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Jackson County, Ohio
History & Genealogy


BIOGRAPHIES

Source:
History of Lower Scioto Co., Ohio
Publ. Chicago: Inter-state Publishing Co.
1884

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
C. M. MARTIN was born in what is now Lick Township, Jackson Co., Ohio, Sept. 14, 1806, a son of John and Margaret (Shoup) Martin, and a grandson of James Martin.  The latter was a native of Ireland and came to America in early manhood, locating in Pennsylvania, where he married.  Subsequently he removed to Maryland where his son John was born, reared and married.  Early in the present century the family removed to Sandusky, Ohio, and in 1804 to the Scioto Salt Reserve, where Jackson now stands, where James Martin died in 1816.  From the date of coming to the county in 1804 till 1818 John Martin worked at the salt furnaces of Ross & Nelson and John Johnson.  He afterward bought considerable land and cleared it of forest trees, converting it into the now broad and open fields of Franklin Township.  He was a member of the Methodist church.  He died at the age of eighty-six years and his wife at the age of eighty.  They had a family of five children all now living - Courtney M., John M., Elizabeth, Nancy and Eliza.  The sum of their ages is 340 years, and all but Elizabeth live in Jackson County.  C. M., the subject of this sketch, is the eldest.  He spent his boyhood days with his father on the farm, remaining with him till twenty-one years of age.  He then worked as a farm hand for $7 and $8 a month, and by economy, in 1831 owned a good farm of eighty acres.  That same year he married Nancy Stephenson, a native of Virginia, born Aug. 22, 1806, and settled on his farm.  In 1835 he moved to Jackson and opened a small grocery, and for many years has been one of the leading merchants of Jackson.  He has met with many reverses and adversities, otherwise his ability as a financier would number him with the wealthiest men of the county.  In 1874 he had five buildings destroyed by fire, but in 1875, nothing daunted, he erected one of the finest buildings in Jackson, on the corner of Main and Broadway; the store fronting on Main street is 73 x 20, and the one on Broadway 88 x 20.  Mr. Martin has always been a public-spirited man and in 1854 took an active part in the building of what is now the M. & C. Railroad.  In 1880 his sons became associated with him in business, and the same year he retired from active business pursuits.  Mr. and Mrs. Martin have had nine children, but six now living.  They are members of the Methodist church.
Source: History of Lower Scioto Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Inter-state Publishing Co. 1884 - Page 566
MAJOR T. S. MATTHEWS was born in Vinton, Gallia Co., Ohio, in 1834, a son of Moses and Mary (Smith) Matthews.  His ancestors were originally of French descent, but later were residents of Wales.  His grandfather, Phineas Matthews, was born in Boston, Mass, and, with Rufus Putnam, was one of the first settlers of Marietta, Ohio.  He died in Gallia County.  His father was born and died in Gallia County.  He was for eight years Associate Judge of that county.  Eleven of his children are still living.  Our subject was reared on a farm and educated in the public schools.  In the fall of 1861 he enlisted in Company B, Thirty-sixth Ohio Infantry.  He served one year in that regiment and was then transferred to the One Hundred and Seventeenth Ohio, and commissioned Adjutant, and subsequently Major.  He participated in the battles of South Mountain, second Bull Run, Antietam, and Nashville.  He was mustered out at Knoxville, Tenn.  In the fall of 1864 he married Francis Chappelle, of French origin, a great-granddaughter of Pitt Putman.  From 1866 till 1868 Mr. Matthews was in the hardware business in Middleport, Meigs Co., Ohio, but in the latter year removed to Jackson and established his present place of business.  He is now the oldest hardware merchant in Jackson.  He carries a full line of goods and receives a favorable patronage.  Mr. and Mrs. Matthews have three children.
Source: History of Lower Scioto Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Inter-state Publishing Co. 1884 - Page 567
ADAM McCLUNG was born in Baltimore County, Md. in 1805, a son of Samuel and grandson of Robert McClung, both natives of Baltimore County, Md.  His grandfather went into the war of the Revolution as a soldier, taking his son Samuel, then only ten years old, with him and remained sixteen months.  Samuel McClung was married to Charlotte Fugit, a native of Baltimore County, Md., who died in Washington County, Pa., in 1853,  Samuel McClung having died in the same county in 1845.  They were the parents of four children - Adam, Caleb, Mordecai and Mary, all deceased but our subject, who was married Dec. 15, 1829, to Alice Cool.  They have had six children of whom only two survive - Samuel and Mary  Four sons are deceased.  Mrs. McClung died in 1870.  Mr. McClung moved to Jackson County in 1844.  He has been a farmer all his life and has done what he could for the prosperity of his adopted State.  He has always affiliated with the Democratic party, and has been a member of the Presbyterian church since 1840.
