OHIO GENEALOGY EXPRESS

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Welcome to
HENRY COUNTY, OHIO
History & Genealogy

HISTORY

Source:
History of Henry & Fulton Counties
edited by Lewis Cass Aldrich - Syracuse NY - Publ. D. Mason & Co.
1888.

 

Chapter XIX.
pg. 208
HISTORY OF FLAT ROCK TOWNSHIP
1

     IN THE YEAR 1833, about September, my parents (Jared and Susanna SCHOFIELD) left Delaware County, N.Y., for the Maumee Valley.  We boarded a canal boat at Utica, N. Y., on the Erie Canal, which took us to Buffalo; thence by sail up Lake Erie.  After a tedious journey of several days we arrived at a place called Portland (now Sandusky City) east of the mouth of Sandusky River; thence by wagon to Lower Sandusky (now Fremont); thence across to Perrysburg, through what was then called the Black Swamp, which, indeed, was properly named.  The road is now macadamized, but then was black swamp the entire distance.  I recollect one day our progress was so slow that we did not get far enough to find a place to stay over night without camping in the mud and water, and we were without horse feed. 

We left the wagons, went back and stayed at the place we had stayed the night before.  After this tedious journey of several days (thirty-one miles) we arrived at Perrysburg, there forded the Maumee River, and went up the north bank to Providence.  There we camped in a log cabin, without floor or windows, and allowed the teams to return to their homes in Portland.
     Our emigrant train consisted of father, mother and seven children, four boys and three girls, and grandmother; also Uncle and Aunt Lucinda MORSE (mother's sister), with two children, a boy and a girl.  My father went prospecting (being some acquainted with the country from a visit here the year before) with his niece and her husband, Joseph HEATH, who located here in the spring of the same year, on the north bank of the river, opposite Girty's Island.  The remainder of the family remained in camp in regular Indian style, hunting and fishing.  Game and fish were plenty.  Upon my father's return, after an absence of a week, we broke camp and embarked on a double pirogue, which consisted of two huge threes being dug out in proper shape, with reasonably thin sides and bottom to make them light as possible, and yet substantial enough to endure some hardships, then laid side by side matched together and caulked in the seam to prevent leaking.  Then "wales" were added around the top of the sides for poling, or propelling purposes.  I believe they had a name for the craft to designate it from a pirogue, which is one huge tree dug out like a canoe. 
     Thus equipped, and under command of Captain CARVER, we weighed anchor and glided up the placid Maumee, using poles for power, and arrived late in the evening of the same day at Girty's Island, and the residence of Joseph HEATH, before mentioned.  All the parties were mutually acquainted in the State of New York.  In this neighborhood I have resided since.  On coming up the river a fine buck was seen swimming across at some distance above us.  Uncle Orrin being anxious to have the first deer made a shot, at a long distance, but failed to hit him.  Shortly after when nearer, father made a better shot, killing the deer.  Upon arriving at the spot, the water being shallow and full of grass, the deer did not sink but was easily pulled into the boat.  This was our first venison captured in Ohio, or perhaps any other place.  It is my first recollection of venison.
     At this time (about October, 1833) Napoleon was not known.  Not a tree was cut.  The branches of trees hung over the banks of the river on either side all the way up, and indeed, all the way to Defiance, and also Fort Wayne, Ind.  Now and then were observed small clearings, one of which was that of John PATRICK, (a pioneer of 1824) three miels east of Napoleon.  Another owned by widow Bucklin, near the mouth of Turkey Foot Creek; Mr. GUNN's at Prairie du Masque; Samuel BOWERS's about one mile west and Elisha SCRIBNER's, off the river farther north.  The next clearing west of John PATRICK was that of Elijah GUNN, a pioneer of 1826, at Girty's Point, opposite of the east end of Girty's Island, in (now) Flat Rock township; then Joseph HEATH's, opposite the west end of the island, on the north bank of the river.  On the south bank were Reuben WAIT and Amos COLE.  The three last named families were pioneers of 1833.  Then came John LOWRY's plan, up near Snake Town, formerly an Indian town on the south bank, opposite the (now) town of Florida; then John CARAVER, at Snake Town.  William HUNTER's inn, or hotel, was a double log cabin on the north bank (now Florida); Thomas BROWN lived a half mile east; William BOWEN, who afterward laid out the town of Florida, lived on his land.  He had a small clearing, as also had Mr. HUNTER and MR. BROWN.  The next clearing, west of Florida, was that of Richard GRIMES, on the north side of the river and a little back (now the residence of Dr. Gibbons PARRY).  The next on the river bank, in succession, now in Richland township, Defiance county, were Mr. TUTTLE, Samuel ROHN, Dr. Jonathan EVANS, ___ HIVELY, Isaac BRANCHER and Pierce EVANS (near Defiance).  On the south bank were Dr. J. L. WATKINS (in now Flat Rock), ___ GRAVES, (now Richland) and Samuel KEPLER.   Then Fort Defiance, at the junction of the AuGlaize and Maumee Rivers.

TOWNSHIP ORGANIZATION - ELECTION RECORDS.

    Flat Rock township was organized on the 23d day of May, 1835.  The records show the election of its first officers of that date.  William BOWEN and Samuel ROHN were judges, and Jared SCOFIELD and Amos COLE, clerks of election.  The book shows ten votes polled.  Amos COLE was elected justice of the peace;  John L. WATKINS, Richard GRIMES and Jared SCOFIELD, trustees; Joseph HEATH, clerk and constable; William BOWEN and George LOWRY, overseers of the poor; John Lowry and Jesse KING, fence viewers; John L. WATKINS and Elijah GUNN, road supervisors.
