OHIO GENEALOGY EXPRESS

 

 


MILITARY HISTORY
OF THE
8TH REGIMENT OHIO VOL. INFY.
ITS
BATTLES, MARCHES AND ARMY
MOVEMENTS

By FRANKLIN SAWYER,
LIEUT. - COL. OF THE REGIMENT, AND BREVET BRIGADIER-GENERAL
------------------
EDITED BY GEO. A. GROOT, CHAIRMAN PUB. COM.

 


CHAPTER VII.

PURSUIT OF JACKSON-SHENANDOAH VALLEY.

     During the night the dead were buried and wounded sent back to Winchester, and early in the morning the detachment joined Col. CARROLL, when we were pushed forward to the front, on the left of the pike, and followed the rear of the retreating enemy to Cedar Creek, occasionally receiving the attention of a shot from their artillery, but without damage.
     At Cedar Creek we bivouaced for the night, during which Gen. BANKS overtook us with a considerable force from Harper's Ferry, and the next day the whole army went into camp south of Strasburg, where we remained quietly, except making a reconnoissance on the 27th to near Woodstock, until the 1st day of April, when the whole force moved to Edinburg, skirmishing all day with the rebel rear guard, and went into camp within cannon shot of the rebel outposts.
     We remained in this camp until the 16th of April, on the evening of which day an advance was made with a view of capturing Jackson's army.
     Col. CARROLL was to take a picked command, and by making a circuitous march, seize the Shenandoah river bridge at Mt. Jackson, while Shields, with the main force, would attack the enemy.
     Col. CARROLL's command consisted of 300 men from the Fourth Ohio, commanded by Lieut. Col. GODMAN; 300 from the Eighth Ohio, and 100 from the Sixty-seventh Ohio, under command of the writer, and 300 from the Fourteenth Indiana, commanded by Lieut. Col. HARROW, and two sections of Clark's battery.
The distance, by the route taken, was some seven miles greater than had been represented, the mountain streams were swollen, and the roads almost impassible. We expected to have been at the bridge before daylight, but at nine o'clock in the morning we were still eight miles away, and learned that JACKSON had escaped. Our march for the balance, of the way was accommodated to the conditions of the roads, and of our tired men and horses.
     The rebels had given SHIELDS the slip, and had got away with trifling loss, but the pursuit was so rapid that he had not succeeded in entirely destroying the bridge. At 4 o'clock in the afternoon bur. advance column was pushed forward as far as New Market, six miles distant, and encamped, the enemy having disappeared.
     It was some four or five days before our tents and baggage came up, and as it rained almost constantly the troops suffered greatly for want of shelter and provisions. This camp was occupied until the 12th of May, except that a reconnaissance was made to near Harrisonburg, in which the Eighth participated.
     This campaign in the Shenandoah Valley introduced us to one of the fairest parts of the earth. The country is rich arid productive. The wooded mountains to the west, and the incomparable outline of the Blue Ridge to the east, make up a panorama of the rarest beauty.

 

 

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