Source: History of Lower Scioto Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Inter-state Publishing Co. 1884 - Page 567
ISAIAH H. McCORMICK was born in Wyandot County, Ohio, a son of James and Mary A. (Savage) McCormick, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter of New Jersey.  His parents were married in 1832, and had a family of seven children, six of them sons, Isaiah H. being the second.  All these sons were in the late war, and I. H. was the only one wounded.  He enlisted in Company A, Fortieth Illinois Infantry, July 27, 1861.  He was in a number of engagements, and was wounded twice at Shiloh.  He was mustered out as Captain of Company E, One Hundred and Forty-eighth Ohio Infantry, Sept. 18, 1864.  He was married Mar. 18, 1864, to Rachel L. Walker, daughter of Marcus H. and Harriet L. (Ratcliff) Walker, Who was born Nov. 22, 1842.  They have had four children, only three now living - Charles E., Cora E. and Elley W.   Annie L. died Aug. 4, 1870.  Mr. McCormick educated himself by his own labor.  He taught school and thus obtained the means to enable him to attend Otterbein University at Westerville three years.  He is now the principal merchant at Raysville, carrying a stock of general merchandise, valued at $3,000.  Heat one time owned 1,100 acres of fine land, and at present owns 1,000 acres.  When he returned from the army he had $300, and in 1867 began business in Raysville.  He is a Knight Templar Mason, an Odd Fellow, a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, the Royal Arcanum and the Knights of Honor.  Mr. McCormick is worth about $40,000, and carries $16,000 life insurance.  He has held various offices of trust in Vinton County, but of late years, though often solicited, refuses to accept any office.  He is a member of the Christian church at Raysville.
Source: History of Lower Scioto Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Inter-state Publishing Co. 1884 - Page 570
WILLIAM McGHEE, deceased, son of John McGhee, who was born in Bedford County, Va., of Scotch extraction.  He matured in his native county, but early in the present century came to Ohio, stopping at Chillicothe.  He removed from there to Jackson about 1808, bought a tract of Congress land near the present town of Jackson and became a prominent pioneer, being especially known for his integrity and uprightness of principle as well as his stability of mind.  He was a genial and pleasant neighbor, and by occupation, a wagon-maker and farmer.  His wife was Priscilla Radcliff by whom he had nine children.  They both died in Jackson County, he aged eighty-one years and his wife forty-five years.  Of their children, William, the subject of this sketch, was the second, and was born in Jackson County, Ohio, Apr. 5, 1815.  In his boyhood days schools were few and very inferior, yet with his increasing energy he acquired a fair education, mostly by close application to studies during the leisure hours on the farm.  At his majority he engaged in business for himself by farming, and about 1840 he opened a store on his farm two miles east of Berlin, conducting the two jointly.  The location for the store may seem to have been rather isolated, yet his large and favorable acquaintance and good business habits soon won for him a large list of customers, and his success was perhaps unparalleled in the county at that time.  In 1854 he became connected with the Latrobe Furnace, in which he was quite active, but in 1856 he severed his relations with that furnace and in 1857 bought the Iron Valley (subsequently the Lincoln) Furnace which name he gave it.  This he operated with remarkable success until his death, July 4, 1871, from an attack of cholera.  Though a man of weak constitution he was very industrious, determined and wary in his undertakings, knowing no such word as fail.  As a business man his capacity was almost unlimited, and his honor and integrity unquestioned.  His charity and liberality toward all worthy enterprises were never wanting, but he was always ready to stand his share of the burden.  Whilst not over active in body he made it up in his mental faculties and we may well quote the old adage, "Still water runs deep." For rapidity and accuracy of mental calculation he had few superiors, seldom talked a great deal, but read considerable, and his advice as a counselor on any subject was considered valuable.  His wife was Electa R., daughter of Judge Hugh Poor.  She was born in Jackson County, Ohio, Apr. 24, 1821, having always resided in the county, and received a good common-school education.  Their marriage was consummated Oct. 27, 1836.  The result of this union was eight children, four died in infancy.  Those living are - James, a prominent furnaceman of Jackson County; Langley and Emma C. Ripley H., the youngest, who after completing a commercial education, a promising young man of moral worth and business integrity, died at the age of nineteen years.
