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GENERAL NEWS BIRTH NEWS DEATHS MARRIAGES COURT NEWS
Source:  Cincinnati Daily Gazette
Date: Aug. 17, 1878

The Soldiers' Reunion in Old Guernsey.
An Immense Crowd and a Jolly Good Time.
Speeches by Private Dalzell, Secretary Garnes, Gen. Leggett, E. N. McEndre and Others.
Special Dispatch to the Cincinnati Gazette.
CAMBRIDGE, O., Aug. 6
The accessions made today to the crowd in attendance at the soldiers' reunion, held in this place, made it exceed that of yesterday by nearly one-half.  Gen. Leggett and Col. Barnes, Secretary of State, were added to the list of visitors from abroad.  The order of exercises was as follows:  Procession will march to the grove at 9 o'clock a.m.  From 10 a.m. to 12 m. will be devoted to a general experience meeting, participated in by soldiers without regard to rank in which reminiscences of the camp, the march, and the battlefield will be related.  Basket picnic at 12:30.  Addresses in the afternoon by Generals Gibson, Ball, Barnes, and others, after which a sham battle, participated in by infantry, cavalry, and artillery, will be had.
     Notwithstanding the heavy showers of rain, the proceedings this morning at the grove were continued.  A stirring war song, "The Battle Cry of Freedom," opened the day.
     Private Dalzell was introduced as the first speaker.  There was an opinion that reunions were played out, but his observation had been that the interest in them was increasing.  Though the old veterans were dying off from year to year, he thought they should be kept up for the benefit of the rising generation.  One thought he would like to leave them, and that was that the orphans of the brave men who had died for their country should continue to be cared for.
     The rain at this juncture began to patter down through the trees overhead.
     Col. Barnes, Secretary of State, was next introduced.  The rain still continued, but he was requested to go on.  After recalling some of the experiences of the war, he was compelled to desist on account of the heavy showers of rain.  The majority of the crowed scattered in different directions for shelter.
     There were some who persisted n carrying out the experience meeting.  Stentorian voices made the woods ring with war songs and vociferous cheering.  Among the soldiers called on to speak was E. N. McEndre, an ex-Confederate, who said he had renewed his allegiance to the old flag, and was ready to defend it.  Many of the incidents were laughable in the extreme.
     In the afternoon the speaking was resumed.  Col. Ferguson, of Cambridge, was first introduced, and paid a high tribute to Guernsey County for the part she had played in the war.
     Gen. Leggett followed next in a speech of considerable length.  He had not come with a prepared speech, but he took great pleasure in speaking to soldiers' and sailors' friends. 
     It was the opinion of many writers, and of the world generally, that a long continued peace, such as that extending from 1812 to 1861, unfitted a people for self-defense.  My experience and yours has shown this to be a fallacy as far as our country is concerned.  It may be necessary in Europe to educate and drill a soldiery and keep a standing army, but here no so.  This was necessary to a certain extent, but the few could direct the many when the occasioned required.  He did not care about the size of the standing army, so long as the hearts of the people were ablaze with patriotism.
     The speaker concluded by saying that it was not in place to introduce political questions, but he wanted to say one thing, and that was he hoped they would never apologize for what they had done in putting down the rebellion. [Long and continued applause]
     A handsome gold headed cane was then presented to Gen. Gibson by the survivors of the 15th Ohio Regiment, to which he responded in his characteristic way, to the great delight and amusement of the audience.  The General is a great favorite here.
     Maj. J. K. Brown, of Cambridge, made the farewell address and the assembly dispersed.
(Transcribed by Sharon Wick from Genealogy Bank)

