OHIO GENEALOGY EXPRESS

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TRUMBULL COUNTY,  OHIO
History & Genealogy

Source:
 History of Trumbull & Mahoning Counties, Ohio
Published:  Cleveland: H. Z. Williams & Bros.
VOLUME I
1882

CHAPTER III.
HARTFORD
Pg. 250

      This township was known under the surveys of the Connecticut Land company as number five, first range, in the Connecticut Western Reserve.   It was called Hartford, after the State capital of the same name.  According to draft book, page 225, draft seven-three was drawn by Urial Holmes and Ephraim Root.  This draft drew all of Hartford township, containing seventeen thousand three hundred and seventeen acres of land.  The Connecticut Land company executed a deed Apr. 22, 1798, to Root and Holmes for a consideration of $12,903.23, being less than seventy-five cents per acre.
     The township was surveyed into lots by Raphael Cooke.  It was bounded on the east by the Pennsylvania State line; on the north by Smithfield, afterwards named Vernon; on the west by Westfield, afterwards named Fowler; and on the south by Brookfield.
     According to Stowe's map of Trumbull county in 1800, numbers four and five in range one and two, and also numbers six, seven, eight and nine in range one, two, and three, were known as Vernon.
     Elections were held at Burg Hill, number five, for this territory of Vernon, which is now divided into sixteen townships, lying in Trumbull and Ashtabula counties.
     Burg Hill, located in the north part of the township of Hartford, may have received its name from the fact that it was the business point and place for elections and militia musters for many years early in the century.
     The earliest records to be found show that a separate township organization must have been in existence in 1811.  Elam Jones was elected township clerk at the April election of that year.
     Legal papers bearing date as late as 1814 were drawn in some cases, as if the names of Vernon and Hartford were both used to designate this township.
     The deed of Holmes and Root to Titis Brockway, drawn in 1803, in which they were reserved one acre of land for a "green," on which to build a "meeting-house," speaks of the township as "Hartford."  In a deed of Edward Brockway to his son Titus, drawn in 1802, the township is called Vernon, "in the territory of the United States, northwest of the Ohio river."
     The first deed by said Urial Holmes and Ephraim Root was made Sept. 23, 1799, to Edward Brockway, conveying 3,194 acres and a fraction of land, being lots seven, eight, fifteen, sixteen, twenty-one, and twenty-two, for a consideration of $500, being less than sixteen cents an acre.  According to tradition he exchanged his farm of two hundred acres in Hartford, Connecticut for nearly one-fourth of the township, and perhaps this formed a part of the consideration in addition to the amount mentioned in the deed.  A number of others exchanged their farms for land here.

GENERAL FEATURES.

 

FIRST SETTLEMENTS.

 

DUTCH RIDGE SETTLEMENT.

 

INDIAN HUNTING CAMP

 

OTHER EARLY SETTLERS.

     The following named persons came into the township during its early settlement, most of them probably from 1804 to 1811:  Titus Hayes, Russel Borden, Linus Hayes, Lester Hayes, Philo Borden, Nehemiah Andrews, Davis Fuller, Horace Flower, Sylvester Borden, Martin Gangyard, Ebenezer Chapman, Elijah Woodford, Thomas Dugan, David Lane, Lebbeus Beach, Levi Giddings, and Isaac Olmstead.

EARLY EVENTS.

 

EPIDEMIC OF 1813.

     The epidemic which prevailed so extensively through the whole Western country during the year 1813, visited this township, and carried off fifteen persons, mostly elderly people, all the deaths of the year except two or three, resulting from it.  Among the deaths are Asa Andrews, Jehiel Hulburt, Titus Hayes, Russel Borden, and Mrs. Lucy Fitch, widow of John Fitch, the inventor of steamboats, whose descendants by one branch are still residing here.

A BEAR STORY.

 

BEAR HUNT.

 

RING, OR WOLF HUNT.

 

THE OLD CHURCH.

 

LATER SETTLERS.

 

ANTI-SLAVERY MOVEMENT.

 

MILLS.

 

INDEPENDENCE DAY.

 

SCHOOLS.

 

MILITARY.

 

PUBLIC HOUSES.

 

POSTAL MATTERS.

 

MERCHANTS.

 

PHYSICIANS.

 

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH.

 

HARTFORD METHODIST CHURCH.

 

DISCIPLES CHURCH.

 

BROCKWAY MILLS METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH.

 

MASONRY.

 

BURG HILL GRANGE NO. 1107.

 

CEMETERIES.

