OHIO GENEALOGY EXPRESS

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HENRY COUNTY, OHIO
History & Genealogy

HISTORY

Source:
History of Henry & Fulton Counties
edited by Lewis Cass Aldrich - Syracuse NY - Publ. D. Mason & Co.
1888.

 

Chapter XXV.
pg. 248
HISTORY OF NAPOLEON TOWNSHIP

     THIS township was organized in the spring of 1835, soon after the full organization of Henry county.  the population in 1880 was 1,472 not including the town of Napoleon; this has increased considerably.  The township contains thirty-six square miles, without deducting the space covered by the Maumee River.  The larger portion of this area is in an advanced state of cultivation.  It lies near the middle of the famous Black Swamp, which was formerly such a terror to emigrants, and which caused it to be passed by by early settlers, who were seeking homes, in what was in the beginning of the century, the "far west."  Its surface is remarkably even, except in the immediate vicinity of its water courses, where the surface drift has been washed away, during and since the glacial epoch.  The soil, like that of the Black Swamp generally, is remarkable for its great fertility.  It is underlaid by what is known as the Erie clay, which was deposited during the long ages when the township formed a portion of the bed of Lake Erie.  This clay on account of its great tenacity, furnishes the best possible formation for a fertile soil.  In itself it furnishes a large amount of plant food, and after being exposed to the disintegrating effects of frost and heat, becomes a very productive soil.  The great growth of vegetation, previous to its discovery and settlement by the white man, gave it a rich coat of soil, which the retentiveness of the clay preserved for future use.
     The beautiful Maumee River furnishes the great center of drainage to the township, as well as to the greater portion of the county.  The general trend of the surface is towards the Maumee River, and Lake Erie, i. e., on the northern side of the river the slope is toward the southeast, while that of the southern side of the river is at right angles, or towards the northeast.
     The rate of descent is between four and six feet to the mile, which gives sufficient fall, when skillfully distributed, to secure the benefits of thorough underdraining, which is the Black Swamp is the one great necessity in securing the conditions of successful agriculture.  There are fie small steams with their branches, that empty into the river from the northern side, while there are none of importance in that small portion of the township lying south of the river.
     Much time, labor and money have been expended in bringing the township state of productiveness.  Much, however, remains to be done.
     It took no small amount of courage to attack the swamps and forests of this locality half a century ago.  More hardships were endured and more lives lost in the work of clearing up and preparing the conditions which now exist in the form of beautiful and productive farms, which are to be seen throughout the township, than were endured to subdue the hostile and treacherous Indians which once occupied the country.
     We have here no early history of Indian or other wars, through which the earlier settlers of this region had to pass.  The battle of the Fallen Timbers at Presque Isle, on the Maumee River, three miles above Maumee, so broke the power of the Indians, that no further trouble was had with them.  As that memorable battle occurred in the latter part of the eighteenth century, when there was probably not a single white resident (unless it may have been the renegade Simon Girty), in the whole county, we have therefore no blood-curdling stories of hair-breadth escapes from the Indians, or of ambuscades or battles.  All has been peaceful since the organization of the county.  Our modest story will therefore lack interest to those who require something of a blood-curdling nature.  The early settlers here had enough to contend with in the shape of inhospitable nature, and were very well satisfied with the fact, that the lives of their wives and little ones, as well as their own scalps were in no danger from the savage Indians.
     We see around us now many of the aged pioneers both male and female, who took part in this great contest with savage nature, whose tottering frames show very clearly that they have endured great privations, such as but few of their children would undertake.  Fortunately for the children, they have nothing to do but enjoy the fruits of their parents indomitable pluck and perseverance.
     These old pioneers are rapidly passing away, and soon will be only known by the works they have done.  Yet, before passing away they have had the great satisfaction of knowing that they have left a heritage for their children, where they may enjoy all the comforts of life without enduring the trials, privations and inconveniences they were compelled to endure.
     It is to be hoped that the children will continue to develop the resources of the land their parents have done so much to make ready for their occupation.  In the very nature of things the future resources of this township will mainly depend upon agriculture.  There seems, at present, to be little else upon which the people of Napoleon township can depend except that which may be gained from the cultivation of the soil.  This is not a cause for discouragement.  We have the city of Toledo, with its phenomenal growth, which may fairly entitle it to the appellation of the "Future Great;" also the embryo cities of Findlay, Bowling Green and Lima, with their great flow of oil and gas, which cannot help making them great manufacturing centers.  All of these are our near neighbors, and they will need everything we can produce, and will therefore furnish a market at our very doors, and at remunerative prices.  The early settlers of the township are rapidly passing over to the majority beyond the river, therefore it is well to place on record their early trials and privations, and their heroic struggles with poverty and disease; in their efforts to subdue the unbroken wilderness; in the process of developing its resources to the present condition.  This furnishes a reason for the existence of this volume.  It is intended to be a memorial of inestimable value to the descendants of these worthy pioneers, as well as to all who may hereafter partake of the benefits of their indomitable industry and perseverance.
     We had almost neglected to speak of our beautiful Maumee River, the pride of northwestern Ohio.  The dam built by the State to feed the Miami and Erie canals, backs the water more than twenty-five miles, extending nearly to the western line of the county, thus giving us a beautiful and placid stream which is a marvel of beauty.  It furnishes navigation for pleasure boats of all kinds; and excursions up and down the river are of almost daily occurrence through the summer season, and in winter gives our young people the best of skating which they are not slow to utilize.  Accomplished skater are very numerous among those who live along its beautiful banks.
     The following is a list of the chattel taxpayers of Napoleon township in 1837, viz.: Amos Andrews, Samuel Bowers, Catharine Delong, Jesse Essex, John Glass, Henry Leonard, George Bowers, Alexander Craig, Frederick Lord, James Magill, Jonathan Kneely, Lorenzo Patrick, Adolphus Patrick, John Patrick, John Powell, Edwin Scribner, George Stout, Hazael Strong, Reuben Straight, Israel Wait and J. P. Whipple, - twenty-five names in all.  We believe all of them are dead with the exception of Frederick Lord, who, at last account, was living at Paw Paw, Mich.  Among our best citizens many of these names are found, showing that they are well represented.
     The value of the real estate in the township at that time was $18,792; 25 horses valued at $1,000; 88 head of cattle valued at $700 dollars; money and merchandise to the amount of $425, making a total valuation of $20,941, on which was assessed a tax of $286.97.8.  In the present year, 1887, just fifty years, the same items are as follows:
     Religion is also not neglected.  Besides the numerous church edifices, filled with attentive congregations, in the county seat, there are two Lutheran and one United Brethren churches, outside of the town of Napoleon, where neighbors can attend worship nearer home.
     Okolona is a small village with post-office on the Wabash, St. Louis and Western Railway, in the southwestern part of the township.  It has considerable local trade, and is a convenience to the people in that locality.

