratic.  In 1862, he was married to Asenath Applegate, a daughter of Adam and Naomi (Wall) Applegate, natives of Pennsylvania, who located in this county over one-half century ago.  Mr. and Mrs. Barnes are the parents of three children - George C., Charles A. and Clarilla.  Mrs. Barnes is a member of the Presbyterian Church of Feesburg.  Mr. Barnes is a member of the Democratic party, and is the owner of 250 acres of good land, the old homestead on which his wife was born.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  179
  Pike Twp. -
FREDERICK BAUER, farmer, P. O. Surryville.  Frederick Bauer was born in Bavaria Germany, in March, 1839.  He was the third son and fifth child of George and Philipena (Christman) Bauer.  In his youth, he was trained to the pursuits of farming, in which he is still engaged.  In September, 1868, he married Catherine Lutz, by whom he has three children - George, Elizabeth C. and Thomas.  In 1881, he was elected Treasurer of Pike Township in which capacity he still officiates.  He is a member of the I. O. O. F., and the owner of 235 acres of land.  His parents emigrated from Germany to America in 1815; came to Hamilton County, Ohio, where they remained a number of years; then came to Clark Township, Brown County, where they remained two years; then to Williamsburg Township, Clermont County, where they remained four years; from Clermont County they moved to Pike Township, Brown County, where they remained until 1880, in which year he moved to Clermont County, where he died in April, 1882, having spent a life of usefulness.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 213
  Huntington Twp. -
HARVEY BEASLEY
(deceased), was born in this township Mar. 7, 1813, and was a son of Benjamin and Ann Beasley, old settlers in the county, of whom mention is made in this work  He (Harvey) was married to Eliza Killen, by whom he had eleven children - Eliza A., Mason, John H., Mary, Erastus, Caroline, Margaret, Louisa, Henry (deceased), William (deceased), and Alice (deceased).  Eliza A. was married to William H. Grimes in 1853, by whom she had eight children - Elizabeth, Mary, Samuel, Jessimine, William H., Ola B., Sallie, and an infant.  Mr. Grimes was born in Brown County July 4, 1827, and died Feb .8, 1873; was a son of Samuel and Sallie (Brookover) GrimesMrs. G. was married to L. P. Cord Apr. 27, 1876.  He (Mr. Cord) was born in Fleming County, Ky., Apr. 12, 1835, and is a son of Garrett and Martha Cord; the former a native of Maryland, and the latter of Georgia.  Early in life Mr. Cord began teaching and was appointed Postmaster in Flemingsburg in 1855, he having previously studied law.  He has since followed various pursuits in various places.  July 23, 1862, he was married to Ruth A. Williams.  In 1872 he began the practice of law at Mount Olivet, Ky., and shortly after was elected Prosecuting Attorney of Fleming County, a position he filled for several years; he was also Probate and Police Magistrate.  His wife died July 21, 1870.  Since his last marriage he has resided in this township.  To Mr. and Mrs. C. has been born one child (deceased) - Gertrude  By his first wife he had one child - Theodore (deceased).  Mrs. Cord owns 251 acres of excellent land well improved.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 149
  Union Twp. -
JEPTHA C. BEASLEY, farmer, P. O. Ripley, was born in Union Township, Jan. 5, 1809.  He is a son of Jeptha and Sarah (Fisher) Beasley, natives of Spottsylvania County, Va.  Mr. Beasley was born Aug. 20, 1769, and Mrs. B. the same year.  In 1794, they were married, and in 1796 removed to Maysville, Ky., and the following fall crossed the Ohio and located in Union Township, where he purchased 100 acres of land.  In 1818, he removed to Ripley and followed boating to New Orleans for ten years successively.  He was, for a number of years, engaged in merchandising with his brother, Nathaniel Beasley.  In 1828, he planted a vineyard containing two acres, which was the first in the State.  His death occurred Apr. 9, 1858.  He had served in various official capacities; among them was the office of Justice of the Peace, which he held for fifteen years, and County Commissioner four years.  His father, Ezekiel Beasley, and family removed from Virginia to Maysville, Ky., in 1800, and died there.  James Beasley, brother to Jeptha Beasley, Sr., served in the Revolutionary war, and was killed by the Tories in South Carolina.  His brother, Charles Beasley, left Virginia and went to Lexington, Ky., thence for Louisville, but was captured on the way by the Indians; he finally escaped at Troy.  He and his brother John both participated in the battle of Blue Lick, where the latter was captured by the Indians.  Mr. Beasley, our subject, was reared on a farm and received his training in the common schools.  When of age, he and his brother, William Beasley, engaged in boating to the Crescent City, and followed it six years.  He was married, July 27, 1833, to Sarah Shelton, a daughter of Thomas and Sarah SheltonMrs. B. was born in Mason County, Ky., Oct. 20, 1815.  One child was born to this family, viz., William T., married July, 1857, to Miss Frances Douglas, a daughter of David and Mariah Douglas, of Kentucky.  Two children were the fruits of this union; of these, one is living— Hattie; Horace G. (deceased).  Mr. Beasley is by occupation an agriculturist and stock-raiser, and has been successful in the pursuits of life.  Mrs. B. has been a member of the Christian Church for forty years.  Mr. B. is a Republican.  He owns 178 acres of well-improved land.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 52
  Huntington Twp. -
MASSIE BEASLEY, Justice of the Peace, Aberdeen.  Probably no man in Brown County enjoys a greater degree of notoriety than the above-named gentleman.  He was born in this township Jan. 3, 1811, and is a son of Benjamin and Ann (Allentharp) Beasley.  The former was born in Virginia, Dec. 13, 1773, and died in this township July 24, 1851; his wife was born Dec. 25, 1777, and died Dec. 7, 1841 Benjamin was a son of Charles and Elizabeth BeasleyCharles’ father was born in England.  In 1788, Charles Beasley with his family emigrated to Kentucky, and in 1793 and 1794, Benjamin acted as an Indian spy under Gen. Henry Lee, and did good service for the pioneers.  In 1796, he was married to Ann Allentharp, and soon after joined a company gotten up by Gen. Nathaniel Massie, to found a settlement where the city of Manchester is now located.  One year later, he came to this township and bought 200 acres of land in Survey No. 2,627.  He was a man of good attainments and a skilled surveyor; he was successful, and accumulated a large property.  Ten children were born to him— John T., Mary, Elizabeth, Jeptha, Lucinda, Benjamin, Mason, Massie, Harvey and Julia Ann —all deceased but Massie.  