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Highland County,
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BIOGRAPHIES

 

Source:
History of Highland County, Ohio
by Rev. J. W. Klise -
Publ. Madison, Wis.,
Northwestern Historical Association
1902

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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
EDGAR J. MARTIN, M. D., a popular young physician of Greenfield, Ohio, comes of a family which for four generations has had representatives in the medical profession.  His father, grandfather and great-grandfather were all doctors of eminence  The first mentioned, the late Dr. A. J. Martin, was for years one of the leading physicians of Wilmington, Ohio.  He was educated at Norwalk and was graduated as M. D. at the Cleveland Medical college in 1859.  He located without delay in Wilmington, and, with the exception of one year while he was with the Seventy-ninth Ohio regiment during the Civil war, he was in continuous practice until his death in 1898.  His son, E. J. Martin, inherited the family predilection for medicine and lost no time in preparing himself for the profession.  He was born in Clinton county and educated in the public schools of Wilmington.  With this literary equipment he entered the Medical college of Ohio and by diligent attendance and close study received his diploma as M. D. in 1889.  Immediately after graduation, Dr. Martin located in Cincinnati, where he practiced five years, during most of that time being assistant surgeon of the Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern railroad company.  In 1894, he took up his residence at Greenfield, where he has since remained with a widening patronage and increasing prospects of success.
Source: History of Highland County, Ohio by Rev. J. W. Klise - Publ. Madison, Wis., Northwestern Historical Association - 1902 - Page 396
ELI MARTIN, deserving of note among the enterprising and successful farmers of White Oak township, was born in that township, Dec. 25, 1854, on the farm now owned by his father, William Martin.  The latter was born June 21, 1816, son of Andrew Martin one of the pioneers of Highland county, whose descendants are now numbered among the most worthy people of the region  William Martin was reared in the pioneer home and educated in the log school house of his day, and in early manhood was married to Abigail Gibler, also a native of Highland county.  They had their home upon a farm of 128 acres in White Oak township until the death of the mother in 1861.  A few years later, having married a second time, to Elizabeth Roberts.  Mr. Martin moved to Concord township, where he is still living, at the age of eighty-six years, one of the oldest of the survivors of the early days, a devoted member of the United Brethren church, and held in high esteem by the many who recall his many years of prominence and influence in the affairs of the township.  He had twelve children by his first marriage - James, living in Brown county; Daniel, deceased; Millie, of Adams county; Cynthia, of Brown county; Sarah, deceased; Mollie and Josie, of Fayette county; Rilda, of White Oak township; Martha, of Mowreystown; Eli, the subject of this sketch; William, living on the old homestead, and Henry, in Fayette county.  Eli Martin was reared at the White Oak township homestead, and educated in the district school.  In early manhood he was married to Ella Hicks, daughter of Wilson and Rachel Hicks, respected and well-known early settlers, and the young couple began their married life in Concord township.  Two years later they moved to White Oak township, and in 1894 he bought the farm of sixty acres where they now live.  Three children have been born to them - Denver C., Carlis W., and Glenn, all living at home.  Mr. Martin is a valued citizen, he and his wife are members of the Christian church, and he is a member of the Knights of Pythias and in politics a Democrat, like his father.  In 1902 he held the office of assessor for White Oak township.
Source: History of Highland County, Ohio by Rev. J. W. Klise - Publ. Madison, Wis., Northwestern Historical Association - 1902 - Page 496
JOHN ALLEN MARTIN, a well-to-do farmer of Marshall township and veteran of the Civil war, comes of one of the old families of Highland county.  His grandparents were William and Nancy (Mason) Martin, Pennsylvanians who came to Ohio in 1820 and located in Highland county and reared the following named children: Keziah, Hannah, William, Nancy and Mary Ann.  William Martin, junior, was born in Pennsylvania, Jan. 26, 1811, and married Mary Ann, daughter of Jacob and Sarah (McKnight) Moyers.  The children of this union were:  Clarissa, who married Christopher C. Underwood and died in 1891; Ann Eliza, who married William C. Fenner and died in 1902; John A., subject of this sketch; Wilson Howell, who was taken prisoner during the civil war and confined at Libby and Danville, dying at the latter place; Sarah Jane, wife of Jacob W. Lucas, who resides near St. Joseph, Mo.; Joseph Perry, died at the age of thirty-two; Lydia V., the wife of Theodore F. Brown, of Washington Court House; and Luella, wife of James T. Miller, a farmer of Marshall township.  Mrs. Martin, the venerable mother of these children, was born Feb. 28, 1813, now resides with her daughter, Mrs. Luella Miller, and is approaching her ninetieth year.  John Allen Martin, the third in order of the children, was born at the parental home in Highland county, Apr. 4, 1838, and as he grew up learned the business of farming which he has followed all his life.  In July, 1863, he enlisted in Company A, Second regiment Ohio heavy artillery, with which he remained until mustered out of the service in August, 1865.  While serving with this battery, Mr. Martin took part in the battle of Strawberry Plains and other minor engagements during the campaigns in East Tennessee.  Since the war he has been engaged in farming, has served as trustee of Marshall township several terms and performed the duties of director of schools.  Nov. 7, 1861, he was married to Emeline Tedrow, by whom he had two children:  Carrie Kate, wife of Lewis Bevan, of Missouri, and Elizabeth Della, wife of G. M. Ausbach, of Iowa.  Their mother dying, Mr. Martin was married Aug. 22, 1872, to Celinda Bell.  Their children are:  Eva M., at home; Anna Belle, died in infancy; Luella, teacher in the public schools; Charles Chenowith, also a teacher; Cora Emma, died in infancy; William Brown, Clara and John Joseph at home.  Mrs. Martin is a daughter of Thomas Bell, who came to this country from England when twenty-two years old, and married Susan Montgomery.  Their children, brothers and sisters of Mrs. Martin are:  Andrew S. Bell, a farmer and dairyman of Madison county; Nelson, who died in the Union army; John, a Union soldier who died after the war; and Eva, wife of Caleb B. Lucas of St. Joseph, Mo.  The half sisters of Mrs. Martin are Lucy, widow of Robert Thomas, and Elizabeth, resident of Madison county.
Source: History of Highland County, Ohio by Rev. J. W. Klise - Publ. Madison, Wis., Northwestern Historical Association - 1902 - Page 397
MARTIN LUTHER MATTHEWS

Source: History of Highland County, Ohio by Rev. J. W. Klise - Publ. Madison, Wis., Northwestern Historical Association - 1902 - Page 398

G. J. MAYERHOEFER

Source: History of Highland County, Ohio by Rev. J. W. Klise - Publ. Madison, Wis., Northwestern Historical Association - 1902 - Page 399

D. N. McBRIDE

Source: History of Highland County, Ohio by Rev. J. W. Klise - Publ. Madison, Wis., Northwestern Historical Association - 1902 - Page 380