SKETCHES OF PIONEER RESIDENTS OF NAPOLEON TOWNSHIP

     HAZAEL STRONG was born in Vermont, Mar. 23, 1804.  He was married to Sabrina Garrey in 1833.  Mrs. Strong was also born in 1804.  They settled in Henry county and Napoleon township in the same year they were married.  Mr. Strong was the first auditor of Henry county, having been appointed to that position by the associate judges at the time the county was organized.  He held the office his successor was elected at the first general election.  He afterwards held the office of county recorder; he was clerk of the Common Pleas Court fourteen years; he also held the office of the county surveyor, for which office he was peculiarly well fitted, as he took  great pride in doing his work with the greatest possible accuracy; he also served as deputy treasurer of the county during the term for which Israel Wait was elected, doing the greater portion of the work of the office.  They had only one child, a son, who died in 1861.  Hazael Strong died in 1877.  His widow still survives at the ripe age of eighty-three years.

     HON. JOHN POWELL was one of the first settlers in Henry county, having permanently located here in 1835.  He was born in Oneida county, N. Y., Dec. 14, 1806; was married in Erie county, O., Jan. 9, 1831, to Esther Magill, who was born in Huron county, O., Dec. 7, 1811.  They had a family of twelve children, five of whom are dead; one of them, Volney Powell, having been murdered in a South Carolina massacre, Oct. 20, 1870.  Four of their sons served their country in the War of the Rebellion.  Samuel Powell belonged to Co. B, 38th Regiment O. V. I., of which regiment Hazael B. Powell, M. D., then quite a young man, was surgeon.  Volney Powell belonged to the 14th Regiment O. V. I., and was afterwards in the one hundred day service.  George Powell was also in the one hundred day service.  When Mr. Powell settled in this county Napoleon consisted of one log house, owned by a man named Andrews.  Several log houses were added to the place during the summer of 1835.  In the same year Mr. Powell was elected township clerk., and in 1837 was elected county auditor.  After serving two terms, he served as deputy sheriff.  He was then elected justice of the peace, and in 1840 was, by the Legislature, appointed associate judge of Henry county, which office he held one term.  He also filled the office of county commissioner, three terms.  He began business in Napoleon, as a shoemaker; in 1836 he began merchandising, which vocation he followed until 1851.  He then kept a hotel or tavern, as it was then called, but soon again entered the mercantile business which he continued until 1862.  After the first court-house burned, in 1847, the question of removing the county seat to the town of Texas, a few miles farther down the river, in Washington township, arose.  The people of the county were divided on the question, and upon that issue Mr. Powell was elected county commissioners, which fixed the county seat at Napoleon.  Mr. Powell died July 27, 1886, and his aged wife followed him in December of the same year.

     EDWIN SCRIBNER, was born in New York in 1808, and brought to Henry county when a lad of eight years old, in 1816.  There was not at that time a wagon road in the county, nothing but Indian trails.  Flour and meal could only be obtained by taking wheat to mill at Monroe, Mich.  When a lad of thirteen years of age, he rode on horseback and alone, to Greenville, Darke county, O., and brought back with him a bundle of rolls of wool to be spun and woven into clothing for the family.  Mr. Scribner erected the first sawmill in Henry county in 1838, on Dry Creek, in what is now Washington township.  He died May 16, 1887.

     ALLEN B. SCRIBNER, a son of the above, was born in Henry county May 25, 1825.  He was married in Delaware county, O., Aug. 24, 1863, to Mary C. Potter, who was born in that county in 1841.  They have had four children.  Mr. S. is at present engaged in the sale of hardware and agricultural implements in Napoleon.

     GEORGE STOUT came to Napoleon in the autumn of 1834.  Napoleon township was then an almost unbroken wilderness.  He purchased a town lot in Napoleon and built the second log cabin in the place.  He lived in this cabin while he built a public house or tavern, into which he moved his family in March, 1835.  This he opened for the entertainment of guests as soon as it could be made ready.  The first two or three terms of the Common Pleas Court, was held in the dining room of this hostelry, and the first grand jury of Henry county slept in the hay-mow in the barn.  At this time there were but few settlers in the county.  Those nearest were Hazael Strong, John Patrick and Amos Andrews, who lived four miles down the river, and Elijah Gunn, who lived on Girty's Island, five miles above town.  For a distance of fifteen miles from the river, on both sides; the county was a vast unbroken wilderness.  As an inducement to settlers, a town lot was offered by the original proprietors of the town, Messrs. Phillips, Cory and Level, to the first permanent settler.  Upon this lot a log cabin had been built by a man named Holloway, and also afterwards by several others, not of whom remained long enough to entitle them to a deed, and was finally deeded to Mr. Stout as the first actual settler in the town.  This was lot No. 25 on the original plat of Napoleon.  The house was somewhat pretentious for those days, as it was built of hewed logs, the greater portion of the buildings of that day being of round logs.  It was afterwards weather-boarded and plastered, and is still standing, being the oldest house in town.