     June 22, 1835.  Trustees met and divided the township into school districts.  Number three included Pleasant township and Marion and Monroe, if they had any inhabitants.  The records do not show when these townships were detached, neither do they show how Richland and Flat Rock were together, but from memory (as a boy fifteen years old), the election was held on the bank of the river, on the territory now of Richland, using a hat for the ballot box.  Some of the voters lived there then, and since to time of their decease.
     The first State and county election was held October 13, 1835.  John L. WATKINS, Jared SCOFIELD and Richard GRIMES were the judges, and Samuel ROHN and William WAIT, clerks of said election.  Patrick G. GOOD received eight votes for representative; for county commissioner, Amos COLE had thirteen, Isaac BRANCHER, ten, and Jonathan MEAD, eight votes; for surveyor, John L. WATKINS had ten, and Frederick LORD two; for sheriff, Samuel BOWERS had thirteen; for coroner, William BOWERS, had thirteen; for auditor, Hazael STRONG had thirteen; for recorder, John N. EVANS, had thirteen; for prosecuting attorney, Frederick LORD had four; for treasurer, Israel WAIT had twelve, and for county assessor, Willis WAIT had thirteen votes.
     The first settlement with township officers was held March 7, 1836.  Trustees present, John L. WATKINS, Jared SCHOFIELD and Richard GRIMES.  The next township election was held April 4, 1836.  Jared SCHOFIELD, John L. WATKINS and Richard GRIMES were judges, and Joseph HEATH and Reuben WAIT, clerks.  Reuben WAIT, Jared SCOFIELD and Richard GRIMES, were elected trustees, and Joseph HEATH clerk.  The following October my father, Jared SCOFIELD, died which ended his further action in developing this, then, wilderness.
     The second State and county election was held October 11, 1836, with twenty-four electors present.  For governor, Joseph VANCE had seventeen votes, and Eli BALDWIN seven; for congress, Patrick G. GOOD had seventeen, and James BROWN seven; for representative in State legislature, John HOLISTER had seventeen votes, and Amos EVANS seven; for county commissioner, John PATRICK had twenty-four votes; for recorder, Hazael STRONG had eighteen votes, and John GLASS six.  From this record it would seem that the Whigs were in the ascendancy.  (A much different state of affairs now exists)  From my recollection the persons receiving the larger number of votes were all Whigs.  The Democratic majority over the Republicans will run an even hundred, and perhaps a little more at this time (1887).
     The next township election was held April 3, 1837.  Sixteen electors were present.  Reuben WAIT, Richard GRIMES and Jesse KING were elected trustees; Joseph A. BREWER, clerk; William BOWEN, treasurer; for school examiner, Wm. C BROWNELL had fifteen votes, Isaac P. WHIPPLE sixteen, and Reuben sixteen.  The record does not show how the tie vote was settled.  The next State and county election was held October 10, 1837, with thirty-two electors present.  For State senator, John PATTERSON had twenty-one votes, and Curtis BATES eleven; for representative, George W. CRAWFORD had twenty-one, and Parley CARLAN eleven; for county commissioners, Isaac BRANCHER had twenty-two, and James MaGILL eight; for treasurer, Israel WAIT had twenty-two and John GLASS, five; for auditor, John POWELL had twenty-one and Frederick LORD eleven; for sheriff, Alexander CRAIG had nineteen votes, and Henry LEONARD twelve; for coroner, John B. RUNDEL had twenty-one, and Joseph HEATH ten; for prosecuting attorney, William D. BARRY had ten, and Frederick LORD twenty-one; for assessor, Adolphus PATRICK and eleven, and Willis WAIT twenty-one.
     The next township election was held April 2, 1838.  Reuben WAIT, Richard GRIMES and JESSE KING were elected trustees, and William C. BROWNELL clerk.  At this election William C. BROWNELL, Richard GRIMES and Amos COLE were elected school land trustees.  On the 10th day of May, 1838, Amos COLE was elected justice of the peace for a second term, and John B. RUNDEL for a first term, making two justices in the township.
     The next State and county election was held October 9, 1838.  Number of electors present, 25.  For governor, Joseph VANCE had 14 votes, and Wilson SHANNON 11; Congress, Patrick G. GOOD had 14, William SAWYER 11; State senator, John HOLLISTER 14, and Curtis BATES 11; representative, William TAYLOR had 14, and Perley CARLIN 11; county commissioner, Jonathan F. EVANS 12, and Henry LEOANRD 13; surveyor, William C. BROWNELL 24, Frederick LORD 1.
     The next township election was held April 1, 1839.  Reuben WAIT, Richard GRIMES and Jesse KING were elected trustees, and Wm. C. BROWNEL, clerk; William BOWEN, treasurer, and Jacob BARNHART, justice of the peace, in place of John B. RUNDEL, deceased.
     The next State and county election was held October 8, 1839.  For State senator, John E. HUNT had 17 votes, and Jonathan TAYLOR 14; representative, Moses McNELLY had 16 and William TAYLOR 14; sheriff, Alexander CRAIG had 22, and William D. BARRY 5; treasurer, John PATRICK 12; commissioner, John KNAPP 14, and David EDWARDS 14; assessor, Benjamin B. ABELL 17, and William C. BROWNELL 14; recorder, Hazael STRONG 21, and John GLASS 3; coroner, Joseph HEATH 18, and John PATRICK 10.  On the second day of March 1840, George A. YOUNG, a citizen of T. 3, N. R. 6, E. (now Pleasant township), presented a petition signed by citizens of that part of territory of Flat Rock township, praying to be set off in a separate school district, known as No. 4, to include No. 3 north of ranges 6 and 7, east (now Pleasant and Marion townships), which was granted; also, at the same time, altered that part of school districts Nos. 2 and 3, as originally divided, as follows:  All of No. 3, in Flat Rock township (T. 4, north of range 6, east), to be included in No. 3; also to include all of No. 4, north, range 7, east (now Monroe township).  This left Nos. 1 and 3, all on the north side of the river, in No. 4, north of range 6, east, which has ever since remained in Flat Rock township.