Source: History of Lower Scioto Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Inter-state Publishing Co. 1884 - Page 568
J. J., G. C. and W. F. McKITTERICK are sons of John and grandsons of John McKitterick.  The latter was a native of Ireland where he died.  John came to Ohio in minor life, and married Maria L. daughter of George L. Crookham an early educator of Jackson County, Ohio.  John McKitterick, Sr. still resides in the county, and is an extensive farmer and stock-grazer.  The McKitterick Brothers are natives of Jackson County.  They were reared to farm life, and acquired a common education.  In the fall of 1877 they opened their mining interests, together with their store, which they have since successfully operated.  Their office is on the corner of Bridge and Water streets, Jackson, Ohio.
Source: History of Lower Scioto Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Inter-state Publishing Co. 1884 - Page 568
CAPTAIN H. C. MESSENGER was born in Licking County, Ohio, Nov. 27, 1827, a son of David and Martha Messenger.  When fourteen years of age he commenced to clerk in a dry-goods store, and when sixteen began to work as an engineer.  He was on a number of the leading railroads of Ohio.  In 1854 he married Sophia E., daughter of Dr. Asa W. Isham, and located in Jackson, Ohio.  He carried on a farm near the city till November, 1861, when he was elected Captain of Company D, Fifty-third Ohio Infantry.  He was a brave and gallant soldier, and was engaged in the battles of Shiloh and Corinth.  Owing to over-exertion he brought on ill health which resulted in typhoid-pneumonia, from the effects of which he died Apr. 27, 1863.  Captain Messenger was a tall, square-shoulders, well-built man, of fine personal appearance.  He left a family of four children to the care of his wife, and they have all grown to maturity, a blessing to the labors of a kind and faithful mother.  They are Nellie; Mary, wife of Rev. J. K. Gibson, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church, Troy, Ohio; Fannie, a graduate of Ann Arbor, Mich., and now practicing medicine in Springfield, Ohio; Asa C., a medical student, under the preceptorship of Dr. Williams.  Captain Messenger was a member of the Masonic fraternity.  In religious faith he was a Presbyterian, as is also Mr. Messenger.  She was born in Jackson in 1833.
Source: History of Lower Scioto Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Inter-state Publishing Co. 1884 - Page 569
HILLBORN C. MILLER, Judge of the Probate Court, is a son of Dr. James H. C. and Azuba (Carpenter) Miller.  He was born May 18, 1841, at Rocky Hill, in Bloomfield Township, Jackson Co., Ohio, and when he was four years old his parents moved into the town of Jackson, where he enjoyed the privilege of the common schools.  In 1858 he began working in a printing office, and followed that occupation till 1867, except the time he served in the United States army.  In 1862 he enlisted in Company E, Eighty-seventh Ohio Infantry, as a Corporal, and was captured at the surrender of Harper's Ferry, in the fall of that year, and soon after paroled and mustered out of service.  As soon as exchanged, in  the summer of 1863, he again enlisted in Company D, First Ohio Heavy Artillery, and was made Orderly Sergeant; was subsequently promoted to Second Lieutenant, and assigned to Company G, of same regiment, in signed to Company G, of same regiment, in which capacity he served until June 20, 1865, when he was honorably discharged at the end of the war.  He was married July 6, 1865, to Miss Annie M. Roberts, of Jackson, Ohio.  She was a daughter of Isaac and Mercy Roberts, and was born in Ross County, Ohio, in 1843.  They have four children living - Maggie, Azuba, Cora Annie, Arthur Roberts and Samuel.  Mr. and Mrs. Miller and their two daughters are members of the Methodist Episcopal church of Jackson.  In 1867 Mr. Miller was appointed as Assistant Assessor of United States Internal Revenue, and held that position and the office of Deputy Collector until 1874, when he resigned, in order to give his attention to an insurance and claim agency which had grown upon his hands, the insurance beginning in 1869 and the claim business in 1873.  This business he continued to prosecute successfully until 1881, when the Republican party nominated and elected him as Judge of the Probate Court of Jackson County, which position he now occupies.  Judge Miller has earned a reputation for honesty, promptness and unquestionable integrity.  This is the verdict of those who know him.
