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BIOGRAPHIES

The following biographies are extracted from:
Source: 
A Standard History of Ross County, Ohio
Vol. II.
Published by The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago & New York
1917

A B C D EF G H IJ K L M N OPQ R S T UV W XYZ

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  WILLIAM WADDLE, M. D.   Prominent among the skillful physicians and surgeons who were successfully engaged in the practice of their profession in Chillicothe a half century and more ago, was the late William Waddle, M. D., who was especially skillful in his treatment of the various diseases which human flesh is heir to.
     He was born in Chillicothe, September 19, 1811, in the family residence which then stood on the southeast corner of Paint and Second streets.
     Alexander Waddle, the doctor's grandfather, was born in Ireland, of Scotch ancestry, and was there reared and married.  In 1784, accompanied by his wife and children, he came to America, and having purchased land in Franklin County, Pennsylvania, was there engaged in agricultural pursuits during the remainder of his life.  His wife, whose maiden name was Elizabeth McCormick, was also born in Ireland, of Scotch lineage. She survived him, and spent the later years of her life in Portsmouth. Ohio. She was the mother of five children, Mary, Alexander, John, Joseph, and William.
     John Waddle was born in 1783, in Belfast, County Tyrone, Ireland, and was little more than an infant when brought by his parents to this country.  Brought up in Franklin County, Pennsylvania, he was apprenticed at the age of fifteen years to Alexander McLaughlin, a prosperous merchant in Pittsburgh. In 1803 he was sent by his employer to Chillicothe with a stock of merchandise, which he disposed of at an advantage.  After his return to Pittsburgh, he formed a partnership with John Carlisle, in Chillicothe, with whom he was associated for a short time, later having as partners Thomas Worthington and Amaziah Davidson.  During the War of 1812 he was associated in business with General Denney, supplying the Government with provisions. In 1822 he retired from mercantile pursuits, and in 1830 removed to Clark County, Ohio, where he had acquired title to considerable land, in Clark and Greene counties, which he intended to improve. In 1831 he again visited Chillicothe, and having been suddenly taken ill with pneumonia, died in this city.
     John Waddle married, in 1806, Nancy Mann, who was born in Kentucky. Her father, William Mann, a native of Augusta County, Virginia, married Eleanor Raeburn, and soon after moved to Kentucky, locating in the Blue Grass region, between Lexington and Georgetown.  Mr. Mann died leaving three daughters, Elizabeth, Nancy and Mary.  His widow subsequently married Captain Lamb, and in 1797 came with him and her children to Chillicothe. Mrs. John Waddle survived her husband forty-three years, dying in 1874, at the advanced age of eighty-five years. She reared eight children, six of whom were living at the time of her death. They were Alexander, William, John, Eleanor, Lucy Ann, and Angus Laugham.
     Having laid a good foundation for his future education at the Chillicothe Academy, William Waddle continued his studies for two years in the Ohio State University, at Athens, leaving that institution at the age of eighteen years. Returning to his home in Clark County he worked on the farm for a year, and then began the study of medicine in Chillicothe, under the preceptorship of Doctor Fullerton. Subsequently entering the Jefferson Medical College, in Philadelphia, he was there graduated in 1836, and during the ensuing year traveled in the South. In 1838 Doctor Waddle located in Chillicothe, where his skill and ability found recognition. He built up a large and highly remunerative practice, and continued a resident of this city until his death on August 23, 1895.  In 1863 the doctor was appointed trustee of the Ohio University, and in 1868 was made a trustee of the Athens Insane Asylum, and for ten years filled the office, resigning in 1878. In 1880 he was appointed a trustee of the Central Insane Asylum at Columbus.
     Doctor Waddle married, in 1845, Jane S. McCoy, a native of Chillicothe. Her father, John McCoy, was born in Franklin County, Pennsylvania, a son of Alexander McCoy, coming on both sides of the house of Scotch-Irish ancestry. Migrating to Ohio, he was for many years engaged in mercantile business in Chillicothe, as a merchant meeting with excellent success. The maiden name of the wife of Mr. McCoy was Janet McCracken, who was born in Pennsylvania, of Scotch-Irish ancestry, and of honored Revolutionary stock. Nine children were born of the union of Doctor and Mrs. Waddle, namely: John McCoy, Elizabeth, William, Eleanor, Jane, Lucy, Edward F., Nancy, and Charles C.
     Doctor Waddle's was pre-eminently a pioneer spirit. In all that related to the betterment of mankind, he was ever foremost. Especially was this true of the profession he loved, and of his native town, which he had seen grow from such small beginnings, and for which he entertained such an enthusiastic devotion. He served for many years on the school board, and when the question of making a public library of the small school library arose, he threw himself with ardor into the project, using both his influence and his means to secure for the town so desirable an improvement.