     JOSEPH A. STOUT, a son of the above, was born in Holmes county, O., July 13, 1819.  He was married to Sarah C. Palmer.  The raised two children, Albert T. and Ella A. Stout.  The latter married Johnson N. High and resides with her husband in Kansas.  Mr. Stout came to Henry county with his parents in 1834, and had with all the settlers of that early period an abundant experience of the trials of pioneer life.

     JOHN G. STOUT, a brother to the above, came to Henry county with his parents in 1834.  He was at one time a superintendent of public works in Ohio, Indiana and Illinois.  HE was married to Ryan Jan. 24, 1841.  They had a family of eight children, one of whom, John P. Stout, is an examiner of pensions in Washington.

     ADAM STOUT was born in Richland county, O., Sept. 29, 1819.  He was married to Mary J. Barnhart, who was born in Maryland, O., in 1826.  They had eight children.  He moved with his parents to this county in 1833.

     HON. JAMES G. HALY was born in Holmes county, O., Dec. 6, 1816.  He was married Aug. 12, 1845, to Harriet Conkling, who was born in Montgomery county, O., Feb. 3, 1821.  He was admitted to the bar of Ohio in the summer of 1840; was elected prosecuting attorney for the county in the same year.  He served four yeas by election and one year by appointment of the court.  He served six years as justice of the peace of Napoleon township, was elected county auditor in 1845, and served four years.  In 1851 e was elected to the Legislature from Putnam and Henry counties, and sat during the first session of that body under the present constitution.  He was appointed collector on the Miami and Erie Canal, and was stationed at Junction, in Paulding county, where the Wabash and Erie Canal joins the Miami and Erie.  He filled the position for a term of three years, during which he collected and paid over to the State of Ohio, more than a quarter of a million dollars.  He then entered into partnership at Napoleon with Edward Sheffield (since deceased) in the practice of law.  This partnership continued until the beginning of the War of the Rebellion in 1861.  He recruited and organized Company D, Sixty-eighth Regiment, O. V. I., and was appointed quartermaster of the regiment, in which capacity he served one year, when he resigned on account of failing health.  He then formed a law partnership with J. M. Haag and William Sheffield (since deceased), which continued until he was elected probate judge of Henry county, which office he held twelve years.  Since his retirement form the judgeship he has retired from active life and occupies himself superintending his farm near town.  Six children were born to them.

     HON. ALEXANDER CRAIG settled in Napoleon township in 1835.  He and is wife were both born in Pennsylvania in 1800, and 1801, respectively.  They were married in 1827.  Mr. Craig held the office of sheriff two terms, and that of associate judge of Henry county one term.  They had a family of four children.  Mr. C. is now dead.

     WILLIAM C. BROWNELL, with his wife, whose maiden name was Lydia Osborn, came to Henry county in the autumn of 1835, and settled in what is now known as Flat Rock township, and came to Napoleon in 1842 or '43; was elected sheriff of the county in 1843, and served one term; was school examiner several years, and was also county surveyor for a long time, doing a larger amount of surveying in the county than any other man.  They had seven children.  He lived and died a consistent member of the society of Friends.

     WILLIAM H. BROWNELL, a son of the above couple, was born in Renssalear county, N. Y., Sept. 6, 1832, and was brought to this county in 1835 with his parents.  He remembers seeing many Indians in his boyhood, as they frequently stayed all night at his father's house.  Mr. B. held the office of county surveyor one team.  He was a farmer in his early life, then learned the trade of carpenter, which he followed until the Rebellion.  He enlisted in Napoleon in Company F, Fourteenth Regiment, Ohio three months men, and served the time in West Virginia.  He took part in the battles of Phillippi, Laurel Hill and Carrick's Ford.  After their term of enlistment expired the regiment re-enlisted and reorganized as the Fourteenth Regiment O. V. I., for three years.  He was appointed first lieutenant of Company D; was in the fight at Wild Cat, Ky., and in numerous skirmishes between Ringgold and Atlanta.  When he reached Atlanta he was compelled to resign on account of his health.  When he arrived home he weighed only 115 pounds.  He has since filled many responsible positions, and is now cashier of Meekison's bank.  He has had six children.

    JOHN O. PALMER settled with his parents in Henry county in 1837.  He was born in New York June 22, 1832, and married in Napoleon, O., Sept. 24, 1857, to Margaret Tressler, who was born in Ohio Aug. 19, 1837.  They had three children.  Mrs. Palmer's mother came to Henry county, a widow, in 1849.

      JAMES SHASTEEN was one of the earliest settlers in the county.  He came with his parents in 1826.  He filled the offices of justice of the peace and assessor.  He furnished three sons to the Union army.  Peter Shasteen belonged to the Fourteenth Regiment O. V. I.; was wounded at Chickamauga, and died from the effects of the wound soon after.  Emanuel Shasteen belonged to the artillery corps, and died in the service.  James Shasteen, jr., belonged to the One Hundred and Eighty-fourth Regiment, O. V. I., and survived the war. 