EDWARD L. McCLAIN

Source: History of Highland County, Ohio by Rev. J. W. Klise - Publ. Madison, Wis., Northwestern Historical Association - 1902 - Page 381

MARTIN McCLURE

Source: History of Highland County, Ohio by Rev. J. W. Klise - Publ. Madison, Wis., Northwestern Historical Association - 1902 - Page 383

WILSON McCLURE

Source: History of Highland County, Ohio by Rev. J. W. Klise - Publ. Madison, Wis., Northwestern Historical Association - 1902 - Page 384

VAN B. McCONNAUGHEY

Source: History of Highland County, Ohio by Rev. J. W. Klise - Publ. Madison, Wis., Northwestern Historical Association - 1902 - Page 385

JOHN A. McCOPPIN

Source: History of Highland County, Ohio by Rev. J. W. Klise - Publ. Madison, Wis., Northwestern Historical Association - 1902 - Page 388

JOHN McCOY, a prosperous farmer of Washington township, is a native of Jackson township, born Nov. 22, 1846, and a grandson of a pioneer of Highland county.  His lineage is associated also in a conspicuous way with the early settlement and commercial and manufacturing development of Ross county.  His grandfather, Thomas McCoy, a native of Maryland, was reared in that state and married there, a union that was blessed with five children - Thomas, Joseph, Eliza, Mary and Mary and Nancy.   With his family Thomas McCoy came to Highland county before the war of 1812, in which he rendered patriotic service as a soldier of the republic and in civil life he was a potent influence for good in the early days.  His son, Joseph, born in Maryland, May 29, 1801, accompanied the family to Highland county, and married Mary Walker, a native of Concord township.  He made his home for forty years in Jackson township, and there reared a family of eleven children (one died in infancy): Martha A., Rebecca, Thomas, Mary E., Martin V. B., Samuel, Joseph, Catherine, John and Nancy.  Joseph McCoy was a man of high character and good business qualifications, became the owner of about six hundred acres of land, and filled several of the township offices; in politics was a staunch Democrat, and in religious life an adherent of the Christian church.  He died at an advanced age, in Concord township, where he passed the later years of his life.  John McCoy was born in Jackson township November 22, 1846, and educated in the district school of that neighborhood, passing his youthful years on the home farm.  He married Lydia, daughter of John and Parmelia Kelley, of Liberty township, went to housekeeping on the home farm.  Afterward he lived on an adjoining farm until the death of his father, when he occupied the old homestead.  His home has been blessed with six children: Birdie, now the wife of J. L. Mercer, of Jackson township; Wilbur, at home; Mattie, wife of Charles Chaney, of Jackson; Hattie J. H., and Stella E., at home.  Mr. McCoy is one of the substantial men of his township, standing high in the estimation of his neighbors.  He follows general farming and stock raising, and has occupied the local office of land appraiser.  In politics he is a Democrat, and his religious affiliation is with the Protestant Methodist church.
Source: History of Highland County, Ohio by Rev. J. W. Klise - Publ. Madison, Wis., Northwestern Historical Association - 1902 - Page 393
WILLIAM A. McKEE, a worthy citizen of New Market township, lately decreased, was well known in his capacity as a blacksmith, which trade he followed in Highland county for many years.  He was born in Miami county, Ohio, Aug. 19, 1833, son of William McKee and his wife Martha who was the eldest daughter of Alexander and Elizabeth Morrow, pioneers of Highland county, who died at Greenfield about 1818, and were both buried in the same grave.  William A. McKee came to Highland county in 1850 and spent all the remainder of his life in this county.  He married Mahala Pence, who was born Sept. 28, 1829, of an old family whose descendants are widely distributed throughout this portion of Ohio.  Her grandparents were Virginians who came to Ohio in the very vanguard of the pioneer army and first located in Adams county, afterward removing about the year 1810 to the county of Highland.  Their son Henry married Catherine, daughter of Isaac and Mary Layman, also Virginia immigrants who moved westward in the beginning of the century.  Henry and Catherine Pence located in that part of old New Market which is now included in Hamer township, where they hewed and grubbed out a farm which eventually became valuable land.  He was a soldier in the war of 1812, a man of great industry and excellent of character and lived to a ripe old age.  His wife, who was born in 1790, was not far from rounding out a century, as her death did not occur until she was ninety-five years old.  They had fourteen children, of whom Sarah, Abigail, Lucinda, Polly, Peter, George, Philip, Ellis, Allen, and Louis have passed away.  Those living are John, Henry, and Mahala, the latter being the youngest.  After their marriage William and Mahala McKee lived a short time in a house near their present residence, to which they removed in about six months and from that on made their home.  They had five children, of whom William H. and Joseph C., second and third in order of birth, have passed away.  Carey F., the first born and Mary J., the fourth, remain at home with their mother, and Martha C. is a resident of Indiana.  William A. McKee died at the age of sixty-nine years, and was buried in the cemetery of Mount Zion church of which during life he had been a consistent member.  Since her husband's death, Mrs. McKee has conducted the business of the estate with the assistance of her son and daughter, and everything has gone along smoothly.  Carey F. McKee, the eldest son and mainstay of his mother, taught school for some time and later was engaged two years in the mercantile business but contemplates trucking for the future.  He is a man of good business qualifications and the habits of industry that make the best assurance of success.  Mrs. McKee and her entire family are members of Mount Zion church.
Source: History of Highland County, Ohio by Rev. J. W. Klise - Publ. Madison, Wis., Northwestern Historical Association - 1902 - Page 389
JOHN McMULLEN

Source: History of Highland County, Ohio by Rev. J. W. Klise - Publ. Madison, Wis., Northwestern Historical Association - 1902 - Page 390

JAMES McNARY

Source: History of Highland County, Ohio by Rev. J. W. Klise - Publ. Madison, Wis., Northwestern Historical Association - 1902 - Page 391