     The next township election was held April 6, 1840.  Reuben WAIT, Jesse KING and Richard GRIMES were elected trustees; Isaac BOWEN, treasurer.  The records for federal, State and county election do not appear on the minutes for this year.  The writer of this chapter was attending school at Lancaster, Fairfield county, O., that summer.  There he saw General William H. HARRISON, candidate for president on the Whig ticket, and Colonel Richard M. JOHNSON, candidate on the Democrat ticket for vice-president; also Thomas CORWIN, candidate for governor of Ohio, and Hon. William ALLEN, since member of Congress from that portion of Ohio, and governor of the State, and many other leading politicians of that day.
     The next township election was held April 6, 1840.  Trustees elected, Reuben WAIT, Jesse KING and Richard GRIMES; clerk, William WAIT; treasurer, Isaac BOWEN.  For the first time, G. A. YOUNG, a citizen of the territory of (now) Pleasant township, was elected supervisor of road district No. 4.  The records do not show when this road district was created.  Road districts Nos. 1, 2 and 3, were in existence some time before this, and, at this election, George LUCIOBEL was elected for district No. 1; William MILLER for No. 2, and Isaac P. WHIPPLE for No. 3; overseers of the poor, Isaac BOWEN and Washington LOWRY; fence viewers, Addison GOODYEAR, Cyrus HOWARD and Jesse KING; constables, Adam STOUT and Henry BANKS.
     The next township election was held April 5, 1841.  Richard GRIMES, Jesse KING and Amos COLE were elected trustees, and David HARLEY, clerk; treasurer, Isaac BOWEN; overseers of the poor, David HARLEY and Cyrus HOWARD.  On May 21, Cyrus HOWARD was elected justice of the peace at a special election.
     The next election was held April 4, 1842.  School land trustees, John LOWRY, Amos COLE and Isaac P. WHIPPLE; trustees of township, Cyrus HOWARD, David HARLEY and William WAIT; clerk, George W. PATTERSON; assessor, William C. BROWNELL; treasurer, Isaac BOWEN.  The records do not show State and county election.
     The next township election was held April 3, 1843.  Cyrus HOWARD, Washington LOWRY and Adam STOUT were elected trustees; George W. PATTERSON, clerk; treasurer, Isaac BOWEN; assessor, Andrew RUNDEL.
     The next annual township election was held April 1, 1844.  Amos COLE, Robert NEWELL and Reuben WAIT were elected trustees; Jared McCARTY, clerk; Andrew RUNDEL, assessor; Cyrus HOWARD, treasurer. The latter did not qualify, and Lyman BACK was appointed by the trustees to fill the vacancy.  Cyrus HOWARD was also elected justice of the peace, at this election, but did not qualify, and, on the 22d day of June, 1844, Amos COLE was elected to fill the vacancy.
     At the next annual election, held April 7, 1845, Reuben WAIT, Amos COLE, and Robert NEWELL were elected trustees; Jared McCARTY, clerk; Daniel A. BLODGET, treasurer; Amos COLE, assessor.
     The next annual township election was held April 6, 1846.  Robert NEWELL, Reuben WAIT and Lemuel SAPP were elected trustees; Gibbons PARRY, clerk; Daniel BLODGET, treasurer, and Jared McCARTY, assessor.
     The next annual election for township was held April 5, 1847.  Amos COLE was elected justice of the peace; Robert NEWELL, Amos COLE and Elijah GUNN, trustees; Lyman BACK, clerk; Adam STOUT, treasurer, and James E. SCOFIELD, assessor.
     The next annual election was held April 2, 1849.  Emanuel BARNHART, Elijah CARR and David HARLEY were elected trustees; Andrew J. SCOFIELD, clerk; Adam STOUT, treasurer, and James E. SCOFIELD, assessor.
     The next annual election was held April 1, 1850.  Emanuel BARNHART, Elijah CARR and Amos COLE were elected trustees; J. C. MCCRACKEN, clerk; Adam STOUT, treasurer, and Charles G. SHULL, assessor; also, Elijah CARR was elected justice of the peace.  On June 25, Lyman BACK resigned his office of justice of the peace, and Jonathan COOK was elected to fill the vacancy, October 8, 1850.
     The next annual election for township officers was held April 7, 1851.  Amos COLE, Elijah CARR and John BRUBAKER were elected trustees; Adam STOUT, treasurer; Charles G. SHULL, assessor, and J. C. McCRACKEN, clerk.
     The next annual township election was held April 5, 1852.  Amos COLE, John BRUBAKER and Elijah CARR were elected trustees; treasurer, Adam STOUT; clerk, George W. WATERMAN, and assessor, James E. SCHOFIELD.
     The next annual election was held April 4, 1853.  Amos COLE, Elijah CARR, John BRUBAKER were elected trustees; George W. WATERMAN, clerk; Emanuel BARNHART, treasurer and assessor.
     The next was held April 3, 1854.  Amos COLE, John BRUBAKER and Jeremiah HUSTON were elected trustees; George W. WATERMAN, clerk; R. K. SCOTT, assessor and James E. SCOFIELD, treasurer.  This year the election for State and county officers appears again, and was held October 10, 1854.  The representative in Congress, Richard MOTT received 90 votes; Henry S. COMMAGER, 28; Joseph R. SWAN, 85, and Shepard F. NORRIS 35, for judge of State Supreme Court.  Board of Public Works, Jacob BLICKENSDERFER, 87, and Alexander P. MILLER, 33; probate judge, Hazael STRONG 78, and Harvey ALLEN 42; county clerk, George B. PFEIFER 83; and Asa H. TYLER, 37; sheriff, William DURBIN 77, and Henry N. LOW 42; surveyor, William H. BROWNELL 84, and Charles HORNUNG 33; commissioner, James E. SCOFIELD 81, and Ward WOODWARD 35.  Whole number of votes polled 120.  At that time the people were dividing some in politics, caused largely by Congress agitating the slavery question; the persons receiving the majority vote being Whigs, except two of the commissioners, both of whom belonged to the Democratic party.  James E. SCOFIELD, the Republican member of the board, was wavering, and voted for Richard MOTT, which undoubtedly caused his Whig friends to give him a good vote.  The vote shows that something did it.