The early life of our subject was passed in a manner common with pioneer boys.  His scientific training was received under his brother Jeptha and Adam Calderwood, surveyors of considerable note.  At the age of sixteen years, he had completed his studies, and then took up civil engineering under the tutorage of Mr. Calderwood.  His business has been extensive, and he has without doubt run more lines than any other surveyor the county ever had.  In 1850, he was elected Justice of the Peace, of this township.  In 1855, he came to Aberdeen, aid has been Mayor of the place three terms.  In 1870, he was again elected Justice of the Peace, and successor to the famous Thomas Shelton, Esq.  For fifty four years this remarkable man wore the ermine of office, and during this time solemnized 4,000 marriages before he died; his mantle fell upon the shoulders of our worthy subject, who, since has with dignity and decorum linked together “for better or worse,” the destinies of 3,000 couples.  His popularity as the “Marriage Squire” extends everywhere, and those whose fondest desires cannot be realized because of parental authority, have only to call upon the Squire, who will in a few minutes, and in an impressive way, still their troubled hearts in defiance of parental restrictions.  Mr. Beasley was married, Mar. 4, 1832, to Jane T., the daughter of Henry and Sophia Cropper, by whom he had nine children— James H., Thomas M., John F., Benjamin F., Eliza, and four that died in infancy.  Mrs. Beasley died Sept/ 7, 1874, aged sixty-one years and twenty-three days.  Massie Beasley, the subject of this sketch, is a well-preserved man, both physically and mentally; is buoyant and frolicism in disposition, and highly esteemed throughout the county.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 148
  Perry Twp. -
FLORIN BERGER, farmer, P. O. Blanchester, Clinton Co., Ohio, son of Lucien and Annie Berger, was born in Baden, Germany, May 5, 1829.  In 1837, his parents came to this country and settled in this township with seven other children.  His parents both died here; his father in 1862, and his mother in 1857.  Mr. Berger was married here, July 29, 1852, to Nancy, daughter of John B. and Eleanor Gus_in, born in Clinton County, Ohio.  They have eleven children - Peter, Sarah, Jemimah, Enoch, John, Andrew, Benage, Flora, Ellen, Fannie and Joseph.  Mr. Berger now has a fine farm of 70 acres, one mile northwest of Ferristown, 20 acres of which he received from his father.  He has been Township Trustee several years, and Supervisor a number of years, and is at preset a School Director.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  131
  Perry Twp. -
JOSEPH L. BERGER, farmer, P. O. Fayetteville, son of Lucien Berger, was born March 19, 1818, in Germany.  In 1835 or 1836, he came to this country and settled in this township, two miles south of Fayetteville.  Several years later, he bought a farm of 160 acres in the northwest part of the township.  He was married in this township, at the age of twenty-seven years, to Lugard Berger, by whom he had eleven children, nine now living - Martin, Joseph, Mary, Elizabeth, Frances, Annie, Christina, Ellen and Peter.  His wife died in 1864, and he again married in this township, in 1865, to Margaret Heitzelman.  They have three children - Louis, Margaret and Matilda.  Mr. Berger received through his wife, who was an only daughter, 100 acres of land.  He afterward bought 63 acres adjoining.  In 1867, he bought 117½ acres of land where he now lives, on which he moved in February, 1882.  He now owns 432 acres of fine land, about two hundred of which are under cultivation.  Mr. Berger has held numerous township offices.  He is at present serving his third term as supervisor; was Township Trustee about nine years and County Commissioner three years.  The family are all members of the Catholic Church of Fayetteville.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  131
  Franklin Twp -
ABRAM BERRY, farmer, P. O. Georgetown, was born in Pleasant Township, Brown County, Ohio, Feb. 27, 1824.  His father, Samuel Berry, was a native of Pennsylvania, who came to this county when a young man.  He located in Pleasant Township, where he resided till his death.  He was an engineer by trade, and worked at that through life.  He married Catharine Sowers, also a native of Pennsylvania, who bore him ten children, six of whom are living.  Our subject was reared a "farmer's boy," and has always been engaged in agricultural pursuits through life.  His educational facilities were limited; and, when quite young, he left the parental roof and went to Ripley, obtaining employment on a farm near that place.  Some time after, he purchased a farm of forty nine acres near his present one, where he resided thirty years.  He then bought his present farm of seventy-one acres, a portion of which is woodland.  Mr. Berry is a firm believer in the principles set forth by the Democratic party, and has served his township as Road Supervisor.  He was married, in 1847, to Elizabeth Abbott, a native of this county.  Of the eight children born to them, six are living - Mary Ann, wife of Ira Hendricks, a farm of Lewis Township; George, a farmer of Pleasant Township, who married Sarah Morrow; Belle; Alice, Mary; and Charlie.  Mr. Berry, wife and eldest daughter are members of the Christian Union Church.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  197
  Franklin Twp. -
S. P. BERRY, P. O. Ash Ridge, a well known and enterprising agriculturist of Franklin Township, is a native of Pennsylvania, where he was born Apr. 19, 1833.  His father, John Jacob Berry, was born in Germany, and emigrated to the United States about 1831.  He first located in Pennsylvania, where he married Susan Rice, a native of that State, and a daughter of Andrew Rice.  In 1837, he came to Brown County, Ohio, settling on a farm adjoining that now occupied by his son, where he lived till his death, Oct. 26, 1881.  Mr. Berry was the father of three children, two living - Elizabeth, wife of George Houck, of this township, and S. P.  The subject of this notice was reared in Franklin Township, and what education he obtained in boyhood days was picked up during leisure hours.  He lived with his father till attaining his majority, and then went to work on a farm by the month.  Some time after, he learned the carpenter trade, which he followed as a business for many years.  When about twenty-four years of age, he bought forty-six acres of his present farm, and has since added to it at different periods, until its present acreage numbers 233, mostly under cultivation.  The buildings on the farm where erected by himself, and betoken the successful farmer.  Mr. Berry's politics have always been strongly Democratic, and for four years he was annually elected to fill the office of Township Treasurer.  He was married, Sept. 16, 1855, to Mary A. Gwinner, a native of this county.  Of the ten children given them, seven are living - Michael, Simon, Edward, Charlie, Lottie A., Louis F., Lafayette, Lizzie, Cora and Matilda F.  Mr. Berry, wife and family, are members of the Protestant Evangelical Church of Arnheim.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  198