     When the question of reclaiming the swamp of the "old riverbed" for a park was mooted by Mr. Bovey, he carried his plan to Doctor Waddle, who gave enthusiastic approval to the scheme. Being at that time a trustee of the Athens Asylum, he invited Mr. Haerlein, who was landscape gardener there, to visit Chillicothe as his guest, to decide whether the scheme was feasible, and when his report was favorable, the doctor used every energy, every influence, to make possible the park of which all Chillicotheans are now so justly proud. Major Poland, Doctor Waddle, and Mr. Meggenhofen were the original park board, each one of them having a deep interest in the park which was born under their auspices.
     The words of his friend, Judge Milton L. Clark, delivered in the Constitutional Convention of 1873-1874, will most fittingly close this imperfect sketch:
     "Of my townsman, Dr. William Waddle, no words of mine can exaggerate his merits. Eminent in his profession, second to few, if any in the state, a gentleman of large mind and superior mental abilities, a native of the 'Ancient Metropolis' and foremost in every good work, his humanity and philanthropy know no bounds!"
Source:  A Standard History of Ross County, Ohio - Vol. II. - Published by The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago & New York 1917 - Page 490
  MRS. BENJAMIN WALKER, whose home is at Gillespieville in Liberty Township, is a member of a very old and prominent family of Ross County, and her own lifetime of fully three quarters of a century has been spent within its limits.
     Her maiden name was Jones.  She was born in Liberty Township, on the Londonderry Pike, April 16, 1841.  Her parents were Jacob and Elizabeth (Clayton) Jones.  Jacob Jones, who was born in New Jersey, was the youngest in a family of eleven children, their father being Thomas Jones.  Thomas Jones brought his family to Ross County at a very early day, and was one of the leading settlers in influence as well as in time in Liberty Township. A large number of the Jones name and relationship located in that section of Ross County, and the place of their location was long known as the Jones Settlement. Members of this large and prominent family acquired land from the Government, and went through all the hardships attendant upon making homes in the wilderness. Jacob Jones grew up in that community and married Elizabeth Clayton, who was also a native of Liberty Township.  They spent the rest of their years on the old homestead established by Thomas Jones, and there Jacob managed the cultivation of about 300 acres.  He was prosperous and a man of no little influence in his community.  The lasting influence of the Quaker religion in that section can be traced in an important degree to members of the Jones family, and Jacob Jones was one of the leaders in that church and did much to upbuild and strengthen the influence of his denomination.  For many years he held an office in the Friends Church, in Liberty Township. Jacob Jones and wife were the parents of four children: Mary, now deceased, married Thomas Schooley; Hope, deceased, married S. Haddle; Rebecca is now Mrs. Benjamin Walker; Margaret, deceased, married Joseph Clyde.
     Miss Rebecca Jones grew up on the old homestead in Liberty Town ship, attended the district schools, and was quite young when she was first married. On June 10, 1860, she became the bride of Mahlon L. Dixon. To their marriage were born seven children: Eugenia, now deceased, who married Ezeriah Peecher; Homer, who lives with his mother; Edgar, a resident of Seymour, Indiana; Edna, wife of Jeremiah Ratliff of Liberty Township; Walter; Fulton, of Dayton, Ohio; and Auretta, deceased, who married Elmer Steigler.
     After the death of Mr. Dixon his widow married in October, 1878, the late Benjamin Walker, a well known resident of Ross County, who died in 1898.  Since his death Mrs. Walker has occupied the old home near Gillespieville.
     After her marriage to Mr. Dixon they lived for a number of years on Salt Creek, in Liberty Township, and at the time of his death they had a farm of 400 acres.  This farm was subsequently sold, and Mrs. Jones then removed to Londonderry.  The late Mr. Dixon was a very active church man and also stood high in political circles.  Benjamin Walker was an active Quaker, and in politics a republican.  Mrs. Walker is a birthright Quaker and has always been one of the active members of the Friends Church in her community.
931
  JOSEPH WILLIAMS.  Especially worthy of mention in a work of this character is Joseph Williams, a veteran of the Civil war, and a highly respected resident of Chillicothe, who, having accomplished a satisfactory work as a farmer, is now living retired from active business.  A son of Robert Lee Carter Williams, he was born Apr. 23, 1842, in Springfield Township, Ross County, Ohio.  His paternal grandfather, John Williams, was of English ancestry, and a life-long resident of Virginia, where he followed the trade of a carpenter.  One of his sons, James, settled permanently in Gainesboro, Tennessee; another son served for a long period in the United States navy; and another son was a sailor, engaged in the merchant marine service.