     The next annual township election was held April 2, 1855.  Amos COLE, John BRUBAKER and Jeremiah HUSTON were elected trustees; George W. WATERMAN, clerk; Isaac KARSNER, treasurer, and Robert K. SCOTT, assessor.  On the third day of March, 1856, James E. SCOFIELD was appointed clerk to fill vacancy caused by G. W. WATERMAN's removing from the township.
     The next annual election for township officers was held April 7, 1856.  James E. SCHOFIELD was elected justice of the peace; Amos COLE, John BRUBAKER and Jeremiah HUSTON; trustees; Robert K. SCOTT, clerk; Matthias DIEMER, assessor, and Isaac KARSNER, treasurer.  James E. SCOFIELD was continued clerk by appointment, as R. K. SCOTT did not qualify.
     The next annual election was held April 6, 1857.  Amos COLE, John BRUBAKER and Henry R. ANDREWS were elected trustees; Isaac KARSNER, treasurer; Milton STOUT, assessor, and James E. SCOFIELD, clerk.
     The next annual election for township officers was held April 5, 1858.  John A. VINCENT was elected justice of the peace; Amos COLE, H. R. ANDREWS and John BRUBAKER, trustees; James E. SCOFIELD, clerk; Isaac KARSNER, treasurer, and Henry BANKS, assessor.
     The next annual township election was held April 4, 1859.  Amos COLE, H. R. ANDREWS and John BRUBAKER were elected trustees; James E. SCOFIELD, clerk; R. K. SCOTT, treasurer, and Henry BANKS, assessor; James E. SCOFIELD, justice of the peace.
     The next annual township election was held April 2, 1860.  Amos COLE, Henry R. ANDREWS and John BRUBAKER were elected trustees; James E. SCOFIELD, clerk; George W. ARMUND, treasurer; Matthias DIEMER, assessor.
     The next annual township election was held April 1, 1861.  Henry R. ANDREWS, Amos COLE and John BRUBAKER were elected trustees; James E. SCOFIELD, clerk; George W. ARMUND, treasurer, and Henry BANKS, assessor.  John A. VINCENT was also elected justice of the peace.
     The next annual election was held April 7, 1862.  Henry R. ANDREWS, John BRUBAKER and John KNIPP, were elected trustees; James E. SCOFIELD, clerk; Isaac KARSNER, treasurer, and Henry BANKS, assessor; James E. SCOFIELD was also elected justice of the peace (his own successor), receiving all the votes polled, 81; and 137 out of 142 for clerk.
     The next annual election, April 6, 1863.  John KNIPP, Henry R. ANDREWS and Joseph BACHMAN were elected trustees; James E. SCOFIELD, clerk; Isaac KARSNER, treasurer (being his own successor without opposition; as also was James E. SCOFIELD, clerk). Curtis L. MORSE, assessor.
     The next annual election was held April 4, 1864.  John KNIPP, Henry R. ANDREWS and John BRUBAER were elected trustees; Isaac KARSNER, treasurer; John A. VINCENT, clerk, and George SCHNEIDER, assessor; also, John A. VINCENT, justice of the peace, being his own successor.  The minutes do not show who was the successor of James E. SCOFIELD, resigned, and moved out of the township temporarily, which event, to his knowledge, occurred the 24th day of February in the year 1864.  He resigned, both as clerk and justice of the peace and also postmaster at Florida.
     James E. SCOFIELD was assistant postmaster at Florida in the year 1850.  In July, of that year, Lyman BACK, the postmaster, died, leaving the office in SCOFIELD's possession.  Shortly after this time the latter was appointed postmaster and remained such until after the nomination of James BUCHANAN for president, in 1856.  This official refused to support Mr. BUCHANAN, in consequence of which is "head went into the basket," and Henry ANDREWS was appointed his successor.  Mr. ANDREWS remained a year or two, when he, too, was deposed, and Isaac KARSNER was appointed his successor.  Shortly after the election of Abraham LINCOLN, in 1860, Mr. KARSNER turned the office over to SCOFIELD, as assistant, and, after the inauguration of President LINCOLN, in 1861, the latter was appointed postmaster, and remained as such until his resignation, in February, 1864, leaving in charge John A. VINCENT, who was shortly afterward appointed to fill the vacancy.  In 1833 there was no post-office nearer than Defiance, but one was established in about 1834, called McLEAN, after John McLEAN, the postmaster-general.  Jared SCOFIELD and Isaac P. WHIPPLE, his brother-in-law, were both candidates for postmaster, which was amicably settled between them, and Isaac P. WHIPPLE became the appointee, this being the first post-office in the township, and perhaps the first one in the territory of Henry county.  Mail was received about once each month, carried on horseback, by John OMENS, as near as can be ascertained.  This post-office was situated about one mile east of the present town of Florida.