     S. L. CURTIS was born in Java Lake, N. Y., Oct. 11, 1836, was married to Mary Chapman, who died in 1872 leaving two children.  He married Margaret A. Guaintance, in Napoleon July 1, 1874.  He settled in Henry county in 1838.

     WILLIAM DODD was born in New Jersey June 18, 1810.  He was married to Mary Thompson in Henry county about the year 1837.  When quite young.  Mr. Dodd enlisted in the U. S. Army, then stationed at Forth Leavenworth.  During the three years he served in the army they were engaged in a very active campaign, under the command of Colonel Dodge, against the Comanche Indians, near the Rocky Mountains.  After his term of enlistment expired he returned to the States in 1836.  He also took part in the Canadian Rebellion in 1837.  He held a colonel's commission from the Provincial Congress of Upper Canada.  He was a contractor during the construction of the Miami  and Erie Canal.  He held the office of sheriff, and also that of treasurer of Henry county.  He died April 22, 1859.  Mrs. Dodd was brought to the Maumee Valley in 1821, when she was four years old.  She is believed to have taught the first school in Henry county.  The school room was in the residence of John Patrick, three miles below Napoleon on the river.  She also taught at Independence, six miles below Defiance on the river.  Many of our oldest citizens attended her school in their early days.  She also taught at Waterville, in Lucas county, and the Indian mission school, near Waterville.  She is now spending the evening of her days with her children in this vicinity.  She has spent sixty-nine years of her life on the Maumee river; the greater portion of this time she resided in Napoleon.  This couple had six children.  Their eldest son, Ezra S. Dodd, was attending school in St. Louis when the war began.  He at once enlisted in the First Missouri Regiment of Infantry for one year.  At the battle of Wilson's Creek he was taken prisoner and was held eighteen months.  After his release he came to Napoleon, and raised Company B, One Hundred and Eighty-fourth Regiment, O. V. I., and was appointed captain.  He was in numerous engagements, and was on board of the first gunboat that passed the gauntlet at Vicksburg.  He was promoted to the rank of major of the regiment, and held that position when mustered out of the service.  He now resides in Toledo, O.

     WILLIAM DODD, JR., was a member of Company I, Sixty-eighth Regiment, O. V. I., and died in the service Oct. 12, 1862.

     EDWIN C. DODD, another son, was a member of the One Hundred and Eighty-fourth Regiment, O. V. I., Company B,, and served to the end of the war.

     GEORGE FREASE was born in Pennsylvania, Aug. 20, 1812.  He was married in Summit county, O., Jun. 7, 1835, to Elizabeth Willard, who was born in Ohio, Dec. 10, 1812.  They had eight children, several of whom are prominent in business circles at this time.  Mr. Frease settled in Henry county in 1843.

     THOMAS BROWN, a millwright, settled in Henry county in 1845.  Nativity, Ohio.

     S. F. HAMLIN, a millwright, settled in Henry county in 1849.  Nativity, Ohio.

     CHARLES SWEET, a millwright, settled in Henry county in 1858.  Nativity, New York.

     D. W. FREASE was born in Stark Co., O., July 28, 1837, is a son of George and Elizabeth Frease, who were natives of Pennsylvania, born in the year 1812, and settled in Henry County in 1842, where they still reside.  Henry Willard, the father of Elizabeth Frease, died in Henry county at the advanced age of ninety-four years.  The subject of this sketch was married at Napoleon Feb. 16, 1871, to Julia Feighner, who was born in Pennsylvania, Mar. 15, 1845.  Mr. Frease enlisted Feb. 14, 1864, in Company B, Thirty-eighth Regiment, O. V. I., and served until the close of the war.  He was in the following battles and campaigns, viz.:  The campaign of Atlanta, campaign of Georgia, siege of Savannah and campaign of North and South Carolina, and served until the end of the war.  He is now a justice of the peace for Napoleon township.  He came to the county with his parents in 1842.

     A. H. TYLER settled in Napoleon in 1847.  He was the first county clerk ever elected in Henry county.  That officer, previous to the present constitution, was appointed by the court.  He has since filled the offices of justice of the peace, county school examiner, and was a member of the constitutional convention that framed the present constitution, which was adopted in the year 1851.  Dr. Tyler was born in New Haven, N. Y., Jan. 27, 1819.  He was married to Elizabeth B. Grannis, in Huron county, O., Oct. 29, 1846.  They had four-children born to them.  Mr. Tyler died in ____.  Dr. Tyler served as assistant surgeon in the Sixty-eighth Regiment O. V. I. for two years.  He married again, and is now residing on his farm near Napoleon.

     BENNETT STENBIRD was born in 1822, and settled in Henry county in 1847.  He enlisted in Company C, Fourteenth Regiment, O. V. I., at Toledo, Sept. 17, 1861, and received his discharge at Atlanta, Ga., Sept. 12, 1864.

    HERMAN A. MYERHOLTZ was born in Hanover, Germany, June 17, 1835, and settled in Henry county with his parents in 1848.  He was married in Defiance county, O., Mar. 17, 1864, to Louisa Shults, who was born in Prussia in 1844.  They have several children.  He has held several offices of trust in the county and township.  He was township trustee, and justice of the peace, and treasurer of Napoleon township.  He was the first infirmary director of the county.  He, with his brother Henry, have carried on the business of grocers and provision dealers for many years.  They also have been engaged in the manufacture of brick and tile for a number of years.