  Pleasant Twp. -
SAMUEL BERRY, farmer, P. O. Georgetown, was born in this township, south of Georgetown, Nov. 15, 1801, the son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Shick) Berry.  His father was of Irish descent.  His maternal grandfather, Louis Shick, emigrated from Germany and was bound out, on his arrival here, for several years to pay his passage, and settled in Straight Creek among the first pioneers.  Samuel was raised on the farm and in earlier life was a great hewer of wood.  He prepared the timber for many a dwelling, and cut many cords of wood was only an average day's work for him.  By his unceasing toil, he obtained a start in this world's goods, and labored long and hard to increase it.  He purchased the farm of his father from the other heirs and still occupies it in the northwest part of the township.  His politics are Democratic.  In 1827, he was married to Rebecca, daughter of Joseph and Dilly (Hannars) HamiltonMrs. Berry was born in 1808.  Their children are Lorenda, wife of William Esby; Jane W., wife of Joseph Ward; Deliverance, wife of Jacob Petacord; Mary E., wife of James W. Herron; Amanda, wife of Joseph Richard; Robert, married; M. D. L., married; Anna, wife of John Purcell Mr. and Mrs. Berry were both members of the M. E. Church, of which he has been class leader.  He remembers the time in early days when tea sold for $3 a pound.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  4
  Sterling Twp. -
GEORGE W. BINGAMAN, farmer, P. O. Marathon, oldest son of Solomon and Rebecca (Hook) Bingaman, was born in Highland County, Ohio, Aug. 15, 1825.  His father, Solomon, was born in Pennsylvania July 6, 1795, and came to Ohio in 1797.  His mother, Rebecca Hook, was born in Brooke County, Va., in 1804.  They married in 1824.  The subject of this sketch was married to Nancy A., daughter of Benjamin Hook, of Highland County; they had one daughter, Catharine, wife of William Creager.  Mrs. Bingaman died when her child was an infant, and Mr. Bingaman still remains single.  He has led an active and varied life, sometimes as a contractor on public works, and sometimes trading in anything he thinks there is money in.  He has traveled in almost every State east of the Rocky Mountains.  He was drafted during the war and paid $700 for a substitute.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  295
  Pleasant Twp. -
JOHN P. BIEHN, Georgetown, attorney at law, was born at Neidersteinbauch, Alsace, Lorraine, France (now Weisenburg County, Germany), June 17, 1827.  His father was Henry Biehm, a Burgeomiester, or Mayor, of that village, and for twelve years a soldier in the French Army.  He was subsequently a merchant there.  He married Katherine Yockey a native of Alsace, Lorraine, and while Burgeomiester of the village, had six sons born to him.  During this period, the French and German empires were constantly quarrelling over the possession of his native villages, and each had it garrisoned at frequent intervals.  The first son was born while the town was under German rule, the other while under French, and so on, alternately, till our subject, the sixth son, was born, the town at that time being a French possession.  Of the six sons born in one house, three were German by birth, and three French.  Mr. Biehn had a good position in his native country, and was a man well to do in life.  He did not like the cramped position which liberty was forced to occupy, and a hope of freedom, coupled with a strong desire to find, a better home for his children, induced to him to come to America.  In 1835, he made the journey, and located in Washington Township, Brown County, Ohio, where he was engaged in farming.  He died in February, 1862, and is buried on the homestead farm.  Mrs. Biehn died one year previous.  Three of their children still survive - Henry Biehm, who has been Postmaster of Ripley for the past thirty years; a sister, Katherine, unmarried, and residing at Carson, Nev., and our subject.  Judge Biehn was reared on the old homestead.  He had attended a German school for two months previous to coming to America, and after arrival in this country was an attendant at the district school for three winter terms.  He remained on the farm till twenty years of age, and then went to Maysville, Ky.  Here he secured a position in the principal hotel of the village, remaining there three years.  His older brothers having married, or moved away, Judge Biehn returned home to assist his father on the farm.  In 1850, he was elected Recorder of Brown County, on the Democratic ticket; he was re-elected, serving two terms of three years each.  He was subsequently Deputy Sheriff, under Charles Oursler, for two years.  During his official career, he applied himself vigorously to the study of law, and was admitted to the bar in 1857.  Soon after, he formed a law partnership with William H. Sly of Georgetown, and remained with him in law practice seven years.  When the war commenced, Judge Biehn sided with the Government, and became a strong "War Democrat."  His was President and Secretary of the County Military Committee, and also served as Secretary of the Congressional District Military Committee.  When the drafting commenced, he was appointed Drafting Commissioner of Brown County, holding that position one year.  He subsequently took affidavits of damage done by "Morgan's Raid," while passing through Brown County.  In 1864, Judge Biehn was chosen Elector at Large for Ohio, on the Lincoln and Johnson ticket, and stumped the State during the succeeding canvass.  After the war, he resumed his practice, leading a quiet and uneventful life until 1875.  In the fall of that year, he was nominated and elected to the office of Probate Judge of Brown County, serving two terms in this position, and until his successor took the bench, in February, 1882.  Judge Biehn speaks German fluently, and in 1872, during the Greeley campaign, stumped the State for the Liberal party, making thirty-six speeches in thirty days, both in English and German.  He was Secretary and member of the Democratic Executive Committee of Brown County for many years.  In the practice of his profession, Judge Biehn has been very successful, having accumulated considerable wealth, and a large amount of valuable village property.  