     Florida was laid out about this time, or soon after, by William BOWEN, who recorded twenty-four lots on the Williams county records.  The records of Henry county being destroyed in the year 1847, by the burning of the court-house, left Florida without any available plat.  About 1872 it became necessary for some cause, to search for records of some lots and corners in dispute, and it was found that none of the lot lines and alleys would correspond with others.  Owing to this unfortunate state of affairs, many and serious complications and disputes arose, but the surveyor had, fortunately, recourse to the records of Williams county, to which Henry county was formerly attached, where he found the original twenty-four lots there recorded.  As application was made to the Legislature for a special act for replatting the town, which was granted in the winter of 1873, but it was found that no law authorizing such an act was made general.  By that act the commissioners of Henry county appointed the writer to re-survey and plat Florida, which was done.  About the year 1865 or '66, a post-office was established and called Okolona, and Mr. SCOFIELD was appointed postmaster and remained as such until about January, 1872, when John H. BENSON, who succeeded to the business of the former incumbent, was appointed.
     The next election for the township offices was held April 8, 1865.  Henry R. ANDREWS, John BRUBAKER and John KNIPP were elected trustees; Isaac KARSNER, treasurer; John A. VINCENT, clerk; and George SCHNEIDER, assessor.  At this election John A. VINCENT failed to qualify, and Andrew J. SCOFIELD was appointed April 21st by John KNIPP and H. R. ANDREWS (two of trustees) to fill vacancy.  David SMITH was also elected justice of the peace at this election.  On May 26, 1866, an order was received from the probate judge for an additional justice of the peace, and on the 12th day of June, 1886, M. V. B. McKINNEY was elected.  On the 9th day of October, 1866, Jerome THAYER was elected justice of the peace.  The next annual township election was held April 1, 1867.  Henry R. ANDREW, John BRUBAKER and John KNIPP were elected trustees; Andrew J. SCOFIELD, clerk; Henry L. WEAVER, treasurer; George SCHNEIDER, assessor; Andrew J. SCOFIELD was also elected justice of the peace.
     The next annual township election was held April 6, 1868, John KNIPP, John BRUBAKER and Henry R. ANDREW were elected trustees; Joseph ICE, clerk; Henry L. WEAVER, treasurer, and George SCHNEIDER, assessor.
     The next annual election was held April 5, 1869, John BRUBAKER, Henry R. ANDREW and John KNIPP were elected trustees; Andrew J. SCOFIELD, clerk; Henry L. WEAVER, treasurer, and William KEMMER, assessor.  On the 12th day of October, 1869, Elias PARKER was elected justice of the peace, and James E. SCOFIELD land appraiser.
     The next annual township election was held on April 4, 1870.  John BRUBAKER, John KNIPP and Henry R. ANDREW, trustees; Andrew J. SCOFIELD, clerk; Henry L. WEAVER, treasurer, and William KEMMER, assessor.  Andrew J. SCOFIELD was also elected justice of the peace of the same day.
     The next annual election was held April 3, 1871.  John BRUBAKER, John KNIPP and Henry R. ANDREW were elected trustees; Andrew J. SCOFIELD, clerk;  Henry L. WEAVER, treasurer; William KEMMER, assessor.
     The next annual election was held April 1, 1872.  James E. SCOFIELD, George HOFFMAN and John BRINKMAN were elected trustees; Andrew J. SCOFIELD, clerk; Henry L. WEAVER, treasurer, and William KEMMER, assessor.
     The next annual election was held April 7, 1873.  John BRINKMAN, George BORTZ and John BRUBAKER were elected trustees; Andrew J. SCOFIELD, clerk; Henry L. WEAVER, treasurer; William KEMMER, assessor.  At the same election Newton S. COLE and William J. BARR were elected justices of the peace.
     The next annual election was held April 6, 1874.  John BRINKMAN, George BORTZ, and Martin LOWRY were elected trustees; Joseph WEIBEL, clerk; Frederick LOENHART, treasurer, and William H. STOCKMAN, assessor.
     The next annual election for township officers was held April 5, 1875. Martin LOWRY, John BRINKMAN and George BORTZ were elected trustees; Frederick LOENHART, treasurer; Joseph WEIBEL, clerk, and William KEMMER, assessor.
     The next annual township election April 3, 1876.  John BRINKMAN, Martin LOWRY and George B. RETTIG were elected trustees; Joseph WEIBEL, clerk; Lewis F. RICHHOLT, treasurer, and William KEMMER assessor.
     The next annual election was held April 2, 1877.  John BRINKMAN, Martin LOWRY and George B. RETTIG were elected trustees; Lewis F. RICHHOLT, treasurer; Joseph WEIBEL, clerk, and William KEMMER, assessor.
     The next election for township officers was held April 1, 1878.  John BRINKMAN, George R. RETTIG and Martin LOWRY were elected trustees; Lewis F. RICHHOLT, treasurer; Andrew J. SCOFIELD, clerk, and William KEMMER, assessor.
     The next township election was held April 7, 1879.  John BRINKMAN, George B. RETTIG and John E. SCOFIELD were elected trustees; Joseph WEIBEL, clerk; Lewis F. RICHHOLT, treasurer, and William KEMMER, assessor.  At this election Joseph WEIBEL an Abraham HUFF were elected justices of the peace.
     The next annual election for township officers was held April 5, 1880.  James E. SCOFIELD, George B. RETTIG and John BRINKMAN were elected trustees; Joseph WEIBEL, clerk; Lewis F. RICHHOLT, treasurer, and William KEMMER, assessor.
     The next annual election for township officers was held April 4, 1881.  John BRINKMAN, James E. SCOFIELD and George B. RETTIG were elected trustees; Joseph WEIBEL, clerk; Lewis F. RICHHOLT, treasurer, and William KEMMER, assessor.
     The next annual election for township officers was held April 3, 1882.  Frederick NISCHWITZ, George B. RETTIG and James E. SCOFIELD were elected trustees;  John W. LONG, clerk; Lewis F. RICHHOLT, treasurer, and Abraham HOUGH, assessor.  Also at this election James E. SCOFIELD and Abraham HOUGH were elected justices of the peace.  The next annual election for township officers was held April 2, 1883.  Frederick NISCHWITZ, William ART and William N. BRUBAKER were elected trustees; Frederick B. LOENHART, treasurer; John W. LONG, clerk, and William H. DANCER, assessor.