Source: History of Lower Scioto Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Inter-state Publishing Co. 1884 - Page 569
O. S. MILLER, merchant, Jackson, Ohio, is a son of James H. C. Miller, who was born in Massachusetts, and a grandson of Samuel Miller who settled in an early day in Ontario County, N. Y., where he died.  There is where James H. C. reached man's estate.  In the early part of his life he applied himself closely to study, acquired a good education, and for a number of years taught school in Maryland and some other of the Southern States, and in the meantime taking up the study of dentistry and surgery.  Subsequently he traveled extensively in South America, where he joined the military duties as Surgeon under General Boliver.  He participated in the Revolution between South America and the Spanish Government, and during his services the South American Government sent him on a mission to the United States, which, while in New York on this mission, he resigned.  He then took a trip through the South and Southwest into the Republic of Texas (as it was then called).  While there the Revolution between Texas and Mexico broke out.  As he could not coincide with the Texans, and seeing that unless he did he would be very unpopular, he returned to New York State where his family was located.  About the year 1836 he moved his family to what is now Columbiana County, Ohio, near Youngstown, where he practiced medicine.  His wife, Calista (Story) Miller, died leaving three children- Dr. S. F. Miller, of Iowa; George W., who died at Jackson, Ohio, and O. S. Miller, the subject of this sketch.  James H. C., while near Youngstown, Ohio, married Miss Azuba Carpenter and in 1838 moved to Bloomfield Township, Jackson Co., Ohio, where he had an extensive practice of medicine, but after seven years he moved to Jackson, opened a drug store and conducted it with his practice some time.  Failing health finally induced him to relinquish his profession and engage in the furnace business, but during the financial crisis of 1857 misfortune met him and he suffered severe losses.  During the late war he moved to Nebraska, where he buried his wife in 1878.   He returned to Jackson, Ohio, where he died in 1881.  He and his wife had three children - Dr. O. C. Miller, now deceased, of Jackson; James A., Clerk of the Supreme Court of Colorado, residence Denver, and H. C. Miller, present Probate Judge of Jackson County, Ohio.  Dr. James H. C. Miller was the preceptor of a number of medical students who have become men of medical note - Dr. Patterson, of Gallia County; Dr. Metcalf, of Missouri, and Dr. French, of Union City, Ind.  While practicing here he had the confidence and esteem of his professional compeers, with whom he was not unfrequently called in council and his advice regarded as valuable.  O. S. Miller, the youngest of his mother's children, was born in what is now Mahoning County, Ohio, in 1837, but since one year old has been a resident of Jackson County, where he received his education, mostly in the schools of Jackson.  His father having been a practical druggist, O. C. became largely associated in the business and for several years in life was a drug clerk.  In 1863 he helped to recruit Company F, One Hundred and Twenty-ninth Ohio Infantry, and was chosen Captain, but was only in actual service seven months.  He opened his present general mercantile business in 1870, and his good business principles, integrity and courtesy have secured for him a hearty trade.  He was married to Phebe A. Steele, by whom he has one daughter - Clara.  Mr. and Mrs. Miller are consistent members of the Methodist Episcopal church, of Jackson, Ohio.
Source: History of Lower Scioto Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Inter-state Publishing Co. 1884 - Page 569
E. W. MITCHELL, contractor and machinist, Jackson, Ohio, is a son of William M. D. Mitchell, who was of Scotch and Irish extraction, but a native of Virginia, where he was engaged as a blacksmith and farmer until his death.  In religion he was a strict Baptist, and in politics a staunch Democrat.  His wife was Elizabeth Stover, also a native of Virginia, but of German paternal ancestors.  Of their seven children E. W., is the second and was born in Virginia in 1842.  He was reared on the farm and in the blacksmith shop and had good advantages, and accordingly acquired a fair education at Hollin's Institute, in Roanoke County, Va.  He served in the Confederate army, not from any desire to continue any human being in slavery but from a State's right principle.  He came to Gallipolis, Ohio, in August, 1865, and then and there, without money and friends, commenced working at the blacksmith trade, subsequently at a furnace in Lawrence County, and in March, 1866, reached Jackson, Ohio, where he assisted on the blacksmith work on the Star Furnace.  Dec. 20, 1866, while thus engaged, he married Mary, daughter of Peter Hoops.  In 1868 he assisted on the smith work of the Fulton Furnace, and in 1872 he moved to Chester, Ill., to accept the position of superintendent of machinery of the Chester & Tamoroa Railroad Company's shops.  Their failure in 1873 necessitated him to seek employment elsewhere, and he accepted the superintendency of machinery of the Joliet Iron and Steel Works at Joliet, Ill.  Their failure during the financial crisis of 1874 again threw him out of a position.  