     Born and reared  in Orange County, Virginia, Robert Lee Carter Williams learned the shoemaker's trade at a time when all footwear was made to order, by hand, before the establishment of shoe factories.  Leaving his native state in 1830, he and his two brothers-in-law, Washington Peecher and Samuel Partlow, came with their families to Ohio, making the entire journey overland, with teams, and bringing all of their worldly goods with them.  The party forded the river at Galliopolis, and for a time after coming to Ohio Robert L. C. Williams lived near Schooley's Station.  Removing to Springfield Township, Ross County, he located on land belonging to his father-in-law, and there in addition to farming he worked at his trade to some extent, making shoes to order, living there until 1857.  Going in that year to Pickaway County, he resided in the vicinity of Kinderhook for a time, and on his return to Ross County settled in Union Township, where his death occurred in the seventy-third year of his age.  The maiden name of his wife was Nancy Partlow.  She was born in Spotsylvania County, Virginia, daughter of John Partlow, a native of Virginia, born in English ancestry.  The owner of a large plantation, which he operated many years with slave labor, John Partlow sold his landed estate in 1834, and, coming to Ohio, freed his slaves.  Purchasing several tracts of land in Ross County, he subsequently resided here until his death, making his home with his children.  Mr. Partlow married Mildred Ballinger, who spent her entire life in Virginia, dying in 1833.  She reared two sons, Daniel  and Samuel, and three daughters.
     Mrs. Nancy (Partlow) Williams died Nov. 19, 1879, aged seventy-six years.  To her and her husband, seven children were born, as follows:  John M.; Sarah; Ursula; Joseph, the subject of this brief personal narrative; Orland; David M.; and Jeremiah.  John M. enlisted twice for service in the Civil war; he first joined the Seventy-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and while scouting in Virginia was severely wounded, and honorably discharged from the service.  Recovering his strength, he enlisted in the Twelfth Ohio Cavalry, and continued with his company until the close of the war.  Orland enlisted for a period of three months in an independent company.
     As a boy and youth Joseph Williams attended the rural schools when opportunity offered, between sessions in the care of the farm, being thus engaged when the tocsin of war rang throughout the land.  In 1862 he enlisted in Company G, Sixtieth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and continued with his regiment in all of its engagements until honorably discharged from the service, Mar. 10, 1864.  Mr. Williams again enlisted, in June,1864, in Company H, One Hundred and Twenty-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and with his command went first to Kentucky, and thence to Knoxville, Tennessee.  In the fall of 1864, he was sent out with a foraging party into the Powell Valley, in Southwest Virginia, and there being captured by the enemy was held a prisoner-of-war for three days and nights.  Mr. Williams and two of his companions dug under the cabin walls, and made their escape.  They separated immediately after getting out of their prison, and Mr. Williams never again heard from the others.  He, however, made his way through the darkness to a small cabin occupied by a negro, who gave him some corn bread, the first morsel of food which he had tasted since his capture.  The negro then piloted him across the mountains, and at daybreak Mr. Williams hid in the top of a tree, where the negro left him, promising to send him another guide.  About nine o'clock he heard firing, which he felt sure was from his own side of the army, and starting in the direction from which the sound came he reached a Union camp in about two hours.  Mr. Williams was then sent to Knoxville by train, and subsequently remained with his command, which he there rejoined, until after the close of the war, receiving his honorable discharge in June, 1865.
     Returning home, Mr. Williams worked as a farm hand for two years.  In 1867, desirous of establishing himself as an independent farmer, he bought a team and some agricultural implements, rented a tract of land and began work on his own account.  Very successful in his undertakings, he bought, in 1875, a farm lying near Andersonville, and for more than thirty-five years managed it with the same systematic skill and enterprise that he had previously shown in his work, making many and valuable improvements on the place.  This farm, which he still owns, he occupied until 1911, when he removed to Chillicothe, where he is now living, retired from active labor.
     Mr. Williams married first, in 1872, Mary E. Thompson, who was born n Ross County, a daughter of John and Maria (Anderson) Thompson.  She died in 1879, leaving one daughter, Viola, wife of Jacob Pabst.  In 1886 Mr. Williams married for his second wife Nora C. Michael, who was born in Union Township, Ross County, a daughter of John and Catherine (Hauser) Michael.  Of this union two children have been born, namely: Selora and Joseph C.   Selora married Grover C. Stout, and they have two children, George Williams and Bernice Catherine.  Completing the course of study in the district schools of Union Township, and in the public schools of Chillicothe, Joseph was graduated from the Chillicothe Business College and has now a position as bookkeeper.