JOHN McNICOL, one of the prosperous farmers in the eastern part of Penn township, is descended from a Scottish family whose first representatives reached central Ohio about the middle of the nineteenth century.  James, son of Robert and Jane (Aitkin) McNicol, was born in Sterlingshire, Scotland, in 1801, and in early manhood married Katharine, daughter of Hugh and Janel (Mitchell) Campbell, who resided on the Isle of Skye.  After his marriage James lived some time in his native country and in 1851 emigrated to Highland county where he spent the remainder of his days and died in 1874.  His children were Robert, John, Jane Margaret, Kate, Ellen and Hugh.  Robert McNicol, eldest of the children, was born in Scotland Oct. 20, 1828, and was consequently about twenty-three years of age when his parents reached Ohio.  Mar. 21, 1858, he was married to Elizabeth L. Leaverton, member of one of the oldest families in Penn township.  Her grandfather, Solomon Leaverton, was a native of Maryland and first came to Highland county in 1806, but spent some years in North Carolina, where he married Lettie Thompson and returned to Ohio in 1817.  John F. Leaverton, third in age of his eleven children, was born in Guilford county, North Carolina, in 1812, and five years later came with his father to Highland county, where he became a leading farmer in Penn township.  He married Sally Ann Wright, by whom he had fourteen children, including Elizabeth L., who became the wife of Robert McNicol.  The latter learned the shoemaker's trade, which he followed until well advanced in years.  He was esteemed in the community where he lived, both as a man and a citizen.  His children, ten in number, were James, John W., Sallie, Kittie, Hugh, Robert, Ella, Lizzie, Vena and Etta.  John W. McNicol, second of the family, was born in Penn township, Highland county, Ohio, Oct. 15, 1860, and has devoted his whole life to agricultural pursuits.  The farm on which he resides is situated in the eastern part of Penn township and he ranks as one of the representative farmers in that section of Highland county.  By industry and good management he has achieved a fair measure of prosperity and is surrounded by all the comforts of a pleasant rural home.  Dec. 29, 1881, he was married to Clara Ella, daughter of I. E. and Mary (McWilliams) Johnson, of Highland county, by whom he has three children:  Ernest, born Oct. 20, 1882; Vena, born Feb. 15, 1886; and Robert, born Sept. 21, 1890.  Mr. McNicol is a member of the order of Knights of Pythias.
Source #1 - History of Highland County, Ohio by Rev. J. W. Klise - Publ. Madison, Wis., Northwestern Historical Association - 1902
JOHN A. MERCER

Source: History of Highland County, Ohio by Rev. J. W. Klise - Publ. Madison, Wis., Northwestern Historical Association - 1902 - Page 399

SAMUEL P. MICHAEL, who commenced life as a blacksmith but has put in most of his time as a farmer, is one of the substantial and respected citizens of Liberty township.  He comes of pioneer stock as his father, Daniel Michael, moved in as early as 1826 and became a resident of Penn township.  Of his large family of twelve children the only survivor is Jackson, who resides at Russell Station.  Another of the sons named Samuel, who was born July 8, 1816, married Acenith, daughter of  Elias and Margaret (Hussey) Carey, and by her had the following children: William, who died in 1861, at the age of twenty-two years; Carey Allen now a resident of Lynchburg, who served over two yeas in the civil war; Joseph, also a Union veteran, who died at Cincinnati on his way home from the army; Mary, wife of DeWitt C. Arment of Xenia; Margaret, wife of Dr. Achor of Oklahoma; Sarah E., wife of M. W. Rankins of Union township; Martha, died in infancy; Samuel P., further sketched below; Silas E.., a farmer in Union township; and Annabel, widow of James WrightSamuel P. Michael, eighth of the children above enumerated, was born in Highland county, Ohio, July 4, 1854, and in early youth put in a good deal of time learning the blacksmith's trade..  The useful calling, however, he abandoned in time to take up farming which was constituted the principal occupation of his life.  At the present time he resides in one of the Evans farms four miles northwest of Hillsboro, which he cultivates industriously and successfully, enjoying the reputation of being not only a good workman but a good citizen in all the name implies.  June 7, 1877, Mr. Michael was married to Martha M., daughter of John and Elizabeth (Runk) Rankins, natives of Scotland who located in Clinton county.  The children resulting from this union are: Minnie, who died in childhood; Dora M., wife of Lee Duncan of Hillsboro; Anna B., wife of Peter Runion of Liberty township; Clarence L., at home; Alva, died in infancy; Jessie, Clara Acenith, Albert Otto and Francis, at home; Elmer Hobart, who died in infancy and his twin brother, Ellis, at home.
Source: History of Highland County, Ohio by Rev. J. W. Klise - Publ. Madison, Wis., Northwestern Historical Association - 1902
MRS. MARY A. MIDDLETON, of Greenfield, widow of the late Rev. John Henry Middleton,  is the only surviving child of John T. Wright, who came from Adams county to Highland county about 1850.  Although he was a tanner by trade, he taught several terms of school in Adams county prior to leaving it, and after coming to Highland county was engaged in teaching,, and for many years was a member of the board of school examiners.  At the time of his death he had charge of the public schools at Lynchburg and enjoyed the reputation of being one of the most successful teachers in the county.  In 1841 he married Sarah T. Roush, of Adams county, by whom he had two children, Maria Louisa (deceased), born Jan. 1st, 1848, and Mary A. Wright.  The latter born in Bentonville, Adams county, Ohio, on Aug. 11, 1842, was brought in infancy to Highland county where she was reared and educated.  in 1865 she became the wife of Rev. John Henry Middleton, a native of New York who came to Ross county, Ohio, in boyhood.  He received his education at Greenfield, after which he taught school for many years, and in 1856 was ordained a minister of the Methodist Episcopal church, and assigned to the Williamsburg circuit.  He engaged enthusiastically in his ministerial work and pressed it with energy until the outbreak of the civil war caused him to exchange the pastoral robes for a musket and other paraphernalia of conflict.  In 1861 two companies were recruited in Highland county for the Eighty-first regiment Ohio volunteer infantry, and Mr. Middleton enrolled his named with one of these, which afterward became Company C.  The command was sent South in the fall following its organization and for some time was kept almost constantly on scouting duty.  During its campaigning after Forrest, Mr. Middleton was badly crippled so that from that time until the end of his days he was compelled to use a church.  At the expiration of his term of enlistment he was discharged from the military service and resumed his ministerial work, which he continued until 1895, when he retired from the ministry and took up his residence at Greenfield, where his death occurred suddenly in 1900.  His widow, Mrs. Mary A. Middleton, still resides in Greenfield, where she is highly esteemed by a wide circle of acquaintances for her many excellent traits of character.
Source: History of Highland County, Ohio by Rev. J. W. Klise - Publ. Madison, Wis., Northwestern Historical Association - 1902