He is connected by membership with the Masonic Lodge, Chapter and Council, at Georgetown; Confidence Lodge 307, I. O. O. F., of Georgetown, and the Knights of Pythias Lodge, at Russellville, in Jefferson Township.  Judge Biehn's parents were members of the German Protestants, and the Judge was reared in that faith.  He was married, Jan. 4, 1853, to Elizabeth, daughter of Matthias Arn, a prominent farmer of Franklin Township, residing near Arnheim.  Five children have been born to this union, three living - Mary A., who served as Deputy Probate Judge under her father; Henry, and Lisette, operator in charge of the Western Union Telegraph office at Georgetown.  The eldest daughter, Lillie D., was an excellent musician, but died of consumption, contracted while attending a conservatory of music at Cincinnati.  The other child, Howard G., died at the age of six months.  Mrs. Biehn is a member of the Presbyterian Church.  In 1869, Judge Biehn was suddenly attacked with small pox, probably contracted through correspondence.  He suffered severely during the winter months, and in the spring of 1870 decided to pay a visit to his birthplace, and the scenes of other days."  He left New York for Ireland thence to England, having come business to attend to in each country.  He next visited Belgium, Brussels, Aux la Chapelle; thence to Cologne, and up the Rhine to Alsace, Lorraine, his native country.  The Franco-Prussian war was in progress, and Judge Biehn, visited Sudan three days after the battle; was at Strasbourg next day after the surrender, and subsequently visited the battlefield of Woerth, which is only six miles from his native town.  While in the latter place, he was pointed to a large granite schoolhouse, built by the village while his father was its chief officer, and which bore the latter's name over the door.  Since retiring from office, Judge Biehn has become a Director of the First National Bank, and also a Director and Treasurer of the Columbus & Ohio River Railroad Company.  In these latter positions, he has worked faithfully and earnestly to secure for Georgetown and Brown County a railroad on which to ship the many products, and to decrease the cost and time of freight landed within the county's borders.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  4
  Clark Twp. -
S. W. BLAIR, agent C. G. & P. R. R., Hamersville, is the son of Samuel Blair and a native of Clark Township, where he was born Oct. 24, 1847.  He received a common school education in his native township, and at the age of twenty years commenced teaching school, at which he continued nearly five years, a part of the time in Woodford County, Ill.  He subsequently returned to Hamersville, where he engaged in mercantile business with his brother under the firm name of C. C. Blair & Bro.  They met with good success in their enterprise, and, on the retirement of his brother, our subject continued the business until 1876, when his store was destroyed by fire.  His loss was considerable, but by industry and economy he has succeeded in recovering his financial standing.  He received the appointment of railroad agent at Hamersville, and in that capacity is giving universal satisfaction.  He was married, in 1872, to Miss Isabelle Price, by whom he has had two children - Daisy Irene  and Elmer Hamer.  Mr. and Mrs. Blair are members of the Disciple Church.  He is a Democrat, has acted as School Director, and is an earnest supporter of the public schools of his village, in which he takes the greatest interest.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  180
  Pleasant Twp. -
GUSTAVUS A. BOEHM, farmer, P. O. Higginsport, was born in Saxony, Germany, July 18, 1841, the son of Frederick Joseph and Caroline (Sonday) Boehm, who emigrated to America in 1851.  He received a common school education in Germany, and chose farming as his occupation.  In it he has been successful, and now owns a farm of 158 acres, under a high state of cultivation, well adapted for tobacco raising.  He enlisted in Company G, Fifty-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, in 1862. under Capt. Kautz, and was discharged in 1865.  They have one child, Caroline Rosa.  Both are members of the Lutheran Church.  Mr. Boehm commenced life by working by the month, and has accumulated his property by his own industry.  He is a Republican.  His father died in Lewis Township in 1881.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  6
  Clark Twp. -
JOSEPH BOWERS, farmer, P. O. Hamersville, was born in Dauphin County, Penn., Sept. 9, 1819.  His parents, John and Margaret (Weaver) Bowers, were of German Descent.  Mr. Bowers left the parental roof and started to make his own living at the early age of sixteen years.  He embarked at Pittsburgh on the steamer Oswego as cabin boy; the boat froze up on the first return trip from Louisville at Hanging Rock, and he had to walk to Pittsburgh.  On the opening of navigation he shipped on the Dolphin as bar-keeper, and continued three years, then went to school a short time in Pittsburgh, then worked awhile in a blacksmith shop, and then worked at steamboat building for a couple of years, the most of the time in the finishing shop.  All this time he was preparing himself for an engineer.  He shipped for his first trip on the steamer Lilly as assistant engineer, and continued in the Wabash trade about three years on different boats.  He then went on the Lower Mississippi trade, and was on the Mattamora when she sank in Cyprus Bend.  He was in the Government service during the Mexican war on the steamer William R. McKee, on the Rio Grande, for nearly a year.  He then went back to the Mississippi trade, where he continued on the different rivers of the South up to within a short time of the rebellion.  During the civil war, he was enrolled as an engineer in the United States service, but was not called into active service.  During his long and eventful career as a steamboat engineer, not a single life was lost by the carelessness or incapacity of the officers.  Mr. Bowers was married in 1850 to Rehab Higgins, daughter of Wesley Higgins, a native of Brown County, and soon after, in 1854, settled in Clark Township, where he has since resided.  He was in the huckster and grocery business for several years, and then bought his far and went to farming.  He raised three children, all girls - Emma B. (wife of Charlie De Vore), Sarah Ada (wife of George W. Moore), and Dora M.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  180
  Huntington Twp. -