     H. F. MYERHOLTZ, a brother of the above, was born in Germany June 24, 1844, and married to Mary Gilson Sept. 15, 1868.  He came to Henry county with his parents in 1848.  He enlisted in Company F, Sixty-eighth Regiment, O. V. I., and served until Jan. 27, 1863, when he was discharged at Cincinnati, O.  He re-enlisted Feb. 9, 1865, and served until the close of the war, he escaped without the slightest wound.

     W. LINN settled in Henry county in 1849.

     REUBEN P. CALKINS was born in New York Apr. 2, 1821.  He was married in Ohio to Annie E. Thompson, daughter of William and Rebecca Thompson, of Stark county, O.  Four children were born to them.  Mr. Calkins's parents settled in Henry county in 1836.  Mr. C. himself came in 1856.

     CHRISTIAN H. HELBERG was born in Germany Nov. 11, 1833.  He was married in Henry county Nov. 17, 1865, to Anna Drewes, whose parents were natives of Germany, and who settled in Henry county, where Mrs. H. was born.  Mr. H. settled in Henry county in 1848, and suffered the privations common to the settlers of that period.  In early times in this county it was not an uncommon thing for the farmer to shoulder a bag of grain and carry it to mill, as that was frequently the easiest way to get there.  the forests at that time were full of game.  Squirrels were very numerous, and materially assisted the farmer in gathering his corn crop.  Mr. Helberg enlisted in the Sixty-eighth Regiment O. V. I., Oct. 15, 1861.  He took part in the siege  of Vicksburg, battle of Atlanta, and marched with Sherman to Atlanta.  He was wounded, and the ball was never extracted.

     JOHN DANCER was born in Jefferson county, O., June 3, 1823.  He was married to Margaret Huston in Ashland county, O., November 5, 1849.  Mrs. Dancer was born in Columbiana county, O., May 28, 1827.  They had six children.  Their son George was a member of the Seventy-seventh Regiment, O. V. I., and served three years and ten months.  Mr. Dancer settled in Henry county in 1848.

     WILLIAM MASON was born in Milan, O., Apr. 12, 1817.  He married Elizabeth Smith, who was born in Wayne county, O., Sept. 23, 1824.  They had four children, and were early settlers in the county.

     HON. WILLIAM A. TRESSLER was born Mar. 19, 1824; was married Jan. 23, 1845, in Frederick county, Md., to Anna Elliott, who was born Jan. 14, 1823.  They came to Henry county in the spring of 1849.  Mrs. Tressler died Nov. 11, 1881.  Mr. Tressler has lived in the county ever since his first arrival.  He has held the office of State Senator two years, was county treasurer four years, was mayor of Napoleon four years, marshal of the town two years, and justice of the peace eight years, which office he now fills.

     GEORGE DAUM is the son of George and Margaret Daum, both of whom are deceased.  They were born in France, in 1798, in the same town and on the same day and hour.  The subject of this sketch was born in France, Jan. 12, 1834, and married in Napoleon, O., in the autumn if 1871, to Rachel Spieth, whose parents were Germans.  They have a large family of children.  He settled in Henry county in 1846.  He was at one time clerk of Pleasant township, was elected sheriff in 1872, which office he held four years, was elected county commissioner in 1886, which office he now holds.  Mr. Daum enlisted in Cleveland Oct. 1, 1862, in Company D, 124th Regiment O. V. I.  He was promoted from second lieutenant to captain of the company in which capacity he served until the close of the war.  He was wounded in the battle of Nashville, in the  second day's fight.  He also took part in the battles of Chickamauga, Resaca, Kenesaw Mountain, Peachtree Creek and Atlanta.

     HENRY E. CARY was born in Huron county, O., Jan. 14, 1838, and removed with his parents to Henry county in 1846.  His father, Joel Cary, was born in Vermont in 1814, and died Sept. 21, 1849.  His mother, Harriet W. C. Cary, was born in Connecticut in 1818, and still resides in Napoleon.  Mr. Cary was married in Napoleon, Dec. 27, 1886, to Amelia M. Roach, who was born in Providence, Lucas county, O., Jan. 22, 1845.  They have three children.  Mr. Cary enlisted in Company G, 163d Regiment, O. V. I. as lieutenant, and served ninety days.  His brother, Harlem P. Cary was a member of the 68th Regiment, O. V. I.  On his way home he died with small-pox, at Chattanooga, Tenn.  Mr. Cary claims to have the oldest grocery house in Napoleon.

     HOMER P. HOPKINS was born in Erie county, O., May 29, 1837, and was married Oct. 1, 1867, to Mary A. Neidhamer, who was born in Michigan, in 1847.  Mr. Hopkins enlisted in Company H, First Regiment, M. V. I., at Adrian, Mich., Jul. 25, 1861.  The regiment was assigned to Hooker's brigade, and during the winter of 1861 was kept as guard at Annapolis, Md.  He witnessed the celebrated contest between the Moniter and Merrimac in Chesapeake Bay.  He was in the battle of Mechanicsville, and was shot through the arm at Gaines's Mills.  He took part in the siege of Richmond; at Chancellorsville he narrowly escaped death; while lying flat on the ground a shell burst and a piece struck the ground between his arm and head as he lay with his arm bent, and buried itself eight inches in the hard earth.  After he was wounded he lived six days without food except a few berries.  He was in several of the hard-fought battles of the war, was with Burnside in the march from Falmouth, Va.  He was on honorably discharged at the close of the war.  He was removed from the county.

     MRS. ELIZA HILL was born in Jefferson county, O., Feb. 16, 1825, was married in Holmes county, O.  They had nine children.