     The next was held April 7, 1884.  Gotleib F. ROTHENBERGER, John A. KNIPP and James E. SCOFIELD were elected trustees; Frederick B. LOENHARDT, treasurer; John W. LONG, clerk, and Martin V. BRUBAKER, assessor.
     The next election was held April 6, 1885.  James E. SCOFIELD was elected justice of the peace; John A. KNIPP, Conrad C. GROLL and James E. SCOFIELD, trustees; F. B. LOENHARDT, treasurer; John W. LONG, clerk, and William E. DECKER, assessor.
     The next April 5, 1886, Conrad C. GROLL was elected trustee for three yeas; G. F. ROTHENBERGER for two years, and Philip HUSTON for one year; F. B. LOENHARDT, treasurer; John W. LONG, clerk, and Martin V. BRUBAKER, assessor.
     The next minutes of election do not appear on the books, but the meetings of the trustees for the qualification of the officers elected was held April 11, 1887.  The trustees of Flat Rock township met April 11, 1887, for the purpose of qualifying officers for the respective offices to which they hand been elected as follows; James E. SCOFIELD, trustee for three years; Conrad C. GROLL two years, and Gotleib F. ROTHENBERGER one year;  Frederick LOENHARDT, treasurer, one year; John W. LONG, clerk, 1 year; Peter KEMMER, assessor one year; Joseph H. RENNICKER, and Samuel TRAVIS constables, one year each; Henry EGLER, supervisor road district No. 1, one year; Chrustian BAUR, No. 2; William RUSH, No. 4; John SELL, No. 5; Peter LOENHART, No. 6; John CURRANS, No. 7; Jacob BRECHEISEN, No. 8; Charles CROSSMAN, No. 9; C. H. WESLENHAUSEN, No. 10, and Frederick KEMMER, No. 11; Henry J. KESLER, justice of the peace, three years; and James E. SCOFIELD yet to serve one year.  Road district No. 3 has been recently attached to No. 1, therefore no supervisor of that district was elected, but it is in charge of No. 1.
     The reader will see that the growth of this county has been rapid when he considers that only three road districts existed at the commencement, and the territory comprised four original surveyed townships - Flat Rock, Pleasant, Marion and Monroe - twelve miles square, which will appear separately written in this work.  Each now has its own road districts, and good farms along their roads; but formerly it was a wilderness, the haunt of wolves, bear, deer, wild turkeys and frogs.  No pen picture can make the reader realize the change that this region ahs undergone.  In all this territory were only a few inhabitants, and they settled along the river in the original survey (Flat Rock township), within a distance of about three miles, and the land they tilled would not equal a section (640 acres) of territory.  No good farms and roads are all over this territory.  Flat Rock township, six miles square, contains eleven road districts and good roads.
     Florida, the first village in the township and county, is situated on the Miami and Erie Canal and Maumee River, and here the township records are kept, and township business done.  Its early business men have passed away.  Many are dead; some have removed, and a few are yet living here.  Adam STOUT, Lyman BACK and Jared McCARTY, the last two under the firm name of BACK & McCARTY (all deceased) were its first permanent merchants.  There were a few others at the commencement of digging the canal - Adam STOUT as early as 1840, and BACK & McCARTY about the autumn  of 1842.  About 1846 BACK & McCARTY dissolved partnership, Mr. McCARTY retiring.  Mr. BACK continued the business until his death, in 1850, and Mr. STOUT until about 1852, when he sold to Emanuel BARNHART and Isaac KARSNER, who continued the business for a time, when they dissolved, Mr. BARNHART retiring.  Mr. KARSNER continued for some years, when he sold to Dr. Robert K. SCOTTDr. SCOTT sold out to Mr. KARSNER, and removed to Napoleon and associates himself with S. M. HELLER, then in business at that place.  Mr. KARSNER continued the business until about the close of the war, when he took as partner his step-son, Captain Washington W. BOWEN.  This firm was of short duration, when the firm name was again changed to WEAVER & VIERS, Dr. Henry L. WEAVER and Ezra VIERS having purchased the stock of goods.  This also was a short-lived firm, Mr. VIERS selling to Mr. KARSNER, when the firm name became WEAVER & KARSNER, and continued until about 1875, when it again changed to __ner, but continued in his storeroom, selling drugs and medicines.  On February 24, 1864, he went to Oakland Station (now Okolona), on the Wabash Railroad, in Napoleon township.
     In about the autumn of 1849 David HARLEY erected the storeroom now known as the old school-house, and engaged in merchandising, which he continued for some time when he sold the building to the school directors, they converting it into a school house.