REV. T. J. BOWMAN, minister, Ripley, was born in this township in the year 1846, and is a son of Benjamin and Mary (McElwee) Bowman, old settlers in the county.  The early life of our subject was spent upon the farm, and at the same time he obtained a good practical education in the district schools.  In 1864, be enlisted in the One Hundred and Seventy-second Regiment, of which he was Drum Major; he served seven months and was honorably discharged in 1865.  In 1878, he entered the ministry of the Christian Church, in which he labored as a minister until his ordination, which took place Sept. 11, 1880, since when he has labored regularly in the Southern Ohio Conference of the Christian Church. June 2, 1876, he was married to Miss Abigail Bartley.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  149
  Perry Twp. -
PETER BOWMAN, farmer, P. O. St. Martin’s, son of Peter and Ellen Bowman, was born in the southern part of France Apr/ 7, 1812.  He remained in his native country until 1847, when he emigrated to America. Landing at New York, he remained there one month, after which he came to Perry Township and located in the vicinity of St. Martin’s.  Here he met and, in 1856. married Mary Henry, a daughter of Joseph and Margaret Ann Henry, and by her had seven children, viz.: Julia, Peter, Joseph, Frank, Catharine (deceased), Rosa and Anne.  In 1867, Mr. Bowman purchased and moved on to the farm he now occupies, which consists of eighty-two acres of fine arable land.  His children all live at home with their parents.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  131
  Jackson Twp. -
BENJAMIN BRADY (deceased), was born May 22, 1813, in Franklin Township, Brown County; he was reared on a farm and received but a rudimentary education.  In October, 1849, he married Abigail Shaw, born in September, 1812; this union was blessed with ten children - William A., Mary J., Thomas H., Sarah A., Nancy E., Elizabeth T., Arminda, Joseph K., Benjamin D. and George E.  Mr. Brady has served as Trustee of Jackson Township, and was held in high estimation by the community in which he resided; his death was regretted by all who knew him.  He was a kind and loving father and indulgent husband, and departed this life in June, 1875.  Not only is his presence missed by neighbors and friends, but by loved ones of his own family who mourn their irreparable loss.  His widow still survives him, now in her seventieth year, and resides in the northwestern portion of the township.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  274
  Pleasant Twp. -
CAPT. JOHN T. BRADY, farmer, P. O., Georgetown, was born in Jackson Township, Brown Co., Ohio, Sept. 17, 1836, the son of John and Mary (Moore) Brady, both of whom were natives of this county.  His grandfather, Thomas Brady, settled in Brown County in 1800.  The subject of this sketch received his education in the common schools, and adopted farming as his life pursuit.  He has carried it on with complete success, and is the proprietor of a fine farm of 290 acres, near Georgetown.  In 1861, he enlisted as a private in Company A, Seventieth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and served throughout the war.  He was with Sherman in the grand march to the sea.  He rose form the ranks to the command of his company, and was discharged with it at Little Rock, Ark., in 1865.  In 1875, he was elected Sheriff of Brown County, and served two years.  His marriage to Rachel Rhoten was celebrated in 1873.  They have three children - Rosa, Belle, Sarah A., and John W.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  6
  Eagle Twp. -
JOHN C. BRECKENRIDGE, farmer, P. O. Fincastle, was born Apr. 14, 1830, in Eagle Township, Brown County, Ohio, near where he at present resides.  His parents were Samuel and Mary (Cross) Breckenridge.  They settled in Eagle Township about the year 1829, and were the parents of nine children, four of whom are still living - John C., Mary J., Eliza R. and Sarah T.  Samuel died in October, 1878; his widow survives him, now in her seventy-ninth year.  Our subject was reared to manhood on a farm, and received but a limited education.  In March, 1857, he married Elizabeth J. Duffy, by whom he had one child - Mary C.  She died in May, 1858.  He subsequently married Ella Blair, daughter of William and Louisa Blair, of Pike Township, Brown County.  This union has been blessed with four children, viz., William J., Robert W., James S. and Sarah L.  Mr. Breckenridge has served as Treasurer one year, and Justice of the Peace nine years, for Eagle Township.  He is the owner of seventy-five acres of land, located near Fincastle.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  223
  Huntington Twp. -
JOSEPH BRISBOIS, farmer, P. O. Ripley, was born in France in the year 1822.  He was reared on a farm in his native land, where he followed farming until he came to this country.  In 1855, he emigrated to America, landing in New Orleans, from which place he came to Kentucky, where he lived three years in Mason County.  In 1858, he came to this county and rented land for two years on Brush Creek.  He then purchased fifty acres near Carlisle, to which he added fifty more, on which he lived for six years, when he sold his property and came to where he now lives. He owns seventy-five acres in the home farm and eighty on Laferty Creek, near Eagle Creek.  His land is all under cultivation, and is well improved.  He has been successful since he came to the county, and from nothing he has made a good and comfortable home.  While in France he served six years in the French Army, five years of which time he was on the Island of Martinet.  In 1851 (in France), he was married to Christena Kaufman, who has borne him eight children, five living—Benjamin, Magdalena, Catherine, Christena and John.  The deceased are Mary, Joseph and Josephine.  He and entire family belong to the Catholic Church.  In politics, he votes with the Democrats.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 149
  Pike Twp. -
A. B. BROOKS, teacher, Locust Ridge, was born in Clark Township, Brown County, Ohio, Oct. 10, 1851, and is a son of Rev. William Brooks, who was a Baptist minister for a period of forty years.  He was born in Clark Township, Brown County, Oct. 10, 1805, and was united in marriage with Abigail Rounds, who was born in Brown County in 1812.  A. B. Brooks was the eighth child and seventh son.  He acquired a common school education, and is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows.  He was married to Salina B. Long, Feb. 26, 1875.  He began work for himself at twenty-one years of age.  He first engaged as an apprentice to learn the carpenter trade, and his health would not permit him to follow that.  He then engaged as teacher in the common schools, a profession he has followed for seven years.  He was elected Justice of the Peace, in Pike Township, in April, 1882.  Mr. and Mrs. Brooks are the parents of two children, viz.: William H. and Augustus O.  Mr. Brooks ranks to-day among the intelligent men of his neighbor hood, and enjoys the confidence of all who know him.  He and his wife both belong to the Christian Church.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 214