     Mr. and Mrs. Williams are both members of the Union Chapel Methodist Episcopal Church at Andersonville.  Mr. Williams was a charter member of the W. H. Lutz Post, No. 338.  Grand Army of the Republic of which there are now but four surviving members, and served as chaplain during the existence of the organization.  Although not a politician in the accepted sense of the term, he has filled various offices of trust and responsibility in the township, having been supervisor of roads, a member of the school board, and for a number of years was justice of the peace.
Source:  A Standard History of Ross County, Ohio - Vol. II. - Published by The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago & New York 1917 - Page 584
  JOSEPH WILLIAMS.  Especially worthy of mention in a work of this character is Joseph Williams, a veteran of the Civil war, and a highly respected resident of Chillicothe, who, having accomplished a satisfactory work as a farmer, is now living retired from active business.  A son of Robert Lee Carter Williams, he was born Apr. 23, 1842, in Springfield Township, Ross County, Ohio.  His paternal grandfather, John Williams, was of English ancestry, and a life-long resident of Virginia, where he followed the trade of a carpenter.  One of his sons, James, settled permanently in Gainesboro, Tennessee; another son served for a long period in the United States navy; and another son was a sailor, engaged in the merchant marine service.
     Born and reared  in Orange County, Virginia, Robert Lee Carter Williams learned the shoemaker's trade at a time when all footwear was made to order, by hand, before the establishment of shoe factories.  Leaving his native state in 1830, he and his two brothers-in-law, Washington Peecher and Samuel Partlow, came with their families to Ohio, making the entire journey overland, with teams, and bringing all of their worldly goods with them.  The party forded the river at Galliopolis, and for a time after coming to Ohio Robert L. C. Williams lived near Schooley's Station.  Removing to Springfield Township, Ross County, he located on land belonging to his father-in-law, and there in addition to farming he worked at his trade to some extent, making shoes to order, living there until 1857.  Going in that year to Pickaway County, he resided in the vicinity of Kinderhook for a time, and on his return to Ross County settled in Union Township, where his death occurred in the seventy-third year of his age.  The maiden name of his wife was Nancy Partlow.  She was born in Spotsylvania County, Virginia, daughter of John Partlow, a native of Virginia, born in English ancestry.  The owner of a large plantation, which he operated many years with slave labor, John Partlow sold his landed estate in 1834, and, coming to Ohio, freed his slaves.  Purchasing several tracts of land in Ross County, he subsequently resided here until his death, making his home with his children.  Mr. Partlow married Mildred Ballinger, who spent her entire life in Virginia, dying in 1833.  She reared two sons, Daniel  and Samuel, and three daughters.
     Mrs. Nancy (Partlow) Williams died Nov. 19, 1879, aged seventy-six years.  To her and her husband, seven children were born, as follows:  John M.; Sarah; Ursula; Joseph, the subject of this brief personal narrative; Orland; David M.; and Jeremiah.  John M. enlisted twice for service in the Civil war; he first joined the Seventy-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and while scouting in Virginia was severely wounded, and honorably discharged from the service.  Recovering his strength, he enlisted in the Twelfth Ohio Cavalry, and continued with his company until the close of the war.  Orland enlisted for a period of three months in an independent company.
     As a boy and youth Joseph Williams attended the rural schools when opportunity offered, between sessions in the care of the farm, being thus engaged when the tocsin of war rang throughout the land.  In 1862 he enlisted in Company G, Sixtieth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and continued with his regiment in all of its engagements until honorably discharged from the service, Mar. 10, 1864.  Mr. Williams again enlisted, in June,1864, in Company H, One Hundred and Twenty-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and with his command went first to Kentucky, and thence to Knoxville, Tennessee.  In the fall of 1864, he was sent out with a foraging party into the Powell Valley, in Southwest Virginia, and there being captured by the enemy was held a prisoner-of-war for three days and nights.  Mr. Williams and two of his companions dug under the cabin walls, and made their escape.  They separated immediately after getting out of their prison, and Mr. Williams never again heard from the others.  He, however, made his way through the darkness to a small cabin occupied by a negro, who gave him some corn bread, the first morsel of food which he had tasted since his capture.  The negro then piloted him across the mountains, and at daybreak Mr. Williams hid in the top of a tree, where the negro left him, promising to send him another guide.  About nine o'clock he heard firing, which he felt sure was from his own side of the army, and starting in the direction from which the sound came he reached a Union camp in about two hours.  Mr. Williams was then sent to Knoxville by train, and subsequently remained with his command, which he there rejoined, until after the close of the war, receiving his honorable discharge in June, 1865.