     There are three cemeteries in the township, the one at the center being the oldest.  The site was selected in 1805, after the death of Fidelia Andrews, the land being given by Titus Brockway.  She was buried in the forest, and her grave was surrounded by an enclosure of logs.
     Among the marble headstones of later years are scattered here and there the old brown flag and sand-stones, which mark the early graves.  On many of these the inscriptions are rudely chiseled, and some are almost obliterated by the hand of time.  Beside them grow the roses planted by hands long since folded to rest in other graves.
     Here lies the first pioneer, Edward Brockway, and a large number of his descendants are also buried here.  The soldier of the Revolution and the soldier of the Rebellion are found here, and near them lies Asahel Brainard, the first settler, who spent the winter alone in this unbroken forest, the only representative of this pioneer family buried in the township.  The Hon. Calvin Cone, the Hon. Titus Brockway, Colonel William Bushnell, and the Hon. James Beebe are among the prominent persons interred in this old cemetery, including Captain Alexander Bushnell, Thomas Bushnell, Titus Hayes, Edward Brockway, and Daniel Bushnell, who were soldiers of the war of the Revolution.  Here also are buried Thomas McFarland, Davis Fuller, Alexander Bushnell, Elijah Woodford, Selden Jones, Seth Thompson, Hosea Mowrey, John Pfouts, Wilson Bushnell, Michael Quiggle, Matthias Gates, S. C. Jones, Elijah Sawyer, Ambrose Hart, Jehial Hulburt, Lester Bushnell, General Andrews Bushnell, Archibald McFarland, and Elisha Bennett, soldiers of the War of 1812.  Also D. W. Brockway, Milo Bushnell, Lieutenant C. C. Hart, Christopher A. Bennett, Charles Bennett, and Lieutenant Davis Fuller, Soldiers of the Rebellion.
     The burying ground at Burg Hill has been the burial place of the pioneer families of Hayes, Jones, Merry, and Hull.  The first grave was that of Eliza Hayes, daughter of Colonel Richard Hayes, who died Aug. 14, 1814.  This site was afterwards presented to the township by the Hayes familyIsaac Jones, one of the first pioneers, William C. Jones, a pioneer and a veteran of 1776, Colonel Richard Hayes, Lester Hayes, Luman Brockway, and James Henry, soldiers of the War of 1812, and Robert Mizener, a Vernon soldier of the late war, are buried here.
     The west burying ground was given to the township by Deacon Elihu Bates, and the first grave was that of Mrs. Samuel Bates, in 1837.  Romanta Norton, Joel Hall, and William Bates, soldiers of 1812 and George Norton, a soldier of the late war, are buried here.  This has been the burial place of the Bates, Leaming, Norton, Parsons, Newman, Spencer, Mason, and Hall families, mostly settlers of a later date.  John Grocost, a soldier of 1812, was buried on lot one, on the farm formerly owned by him.
     At Orangeville no permanent place of burial was selected until 1841, when Augustus Reed made a donation of land for that purpose.  Previous to this time most of the interments were at the centre of the township, a few, however, being made near the residence of Mr. Patton.  According to tradition early in the century a man was buried where the shop of Mr. Davis now stands, and also two children by the name of Totman on the south bank of the Pymatuning east of the State line.  The first interment in the present cemetery was Ann Catherine, a daughter of Rensselaer Root, who died June 10, 1841.  John Cassidy, Jacob Dewitt, O. S. Goodrich, William Carnes, and A. W. Moses, soldiers of the War of 1812, are buried here.  Of the late war Harrison Allen, Caleb Leonard, Milton Mellinger, George Wait, and a non-resident soldier by the name of Fitzpatrick, who was killed on the railroad, are also buried here.

ORANGEVILLE.

 

BAPTIST CHURCH.

 

ORANGEVILLE METHODIST CHURCH.

 

UNITED BRETHREN CHURCH.

 

OLD PEOPLE.