Source: Ohio State Journal
Date: Sep. 20, 1854
    
WILLIAM LAWRENCE, of Guernsey county, a Locofoco of same note, once in the Ohio Legislature got awfully excited at the late Locofoco District Convention, of Barnesville.  The resolations sanctioned the Nebraska fraud and praised Shannon for voting for it.  Lawrence led off the opposition, and closed the debate in the following very emphatic and unmistakable language.
     "Be it therefore remembered, that on this 1_ day of September, in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-four, in the presence of this convention, called for the ostensible purpose of reflecting the sentiment of the people, but for the real purpose of smothering it - I announce to you, that from now till the election, I am an Independent Anti-Nebraska candidate for Congress.
     He is in for the war.
(Transcribed by Sharon Wick from Genealogy Bank)
Source: Summit County Beacon - Ohio
Date: 08-18-1880
     A Cambridge man, for whom the State Journal vouches as "a thoroughly reliable man, well known throughout eastern Ohio; who is not the man to prefer such grave charges unless he is prepared to substantiate them," declares in a communication that he is prepared to verify by citizens of Guernsey County:
     "First - That J. J. Burns was a rebel in sentiment when the war commenced.
     "Second - That he did go to Mississippi and volunteer as an officer of a battery in the rebel army.
     "Third - That after the fall of Vicksburg he deserted from the rebel army to the Union lines, where he took the oath of allegience and was paroled.
     "Here is the kind of a man the Democrats of Ohio have placed at the head of our school system, as an example for our children.  The election of such a man to the office of School Commissioner is a mockery of all the professions and practices which the people of Ohio have made and pursued.                              "Ex-Soldier"
(Transcribed by Sharon Wick from Genealogy Bank)
Source: Newport Mercury - Rhode Island
Date: 04-29-1837
     It is stated in the Guernsey, (Ohio) Times, that "Blennerhasset, the friend and companion of Aaron Burr, is now residing on the island of Guernsey, Europe.  It is said his accomplished and fascinating lady is still living, though at an advanced age."
(Transcribed by Sharon Wick from Genealogy Bank)
Source: Wheeling Register - W. Va.
Date: 12-02-1874
     "OLD Johny Appleseeds" who brought into the region of the Ohio, the first stock of appleseeds, ahs at last got into history b- the above name.  He was a week minded wanderer, who always had little satchels and his pockets filled with seeds and cuttings and from his distributions, the first orchards in Guernsey county were planted.  A few very old trees, grown from seed furnished by him, are still bearing.  His real name has been lost in the above pseudonyme.  Perhaps some of the old people who lived along the Wheeling road in the early days many remember his name.  If so, we would be glad to hear it - Guernsey Jeffersonian.
(Transcribed by Sharon Wick from Genealogy Bank)
Source: New Hampshire Gazette
Date: 11 - 11 - 1834
     A fellow confined in Guernsey (Ohio) jail for horse stealing, set fire to him cell, and amidst smoke and noise made his escape and took to his heals.  The jailor arrived in sufficient time to extinguish the fire.
(Transcribed by Sharon Wick from Genealogy Bank)
Source: Baltimore Gazette and Daily Advertiser
Date 02/01/1832
From the Guernsey, Ohio Times
     Perilous Accident
, and Extraordinary Escape. - An accident happened on Saturday morning last, at Crooked Creek bridge, on the National road 1 1/2 miles from Cambridge, which, among the many "moving accidents by flood and field" occuring, from time to time, in various quarters of this wide spread country, was not the least remarkable, as an instance of escape from peril of the most imminent kind.  The circumstances as related to the editor, are these:  A sled, containing the United States mail and seven passengers, who found it necessary to use it for a travelling conveyance, in consequence of the upsetting and breaking of the mail state, on Friday last, near Fairview, on its way from the east, left the stage office in this place, on Saturday morning, for Zanesville - the road being at the time completely covered with ice. 
(Transcribed by Sharon Wick from Genealogy Bank)
Source: Baltimore Gazette and Daily Advertiser
Date: 02-01-1832
From the Guernsey, Ohio Times.
Perilous Accident
, and Extraordinary Escape. - An accident happened on Saturday morning last, at Crooked Creek bridge, on the National road, 1 1/2 miles from Cambridge, which, among the many "moving accidents by flood and field" occurring, from time to time, in various quarters of this wide spread country, was not the least remarkable, as an instance of escape from peril of the most imminent kind.  The circumstances as related to the editor, are these:  A sled, containing the United States mail and seven passengers, who found it necessary to use it for a travelling conveyance, in consequence of the upsetting and breaking of the mail state, on Friday last, near Fairview, on its way from the east, left the stage office in this place, on Saturday morning, for Zanesville - the road being at the time completely covered with ice.  At the bridge over Crooked Creek, there is a sudden turn in the road as it passes the stream.  This happened to be the point of danger.  It appears that in passing around the turn, at a quick speed, the sled was thrown from its track in the center of the road, and dashed with all its contents against the parapet wall of the brige, and overturned.
     The passengers (some of whom we regret to learn, were much injured,) were instantaneously thrown from their seats.  Three of their number, one of whom was lady, were cast, by the force of the conclusion, over the parapet wall into the stream below!  One of these, a gentleman, fell upon the edge of the steam; the other two, the lady before mentioned, and a gentleman from Steubenville, (Mr. Turnbull) fell into the water, which is supposed to be ten feet at the time.  The former individual and was considerable bruised by his fall; the latter swam out unhurt, and the lady saved herself by clinging to a cake of ice floating near her, but until she was rescued from her perilous situation.  The distance from the top of the parapet wall, over which they were precipitated, to the surface of the stream, is said to have been upwards of twenty feet.  Those on the bridge did not escape unhurt - having received sundry bruises.  A few of those injured were brought back to the stage office in this place, for the purpose of receiving medical aid.  One of the mail bags, containing the newspaper mail, who also thrown into the creek - from which, however, it was recovered in the course of the day - but in a state much damaged by the watery element, to which it had  been so suddenly and unceremoniously consigned.
(Transcribed by Sharon Wick from Genealogy Bank)

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