LYCURGUS B. MILBURN, in business at Greenfield, has long been known in Highland county in connection with dairying, sheep-breeding and general farming. The family has been identified with Highland county since 1832, which was the year that David Milburn, father of Lycurgus, came from Pennsylvania and settled in Jackson township. He was only twenty years old when he arrived but went to work immediately and in time became one of the popular men of the township, in which he served as justice of the peace for many years. His wife was Sarah A., daughter of Joseph Hurst, who was one of the advance guard in felling the timber and cutting the roads for the then infant settlement of Jackson township. David and Sarah Milburn became the parents of four children, of whom Therza May is deceased, and Hannah E., who married A. J. Fittro, and Delilah A., wife of William M. Gall, are both residents of Highland county. Lycurgus B. Milburn, third of the children, was born in Jackson Township, Highland county, Ohio, grew up on the farm, and at an early age determined to follow the occupation of teaching. In order to qualify himself for the higher work in this profession, he sought the first opportunity to become a pupil of the National Normal university at Lebanon, Ohio. He remained two terms at this institution for teaching teachers how to teach and when he was through lost no time in testing his efficiency as a practical educator.
     For twelve consecutive years after leaving Lebanon, Mr. Milburn was engaged in imparting knowledge to the rising generation in Highland and Fayette counties. His long continuance in the business would indicate both his success and popularity as a manager of schools, and as a matter of fact he gained the reputation of being one of the most progressive and skillful of the teachers in his territory. Eventually, he laid aside this work and embarked in the dairy business at Hillsboro, which he prosecuted with varying success for three years, when he branched out into general farming and stock raising. In the latter department he gave preference to sheep, making a specialty of the Shropshiredowns, and in course of time had a fine flock of this popular strain. In November, 1882, he was married to Louesa B., daughter of Daniel Koch, a Highland county citizen of German birth. Their four children are Carrie May, Julius Neil, Eloise and Stella B. In 1897 Mr. Milburn decided to remove to Greenfield, in order to obtain better educational facilities for his children, and after locating there held the position of agent for the Standard Oil company four years, but at present is looking after his farming interests. He has been candidate for the city council on the Democratic ticket and is a member of the Woodmen of the World.
Source:  History of Highland County, Ohio by Rev. J. W. Klise - Publ. Madison, Wis., Northwestern Historical Association - 1902 - pp. 402-403

Contributed by: Jay
A. L. MILLER, an enterprising citizen of Washington township, is a representative of the fourth generation of a family that has long been identified with Highland county, and have contributed materially to the present condition of the region.  Their work has not been confined to industry, but they have taken an active part in efforts for the general good.  Miller's chapel, in Concord township, and the church that meets there, is largely a monument of their public spirit and religious devotion.  Thomas Miller, grandfather of A. L., a young man of German and Scotch-Irish descent, came to Highland county from his native state, about 1830, with his parents, who had bought a thousand acres of land on Brush creek in Concord township.  He had been married in Pennsylvania to Mary Stewart, and they reared a large family of children: Daniel and Henry, deceased; Jonathan, living in Missouri; James E., deceased; Noah B., of Washington township; William, deceased; Nancy, of Concord township; and Sally, Mary, Alvira and Rebecca, deceased.  Thomas Miller was a blacksmith by trade, was engaged in that work all his life in addition to farming, and died at an advanced age from an accident which occurred in the course of his labors at the forge.  He is remembered as a devoutly religious man and one of the main supports of the early Methodist church.  Noah B. Miller, father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Concord township in 1835, and in early manhood married Mary Jane Fisher, a native of Virginia.  They began housekeeping near Fairfax, after two years moved to Washington township, and lived there sixteen years, and later, after two years' residence in Concord township, made their home in Washington.  Three children were born to them:  Armanus, A. L. and Sarah A.  Noah B. Miller is widely known as a thresher, a business he has been engaged in for fifty years; is a valued member of the Methodist church, and in politics a Democrat, according to his family faith.  A. L. Miller was born Aug. 1, 1859, on the farm now owned by Charles Rolf, in Jackson township, was educated in the district school, and married Rosa Beatty, a native of Marshall township, and daughter of John and Mary Beatty.  They began housekeeping on the farm in Washington township now owned by Andrew Matthews, but three years later moved to his present home, where he owns a hundred acres of land.  Mr. Miller is also the owner of a saw mill in Concord township, operates a threshing machine, and altogether is an industrious and active man.  He is a member of the Threshers' association and is generally found taking a worthy part in public affairs.
Source: History of Highland County, Ohio by Rev. J. W. Klise - Publ. Madison, Wis., Northwestern Historical Association - 1902 - Page 403
GEORGE W. MILLER, of Marshall township, formerly a member of the board of county commissioners of Highland county, comes of a well known and numerous family of pioneers.  His father, Jesse Miller, was born in Culpepper county, Va., in 1799, and was twice married; to the first union was born Thomas, John P. and Catharine; his second wife was Amanda Davis, and to this union were born six children: William H.; Sarah A., wife of George Bumgardner; Joseph, George W., the subject of this sketch; Jesse, deceased, and Martha J., wife of Samuel Roads.  Jesse Miller, the father, died Sept. 15, 1875, and his wife, Amanda, in January, 1890.  They arrived overland in wagons from Loudoun county, Va., about 1830 and located in Marshall township, where they continued to reside until their respective deaths.  George W. Miller was born in Marshall township, Highland county, Ohio, Oct. 1, 1850, was reared on the farm with a common school education, and on reaching manhood continued in the occupation of farming, which he has demonstrated an intelligent and progressive spirit.  He has been active in public affairs for many years, as a Republican, and in 1885 he was elected a member of the board of county commissioners, an office he held for seven years.  In this capacity he faithfully served the people and the best interests of the county.  In early manhood he was married to Cora E., daughter of A. W. Spargur, and they had six children: Leslie, Vernon, Ida (wife of Burch Watts), Burch, Stanley and Nina.  His second marriage was to Cindora,  daughter of William and Margaret (Roads) Elliott and they have one child, Clarence, born in April, 1890.
Source: History of Highland County, Ohio by Rev. J. W. Klise - Publ. Madison, Wis., Northwestern Historical Association - 1902 - Page 404
JOSEPH MILLER, the present recorder of Highland county, was for many years a popular business man of Hillsboro.  His father, Joseph Miller, was born in Alsace, Germany, about 1826, learned the trade of an iron-moulder, emigrated to Cincinnati in 1840 and some ten years later was married to Catharine, daughter of Jacob Neib.  The latter was born in Germany in 1800, and about forty years later came with his family to Ohio and located in Monroe county.  Joseph Miller died in 1874 and Jacob Neib passed away in 1884.  Joseph and Catharine (Neib) Miller had seven children, four of whom died in infancy, the others being the subject of this sketch; Elizabeth, wife of Frank Noble, a resident of California, and Andrew, oldest of the living children, was born at Cincinnati, Ohio, June 15, 1860, and was educated in the fine schools of his native city.  Several years before reaching his majority he started out to make his living in the world and selected as a favorable point the enterprising capital of Highland county.  Mr. Miller arrived in Hillsboro in 1878, secured employment in a barber shop and has followed that business continuously over twenty years.  Meantime he became widely acquainted with people all over the county, and by gentlemanly manners and accommodating spirit secured the friendship of all those with whom he came in contact.  He took a hand in politics, also, and as a worker for his party acquired influence and local leadership.  This culminated in 1900 in his securing the nomination of his party as candidate for recorder of Highland county, to which position he was chosen for a three years' term at the ensuing election.  Dec. 4, 1897, Mr. Miller was married to Melissa, daughter of Nelson and Albertine (Washburne) Barrere, who comes from a noted pioneer family of the county, of whom mention is made in other parts of this volume.  Nelson is the son of Morgan and Melinda (Colvin) Barrere and his wife was a daughter of Dr. Joseph Washburne, who settled in New Market about the middle of the last century.
Source: History of Highland County, Ohio by Rev. J. W. Klise - Publ. Madison, Wis., Northwestern Historical Association - 1902 - Page 404
THOMAS H. MILLER, of Concord township, one of the most prominent farmers of the county, is in the fourth generation of one of the notable early families of Highland county.  The founder of his family in the United States is Philip Miller, a native of Bavaria, Germany, who came to Maryland just before the war of the Revolution, through which he served as a patriot, battling for the rights of his adopted country.  As the close of the struggle he was rewarded with a patent for one hundred and sixty acres of land, which he located in Pennsylvania near Hagerstown, Maryland, the site in later years of one of the first oil wells opened in Pennsylvania.  With his wife and seven daughters and three sons  he came to Ohio in 1814 and settled in Liberty township, where he was engaged in farming to a very advanced age, dying in 1825.  His son, John, born near Hagerstown, Md., married Nellie Chaney in Pennsylvania in 1802, and accompanied his aged parents to Ohio, taking the leading part in the work of subduing the wilderness and making a new home.  He lived in Liberty township to the age of eighty-five years, was quite successful in the building up of his property and prominent in social and business and religious life.  He reared a family of twelve children, all now deceased:  Adam, James, Jacob, John C., Wilson, Christine, Mary, Jane, Ellen, Amy, Betsey and CatharineJohn C., the father of the subject of this sketch, was born near Rocky Fork, in Liberty township, Apr. 9, 1818, and in early manhood married Elizabeth, daughter of George Frederick and Mary Brous, natives of Virginia, who came to Highland county about 1814.  They began their married life in the loft of a milk house on the old Miller farm, and several years later came to Concord township and bought a farm of one hundred acres.  In his youth and early manhood John C. Miller was engaged in the commerce of his day, hauling goods from Cincinnati to Chillicothe, Ripley and Hillsboro.  After his marriage he prospered as a farmer, came to own 560 acres of land, and for many years was honored with the office of township trustee.  He died at the age of sixty-three years.  Thomas H. Miller was the oldest of their three children, the others being Amy D. and Mary E.  Thomas H. was born Nov. 5, 1848, while has parents lived on the old homestead on Rocky fork, and was educated in the district schools.  ON reaching manhood he married Minerva, daughter of Harvey and Eva (Surber) Badgley, and they began housekeeping on the place they now occupy.  But since then they have made great improvements.  The land owned by Mr. Miller now amounts to 1,150 acres, his residence is up to date and very commodious, and his farm buildings are the equal of any in the county in their adaptation to his industry and the modern style of agriculture.  His land is nearly all under profitable cultivation, and he ranks among the substantial men of the county.  Of his three children, Alberta is the wife of Henry Sauner, of White Oak township; Stella is the wife of Henry Sauner of the same township, and Otis, who was married Ora Seip, lives on the homestead.  Mrs. Miller is the granddaughter of Captain Andrew Badgley, a revolutionary soldier, who was famous in the pioneer history of White Oak township.
Source: History of Highland County, Ohio by Rev. J. W. Klise - Publ. Madison, Wis., Northwestern Historical Association - 1902 - Page 405
CHARLES M. MILLS