  Clark Twp. -
A. E. BROOKS, farmer, P. O. Hamersville, was born in Clark Twp., Mar. 6, 1834.  His parents were John and Nancy (Curliss) Brooks, the former born four miles south of Lexington, Ky., and the latter a native of Pennsylvania.  They were among the early settlers to Brown County.  Our subject received a good common school education, and spent six years of his early life in teaching.  He now owns the farm upon which he resides, and is devoting his time to farming, making tobacco raising a specialty.  He was married, in 1858, to Miss L. Neal, a daughter of John and Betsey Neal, who were early settlers in this vicinity.  Seven children are the surviving issue of this union - Nancy V., John, Sherman, Ida, Thomas, Ora and Albert.  Mr. and Mrs. Brooks are members of the M. E. Church, in which he has been a classleader and Steward.  He is an Odd Fellow, a Democrat and for six years was a Justice of the Peace.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  180
  Pike Twp. -
J. BROOKS, farmer, P. O. Surryville.  Mr. Brooks is a son of John and Nancy Brooks, was born Aug. 9, 1830, in Clark Township, Brown County, was raised and educated a farmer, and has always been engaged in that pursuit.  His educational advantages were very limited.  He was married to Clarissa Cowdery, and engaged in business for himself at twenty years of age.  He rented land for twelve years, then bought twenty acres, where he now resides.  He and his wife both belong to the Methodist Church.  His political views are Democratic.  They had ten children, of whom eight are living, viz.: Oscar C., Augustus, Charlie, Olive, Sarah Elizabeth, Frances Mary, Acksa Isabelle and Eva.  Mr. Brooks is noted for his honesty, and as a neighbor, enjoys the confidence of all with whom he is acquainted.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 214
  Pleasant Twp. -
JOHN E. BROSE, farmer, P. O. Georgetown, was born in Baltimore, Md., Sept. 19, 1829.  His parents, John G. and Maria (Kober) Broe, emigrated from Wurtemburg, Germany, to the United States, in 1827.  They lived in Maryland four years; then came West to Cincinnati, and in 1833 to Brown County, settling seven miles north of Georgetown.  John G. Brose was a baker and confectioner by trade, and became a highly respected citizen of Brown County, and a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity.  His death occurred in 1877.  John E. worked with his father at the baker's trade till he was twenty-three years old, then commenced the business of farming, and has followed it with success since.  In 1852, he was married to Miss M. E. Fyffe, a daughter of Perry Fyffe, of this county, and has the following children: Lucinda J. (the wife of J. D. Richards, of Clark Township), Frank A., John P., George, and E. K.  Mr. and Mrs. Brose are members of the Presbyterian Church.  He has served his township as Justice of the Peace, and Trustee; is a Democrat, and prominent Freemason, and member of the lodge of United Workmen.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  6
  Pike Twp. 
E. E. BROWN, farmer, P. O. Surryville, was born in Russellville, Brown Co., Ohio, Feb. 24, 1860, and is a son of James E. and Minerva Brown.  James E. Brown was born near Russellville, Brown Co., Ohio.  He was married Nov. 9, 1858.  He was a school teacher, and taught until Sept. 7, 1864, at which time he died, being the thirty-eighth year of his age.  Mrs. Brown remained a widow until Apr. 9, 1870, when she married Thomas Robinson.  Young Edwin Brown commenced business for himself while very young; he first engaged in farming, and thus continued until he purchased forty acres, where he now resides.  He was married Feb. 24, 1882, to Georgia Donley.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  214
  Scott Twp. -
EPHRAIM BROWN, farmer, P. O. Brownstown, was born in Brown County, Ohio, Aug. 11, 1815, he is a son of John and Lettice (West) Brown.  His father, a native of New Jersey, enlisted during the war of the Revolution, but was not accepted on account of his youth; removed to Ohio about 1795.  The subject of this sketch was married in 1835, to Lucy, daughter of Jonathan and Mary (Wait) Fuller, a native of Vermont.  They raised one daughter—Samantha Frances, born Mar. 20, 1840, and wife of John L. SmithLucy (Fuller) Brown was born Nov. 11, 1819, and died Apr. 14, 1882.  John L. Smith was a member of the Fifty-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and was wounded at the battle of Stone River.  Mr. Brown and wife are members of the Christian Church.  Mr. Brown is a modest, hard-working farmer, and made what he owns by hard labor.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  247
  Clark Twp. -
JAMES C. BROWN, farmer, P. O. Hamersville, was born in Franklin Township, Brown Co., Ohio, Feb. 3, 1837.  He was the son of D. D. and Elizabeth (Abbott) Brown, early settlers of Brown County, the former a native of Kentucky and the latter of Ohio.  The father came to Ohio in 1800, and located in Franklin Township.  He died in 1879, leaving a widow who still survives him.  Our subject received his education in the common schools, and early commenced the occupation of farming, at which he continues.  He owns land in Illinois and in Clark Township.  He is a Democrat and has been a school director.  He is an energetic and enterprising young man, capable of filling almost any office in the county.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  180
  Jefferson Twp. -
JOHN BROWN, farmer, P. O. Red Oak.  John Brown, the pioneer and grandfather of our subject, emigrated from Kentucky to what is now known as Brown County, Ohio, about the year 1801.  He settled on the waters of Straight Creek near the old county seat in Franklin Township.  Here amid the varied scenes of pioneer life was reared William Brown, father of the subject of this sketch, who was born Mar. 14, 1799, in Kentucky.  He received a good English education, which enabled him to teach school for several years.  He married in 1820, Elizabeth Edwards, daughter of Col. George Edwards, one of the early settlers of Brown County.  They had nine children, four of whom are still living - John, Thomas J., Lettice M. and Lizzie F.  After living in different parts of Brown County, he finally settled on a farm in the southern portion of Jefferson Township, on the waters of Red Oak Creek.  This occurred about 1830, and he remained there until his demise, in February, 1841.  His widow survived him until April, 1874.  He served as Justice of the Peace for Jefferson Township, and was a member of the Christian Church.  In his death, Brown County lost a worthy and energetic citizen.  John Brown, our subject, was born in August, 1823, in Brown County, Ohio, was reared to man's estate on a farm and received but a limited education.  In April, 1853, he married Rachel A. Records, born in October, 1824, daughter of John N. and Rachel Records  The Records originally came from Maryland and settled in Adams County, now Brown, about the year 1799.  This union has been blessed with four children, two of whom are still living - Charles E. and Omar E.  He has served as Trustee for Jefferson Township, is a fervent member of the Christian Church, and the owner of 171 acres of land.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 234