Subsequently he became foreman in a machine shop in Chicago, Ill., and while there strong evidences were brought to bear that Mr. Mitchell possessed an ingenious and inventive mine, which led to his employment with the Thorn Wire Hedge Company, of the same city, to produce a machine for manufacturing barbed wire, which in due time he completed being the original invention for taking the plain wire, putting through the machine and produce it manufactured for spanning on the fence posts.  In 1876 he returned to Jackson, Ohio, and with George Pugh and Mark Sternberger became a contractor in building the grade from Jackson to Waverly of what is now the Ohio Southern Railroad.  In 1878 he established a blacksmith shop near the site of his present one and has since been engaged in machine smithing, and in 1880 commenced his large contracts by building Pitt Cars, in which he was successful.  In 1882 he contracted the iron work on the present jail building in Jackson, which is acknowledged not to be surpassed for solidity, durability and safety by any jail in the State of Ohio.  In the spring of 1883 he closed a contract for the building of a court-house at Marion, Ohio, at a cost of $95,000.  Mr. Mitchell in securing this contract has forever settled the question, through the Supreme Court, that who gets a contract holds it, be it the lowest bidder or a friend, regardless of bids.  Mr. Mitchell came to Jackson under great obstacles, yet has established a reputation as being possessed with stability of mind, honorable business principles, and in consequence can conduct a large business with a comparatively small capital.  He is one of the well-to-do citizens, willing to assist in all public improvements.  He and his wife have four children, all living.
Source: History of Lower Scioto Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Inter-state Publishing Co. 1884 - Page 570
C. V. MOHLER, of Mohler & Kesinger, miners and dealers in best Jackson coal, was born near Xenia, Greene Co., Ohio, Dec. 31, 1851, a son of Adam and Susan H. (Marmaduke) Mohler, residents of Bellbrook, Ohio, and a grandson of V. B. Mohler, of Dayton, Ohio.  He remained on the farm, attending school during the winter, till thirteen years of age, when he commenced to clerk in a dry-goods house.  He continued in the mercantile business in Xenia, Dayton and Belbrook about fourteen years, and in 1878 removed to Jackson and became engaged in the coal business with Thornhill, Mohler & Co.  In 1881 he formed a partnership with Mr. Mohler owns a fourth interest in the Western Coal Company, of Coalton.  One mine of Mohler & Kesinger is located on the Ada switch, and the other on the Springfield switch.  The latter was opened in 1880 by J. H. Wilson, and is a thirty-two inch vein, free from all impurities; capacity seventy-five tons daily.  Mr. Mohler was married Apr. 20, 1875, to Rachel L. Snyder, of Dayton.  They have two children.
Source: History of Lower Scioto Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Inter-state Publishing Co. 1884 - Page 672
ARTHUR B. MONAHAN, M. D., was born in Belmont County, Ohio, Aug. 24, 1827, a son of James and Maria A. Monahan natives of Maryland, but early settlers of Belmont County, and subsequently residents of Jackson County, where they died.  He lived the greater part of his early life in Monroe County, Ohio, and attended the schools of Mount Pleasant.  He began the study of medicine under Dr. R. Ramsey, of Jefferson County, Ohio, and graduated from the Ohio Medical College, at Cincinnati, in 1851, although at that time he had been a resident of, and practice in Athens County some time.  He was politically a Republican and strongly advocated the suppression of slavery.  In 1859 he was elected to represent Athens County in the State Legislature, serving two years.  In the spring of 1861, after his return home from Columbus, he offered himself as a recruiting officer and raised the Sixty-third Ohio Infantry.  He was tendered the office of Lieutenant-Colonel, but declined it and was afterward appointed Surgeon.  In January, 1862, he had a severe attack of inflammatory rheumatism, which disabled him ten weeks, but in the spring he joined his regiment, though obliged to rely on his cane for support.  He was promoted to Brigade Surgeon, and afterward to Major Surgeon, serving till the close of the war.  At the second battle of Corinth he was wounded in the head by a bursting shell, from which he never fully recovered.  After his return from the war he resumed practice in Athens County, but in the fall of 1865 located in Jackson.  It was his intention at the time to go further west, but the demands for his services were so urgent that he consented to remain in Jackson.  In the fall of 1875 he was elected to the Legislature from Jackson County, and re-elected in 1877, but died June 20, 1878, before the expiration of his second term.  He was a successful practitioner, military officer and legislator, and was a man whose equal is rarely found.  His charity and kindness was never exhausted, especially to the poor and needy.  Though firm in all his convictions, he was kind and considerate of others and at all times had the esteem of his professional brethren.  He married Martha Farmar, Dec. 30, 1847.  They reared a family of four children - William H., R. F., Ida (now Mrs. J. T. Forsythe) and Arthur B.  Dr. Monahan was a Royal Arch Mason and a member of the Grand Army of the Republic.