     EDWARD LINGLE was born in Butler county, O., June 21, 1818, and was married in the same county to Margaret Weaver, Dec. 3, 1846.  Six children were born to them.  The parents of this couple were all from Pennsylvania.  Mr. L. held the office of coroner six years, and that of infirmary director, three years.  He settled in Henry county in 1850.

     JACOB BALES was the son of David and Ann Bales, of Pennsylvania, who moved to Ohio in 1812.  He was born in Wayne county, O., Sept. 27, 1821, and was married in the same county, in 1841, to Salome Sidle, who was born in Pennsylvania, Dec. 9, 1819.  They had eleven children.  Mr. Bales filled the office of assessor and township trustee.

     CONRAD CLAY was born in Stark county, O., Apr. 20, 1822.  He was married in Defiance county, O., Oct. 9, 1851, to Julia A. Stoddard, who was born in Connecticut, Feb. 17, 18324.  They had nine children.  He lost a valuable mill by fire in 1871.  He, together with his parents, John and Julia Clay, settled in Henry county in 1850, as also did William H. and Abigail Stoddard, the parents of Mrs. Clay.

      ANDREW SHERMAN was born in Germany, and settled in Henry county in 1852.  He was married in Sandusky City, O., May 9, 1849, to Eva Walter, also a German.  He settled in Henry county in 1852.

     HENRY PANNING was born in Germany, Feb. 21, 1821.  He was married in Henry county, O., Jan. 28, 1851.  Miss Othnar was also born in Germany, December, 1824.  They had nine children.  Mr. P's parents settled in this county in 1854.  His wife's parents came in 1858.  Mr. Panning settled in this county in 1851.

     HENRY DACHENHAUS settled with his parents, who are Germans, in Henry county in 1850.  He was born Jan. 5, 1825, and married in Henry county, Oct. 18, 1854, to Sophia Precht, also of Germany, where she was born in 1828.  Seven children were born to them.

     HENRY BUHLART was born in Germany May 15, 1844.  He was married May 30, 1867, to Eliza Ludeman, who was born in Cleveland, Apr. 1, 1844.  Mr. Buhlart, with his parents, Henry and Louisa Buhlart, settled in Henry county, in 1849.  Mrs. Buhlart's parents , Frederick and Catharine Ludeman, settled in Henry county, in 1845.  Mr. Buhlart was a member of the Sixty-eighth Regiment O. V. Infantry, and was in a number of battles during his term of service.

     ROBERT K. SCOTT was born in Armstrong county, Pa., in 1826, and settled in Henry county in 1851.  He practiced medicine five years, then engaged in merchandising.  In 1861 he was appointed major of the Sixty-eighth O. V. Infantry, which he recruited.  He was promoted to lieutenant-colonel Nov. 29, 1861; was at the battles of Fort Donaldson, Pittsburgh Landing, then at the siege of Corinth.  He commanded a brigade in the battle of Hatchie River.  His regiment was placed in the command of Major-General McPherson  He took part in the battles of Port Hudson, Raymond, Jackson, Champion Hills and Big Black.  He was placed in command of the Second Brigade, Seventeenth Army Corps.  He was taken prisoner during the investment of Atlanta, was exchanged and returned to his brigade, with which he accompanied Sherman in his famous march to the sea.  His brigade was mustered out of service July 10, 1865, and before the close of the war was made a major-general by brevet.  In January, 1866, he was ordered to take charge of the Freedman's Bureau, in South Carolina.  In 1868 he was elected governor of South Carolina, and again in 1870.  He returned to Henry county in 1876.  He married Jane Lowry, by whom he has one son, R. K. Scott, jr., who was for some time captain of Company F, O. N. G.  The governor is now engaged in manufacturing.

     WILLIAM McHENRY, the son of Dr. McHenry mentioned Sept. 3, 1873, to Anna M. Reiter, who was born in Henry county, Jan. 15, 1855.  They have two children.  He enlisted in Company D, One Hundred and Twenty-fifth Regiment O. V. Infantry, Oct. 8, 1862.  He was transferred to Company I, in the same regiment, June 15, 1863.  He took part in the battles of Chickamauga, Mission Ridge, Dandridge, Kenesaw Mountain and Lovejoy Station.  He received a wound at Dandridge, and another at Lovejoy Station, and was honorably discharged on account of disability, Nov. 15, 1864.  HE served five years as guard at the Ohio Penitentiary, during a part of which time he filled the position of instructor of schools and librarian.  HE came to Henry county with his parents in 1850.

     DAVID MEEKISON was born in Forfarshire, Scotland, in 1812, and came to Henry county in 1853.  He was married in 1835, in Dundee, Scotland.  They had eight children.  Mrs. Meekison died June 3, 1875.  He married again and still lives in Napoleon.

     DAVID MEEKISON, JR., a son of the above, was born in Scotland, Nov. 14, 1849.  He was married Aug. 24, 1881, to Clara E. Bowers, who was born in Henry county, Aug. 4, 1860.  Three children have been born to them.  Mr. Meekison made the first start in public life by joining the Fourth U. S. Artillery, in which he served three years as a private.  He then returned to Napoleon, and received the appointment of clerk of the town, to fill an unexpired term, after which he was elected and served two terms.  His second term as probate judge will expire in Dec., of this year, 1887.  He is an active and public-spirited citizen, and is foremost in all enterprises that tend to advance the well-being of the place.  He came to Henry county in 1855.

     JULIUS CHAPPNIS was born in France, Aug. 6, 1841.  He was married at Texas, in Henry county, in September, 1861, to Ann Hardy, who was born in Virginia, Dec. 24, 1837.  They have six children.  Mr. Chappnis settled in Henry county in 1853.

