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CLERMONT COUNTY, OHIO
History & Genealogy

BIOGRAPHIES

Source:
1795
History of
Clermont County, Ohio

with
Illustrations and Biographical Sketches
of its
Prominent Men and Pioneers
Philadelphia:
Louis H. Everts
Press of J. B. Lippincott & Co., Philadelphia
1880

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A B C D E F G H I J K L
M N O P Q R S T U V W XYZ
  JAMES B. SHAW.  The pioneers of Clermont were nearly all farmers, as were their immediate descendants, and did not consider it beneath the dignity of honorable men to swing the axe, the cradle, the seythe, or flail.  They were proud of being farmers and of being engaged in agriculture.  - the oldest profession of man; and arising from the commission of Heaven "to dress and to keep" the Garden of Eden, and to "till the ground," its origin alone should instill within us a respect for the tillers of the soil.  Among those who early endured the hardships and privations of the sparse settlements in Clermont were Thomas Shaw and his wife Martha, who in 1807 emigrated from Bucks Co., Pa., and settled in Miami township, on a farm at Union Cross Roads.  They were of Quaker ancestry, and descended from the noble stock that early in American history settled in Pennsylvania and Maryland, and who left the old country to escape persecutions and find in the New World that peace of mind and freedom of thought which religious intolerance and monarchical rule denied them in the Old.  Like his ancestors, Thomas Shaw was a quiet, honest, and law-abiding citizen, industrious and intelligent.  He first bought sixty-eight acres of land of Col. Thomas Paxton, and in 1808 he purchased sixty-three more of Gen. William Lytle, and began opening up the wilderness into beautiful fields.  He afterwards added to his possessions, and died in good circumstances.  His son, James Belford Shaw, born in 1798, was nine years old when his parents removed to Ohio, was brought up on the farm, and received the usual but limited education given to boys in those early times.  In 1836 he married Mary A. Banghart, by which union four children were born, viz., William, married Oct. 30, 1860, by Rev. George Gatch to Miss E. A. SmysorMartha H., married Dec. 10, 1862, by Rev. George Sapp to James Tice; Sarah J., married Oct 26, 1870, by Rev. R. E. Smith, to Zachariah T. Robinson; and James M., married to Miss Rosa Kearney, of Cincinnati.  He was a sound business man, of clear judgment and the sternest integrity, and possessed the full and unquestioned confidence of the community.  He was a systematic farmer and most careful in his management of soils, and had that taste which led him to have everything on his farm in a neat condition.  He was one of the projectors of the Milford, Edenton and Woodville turnpike, and from its organization in 1851 to his death was one of its directors.  He was greatly interested in public improvements for the benefit of the country, and was always ready to contribute his full quota in their aid.  Being of Quaker descent, he was a member of no church, but a man of the highest morals and purity of character, and was interested in all reforms for elevating mankind.  He was of the Democratic school of politics up to the Rebellion, when he espoused the Union cause, and was afterwards identified with the Republican party.  His lands including his homestead residence, were in McDowell's survey, partly in Miami and partly in Stonelick township, but his house was in the latter.  He died Feb. 12, 1873, and in his life of just three quarters of a century he demonstrated to the world the virtues of an upright life.  He came when a small boy to Clermont, at a period when there were but few improved farms or comfortable houses, but he lived to see the forests converted into cultivated fields, to witness the building up of pleasant villages, and behold the lands dotted over with spacious dwellings and the harvest-fields buzz with improved machinery.
     James B. Shaw died esteemed by the public, leaving the heritage of a good name to his four children, who are worthy descendants of him.
Source: 1795 History of Clermont County, Ohio, Publ. Philadelphia: Louis H. Everts - Press of J. B. Lippincott & Co., Philadelphia - 1880 - Page 546
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