  Franklin Twp. -
JOHN E. BROWN, farmer, P. O. Russellville, was born on Straight Creek, in Franklin Township, Apr. 26, 1828.  His father, David D. Brown, was a native of Brown County, Ohio, and an agriculturist through life.  He married Eliza Abbott, also a native of Franklin Township, who bore him eight children.  Mr. Brown departed this life in 1879.  Mr. Brown still survives, and resides in Clark Township, four miles from Bethel.  John E. Brown, attained his majority on his father's farm, obtaining the benefits of good English education.  He early learned the carpenter's trade, and followed it for about twenty years, erecting all the buildings on his own farm, and many of the substantial residences and barns in that portion of Brown County.  He also worked at his trade in New Orleans for two winter seasons; but not liking the country, came back to Ohio.  On February 9, 1857, he purchased 111 acres of land - his present farm - which is located on both sides of Straight Creek, and the Ripley & Arnheim pike.  A short time since, Mr. Brown gave one-half acre of his land to the school district in which he resides; upon which was erected a handsome frame schoolhouse.  Mr. Brown has been fairly successful in life; is Democratic on National questions. but locally votes for the man who will best serve the community; and has officiated as School Director.  He was married, Mar. 6, 1856, to Sarah E. Coombes, a native of Southern Indiana.  They have eight children - William M. (who married Annie Kendall), Levi E., Clement A., Annie May, Addie Ora, Lee Owen, Eddie E. and Lora Eliza.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  213
  Pike Twp. -
R. A. BROWN, retired farmer, P. O. White Oak.  To another of the early settlers of Pike Township we are pleased to allot a space to the biographical album of this work.  He has been a resident of this county since his birth, which took place June 11, 1819, and has been schooled in the pioneer days of Brown County, passing through the trials of those days.  He was raised to farm life, and shortly after his marriage he began farming as a renter.  Thus he continued for a few years, when he bought fifty-three acres; not liking the location, he sold and purchased two other tracts, and neither of these tracts suiting him, he sold and bought 126 acres where he now resides.  His marriage with Elizabeth Wardlow, was solemnized Sept. 30, 1840.  The following children were the issue of this marriage, eleven in number, of whom seven now survive:  Mary, Martha, William R., Adda, Robert L., Jackson J. and James H.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  214
  Eagle Twp. -
REASON R. BROWN, farmer, P. O. Emerald, Adams Co., was born in September, 1813, in Adams County, Ohio; son of Thomas and Catharine Brown, who were among the early settlers of Adams County.  Our subject was reared to manhood on a farm, and received a rudimentary education in a district school.  In November, 1841, he married Elizabeth Gutridge, daughter of Benjamin and Rachel Gutridge.  To them have been born five children, three of whom are still living, viz.:  Robert F., Lucinda J. and Franklin W.  In March, 1842, Mr. Brown located in the eastern portion acres of land, pleasantly located, and in good state of cultivation.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  223
  Green Twp. -
SAMUEL R. BROWN (deceased), was born June 20, 1817, in Antrim County, Ireland.  His parents were Allen and Margaret E. Brown, with whom, when he was seven years old, he emigrated to America, and by way of Baltimore came to Kentucky, where they remained but a short time.  About the year 1825, they came to Ohio, and located at Point Pleasant, Clermont County, where they remained but a short time.  They then went to Highland County, where they engaged in the mercantile business several years.  They then spent one year in Brown County, when they went to Oxford, Butler County, and engaged in the mercantile business several years; from Butler County, Mr. Brown moved to Hillsboro, Highland County.  In April, 1868, he located in Brown County, Green Township, where his son Charles E. now resides.  He was one of the most prominent stock-raisers in Southern Ohio, his farm, known as the "Sterling Stock Farm" is now judiciously managed by his son Charles E. Brown, who, since his father's death, has sustained the reputation of the Sterling Stock Farm which his father established.  Mr. Brown was greatly given to hospitality and kindness, and his marked success in a financial view is apparent, having left to his family a fine estate of 550 acres of land.  The homestead farm is pleasantly located in Green Township, and is one of the finest in Brown County.  He died at the homestead Dec. 22, 1881.  His wife died Dec. 12, 1880.  They were the parents of eight children, seven of whom are now living - Margaret E., John A., Anna M., Charles E., Edward W., James D. and Mary B.  Mr. Brown was a man of sterling integrity and reliable character and in his death Brown County lost one of her most worthy citizens.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  259
  Jefferson Twp. -
THOMAS J. BROWN, farmer, P. O. Red Oak, was the third child of William and Elizabeth Brown of whom we have made mention in this work, and was born Jan. 12, 1825, in Brown County, Jackson Township.  He received the rudiments of an English education in a district school.  Having selected for his future companion, Miss Margaret A. King, daughter of Hugh and Sarah King their nuptials were celebrated in December, 1849.  This union has been blessed with ten children, eight of whom are still living, viz.:  Edward F., Ida B., Orlando E., Lillie M., Oscar L., William T., James H., and Lewis L.  In 1872, Mr. Brown moved from Jefferson Township to Georgetown, where he was for some three or four years part proprietor of the woolen mills.  He remained in Georgetown until 1871, when he returned to his farm in the southern portion of Jefferson Township, where he still resides.  While in Georgetown he served as Street Commissioner, and as Trustee for Pleasant Township.  Mr. Brown and wife are both members of the Christian Church.  He is a Democrat and the owner of ninety-six acres of land.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 234
  Huntington Twp.