Source: History of Lower Scioto Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Inter-state Publishing Co. 1884 - Page 672
DR. I. T. MONAHAN, deceased, Senator and physician, was a son of James and Maria A. (Walker) Monahan both natives of Maryland, who became early settlers of Belmont County, Ohio, later of Athens County, and finally of Jackson County, where they resided until their death.  Their family consisted of thirteen children, two daughters and eleven sons, six of whom became practicing physicians.  The subject of this memoir was born in Belmont County, Ohio, in 1829, near the village of Bellaire.  While in minor life he was a t home with his parents who gave him the advantage of a good common-school education, and at the age of fifteen commenced teaching; and while following that channel of life a few years, the study of medicine seemed to predominate in his mind and accordingly he took it up.  In due time he graduated in the school of medicine and commenced practicing in Athens County, Ohio.  The year 1861 marks his removal to Jackson, Ohio, where he soon gained a large practice.  Whilst always watchful and attentive to his patients he seemed so full of nervous, restless energy that must have vent that he was always engaged in various enterprises.  With his wonderful business capacity he could successfully conduct a half a dozen kinds of business.  Although  he was desirous of accumulating finances, crowded with practice and watching, and other business ventures, he always found time to take active part in National, State and local politics, as well as all matters of public enterprise, either scientific, literary or religious.  IN the fall of 1875 he was a candidate on the Democratic ticket for Senator from the Seventh Senatorial District and in this strong Republican district was elected.  His ability as a Senator together with his due regard and appreciation for humanity at large won for him many warm friends, not only in his own but also in the Republican party.  In the fall of 1872 he refused to support Greeley, believing it inconsistent for the Democratic party to vote for a life-long opponent.  In all matters he had the courage to express his opinion, never leaving any man in doubt as to where he stood on any question, and when once his conclusions were formed they were unchangeable, although his active mind, nervous force, diverse business interests, strong political affiliations, with his aggressive method of expression could not avoid exciting opposition an antagonism.  His moral principals were fixed and his perceptions of right and wrong keen.  As a neighbor he was obliging and kind, his heart never closed to appeals for charitable and benevolent purposes.  The Doctor was impulsive, and when errors were committed they were not premeditated.  The Doctor was married July 25, 1850, at Watertown, Washington Co., Ohio, to Mary, daughter of Dennis and Catherine Ryan.  She was of Irish parents, born at Beth, near Montreal, Canada, Jan. 17, 1824, and when a child her parents moved to Washington County, Ohio.  She was an ardent member of the Catholic church, quiet, modest and unobtrusive; a kind neighbor, model companion and kind mother to her four children, of whom two now survive - Josephine, wife of L. Q. Branson, and Charlotte.  In the spring of 1882 the ill health of the Doctor induced him to travel and taking his wife he started for New Orleans.  On arriving, the news bearing the death of his aged mother at Jackson was awaiting them.  They took a homeward course on the steamer Golden City, the same they had arrived in, and on the morning of Mar. 30, 1882, as the noble steamer was nearing the wharf at Memphis, Tenn., it took fire and in a few minutes the entire steamer and contents had sunk.  Thus ended the earthly and contents had sunk.  Thus ended the earthly career of two of Jackson's noblest citizens.
Source: History of Lower Scioto Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Inter-state Publishing Co. 1884 - Page 573
W. H. MONAHAN, M. D., was born in Hockingport, Athens Co., Ohio, Dec. 7, 1850, a son of A. B. Monahan, M. D.  He received his elementary education at Coolville where his parents at that time lived.  In 1865 they came to Jackson and he entered the High School taking a full course.  In 1868 he went to the Ohio University and spent two years.  In 1871 he began the study of medicine with his father as preceptor and in 1871 graduated  from the Buckeye College at Sandusky, Ohio.  In 1874 he graduated from the Ohio Medical College at Cincinnati, and since then has been practicing in Jackson.  He was married in 1871 to Mollie Hunt, of Jackson County.  Of the four children born to them one is deceased.
