OHIO GENEALOGY EXPRESS

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Licking County
OHIO
History & Genealogy

LICKING COUNTY TOWNS - When Laid Out and by Whom
(Given in Chronological order)
(Source: Centennial History of Licking County, Ohio by Isaac Smucker
Publ. Newark, Ohio: Clark & Underwood, Book and Job Printers - 1876)

[Pg. 39 - continued]

REVIEW.

      I have thus taken a cursory glance at the evidences of material prosperity which Licking County presents; also at the Educational efforts made by the people; and no less, at the numerous, and more or less efficient organizations established all over the County, to promote the practice of the social and moral virtues.  It therefore only remains, that I present, in this connection to you, a list of the various church edifices now existing in Licking county, (of which there are one hundred and thirty-eight,) the Township in which they are located, and the various religious denominations to which they be-
[Pg. 40]
long, the number of Christian Societies, represented in Licking County, by one or more church buildings, being twenty-six, eleven of them having each only one edifice, the others being divided among the remaining fifteen denominations, forty being the highest number owned by any one, that being the Episcopal Methodist.

NUMBER, DENOMINATION AND LOCATION OF CHURCH EDIFICES IN LICKING COUNTY, OHIO.

     Total number of Church edifices in Licking County, Ohio, is 138, their total valuation being $300,000, and supposed to furnish sittings for 20,000 persons.
     The Methodists were the first denomination to organize, being in 1804; the Congregationalists were the second, being in 1805; the Baptists and Presbyterians the next, being in 1808; the Covenanters organized in 1813; the Lutherans in 1817.  The others afterwards.
[Pg. 41]

OUR PIONEERS - THER CHARACTERISTICS.

     The Pioneer inhabitants of Licking Country were not a homogeneous people, but were composed of a number of different nationalities, and of immigrants from many different States of the Union, and from various sections of our country.  North and South Carolina, Maryland and Virginia were the chief Southern States that contributed settlers to our County, the two latter most largely.  Pennsylvania certainly furnished her full quota to our stock of early-time inhabitants - perhaps more in the aggregate, than any other single State.  Massachusetts and Connecticut did their share, and so did Wales; and the German speaking counties of Europe, (although the Teutonics came somewhat later,) furnished us with more than a tithe of our present population.  The proportion of German and Welsh residents of Licking County may be approximately inferred, by the number of religious organizations maintained by them, respectively: the Germans having six, and the Welsh five.  The other one hundred and twenty-seven were established by the English speaking races.  Only three languages, therefore, are employed in the pulpit ministrations of our County, except what of the Latin language is used in the Catholic Churches.

 

MORE TO COME......

[Pg. 42]

 

 

 

 

INCIDENTS.

     In the further development of our County's history, I present very briefly a few prominent incidents, facts, and events that are part and parcel of the history of our County, followed by very short personal sketches of those who exerted a potential influence in the formation of our habits, customs and general line of thought, and thus intimately connected themselves, for good or evil with our County's history.

JUDGE ELLIOTT AND THE INDIANS.

 

[Pg. 43]

 

 

 

ELIAS HUGHES AND THE INDIAN HORSE THIEVES.

 

 

[Pg. 44]

 

 

 

AN EARLY-TIME SUNDAY IN NEWARK

 

ENEMIES OF THE EARLY SETTLERS.

 

[Pg. 45]
 

 

 

[Pg. 46]

 

 

THE GRANVILLE COLONY'S FIRST SABBATH IN THE WILDERNESS.

 

 

THE FOURTH OF JULY CELEBRATION IN NEWARK, IN 1807.

 

 

[Pg. 47]

 

 

 

 

AN INCIDENT IN 1810.

     William Kinning, a Scotch batchelor, reputed to have some means, boarded with family that lived in the North Fork Valley in 1810, eight miles above Newark.  While in the act of crossing the North Fork on a log, near the present village of St. Louisville, he received a rifle ball in his body, which it was long supposed would prove fatal, but he ultimately recovered.  Tracks on the snow and other circumstances pointed to a man living in that vicinity by the name of Hoyt, as the would-be assassin.  The suspected culprit fled but was pursued, captured and imprisoned in the Newark jail.  William Stanbery, then a rising young lawyer, of Newark in the second year of his practice in Licking County, was engaged to defend Hoyt, but before the day set for his trial arrived, he broke jail and fled to parts unknown, and so far as is known, never returned to our County; indeed he was never heard from afterwards!  This then just fairly entered upon his public career, and all of whom subsequently attained to a good degree of professional distinction.  Thos were Rev. James B. Finley, Dr. John J. Brice and Hon. William
[Pg. 48]
Stanbery; the first named being then an itinerant Methodist minister in our County, it being the second year of his itinerancy; the second named gentleman being the physician who applied the skill of the healing art upon Kinning to his recovery and final restoration to health, and the last named is already stated, who recently deceased at the ripe age of 85 years.  Rev. J. B. Finley head the report of Hoyt's gun, and the screams of his poor victim - he was also witness to the agony of the supposed dying man and ministered to his spiritual comfort in his extremity!

 

 

 

JOHNNY APPLESEED AND CHAPLAIN JONES.

 

 

[Pg. 49]

 

 

AN EARLY TIME INCIDENT.

 

 

 

 

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