JOHN BUCHANAN, farmer, P. O. Ripley, was born in Balfron, Scotland, in the year 1823.  His early life was passed in his native village, where he received the rudiments of his education in the common schools of the town.  After becoming of proper age, he was apprenticed to a shoe-maker and, after he had acquired the trade, he commenced business on his own responsibility.  On June 6, 1849, he emigrated from Glasgow to New York, which latter place he reached after a voyage of forty-nine days.  From New York he came by way of Buffalo and Eire to the Ohio River, then to Ripley, Ohio, on the old Mayflower.  The latter place he reached August 6, following.  He made his home in Brown County, Ohio, and for nearly three years followed his trade in Maysville, Ky.; after which he engaged in farming, having purchased an interest in 198 acres of land, where Thomas Buchanan now lives.  Here he carried on farming for several years, when he purchased his present farm of 184 acres, which is the result of different purchases.  On this land he located in 1860, and it has since been his home.  He has been successful in his business operations, and has a well improved and highly cultivated farm.  He has been Trustee of the township three terms and held some of the minor offices, such as School Director, etc.  He has been a member of the School Board since 1861, and Superintendent of the Colored School Fund since its organization.  He is a member of the Union Lodge No. 71, F. & A. M., Ripley Chapter, and Cincinnati Commandery No. 3.  He and wife are members of the Huntington Presbyterian Church, of which he is a Trustee.  He was married Dec. 13, 1860, to Isabella, daughter of Samuel and Sarah Hiett, old settlers.  To them have been born nine children, namely - Sadie J., Thomas S., Mary E., Swinton J., Anna Y., Margaret M., George H., Elizabeth S. and Samuel H., deceased.  Mr. Buchanan returned to Scotland in 1854, and again in 1858, making five times he has crossed the ocean.  Mrs. Buchanan was born in this township August 7, 1837.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  151
  Huntington Twp. -
THOMAS BUCHANAN, farmer, P. O. Ripley, was born in Scotland in the year 1833, and is a son of Thomas Buchanan, Sr., a native of Scotland.  Our subject resided in his native land until 1849, when he came to this country, and found work with one John Thomas in this township.  His industry and economy enabled him, in 1851, to buy sixty-six acres, where he now resides; and at the present time (1882) he owns 324 acres of land.  He is a Free and Accepted Mason, belonging to Union Lodge, No. 71, Commandery No. 3, and Cincinnati Consistory.  Apr. 13, 1853, he was married to Ellen, the daughter of Samuel and Sarah (Gilbert) Hiett, by whom he was married to Ellen, the daughter of Samuel and Sarah (Gilbert) Hiett, by whom he has had ten children, viz., John, Thomas, Sarah A., Janet, George, Griffith, Elizabeth, Ruth, William, and Samuel (deceased).  Mr. Buchanan has been very successful, and is one of the foremost in improvement and prosperity.  Samuel Hiett, father of Mrs. Buchanan, was a son of William and Mary (Daniels) Hiett, of Virginia, who settled in this township in 1806, buying 300 acres of land in the Hite Survey.  Seven children were born to them, three of whom are living.  Mr. Hiett was born July 14, 1803.  He died in 1868.  Mrs. Hiett died in 1866.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  151
  Pleasant Twp., -
GEORGE BURGETT, farmer, P. O. Georgetown.  Mr. Burgett was born in this township Mar. 24, 1840.  His parents are Samuel and Mary (Brazelton) Burgett, the former a native of this county, the latter of Gibson County, Ind.  He attended school in his own township, and has followed the avocation of farming.  In 1863, he united in marriage with Louisa Mitchell, the daughter of George Mitchell, an early settler of Brown County.  Five children have blessed their marriage  Emma, Felix S. (deceased), Everett Lewis, Ella and Samuel.  The religious connections of Mr. and Mrs. Burgett are with the New Light Church.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  7
  Pleasant Twp. - 
JOHN V. BURGETT, farmer, P. O. Georgetown.  Mr. Burgett was born in this township in 1842, and is the son of Samuel and Mary (Brazelton) Burgett.  He received a good common school education in his home district, and then gave his attention to farming.  He has a pleasant little home of sixty-eight acres, and has recently erected a neat and substantial residence.  In politics, he is a stanch Republican, and is outspoken in the expression of his political opinions.  His marriage to Mary Milburn, of Gibson County, Ind., occurred in 1865.  Three children have blessed this marriage  Clara Lee, Clark Milburn and Cordelia Florence.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  7
  Pleasant Twp. -
SAMUEL BURGETT, Georgetown, is one of the oldest and most prominent citizens of Pleasant Township, and Brown County.  He was born on the farm where he now resides Jan. 25, 1812.  His parents were Valentine and Mary (Lane) Burgett, natives of Virginia, the former of German and the latter of English parentage.  Mr. Burgett was raised a "farmer's boy,{" and has been a farmer through live.  In 1829, his father died, and soon after Mr. Burgett purchased the farm of 240 acres of the heirs.  When twenty-three years of age, he engaged in boating on the Ohio River, and followed it for five years.  His father gave him $300 when he attained his majority, which has been all he has received, except from his own labors.  In 1874, he commenced dealing in leaf tobacco, barreled pork and flour, having at one time 75,000 pounds of tobacco, 1,000 barrels of flour and 250 barrels of pork.  Investments in these products proved quite satisfactory in a financial point of view, and were continued until 1881,when Mr. Burgett turned over his business to his son-in-law, John A. Tweed, a former partner, who is still engaged in buying and shipping tobacco.  Mr. Burgett has been twice married.  His first wife was Harriet Parker, daughter of William Parker.  They were married in 1831, and one daughter is living - Harriet, wife of Samuel BrazeltonMrs. Burgett departed this life Nov.18, 1832.  Mr. Burgett was again married, in 1839, to Mary G. Brazelton, a native of Gibson County, Ind.  Of their six children, three are living - George, John V. (soldier in the late war), and Cordelia (wife of Jacob Rainey).  Mr. Burgett and wife are members of Olive Chapel, of the Children denomination, in which body he has been a Deacon from date of organization.  Politically, he is Republican, and he served two terms as Township Trustee.  Samuel Burgett was born, reared and educated in Pleasant Township, and has there lived during his long and useful life.  He was present at the erection of the first brick building in Georgetown, and has watched with strange interest in the progress made in all parts of the county during these intervening years.  Not only has he watched, but the better part of his life energies have been given to advance the cause of morality, social life, business and agriculture.  For seventy years he has toiled earnestly, early and late, to make a home for his children, and a count of which they will be proud.  Mr. Burgett is probably the oldest inhabitant, by birth, in Pleasant Township, and none is more highly esteemed.  Himself and wife are genial and kind-hearted, and by their acts of benevolence and charity have endeared themselves to one and all.  His long life has not been a failure financially, for he has amassed a sum sufficient for old age, and to benefit those who survive him.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 7

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