Source: History of Lower Scioto Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Inter-state Publishing Co. 1884 - Page 573
JOHN T. MOORE, attorney at law, Jackson, Ohio, was born Nov. 25, 1831, in Seal Township, Pike Co., Ohio, a son of Levi and Polly (Higginbotham) Moore, his father a native of Virginia and his mother of Pennsylvania.  His parents were married in Lexington, Ky., in 1812, and about 1817 or 1818 came to Ohio and settled in Pike County where resided till their death.  Both lived to an advanced age, their married life extending over a period of nearly sixty years.  They had a family of fifteen children, several dying infancy.  Of their children our subject is the eleventh.  His early life was spent in working on the farm, his educational advantages being meager.  In 1849 he received a teacher's certificate and taught till 1861, at the same time devoting all his spare time to study, and has thus gained the reputation of being a man of learning.  He  was School Examiner of Pike County seventeen years and is at present City Examiner of Jackson.  At the April term of the District Court, 1861, he was admitted to the bar, and has since been in the active practice of the law, serving six years as Prosecuting Attorney of his native county.  Politically he is a Democrat and is also a strong advocate of temperance, believing it politic to prohibit the traffic of intoxicating liquor.  He has been a member of the First Presbyterian Church, Jackson, six years and is now serving as Elder.  Apr. 18, 1860, he was married at the residence of Dr. E. R. Allen to Delilah L. Stedman.  They are the parents of twelve children, eleven of whom are living - Tom, Mary E., Hatemma, John Ira, Mabel Louisa, Amanda Malvina, Minnie Emmett, Sam Randal, Sarah Dell, Juno Clare and Amelia.  The eldest son, Tom, was admitted to the bar by the Supreme Court of Ohio, May 1, 1883, and is now practicing with his father, the firm name being John T. Moore & Son.  July 11, 1883, he delivered a powerful argument (it being his first) to the jury trying Luke Jones for murder in the first degree.  Mr. Moore has been an Odd Fellow since August, 1857, and is now P. G. and P. P. of that order.
Source #2 - History of Lower Scioto Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Inter-state Publishing Co. 1884 - Page 574
MOSES MORGAN, of the firm of Jones & Morgan, was born in Jackson County, Ohio, in 1840, a son of Daniel and grandson of Moses Morgan, natives of Wales.  In 1838 his father married Catharine Davis and immediately emigrated to the United States.  They settled in Pomeroy, Ohio, and in 1840 removed to Oak Hill, Jackson County, and bought eighty acres of land, where he died in 1862, and his widow in December, 1872.  Of their five children Moses is the eldest now living.  He was reared on a farm and attended the common schools, and afterward the Ohio University, Athens.  In 1857 he began teaching, a vocation he followed till July, 1864, when he enlisted in Company D, One Hundred and Seventy-third Ohio Infantry, as a private, but was soon after promoted as Second Lieutenant of Company K.  He participated in the siege of Nashville, but the remainder of his time was sent in guarding the military post of Johnsonville, Tenn.  He returned home in July, 1865, and the next fall resumed teaching.  In 1871 he was engaged to manage the Jackson Furnace.  In 1872 he began the manufacture of salt at Mason City, W. Va.  In 1878 he came to Jackson, and has since then been extensively interested in mining, being a part owner in the Jackson Hill and Wellston Shaft coal mines.  He was married in September, 1875, to Martha L. Jarrott, of French origin.  They have three children.
Source: History of Lower Scioto Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Inter-state Publishing Co. 1884 - Page 574
JEREMIAH MORROW, Superintendent of the Springfield Coal Company mines, a son of the Rev. Jeremiah Morrow and grandson of Jeremiah Morrow, ex-Governor of Ohio, was born in Chillicothe, Ohio, in the year 1843, at which place he lived until twelve years of age.  He removed to Oxford, Butler Co., Ohio, where he received his education at Miami University, graduating in 1863, having previously served in the three months' service, being a member of Company A, Eighty-sixth Ohio Infantry.  Soon after finishing his college life he entered the United States flag ship Cricket, passing through many hard-fought naval engagements on the Western waters.  He left the service at the close of hostilities with especial mention by Commodore Gorringe (his commander) for his courage and zeal.  In 1865 Mr. Morrow cast his lot with the mining interests has been engaged with the largest mining enterprises of the county as manager and superintendent, having served in that capacity with the old Cincinnati Furnace Company, Petrea Coal Company, and his present engagement with the Springfield Coal Company.  Mr. Morrow is the inventor of the Morrow dumping and weighing machine, a device for saving the breakage of coal in loading from the bank cars to the railroad flats, the advantage of which is valuable to the coal interest.