     In about 1852 John and Jacob FREASE bought, at administrator's sale of the estate of Lyman BACK, the plank warehouse and storeroom combined, erected by him just before his death in 1850.  They put in it a stock of goods usually kept in a first class country store.  It was placed in charge of George FREASE.  This firm sold their stock of goods to David HARLEY & WOODWARD continued the business in all its parts for a time, when C. K. WOODWARD bought Mr. HARLEY's interest.  Soon after this John J. STOCKMAN bought the warehouse and store-room, when the old firm removed their goods to a small storeroom in the house now occupied by LONG & TUTTLE.  The storeroom at that time was much smaller than now, it having since been remodeled and enlarged by the latter firm.  The firm of WOODWARD Brothers continued for a time, when they closed out, C. K. WOODWARD returning to his farm in Liberty township, and F. A. WOODWARD and David HARLEY moving to Napoleon, where they again engaged in merchandising.  Some time after this, about 1865, John J. STOCKMAN opened a store in the plank warehouse of which he was now the owner, and continued the business, together with grain buying, for a time, when he took a partner in the person of Joseph ICE.  This firm  continued for a time, when William H., a son of the elder STOCKMAN, became the partner, which latter firm was continued up to the death of John J. STOCKMAN, when the entire stock of goods was closed out at administrator's sale.  Since that time there has been nothing of any importance in the old plank warehouse.  A hardware stock of small amount was continued there for a time, supposed to be the property of W. H. STOCKMAN, but the store was in charge of W. T. FAUCET, neither of which persons are now residents.  The business now being generally closed along the canal, the little village of Florida began to decline.  The probably cause of this may not be out of place.  The firm of SMITH & SCOFIELD, at Oakland Station, on the Wabash Railroad, north of Florida, drew largely from all the former patrons of the place, and, moreover, the county seat, Napoleon, had grown since 1835, and down to 1850 in more than double proportions, and became a natural trading center to which the farming people were glad to resort.  The Wabash road went into operation about 1852.  It passed about two miles north of the town, and where once had been the most flourishing village of the county, there was nothing but a way station on the old canal, which, too, had practically gone into disuse.  Many business men left about this time, of completion of the Wabash Railroad.  About twelve or fourteen years later the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad was finished, passing the town on the south, and Holgate, a new town on that road, cut the trade again.  Florida, however, has not become wholly depopulated.  The country in the vicinity contains many fine farms, and the village still holds some small trade.  The village is pleasantly situated on the river in the northwest part of Flat Rock township, and contains some two hundred and fifty inhabitants.  It has had some manufacturing industries.  David HARLEY, a contractor on the canal during its construction, shortly afterward erected a saw mill on the present site of the flouring-mill of J. E. KLINGELHOFER.  To this was added one run of stone for flouring and grinding corn.  This was the first grist-mill in Henry county after is organizationin 1835.  Isaac KARSNER was forman in the mill for a time.  It afterward became the property of Gibbons PARRY and Isaac KARSNER, under the firm name of KARSNER & PARRY.  This continued for a time when Daniel FRIBLEY and Peters GIGGONS were added to the firm, and Mr. KARSNER retired and went to merchandising.  The firm name then changed to PARRY, GIBBONS & FRIBLEY, who in about 1856, erected the flouring-mill now owned by J. E. KLINGELHOFER.  This mill had two heavy run of stone, together with the light one in the old mill.  This firm remained until about 1860, when it dissolved, Dr. PARRY  retiring, and Mr. FRIBLEY selling his interest in the saw-mill, but retained it in the flouring-mill, of which he became sold proprietor.  Austin F. GITCHEL became a partner with Peters GIBBONS.  They entirely rebuilt the saw-mill.  The firm name became GIBBONS & GITCHEL, which was continued until choice timber was scarce and portable mills became frequent, after which it went into disuse and decay.  But little of it is now left, only the flume which supplies the flouring-mill.  About 1865 the flouring-mill passed into the hands of John SPANGLER and David BOOR, of Defiance.  This firm remained for a time when Mr. BOOR sold his interest to Alfred ELKINS, and the firm then changed to ELKINS & SPANGLER.  After a short time Mr. ELKINS became sole proprietor and continued up to his death, in March, 1881, he being killed in the mill.  His widow, with her two sons, John and Newton ELKINS, continued the business for a time, when it was sold to SIGG & KLINGELHOFER, under whom it was quite extensively repaired.  In 1886 it passed to J. E. KLINGELHOFER, Mr. SIGG retiring.  J. E. KLINGELHOFER, the present enterprising owner, had all the old machinery taken out and replaced with full roller process, second to none in northwestern Ohio.
     Florida, being located in the center of a large grain growing country, with a good flouring-mill, for sale and custom work, will add materially to its present trade.  Mr. K. intends manufacturing flour for shipment, which will give employment in winter when the canal is closed.  The first physician of the village was Dr. John L. WATSON.  He was here on a farm in the woods, on the south side of, and up the river from Florida.  Whether a graduate is not known, but it is presumed that he was, as he was a man of excellent education.
     About 1842 Dr. George W. PATTERSON located in Florida and practiced for some years, when he moved away.  In 1840 Dr. Gibbons PARRY located at Independence, some five miles above Florida.  His practice extended to this point, and further east along the canal, then in course of construction.  Shortly after he removed to Florida, where he has since remained.  HE obtained a lucrative practice, and now lives on his farm in a little out of town, enjoying the fruits of his well spent life, and is aged over eighty years.  There were several other physicians, but of short residence, many of whose names are forgotten by the present inhabitants.
     In about 1860 Drs. Henry L. WEAVER and Abraham McKINNEY located here and commenced practice under the firm name of WEAVER & McKINNEY.  They remained for a time, when a dissolution occurred, Dr. WEAVER retiring, and went to merchandising.  Dr. McKINNEY continued for a time, when he removed to Defiance, and is yet in practice.  About 1866 Dr. TYLER located here and practiced, but soon returned to Napoleon.  About 1872, Dr. J. M. STOUT came here and practiced and Dr. H. L. WEAVER became associated with him.  This firm practiced for a time, when Dr. WEAVER returned, went into other business, and Dr. STOUT moved to Holgate, where he is yet in practice.  About 1876 Dr. Albert M. PHERSON located here in the spring of 1887.  About 1848 Dr. John L. ARNOLD located here and practiced in connection with his other business (groceries and provisions) together with his farm, which he obtained soon after his location.   Isaac KARSNER read medicine with Dr. Gibbons PARRY to better prepare himself for the profession, having had some practice in earlier days of the country.  He practiced in connection with his other business for a time, and is yet living in the town, but doing no other business than looking after his farm.  He is now in the sixty-seventh year of life.
