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Welcome to
Marion County, Ohio

History & Genealogy

Biographies



Source:
Portrait & Biographical Records
of Marion & Hardin Counties, Ohio
Containing Portraits and Biographical Sketches of Prominent
and Representative Citizens of the Counties
 Together with Biographies and Portraits of all the Presidents
of the United States
Chicago:
Chapman Publishing Co.
1895

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

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JAMES EMERY is one of the honored old settlers of Marion County, and has passed his entire life within its boundaries.  He now owns and manages a farm of one hundred acres on section 19, Waldo Township, where he is engaged in the cultivation of the soil and in stock-raising.  On various occasions he has held local township offices, such as Assessor, Trustee and School Director.  In his early years he experienced the hardships and privations which usually fall to the lot of the pioneer, and the first school which he attended was one managed on the subscription plan and located a mile and a half from his home.
     The birthday of James Emery was July 4, 1826, the same day that Thomas Jefferson and John Adams were summoned to the home beyond.  The event occurred on the banks of the Whitestone River, in Richland Township, where his parents had located some six years previously.
     The father John Emery, was born Nov. 14, 1797, in Berkeley County, Va., and the mother, Catherine (Wagner) Emery, was a native of Perry County, Pa.  In 1820 John Emery came to this state, making the journey westward by team, and had to cut his way through the woods from Waldo to his homestead, which was a piece of school land on section 16, and comprised eighty acres.  Mr. Emery put up a log cabin in the fashion of those days, and cleared his land of the forest.  Delaware was his trading-post for years, and the only thing on the site of Marion was a well.  The Indians were still numerous here at that day, but made no trouble for the early settlers.  Fourteen years after coming to Ohio, John Emery and his wife went on a visit to Monroe County, Ohio, making the journey on horseback.  He died in 1873, and his wife survived him several years, passing away in 1885, in her eighty-sixth year.  They were both buried in Richland Cemetery.  Religiously they were firm believers in the Methodist faith.
     In a family of nine children, our subject is the fourth in order of birth.  His eldest brother, Martin, lives on the old homestead, and the others are as follows: Rebecca, Elizabeth, Susan, Fannie, Annie, Jane and Catherine.  Until he was twenty-three years of age, James Emery continued to give his services to his father on the old homestead.
    About 1849 our subject embarked in business for himself, by buying and selling live stock, and was thus employed for about twenty years, meeting with good success.  In 1869 he turned his attention to agricultural pursuits and moved to the farm where he is yet living, and which under his supervision has been improved and cultivated until it is now one of the best in the locality.  On questions relating to politics, Mr. Emery is a Prohibitionist and never fails in exercising his right of franchise at election time.
     June 16, 1853, occurred the marriage of James Emery and Rachel Showers.  Twelve children were born to this worthy couple.  Three of the number died in infancy, and Fannie E., the eldest is also deceased.  Those living are named as follows:  Lucinda J., Annie V., Clement, John W., Benjamin F. James, Joseph and Gladys.
Source: Portrait & Biographical Records of Marion & Hardin Counties, Ohio - 1895 - Page 158


John Evans
JOHN EVANS

 

Source: Portrait & Biographical Records of Marion & Hardin Counties, Ohio - 1895 - Page 151

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