     Mrs. Chloe (Wait) Bushnell, wife of Captain Alexander Bushnell, was born June 20, 1738, at Lyme, Connecticut, and died here Oct. 28, 1832, the oldest person deceased in the township during the first seventy years of its history.  Nearly thirty years before she came here with three generations of descendants, and but for an  accident might have lived her hundred years.  At the time of her death her descendants numbered three hundred and twenty-two, four being of the fifth generation.
     Mrs. Sarah (Hyde) Jones, wife of Elam Jones was born May 18, 1776, at West Hartland, Connecticut, and died Aug. 30, 1870.  She retained her memory in an unusual degree, and to her more than to any one else is the writer indebted for his data of our pioneer history.  She had been a resident of the township sixty-five years at the time of her decease.  She had, during her life, a personal acquaintance with all of our early citizens, and her narrations of incidents in pioneer times were full of interest.  She was a daughter of Uriah Hyde, whose family has been noted for its longevity.
     Mrs. Elizabeth (Hyde) Hewitt, wife of Samuel Hewitt, and daughter of Uriah Hyde, was born in West Hartland, Connecticut, Jan. 4, 1772.  she resided here for many years but removed with her son, S. N. Hewitt, to Vernon.  At ninety-eight years of age she removed to Kansas and a few months later to Fayetteville, Arkansas, where she died July 22, 1873, being over one hundred and one years of age.
     Mrs. Anna (Hyde) Hull, wife of William Hull, and daughter of Uriah Hyde, was born Nov. 16, 1778, at West Hartland, Connecticut, and died July 11, 1874, being in the ninety-sixth year of her age, and at the time of her death the oldest person ever deceased in the township.
     Mrs. Lovisa (Borden) Fitch, wife of Shaler Fitch, was born Dec. 10, 1779, and died June 6, 1871.  They emigrated to Ohio in 1804.
     Mrs. Mary Kepner Pfouts, wife of John Pfouts, was born Sept. 5, 1771, and died Jan. 9, 1864.
     George W. Cassidy was born in Chester county, Pennsylvania, Sept. 15, 1780, and died Apr. 2, 1870.  He was a soldier in the War of 1812 and lost his right arm at the battle of Chippewa.
     Mrs. Elizabeth (Allerton) Cassidy was born Apr. 5, 1785, and died June 24, 1875.
     Mrs. Phebe (Bushnell) Borden, wife of Ashel Borden, was born Aug. 2, 1784, and died Dec. 4, 1875.  She was the last of the adult pioneers to pass away.
     Mrs. Catherine (Lavley) Roberts was born near Baltimore, Maryland, Aug. 20, 1776, and died here Jan. 10, 1881, at the residence of her son-in-law, Mr. Jacob Barnhart.  She had attained the great age of one hundred and four years, four months, and twenty days.  In 1794 she was married to Peter Roberts, and four years, four months, and twenty days.  In 1794 she was married to Peter Roberts, and for the almost unparalleled period of seventy-eight years they journeyed through life together, he having reached the advanced age of ninety-six years at the time of his death.  She always possessed a strong constitution and in her earlier years was accustomed to doing much out-door work and boasted of having been able to reap more wheat than any man, not excepting her husband.  She kept house and did all her own work until her husband's death, although she was then ninety-eight years of age.  Se was the wife of a soldier of the War of 1812, and grand-daughter of a soldier of the Revolution.  She was undoubtedly the oldest person in the county, and probably on the Western Reserve, if not in the State.
     Nathaniel Wilson, for many years a resident here, died in his ninety-second year.
     Among the old people still living in the township who have arrived at fourscore years and over, are Mrs. Alexander Bushnell, at the age of 87; Mrs. Seth Thompson, 85; Lory Norton, 84; John Jones, 82; George W. Bushnell, 82; Mrs. Isaac Leaming, 84; Edward Bowmiller, 83; Dorothy Bowmiller, 83; Mrs. Elisha Cannon, 82; Margaret Bear, 82; Michael Pfouts, 80; Bradford Hewitt, 82; Rebecca Craton, 81; Mrs. Louisa Laird, 80; Mrs. Julia Bates, 80; John Adam Sonk, 87He was born in Bavaria May 10, 1794.  In 1814 he was drafted into the German army, and served in the second company of fusileers, Ninth regiment, commanded by Ferdinand of Wurtemburg.  He served six years, nine months in active service, and the rest of the time in garrison.
     According to the census of 1880 fifty-three persons in the township had passed their three-score and ten years.

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS.

 

 

BIOGRAPHIES OF HARTFORD TOWNSHIP

DR. R. M. BEEBE

THE BORDEN FAMILY

EDWARD BROCKWAY

BUSHNELL FAMILY - Partially finished

FOWLER FAMILY

DAVIS FULLER

HAYES FAMILY

SULLIVAN HUTCHINS

THE JONES FAMILY

KEPNER FAMILY

McFARLAND FAMILY

WILLIS REEDER

GEORGE SNYDER, SR.
 

BIOGRAPHICAL NOTES:

     PETER CARLTON was born in Liberty township, Oct. 28, 1821.  He is a grandson of Francis Carlton, a Revolutionary soldier, who emigrated from New Jersey in 1799, and was one of the first settlers of Warren, Ohio, and son of Peter Carlton, a solder of the War of 1812, who was one of the boys present at Salt Springs when Captain George was killed by McMahon, July 20, 1800.  Peter Carlton, Jr., married Miss Catherine Cauffield, of Brookfield, in 1850, and removed to Hartford in 1857, and settled in the south part of the township, on lot twenty-nine, on the farm where he has since resided.  Their children are Mary B., Lizzie A., Jennie D., John B. and BerthaMr. Carlton is a much respected citizen and a peaceable, industrious farmer.  He was elected justice of the peace in 1866, and has been successively re-elected four times, holding the office fifteen years.  Although he is an active worker in the Republican party he has had the support of all parties.  He has considerable reputation as a juror, often having served as grand, common pleas, the United States juror.  He was one of the corporators of the Harvard Academic institute.  He was the only man in the township who attended the inauguration of President Garfield in 1881.  He now holds the office of notary public.

     WILLIAM HULL

     NORMAN E. AUSTIN

     ARIAL CHAPMAN

     CHARLES HULL

     WILLIAM BOND

     JOHN FITCH

     JAMES D. BURNETT

     GILES M. HAYES is a prosperous, enterprising young farmer, residing on lot forty near the east line of the township in Hartford; here he located about 1875, and married Miss Emma Barnhart.  He is a son of Almon Hayes and grandson of Elias Hayes, late of Harrison county, Ohio, and on his mother's side a descendant of Wilcox Akins, one of the pioneers of Vernon, who came from Norwalk, Connecticut, about 1810.

 

 

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