Source: History of Highland County, Ohio by Rev. J. W. Klise - Publ. Madison, Wis., Northwestern Historical Association - 1902 - Page 406

WESLEY MILNER

Source: History of Highland County, Ohio by Rev. J. W. Klise - Publ. Madison, Wis., Northwestern Historical Association - 1902 - Page 407

CHRISTOPHER C. MOBERLY, of Clay township, a well-known farmer and veteran of the civil war, is a great-grandson of Rezin Moberly, a worthy pioneer of Highland county whose life is described in the foregoing sketch.  His father was Frederick, eldest son of John Moberly (of whom mention has also been made), and he was the eldest son of Rezin Moberly Frederick Moberly was born in Liberty township in 1812, was educated in the subscription schools of his day, and in 1834 was married to Lydia Husey, also a native of Liberty township, and daughter of Christopher Husey.  Following this event he built a hewed log house on 120 acres of forest land in Clay township, and there he and his wife began their toilsome work of redeeming the land from the wildness of nature, and rearing for lives of usefulness the eight children that were given them in the course of their early married life.  The father lived to the age of sixty-three years, the mother of fifty-seven.  Three of their children, Mary, Jane and Emma, the youngest, are dead, but besides the subject of this sketch, John F. resides in the state of Washington; James in Clay township; Charles A. in Buford, and Cyrus F. on the old homestead.  Christopher C. Moberly was born on the homestead Nov. 17, 1836, and received his education in the common schools.  When the war with the South broke out he promptly offered his services in behalf of his country, and was mustered in at Hillsboro, in October, 1861, as a private soldier in Company B of the Sixtieth regiment Ohio infantry.  After sometime in camp at Camp Mitchell and on guard duty at Gallipolis, Mr. Moberly and his comrades moved into West Virginia, and engaged in the campaign in the Kanawha and Shenandoah valleys, participating in the active campaign of the spring of 1862 against the famous Stonewall Jackson.  Among the engagements in which he took part were those of Cotton Town, Mt. Jackson and Cross Keys.  Later in the year, during the Maryland campaign, he and his regiment were stationed at Harper's Ferry, and were there surrendered to General Jackson, Sept. 15th.  Being at once paroled they went to Annapolis, Md., and from there sent to Chicago, where they were finally mustered out.  This closed his experience in war, and he returned to his home and resumed farming.  On Jan. 12, 1853, he was married to Louisa J. Wood, a native of Danville, Highland county, and they began housekeeping in Brown county.  Two years later they bought the fifty acres in Clay township where Mr. Moberly now lives, to which he has since added enough to make 105 acres.  In 1892 they moved to Hillsboro, and two years later to Buford, where Mrs. Moberly died Nov. 3, 1893.  Since then he has occupied his farm home, continuing to give his attention to general agriculture and the raising of Shorthorn cattle and other fancy stock.  He has been honored with several township offices, is a member of the Buford camp of the Grand Army of the Republic, and of the Methodist church, and in politics is a Republican.  Three children are living: Oliver N., of Cincinnati; Herber L., at home, and Clyde, residing at New Orleans, La.
Source: History of Highland County, Ohio by Rev. J. W. Klise - Publ. Madison, Wis., Northwestern Historical Association - 1902 - Page 410
JOHN D. MOBERLY, a well known farmer and stock man of Clay township, is a great-grandson of Rezin Moberly, a native of Virginia who was conspicuous among the pioneer settlers of Highland county.  The facts of the career of this ancestor and of his son, John Moberly, through whom J. D. Moberly is descended, is given in a sketch foregoing.  They were pioneers worthy of remembrance, and their descendants are among the best people of this region.  The second son of John Moberly, as has been noted, was William, born Oct. 24, 1815, at the farm home in Liberty township.  William Moberly removed  to Clay township in early manhood, and married Nancy Tygart, as also a native of Highland county, of an old family.  Making his home in a log cabin on 121 acres of wild land that he bought, he began the work of clearing away the forest, as a forerunner of the present magnificent agricultural development of the county.  His first wife died after giving birth to one child, Louisa J., who is now the wife of H. G. Fite, of Brown county, and subsequently Mr. Moberly was married to Harriet Foreman, daughter of John and Nellie Foreman.  She was also a native of the county.  William Moberly continued his work as a farmer, living upon the same place, but enlarged his holdings until he was the owner of over four hundred acres, and as time passed replaced his early home with modern buildings.  He was a very prosperous man, was active in politics as a Democrat, contributed generously to religious enterprises, and was known all over the county as a man deserving of esteem and confidence.  He passed away at eighty-one years of age, but his widow is yet living at Mount Orab.  They had four children, J. D., W. H.., Sarah E., wife of N. Irons, of Brown county, and Luella, wife of T. J. Sprinkle, of Brown county.  J. D. Moberly was born on the farm adjoining his present home in Clay township, Jan. 9, 1845, was reared at home and educated in the district school until eighteen years of age, and then, it being the period of the civil war, he went to Cincinnati and obtained employment in the government service as a teamster.  He was regularly enlisted, and after two months at Cincinnati, went to the front with the company of Captain Douglas, and took part in the battle of Lavergne, Tenn.  then, his time  of enlistment having expired, he was honorably discharged and came home, but soon afterward re-enlisted in Company G of the Hundred and Ninety-second Ohio volunteer infantry, which was mustered in at Columbus.  With this regiment he went to Virginia, and was on duty during the closing months of the war, finally being mustered out with his comrades at Winchester, Va., Sept. 1, 1865.  He returned at once to his farm home upon the conclusion of this honorable service for the country, and resumed his former occupation, and presently was happily married to Rachel E. Brown, a native of Clinton county, Ohio.  Ever since they have made their home at the present residence, prospering in their undertakings and adding improvements and comforts as the years rolled by.  Their home has been blessed with three children, two of whom - Elva and Frank - have died.  Anna, their third, is the wife of T. S. Evans, of Dayton, Ohio.  they have also reared their granddaughter, Goldie M. Puckett.  Mr. Moberly has given much attention to the breeding of Oxforddown sheep, and Duroc and Jersey swine, in addition to farming, and has been extensive dealer in live stock.  He is a member of the camp of the Grand Army of the Republic at Buford, and of the Christian church, and is a Republican in politics.
Source: History of Highland County, Ohio by Rev. J. W. Klise - Publ. Madison, Wis., Northwestern Historical Association - 1902 - Page 411