     ABRAHAM L. WILLARD was born in Stark county, O., Apr. 12, 1819, and came to Henry county in 1852.  He owned and ran a boat on the canal for ten years.  He was never married.  He still lives in Napoleon.

     HENRY OTTE was born in Germany, in 1831; was married in 1855 to Elsie Myer, who was also born in Germany.  They had seven children, and were early settlers in the county.

     JO. CHRIST BUCHELE was born in Germany, June 18, 1838, and was married in Henry county, in 1854, to Christina Singer, who was also born in Germany, July 20, 1832.  They had nine children.  They settled in Henry county in 1853.

     JOHN F. OBERHAUS was born in Germany, July 18, 1842, and was married in Henry county, Apr. 19, 1872, to Sophia M. Beaderstat, who was also born in Germany, Dec. 12, 1851.  Mr. Oberhaus had a brother in the Sixty-eighth O. V. Infanty, in 1851, and served until the close of the war.  They had several children.

     JULIUS VAN HYNING was born in Summit county, O., Jan. 3, 1822, and was married in the same county Jan. 19, 1851, to Sarah Willard, who was born in Stark county, Jan. 1, 1822.  They had six children.  Mr. Van Hyning belonged to the Sixty-eighth O. V. I., and took part in the battles of Fort Donaldson, Pittsburgh Landing, Fort Henry, and was wounded at the battle of Crump's Landing, Tenn.  He was honorably discharged from the service for disability.  He settled in Henry county in 1858, and still resides on his farm near Napoleon.

     NATHANIEL HARTMAN was born in Pennsylvania in 1835, and was married in Henry county Nov. 2, 1856, to Lydia R. Ritter, who was born in Ohio in 1838.  Seven children were born to them. Mr. H. was a member of the One hundred and sixty-third O. V. I. during the "late unpleasantness," and died in Napoleon in 1886.  He settled in Henry county in 1850.

     JOHN WAIT was born in Pennsylvania Mar. 3, 1826, and married to his second wife in Henry county, Sept. 5, 1871, to Annie M. Strole, who was the widow of Milton Atkinson, who enlisted in Company B, One Hundredth Regiment, O. V. I., in 1862, and was lost in the battle of Limestone Ridge, Tenn., in 1863.  His real fate is not known, but he is supposed to have been killed.  Mr. Atkinson left four children.  Mr. Wait had one child by his first wife, and two by his second wife.  He belonged to the Ninety-sixth Regiment O. V. I.; was in several battles and escaped unharmed.  He settled in Henry county in 1867.

     H. H. FAST was born in Ohio, and settled in Henry county in 1852.

     WILLIAM F. DAGGETT was born in Lucas county, O., May 24, 1830.  He was married in Washington township, Henry county, Dec. 25, 1855, to Alvira L. Scribner, who was born in the same township Jan. 24, 1833.  They had eight children.  He was recorder of the county six years and auditor three years.  He settled in Henry county in 1852.

     CHARLES E. REYNOLDS was born in Massachusetts June 15, 1844.  He was married at Napoleon Sept. 12, 1866, to Sarah E. Parker.  Two children were born to them.  He served as auditor for several years; also as county school examiner for many years, which office he now fills.  He also served as clerk of Napoleon township ten years.  He enlisted in the fall of 1861 in Company F, Sixty-eighth Regiment, O. V. I., and served until the close of the war.  He entered the service as a private, and was promoted to quartermaster-sergeant.  He was in the battle of Little Hatchie.  At the siege of Richmond he was taken prisoner and sent to Libby prison, where he remained one month, when he was exchanged, but was afterwards again taken prisoner while on Sherman's raid, near Norton, Miss.  He was confined first at Mobile, then at Cahaba, Ala., and lastly at that shed on earth - Adersonville - where he spent thirteen months, until the final exchange.  Like all the unfortunates who entered that worse than hell, he suffered such tortures and privations as no pen has yet been able, adequately, to describe.  The close of the war released him, with such of his comrades as had survived.  He now resides in Napoleon, and is engaged in the business of insurance.  He came to Henry county in 1854.

     PATRICK RAGAN was born in 1800, in County Cork, Ireland; was married in 1844 in Canada to Norah Hagerty, who was born in St. Johns, New Brunswick, in 1822.  They had six children.  Mrs. Ragan died in 1856; Mr. Ragan in 1866.  They settled in Henry county in 1854.

     JAMES RAGAN, a son of the above, was born in Gilead, near Grand Rapids, in Wood county, O., Mar. 17, 1852, and came with his parents to Henry county, in 1854.  After teaching school a number of years he studied law, and was admitted to the bar Mar. 16, 1878.  He resides in Napoleon and is engaged in the practice of his profession in partnership with Hon. J. M. Haag.

     JOHN DIEMER, was born in Bavaria, Feb. 2, 1837.  He was married in Napoleon, in 1860, to Josephine Greber, who was born in Bavaria in 1840.  They had twelve children.  Dr. Diemer enlisted in the Fourteenth Ohio three months troops, and served four months.  He was honorably discharged and returned to Napoleon.  HE was in many skirmishes and battles during his term of service, among which were Philippi, Laurel Hill, Cheat River and Carrick's Ford.  Since the war has continued to reside with his family in Napoleon.  He has kept a meat marrket for many years.  He came to Henry county in 1850.

     JOHN D. BELKNAP came to Henry county in 1850, and was one of the first men to enlist in the Fourteenth Regiment, three months men, and was instantly killed at Laurel Hill.  He was married before coming to this county.  They had three children.  His son, J. P. Belknap, is the editor and proprietor of the Henry County Signal.