     Among the business interests of Florida not before mentioned, there may be named the following:  R. A. WOOD opened a stock of dry goods and boots and shoes, which was continued for a time, and then sold to JONES & ANDREW (Millet JONES and Calvin R. ANDREW).  These firms were in the building now occupied by LONG & TUTTLE.  The business was, after a few years, closed out, Mr. ANDREWS going to Dakota, and Mr. JONES resumed his trade as a carpenter.  About 1846 Lyman BACK, in connection with his dry goods business on the street north of the canal, opened a grocery and feed store for the accommodation of the boating people.  This was soon followed by Adam STOUT and others, some adding "fire water" and other beverages for the inner man.  The saloon business became sommon, and in fact at one time outranked other branches of trade, but with the genral decline these went down, so that there is but one saloon in Florida at this time.  About 1847 Matthias DIEMER and Andrew BOLLEY opened a general boat and feed store, all kinds of groceries and provisions, vegetables, including "fire water," and did a prosperous business.
     (page 224 missing)    
     In 1871, this society erected their church on the property.  This was the first church building in the village.  Soon afterward followed the United Brethren Church in 1874; then the Evangelical German Reform Church in 1875.  A few years later the German Lutheran Church in 1875.  A few years later the German Lutheran society built a brick church edifice.  These four buildings are neat and substantial edifices sufficient for the necessities of their respective societies.  Prior to the several church erections worship was conducted in private dwellings and school-houses.
     At an early day William BOWEN, a devout Methodist, a proprietor of the village, donated a portion of his lands for church and school purposes.  A small frame building was erected by the school authorities and church members and was used by both up to and after the death of Mr. BOWEN, when it was found that neither had title in fee simple.  The property was deeded by the heirs to the school authorities, an was used many years for school and church purposes.
     The first post-office at or near Florida was established about 1834, with Isaac P. WHIPPLE as postmaster.  It remained there until about 1842, when, at the death of Mr. WHIPPLE, it was moved to Florida and George W. PATTERSON appointed postmaster.  In about two or three years Mr. PATTERSON left the town and Lyman BACK become postmaster, and continued as such to the time of his death in 1850, when James E. SCOFIELD became his successor.  He continued to 856, when he was deposed for refusing to support James BUCHANAN for president, and Henry ANDREW became his successor.  In about a year Mr. ANDREW was succeeded by Isaac KARSNER.  In 1860 James E. SCOFIELD became Mr. KARSNER's assistant and removed the office back to its old quarters.  In 1861 Mr. SCOFIELD was appointed to fill vacancy caused by Mr. KARSNER's resignation, and continued to 1864, when he resigned and removed to the little station of Oakland, on the Wabash railroad (now Okolona) where he again became postmaster for a term of years, mention of which has been made in this chapter.  John A. VINCENT became his successor and remained until his resignation in 1885.  John W. LONG, the present incumbent, next succeeded to the office.  It may be well here to mention that during Mr. WEAVER's term the office was in the hands of an assistant, and at three different locations besides the first.
     Early and Prominent Settlers -   Elijah GUNN, in about 1826, settled in what is known in history as "Girty's Point," which contains a large extent of as fertile land as is in the State.  The GUNN tract is now owned by his heirs who reside thereon.  Much of this rich and highly productive land, which gently rises back from the river at this historic point, and including Girty's Island, is owned by different parties, among whom are Leroy WAIT, Anthony SHULTZ's heirs, and Henry BOESLING.  All these farms are under excellent cultivation, having good buildings, rendering them very valuable farming lands.  In 1833 Girty's Island was a dense forest with an undergrowth of whortleberry, wild grapes, buckeye, and other growth indigenous to the rich soil.  On some of the small islands surrounding it, grew great quantities of wild onions.  The smaller islands have disappeared.  The larger portion of the main island, containing about thirty acres, has been somewhat diminished from its original size by ice and wash.  About one-half is now under cultivation.  This island is yet the favorite resort of pleasure seekers for recreation.  It was commonly reported that a cannon was shoved off the foot of the island during the war along the Maumee.  Some of the boys of 1833-4 have sought for it without result, the water at that point being extremely deep.  Many relics of warfare have been plowed up on the farms adjoining the river, such as sabres, gun-barrels and bullets; also Indian relics such as rings, brooches, buckles, tomahawks, pipes, stone hammers and arrow heads of flint.  At that time (1833) the Indians were more numerous than the whites, but perfectly civil.  They had camps near this island on the south bank of the stream, and came each year and burned bones at the graves of their deceased friends.  The old forest farms of Judges WAIT and COLE, on the south bank of the river opposite and west of this island, are now in the possession of heirs and purchasers, but in good state of cultivation, now having but little woodlands as compared with their state fifty years ago.  No pen picture can make the reader realize the change from then to the present.  Among the enterprising residents might be named Henry L. WEAVER, Ernest WEAVER, Joseph LOWRY, John A. ANDREW, John BRINKMAN, William GOLDENSTAR, Isaac KARSNER, Dr. Gibbons PARRY, Christian STOUT, James E. SCOFIELD, John BRUBAKER and David BRUBAKER.  All of these owned and lived on their farms between, 1833 and 1850, except Ernest WEAVER, John BRINKMAN and William GOLDENSTAR the latter two having bought improved farms.  There are many other excellent old farms near Florida, but they are mostly owned by farmers that bought already cleared farms from heirs and some of the older inhabitants who have removed from the township.  Many others in the immediate neighborhood and the Richland township, Defiance county, contribute liberally to the trade of Florida, which makes it a village of much prosperity and likely to remain so in the future.  It will grow in number of inhabitants as the country and soil is capable of sustaining a population multiplied by ten or twenty of its present.  The same may be said of the county in general, and indeed, of all northwestern Ohio.  Flat Rock is one of the best "cleared up" townships in the county, containing more of the "old" farms, perhaps, than any other section.
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1. Written and contributed for this volume by James E. Scofield, a pioneer of the Maumee Valley, from personal recollections, records, and information derived from other early settlers.

 

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