REZIN MOBERLY, a native of Pennsylvania, was one of the pioneers of Liberty township, and progenitor of a family which has had an honorable part in the development of Highland county.  While yet a resident of the Keystone state, he married a Miss Fenner, and with his wife and children, early in the last century, he came to Ohio and settled in the forests of Liberty township, assisting in laying out the town of Hillsboro, as the county seat, in 1806 or 1807, and serving as one of the first township trustees.  He followed the occupation of farming, and was a man of enterprise in his field.  It is worthy of note that the first threshing machine brought into Highland county was set up on his farm.  After many years of peaceful and happy life, this worthy pioneer and his wife passed away, and were laid to rest where they began their labors as clearers of the forest.  Their children, John, Stephen, James, William and Amos, and Delilah, are also all deceased.  John Moberly, the eldest, was a boy of some years when the family came to Ohio, and he aided in building the first house raised at Hillsboro.  For many years he was actively identified with the promotion of the interests of the city with which he was thus early associated.  Marrying Elizabeth Fenner, a native of Pennsylvania, in early manhood, he made his home on a farm on the Wilmington road near Hillsboro, where he lived until the death of his wife, passing the remainder of his days with his son, Rezin W.  Of his ten children, Frederick, William, John, Rezin W., Caleb, Sarah, Rachel, Maria, Delilah and Mary A., all are dead but Rezin W. and Mary A., the last named being the widow of George Brown, of Mount Oreb.  Rezin W. Moberly was born at the Liberty township home Dec. 27, 1821, was educated in the district schools, and after spending some of the early years of manhood at home, in 1847 bought a place of 15 acres in Clay township, for about $2.60 an acre, of William Scott.  He was buried in clearing and working this farm, living in a small log house, for two years, and then he bought the farm of 130 acres where he now lives.  Following this purchase he married Elizabeth J. Roberts, daughter of Abraham and Elizabeth Roberts, an estimable lady who was also a native of Highland county, who died in 1898 and is buried in Buford.  Eight children have been born to them:  John A., a resident of Brown county; George, at the old home; William, of Clay township; Clinton and Mary J., deceased; Rachel, wife of George Mink; Ellen B., wife of Lee Barley, of Clay township, and Lulu, wife of George Weaver, of Buford.  Rezin W. Moberly has long been considered one of the leading citizens of Clay township, enterprising, intelligent and trustworthy.  He has held many of the official positions of the township, some of them a great many years; for a considerable number of years he actively conducted a general store near his home, and he has been active in the work of the grange, holding the office of treasurer for a long time.  He has been an extensive land owner, and at one time had seven hundred acres, part of which he has divided among his children.  In farming and stock raising he has been successful, giving considerable attention to Shorthorn cattle and Poland China hogs.
Source: History of Highland County, Ohio by Rev. J. W. Klise - Publ. Madison, Wis., Northwestern Historical Association - 1902 - Page 408
WILLIAM S. MOORE, proprietor of the Hotel Kramer, at Hillsboro, is one of the popular landlords of Highland county and during an experience of some years has shown that he is master of the problem of public entertainment.  He is a native of the good old county of Pike, and a son of Sailesbuy and Mary S. (Eager) Moore, well known citizens of that part of Ohio.  In 1894, Mr. Moore engaged in the business of drilling water-wells and followed that occupation about six years.  Having an inclination for catering to the "inner wants' of man, he determined to turn this talent to good account by entering into the hotel business regularly.  With this end in view he secured control of the Central House at Leesburg and in 1900 took charge as proprietor of that hostelry.  About two years later, desiring a larger field, Mr. Moore came to Hillsboro and in February, 1902, opened the Hotel Kramer.  Under his good management this house came to the front of once as a place where good entertainment could be obtained at reasonable rates, and has steadily gained in its hold on the traveling public.  Owing to its favorable location on West Main street, near the business center of Hillsboro, the Hotel Kramer seems destined to become one of the most popular of the city's resorts.
Source: History of Highland County, Ohio by Rev. J. W. Klise - Publ. Madison, Wis., Northwestern Historical Association - 1902
THE MORROW FAMILY: - John Morrow was an old revolutionary soldier, who took part in the battle of Trenton, a few years later sought a home in the wilderness of Kentucky and afterward moved to the White Water valley of Indiana, where he died in 1826.  His son Alexander, who was born May 2, 1783, subsequently made his way to Ohio and in 1812 found a location near Greenfield in the county of Highland.  The war fever was strong at that time in central Ohio and soon after his arrival Alexander Morrow went to the front to do his part toward fighting the British.  In December, 1815, after his return from the army, he was married to Polly Coffey, a typical pioneer woman and daughter of one of the notable characters of that day.  Her father, John Coffey, who came from Pennsylvania in 1800, was the keeper of the first tavern opened at Greenfield, then a very small settlement of crude log cabins.  This primitive but genuine "Coffey House" was built of hewed logs, was two stories in height, and twenty-two by thirty feet on the ground.  Though not as showy as the modern French "coffee-house" of our large capitals, the tavern at Greenfield was a veritable oasis in the desert at the time of its inception and furnished appetizing means for many a hungry traveler before advancing civilization brought better accommodations.  Besides filling the important role of "mine host," John Coffey was also the first justice of the peace elected in Madison township, and between feeding the public and enforcing the law was a man of weight in the infant community.  Polly Coffey, his daughter, was born Feb. 1, 1796, lived over sixty-one years after her wedding, and passed away from the scenes of earth Apr. 3, 1877.  By her marriage with Alexander Morrow there were five children who reached maturity:  Ruth E., wife of Hugh Beatty; Margaret, wife of Robert McCalpin; John and James P., the latter still residing in Greenfield, and William Alexander.  The latter was born May 13, 1826, and after residing four years in Chillicothe, came to Hillsboro in 1860, embarked in the business of photography and followed that occupation for many years.  Jan. 8, 1852, he was married to Harriet L., daughter of Abner Taylor, member of one of the well known pioneer families.  William Alexander and Harriet  (Taylor) Morrow became the parents of the following named children: Otway C., of Hillsboro; John Franklin, who died in Texas at the age of thirty; Minnie R., wife of D. T. Larrimore, a druggist of New York City; William A., queensware merchant of Hillsboro; Jennie T., wife of William S. Conrad, with the McKeehan & Hiestand company; Lizzie B., a dressmaker in Covington, Ky.; George D., doing contract work for a new York firm; Bertie, died in infancy; Lucie, a milliner in Cincinnati; and Sadie, wife of Fred McClure, billing clerk for C. S. Bell & Co.  Otway C. Morrow eldest born of the above, after finishing his education in the city schools, was engaged for several years as a clerk in the mercantile business at Hillsboro.  In 1880 he became manager for a queensware house in Cincinnati, but returned to Hillsboro in 1887 to accept a partnership with the McKeehan & Hiestand company, of which he is at present secretary and treasurer.  June 19, 1884, he was united in wedlock with Anna J. Leyden, a lady of the best social connections in Cincinnati.  Her parents were members of prominent families in Ireland and emigrated to America in the early part of the nineteenth century.  Mr. and Mrs. Morrow's only child, Curry Leyden, was born Nov. 21, 1897.
Source: History of Highland County, Ohio by Rev. J. W. Klise - Publ. Madison, Wis., Northwestern Historical Association - 1902 ~ Page 412
CHARLES C. MUHLBACH

