OHIO GENEALOGY EXPRESS

 

 


MILITARY HISTORY
OF THE
8TH REGIMENT OHIO VOL. INFY.
ITS
BATTLES, MARCHES AND ARMY
MOVEMENTS

By FRANKLIN SAWYER,
LIEUT. - COL. OF THE REGIMENT, AND BREVET BRIGADIER-GENERAL
------------------
EDITED BY GEO. A. GROOT, CHAIRMAN PUB. COM.

 


CHAPTER II.

THE REGIMENT TRANSPORTED TO GRAFTON, VA.

     On the evening of the 8th of July, the Regiment with its tents, baggage, transportation, &c., was embarked on board the cars at Camp Dennison, and rapidly rolled away to the Seat of War.  We had heard of the route of Garnett's army by McCLELLAN, of the brilliant dash of LANDER and KELLY at Phillippi, and every man was anxious to push forward, and, at least, "Be in at the death"  PHINEAS P. MERWIN had been elected sutler of the Regiment and was aboard with a stock of goods that put the idea of hunger and thirst out of the question.  S. B. FULLER, of Norwalk, commonly known as "Jonathan," was made wagon-master, and he was on hand with his transportation and cargo of quartermaster and commissary stores.
     The men were noisy and jolly all night, not seeming to care about sleep, and when daylight came, the road side was literally lined up with people who had congregated along the route to cheer us onward.  At Zanesville, a splendid lunch was in readiness for us, and the whole town seemed to be present with good things and cheering words.  Banners were waiving everywhere.  Bands were playing.  Songs were sung.  The Flag, the Country, the President, the Army, and the Eighth Ohio were cheered. and "three times three and a tiger" could be had for almost anything, and at any time for the asking.  We arrived at Bellaire, and same in sight of the grand old river that separated the loyal from the disloyal states.  Nothing could be heard but "Away down south in Dixie," parodied and paraphrased in the most uncomplimentary terms of the "Chivalry."
    
We were soon across the river, loaded into some crazy old cars, and on our way to Grafton, one hundred miles east of the river.
     The train wound along among the mountains at a very slow rate of speed, frequently stopping for trains to pass or for some other purpose, so that it was near daylight when we arrived at Fetterman, near Grafton.  Here we stopped until eight or nine o'clock.  The men built fires in the woods, cooked their breakfast, and being worn out with the journey and two wakeful nights, sought a quiet place and addressed themselves to sleep.
     Col. DEPUY, Lieut. Col. PARK and the writer reported to Gen. HILL, then in command, and had a long conversation about the situation of affairs, and what was expected of us.
     Garnett's army seemed to be on the retreat, and the force under Gen. HILL was expected to cut off and capture it.  Maps were examined and the line of retreat traced along Cheat river and over the summit of the Alleghenies, near the source of the Potomac.
     Gen. HILL was awaiting orders or information from the army in pursuit of Garnett, and in the mean time our troops retained possession of the cars at Fetterman. 
     On this night, we were for the first time aroused by the "long roll," and formed in line of battle.  A picket line was thrown out along a line of hills in our front.  The long roll beat and the regiment was formed in the twinkling of an eye.  Desperate work was expected.  On officer was said to have sallied forth with a navy revolver in each hand and his sword in his teeth!  The innocent cause of the alarm was soon ascertained.  The fact was that an inquisitive cow had approached one of the sentinels who fired, dispersing the cow and summarily arousing the troops.  This fact having been ascertained by our commander, we fell back in good order to our bunks.

 

 

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