     JONAS SHUMAKER was born in Wayne county, O., Oct. 26, 1821.  He was married in Crawford county, O., May 15, 1847, to Esther Speigle, who was born in Stark county, O., Dec., 1829.  They had seven children.  He was a member of the board of education nine years.  He settled in Henry county in 1850.

     JOSEPH SHUMAKER, brother to the above, was born in Wayne county, O., May 13, 1828.  He was married in Crawford county, O., Oct. 18, 1853, to Mary A. Weiler, who was born in Pennsylvania, of German parentage.  They had seen children.  Mr. S. came to Henry county in 1858.

     JEREMIAH J. THOMPSON, was born Apr. 12, 1850, in Holmes county, O.; was married in Henry county Sept. 3, 1871, to Mary Foncannon, who was born in Seneca county, O., May 21, 1853.  They had two children.  Mr. Thompson settled in Henry county in 1853.

     GEORGE STONER was born in Maryland, July 16, 1828.  He was married in Seneca county, O., Nov. 16, 1852, to Louisa Wilkins, who was born in Ohio, Jan. 31, 1830.  They have a family of eleven children.  He settled in Henry county in 1866.

     THOMAS J. HOWELL was born in Ohio, Feb. 15, 1850.  He was married in Henry county Nov. 4, 1870, to Eliza Elarton, who was born in Seneca county, O., Oct. 15, 1852.  Mr. Howell settled in Henry county in 1867.  Mrs. Howell's father, Samuel Elarton, enlisted in the 100th Regiment O. V. I., during the War of the Rebellion.  He served his country three years, and died in Libby prison.  Richard Howell, a brother of the subject of this sketch, belonged to the 113th Regiment O. V. I., and served three years.

     JOHN SNYDER was born in Ohio, August 13, 1841, of German parentage.  He was married in Henry county Oct. 31, 1864, to Catharine Leifer, who was born in Richland county, O., Aug. 8, 1841.  They had five children born to them.  Mr. Leifer, the father of Mrs. Snyder, settle in Henry county in 1853.

     WILLIAM M. FRENCH was born in Licking county, O., July 18, 1847, and was married in Henry county Mar. 31, 1868, to Sarah E. Miller, who was born in Marion county, O., Jan. 24, 1850.  The parents of Mr. French, William S. and Mary G. French, settled in Henry county in 1862.

     HENRY H. FREYTAG was born in Germany, in 1845; was married in Henry county June 24, 1869, to Catharine Rohrs, who was born in Germany in 1849.  Mr. F. settled with his parents in Henry county, in 1851.  His wife's parents, John and Mary Rohrs came to the county in 1858.

     JUSTIN H. TYLER (and photo) was born Nov. 15, 1815, in Massachusetts, and was married June 21, 1847, to Alice Olmsted, who was born in New York city, in 1825, and died in Napoleon, Jan. 2, 1860, leaving two children.  Mr. Tyler was married the second time, on Feb. 21, 1861, to Hattie M. Peck, at Shelbourne, Mass., where she was born June 21, 1832.  Four children were born to them.  Mr. Tyler was admitted to practice law in 1841.  He first located at Huron, O., where he held the office of the township clerk, and also was clerk of the village of Huron, three years.  He then came to Henry county, where he has held the office of prosecuting attorney four years.  He was also a member of the Ohio Legislature two years; he was also school examiner for several years, and was the first mayor of the village of Napoleon, which office he held three terms.  When he first came to the county, in 1852, Napoleon was a village of about three hundred inhabitants, and a large portion of the county was an almost unbroken wilderness.  He has practice law in the county thirty-five years.  He does not now engage actively in the duties of his profession, leaving the bulk of the work to be performed by his son, Julian H. Tyler, who promises to fill with credit the position so long held by his father.  Although Mr. Tyler is not a member of any church, he has been a most liberal contributor to the construction of church buildings, claiming that he has contributed to nearly every church built in the county.  Mr. Tyler was  originally a Whig in politics; and after the disruption of that party he became an ardent Republican, and, although always in the minority, he continues firm in his allegiance to that party.  He resides in Napoleon.

     LEWIS Y. RICHARDS was born Dec. 20, 1831, in Greene county, O.; was married Nov. 8, 1860, to Harriet Augusta Brancher, who was born in 1839, at Defiance.  They had two children.  He came to Defiance county in 1846, and removed to Henry county in 1853.  He enlisted Oct. 3, 1861, in Company A, 68th O. V. I., as second lieutenant.  He was soon promoted to first lieutenant, and afterwards became captain of his company.  He was in the battles of Pittsburgh Landing, Fort Donaldson, Siege of Corinth, Hatchie River, Port Hudson, Raymond, Jackson, Champion Hills and Big Black. He was offered a commission as major, in 1863, but declined, and was mustered out of service at the expiration of is period of enlistment, Nov. 24, 1864

     CHRISTIAN E. AXE was born in Wayne county, O., Sept. 16, 1837, and was married in Henry county Dec. 9, 1860, to Mary A. Freysinger, who was born in Wayne county, O., May 31, 1840.  They had three children.  Mr. Axe's parents settled in Henry county in 1849, and those of his wife in 1859.

     THOMAS W. DURBIN was born in Maryland, Aug. 24, 1822, and was married May 22, 1850, to Lucinda King, who was born in Perry county, O., July 8, 1832.  They had five children.  Mr. Durbin was clerk of the Court of Common Pleas for Henry county during one term of three years; he also held the office of county commissioner during one term, and has been county recorder since Jan. 7, 1884, being now in his second term.  He came to Henry county in 1843.
 

 

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