Source: History of Highland County, Ohio by Rev. J. W. Klise - Publ. Madison, Wis., Northwestern Historical Association - 1902 - Page 415

THOMAS MULLENIX, notable among the settlers soon after the war of 1812 in the vicinity of Hillsboro, was born in Jefferson county, Va., in 1791, one of six children of William Mullinex, a native of England, who married there and came to America with his wife soon after the war of the Rebellion.  The six children were Nathan, Thomas, Harry, Jack, and two daughters.  The mother died in Virginia, and the father in later years joined his son Thomas in Highland county and died here.  Thomas was married in Virginia to Ellen Pulse, a native of the same state, and they began their married life in Virginia, but in 1817 came west and established a pioneer home on one hundred acres of wild land that he bought in Liberty township, about two miles from Hillsboro.  There, Thomas Mullenix reared a family of eleven children, and lived to the age of seventy-five years, his wife surviving to past ninety.  Their children were David, deceased; Mary, widow of D. Dunn, of Taylorsville; Lewis deceased; William H., of Washington township; Thomas, of Belfast, Ohio; John, of Iowa; Rebecca, wife of Hugh Shepard, of Hillsboro; Henry of Liberty township; Martha, widow of George Spicard, of Illinois; Sarah E., and Jacob, deceased.  William H., for many years a worthy citizen of Highland county, was born in Liberty township, Apr. 24, 1818, and in early manhood married Ellen Higgins, daughter of Charles and Elizabeth Higgins.  They made their home on the original Mullenix farm for twenty years, then spent a year in Iowa, and after that in Liberty township until 8146, when the wife died, after which he made his home in Washington township.  For sixty-four years he has been a member of the Methodist church.  The children born to these parents were Margaret and Samantha, deceased; H. E., of Washington township; Clara, living in Kansas; Paulina, deceased; Jacob, of Clinton county; and Mary E. and Thomas, deceased.  H. E. Mullenix was born in Liberty township, Nov. 13, 1847, received his education in the district school and married Sina Carlisle, a native of Washington township, daughter of John and Mima Carlisle.   They began their married life in Clinton county, Ohio, afterward lived for twelve years in Missouri, and then returned to Washington township, where he bought a farm and now owns 122 acres.  He is a man of influence in the community, has served as a member of the school board, and is the present trustee of the township; is a Republican in politics, and a member of the Methodist church.  His children living are, Harley, Harry, Alpha, and Jesse.  One, Marie, is deceased.
Source: History of Highland County, Ohio by Rev. J. W. Klise - Publ. Madison, Wis., Northwestern Historical Association - 1902 ~ Page 414
CHARLES C. MUHLBACH

Source: History of Highland County, Ohio by Rev. J. W. Klise - Publ. Madison, Wis., Northwestern Historical Association - 1902 ~ Page 415