     Returning home, Mr. Williams worked as a farm hand for two years.  In 1867, desirous of establishing himself as an independent farmer, he bought a team and some agricultural implements, rented a tract of land and began work on his own account.  Very successful in his undertakings, he bought, in 1875, a farm lying near Andersonville, and for more than thirty-five years managed it with the same systematic skill and enterprise that he had previously shown in his work, making many and valuable improvements on the place.  This farm, which he still owns, he occupied until 1911, when he removed to Chillicothe, where he is now living, retired from active labor.
     Mr. Williams married first, in 1872, Mary E. Thompson, who was born n Ross County, a daughter of John and Maria (Anderson) Thompson.  She died in 1879, leaving one daughter, Viola, wife of Jacob Pabst.  In 1886 Mr. Williams married for his second wife Nora C. Michael, who was born in Union Township, Ross County, a daughter of John and Catherine (Hauser) Michael.  Of this union two children have been born, namely: Selora and Joseph C.   Selora married Grover C. Stout, and they have two children, George Williams and Bernice Catherine.  Completing the course of study in the district schools of Union Township, and in the public schools of Chillicothe, Joseph was graduated from the Chillicothe Business College and has now a position as bookkeeper.
     Mr. and Mrs. Williams are both members of the Union Chapel Methodist Episcopal Church at Andersonville.  Mr. Williams was a charter member of the W. H. Lutz Post, No. 338.  Grand Army of the Republic of which there are now but four surviving members, and served as chaplain during the existence of the organization.  Although not a politician in the accepted sense of the term, he has filled various offices of trust and responsibility in the township, having been supervisor of roads, a member of the school board, and for a number of years was justice of the peace.
Source:  A Standard History of Ross County, Ohio - Vol. II. - Published by The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago & New York 1917 - Page 584
  JOHN WRIGHT is one of the sterling agriculturists of Deerfield Township, and represents some of that sturdy and industrious stock that first
peopled this section of Ohio.
     He was born in Union Township of Ross County January 1, 1866, a son of Stephen Wright and a grandson of Peter WrightPeter Wright was a native Virginian.  From that state he moved to Ohio, and was one of the early men to establish a home in Ross County.  The land he purchased was covered with timber and located in Union Township.  His hard work enabled him to clear a farm from the woods, and he lived there honorable and upright until his death, November 16, 1861.  Peter Wright married Sarah Corbin, who was born in the State of Delaware, a daughter of William Corbin.  She died January 28, 1875, at the age of seventy-four, having reared four sons, named Peter, Joshua, John and Stephen, and four daughters, Eliza, Luvina, Nancy and Drusilla.
     Stephen Wright was born in Union Township of Ross County in 1833. As a young man he rented land from his father, and his success enabled him to purchase the old homestead, which he occupied and managed very successfully until his death, on October 23, 1906. On February 14, 1852, Stephen Wright married Nancy JusticeMrs. Wright, who is still living, at the age of eighty-three, was born in a log cabin in Newton Township, November 8, 1833.  Her father, Lemuel Justice, was a son of Isaac and Mrs. (Evans) Justice, both natives of Virginia and early settlers of Union Township, where they spent their lives.  Lemuel Justice as a young man assisted in constructing the Erie Canal.  His sons purchased a home for him in Pickaway County, not far from Yellowbud, and there he passed away March 11, 1876.  Mrs. Stephen Wright was one of four sons and five daughters, namely: William, Matilda, Mary, Jane, Nancy, Sarah, Lemuel, Stephen Corbin and James Polk.
     Mrs. Stephen Wright grew up among pioneer scenes.  As a young woman she learned to cook by the open fireplace, and there was no stove in her home until she had been married more than a year.  She also learned to spin both flax and wool.  She still has at her home two beautiful coverlets which represent the intricate handiwork of the women of an older generation.  Though bearing the weight of many years, she is still possessed of all her mental faculties, and talks very entertainingly of pioneer days in Ross County.  She reared nine children, Lafayette,
Mary, Peter, Sarah, Douglas, John, Elmer, Charles
and William.
     Mr. John Wright has always lived at home with his parents.  He was the solace and standby of his father and mother in their old age,
and after his father's death he and his mother continued to occupy the old homestead until 1912, when he bought a pleasant home in Deerfield
Township, where he and his mother still reside.
Source:  A Standard History of Ross County, Ohio - Vol. II. - Published by The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago & New York 1917 - Page 650

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