Source: History of Lower Scioto Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Inter-state Publishing Co. 1884 - Page 575
H. C. MURFIN is a native of Scioto County, Ohio, and a son of James Murfin, a native of Adams County, Ohio, and one of the early furnace men of Southern Ohio.  He died in Scioto County.  Our subject was reared and educated in his native county, and when thirteen years of age entered the Ohio Wesleyan University at Delaware, where he spent three years.  He was then a clerk in a book store in Portsmouth four years, but left there to accept a clerkship at the Ohio Furnace in Scioto County.  In 1878 he returned to Portsmouth and became associated with W. W. Reilly in a book store.  In 1882 he came to Jackson, where he is now operating quite extensively in coal.  He was married in November, 1873, to Margaret A., daughter of W. W. Reilly.  They have four children.
Source: History of Lower Scioto Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Inter-state Publishing Co. 1884 - Page 575
L. T. MURFIN, manager of the "Globe Iron Company," Jackson, Ohio, is one of the leading and successful experimental furnace men of the State.  His father, James Murfin, was a native of Adams County, Ohio, born in 1810, and of Scotch extraction.  He reached his majority in his native county, and in 1832 came to Scioto County, where he became connection with the Scioto Furnace," which business occupied his time until his death in 1862.  At that time he was the ruling member in the Empire Furnace, under the firm name of Murfin & Co.  This and other furnaces he superintended with more than ordinary success, which placed him financially well off.  He was always successful in life, knowing no such word as fail, while his energy and determination were always equal to the emergencies.  In matrimonial comforts he was unfortunate, having, in 1837, buried his first wife, Eliza Turner; his second wife, Elizabeth Rodgers, in 184, and leaving Miss R. Y. Gould his third wife, a widow, who survived him until 1878.  Of his six children our subject is the second eldest, and was born in Scioto County, Ohio, Oct. 24, 1837.  He was reared at Junior Furnace, where he received the rudiments of a common-school education, and when a youth of fifteen entered the Ohio Wesleyan University, at Delaware, Ohio, giving three years to mental labor, under the training of the well-equipped faculty of that institution.  At the age of eighteen he returned home, and became associated actively in the furnace work, and in 1864 took the management of the Empire Furnace, which resulted in establishing his ability as a successful furnace man.  In 1870 he was induced to take charge of the Kenton Furnace, in Greenup County, Ky.  In 1872 he became manager of the Eagle Furnace, in Vinton County, Ohio, and there remained until the centennial year, when he became manager of the Globe Iron Company, at Jackson, Ohio, having, however, been one of the original stockholders of that company, and still continues.  In 1871, while in Kentucky, he was one of the prime movers and original stockholders in building the Hamilton Furnace in Missouri.  As a furnace man, Mr. Murfi's experience covers over a quarter of a century, which has been marked with a number of successful experiences, one of which, as a matter of history, is mentioned:  He was the man who first successfully smelted iron from the raw native ore, making a better quality of pig iron than had formerly been made after roasting the ore.  His observations through furnace work enable him to stand second to none in Southern Ohio, in explaining the condition of material while passing the different periods in the furnace.  In short, his furnace experience has been remunerative and successful, and he is one of the well-to-do citizens, willing to assist in all public improvements, and at the same time does not fail to consider the comforts and happiness of himself and family, as his elegant Gothic frame house on Posey Hill bears testimony, it having been recognized as second to no dwelling in the county for comfort, convenience and architectural excellence, standing as a monument to the taste of the proprietor.  On Jan. 1, 1862, he was married to Miss Kate, daughter of James F. Forsythe, of Scioto County, Ohio.  The issue of this union is one daughter - Jessie F., who, in 1879, graduated from the public schools of Jackson, Ohio, at the age of fifteen, and in 1882 graduated at the Cincinnati Wesleyan College, and was awarded the valedictory in a class of twenty-one.
Source: History of Lower Scioto Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Inter-state Publishing Co. 1884 - Page 575

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