WILSON H. MULLENIX, an enterprising and popular citizen of Washington township,, was born Jan. 1, 1861, son of THOMAS A. MULLENIX.  W. H. Mullenix was reared at home and educated in the district school and Hillsboro high school, and when eighteen years of age he engaged in teaching in the public schools.  Later he was married to Sarah E. Woods, a native of Washington township, and daughter of John and Mary E. Woods, and they began housekeeping in Washington township, on the farm now owned by Dennis Collins.  Five years later they removed to Folsom, where Mr. Mullenix embarked in business as a general merchant.  He still conducts this store, which is one of this most popular in the region, is postmaster, and continues to teach school, an occupation which he has followed with much success for seventeen years.  He is also the owner of a farm of thirty acres, and devotes considerable attention to the raising of live stock of all kinds.  he is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and of the Knights of Pythias lodge at Belfast.  His family includes three children; Sigel W., Everett P., and James H.
Source: History of Highland County, Ohio by Rev. J. W. Klise - Publ. Madison, Wis., Northwestern Historical Association - 1902
THE MURPHY FAMILY, so long and favorably known in Highland county by the prominent connection of its members with public and business affairs, is of Irish origin and honorable lineage.  Hugh Murphy was born in County Down, Ireland, March 5, 1756, and when about twenty-six years old, at the port of Newry went on board a vessel called "The Three Brothers," bound for America.  After the usual long and tedious voyage of sailing ships in those days, he landed at Philadelphia in January, 1783, and a few days later had the privilege of witnessing a great historic event - General Washington reviewing his troops fresh from the achievement of American independence.  The young Irishman made his way to Virginia, where in 1790 he married Mary Beatty.  Ten years later he removed to Fayette county, Penn.  From that region he migrated in the late fall of 1816 to Ohio, where he went into business, reared his children and passed away June 5, 1842.  Hugh Murphy had a son named John, who was born in Loudoun county, Va., Nov. 17, 1793, and was consequently about twenty-three years old, when his parents came to the western country.  About 1820, John Murphy settled a short distance east of Russell Station in Highland county, on the farm subsequently owned by the Rev. Mr. Armstead.  He married Nancy, daughter of John White, who was born in 1806 at the residence of her parents near New Petersburg, and lived until the completion of her eighty-seventh year, long surviving her husband, who passed away Jan. 10, 1845.  The list of their children, taken from the family records, is here given:  Susannah, born Dec. 14, 1828, married George W. Pitzer in May, 1847, and died in 1862; Hugh, born Mar. 7, 1830, died Apr. 15, 1901; Andrew Beatty, born Oct. 14, 1831, died Apr. 2, 1900; Daniel, born Jan. 1, 1833; Martha J., born June 22, 1834, was married in 1856 to George C. Pitzer, dean of the St. Louis Medical college, and died in 1891; Francis Marion, born February 24, 1836; Samuel Lewis, born Mar. 22, 1840, died in infancy; Mary J., born Oct. 5, 1841, was married June 11, 1868, to John G. Bayless, present postmaster of Lynchburg; John W., born July 7, 1844, is a practicing physician at Cuba, Clinton county, Ohio.  Daniel Murphy is one of the most prominent and popular of the citizens of Lynchburg.  He began surveying in early manhood and has followed that useful calling for more than forty years.  He was elected auditor of Highland county in 1868 and filled that office two terms of two years each, ending in 1873.  He has enjoyed practically all the honors that his town had to confer, being elected to the offices of clerk, councilman and mayor, and also clerk of the township.  All his elections, too, were obtained in a town and township where the natural political majority was averse to the party to which Mr. Murphy belonged.  He served as a soldier during the civil war with the Eighty-eighth Ohio regiment, and later was given a commission as lieutenant in the Twenty-seventh U. S. C. T. regiment.  He has long been conspicuous in Masonic circles, having passed through the various degrees of that ancient and popular order up to that of Knight Templar.  Dec. 29, 1859, he was married to Mary Isabelle, daughter of Daniel and granddaughter of John Cashatt, an early settler of Union township from North Carolina.  Hugh, second child of John and Nancy (White) Murphy, was married Dec. 23, 1858, to Mary Glenn Gibson.  Her father was John, son of Joshua and Lydia Gibson, and born in 1777, near Connellsville, Pennsylvania, whence he migrated to Cincinnati in 1809, and died there in 1849.  John Gibson's first wife was Elizabeth Sayre, who bore him six sons and two daughters, and after her death he married Catherine Sutton, of Pennsylvania, the eldest of whose two daughters is the widow of Hugh Murphy.  The children of Hugh and Mary (Gibson) Murphy are Horace G., born Jan. 4, 1861; Harry, born Feb. 28, 1868; Daniel Elias, born Nov. 29, 1869; Raymond Pierce, born Jan. 13, 1871; and Jessie May, born Apr. 13, 1873, and now the wife of Albert Feike, who is a partner in the mill with the Murphy BrothersHorace G. Murphy, eldest of the above enumerated children, was married Feb. 15, 1890, to Maggie M. Dumenil who died Aug. 25, 1891, and on Mar. 10, 1895, he married Mary M. Roser.  Raymond Pierce Murphy was married to Nellie Britton Dec. 24, 1896.  Hugh Murphy, during his life was a very enterprising and industrious citizen and his activities found vent in various kinds of occupations.  He taught school several years, assisted his brother, Daniel, in the auditor's office during the latter's two terms, and in 1892 purchased the mill now conducted by his three sons.  He was the leading spirit in organizing the Farmers' Exchange bank, and at the time of his death was president of that institution, as well as deputy collector of internal revenue.  In short, he was one of hte progressive men of Lynchburg and left to his family the heritage of an honored name.
Source: History of Highland County, Ohio by Rev. J. W. Klise - Publ. Madison, Wis., Northwestern Historical Association - 1902 ~ Page 416
JAMES M. MURRAY, of Greenfield, is carrying on a business which was established by his father more than fifty years ago.  James M. Murray, Sr., though a native of Ross county, left there in early manhood and spent the remainder of his life in Highland county.  He became one of the leading citizens of Greenfield, where he was a member of the city council for many years and actively identified with the industrial life of the city.  He opened an undertaking establishment of which he had charge for fifty-two years, and which is at present the oldest supply house of the kind in the three counties of Ross, Highland, and Fayette.  He died at his home in Greenfield in March, 1901.  His wife, Economy Himiler, was a native Ross county, her family being residents of the Bainbridge neighborhood.  The two living children of this union consist of a son and a daughter, the latter being the wife of A. S. Boden, proprietor of the Boden mills.  James M. Murray, the only son, was born and reared in Greenfield, and trained from early childhood to work in his father's establishment.  when only eleven years old he was taken into the shop and as he grew older was inducted into all the details of the business, with a view to qualifying him for its management.  After his father's death he succeeded to the business and has since carried it on along the lines followed by the former during his more than a half century's control.  Being the oldest supply house of the kind in that part of the "State, Mr. Murray's business is not confined to Greenfield but extends into the three adjoining counties.  In 1893 he was married to Gussie, daughter of W. W. Ballard, of Highland county.  His fraternal connections are with the Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias and the Masonic order.
Source: History of Highland County, Ohio by Rev. J. W. Klise - Publ. Madison, Wis., Northwestern Historical Association - 1902 ~ Page 418

 


 
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