OHIO GENEALOGY EXPRESS

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Welcome to
TRUMBULL COUNTY,  OHIO
History & Genealogy

Source:
 History of Trumbull & Mahoning Counties, Ohio
Published:  Cleveland: H. Z. Williams & Bros.
VOLUME I
1882

CHAPTER IV.
KINSMAN
Pg. 288

     LOCATION AND OWNERSHIP.

     Kinsman - township number seven in the first range - is situated in the northeast corner of the county, adjoining the Ashtabula county line on the north and the Pennsylvania line on the east.  On the south is the township of Vernon and on the west of township of Gustavus.  The township contains 16, 664 acres, to which was annexed by the equalizing board 1,857 acres (lot number eight, tract two) in the eleventh range, being a part of the land on which the city of Akron is now located.  The first township line run by the surveyors began at the south line of the reserve, five miles west from the Pennsylvania State line, and deflected so much from a parallel line as to be nearly five miles and a half from the State line at the lake shore, which accounts for the extra six hundred and sixty-four acres.  The draft was made in 1798 and is known as draft number eighty-one of that series.  The requisite amount to make a draft of a standard township was $12,903.23, and in this draft was assigned as joint owner in this township and in other lands drawn in other drafts.  In the division of the Kinsman and Perkins interest Mr. Kinsman took this township and Major Perkins the Akron and other lands.  Mr. Kinsman also purchased the interests of Joseph Coit and Uriah Tracy, who was then a United States Senator from Connecticut.

PHYSICAL FEATURES, STREAMS, SOIL, TIMBER.

 

INDIANS.

 

ANCIENT HISTORY.

 

SURVEY AND FIRST IMPROVEMENTS.

 

EARLY SETTLEMENT.

     While the settlement of the township will date from the improvements made by Messrs. Kinsman and Reeve, above mentioned, Martin Tidd and his son-in-law, James Hill, and David Randall are regarded as the first permanent settlers, since they were the first to take up their abode with their families, which they did in the spring of 1802, Mr. Kinsman having made a contract with them to this effect the previous fall.
     In April the three families left Youngstown together, with two teams and wagons.  There was probably a good natured strife between the Tidd party, who occupied one wagon, and Randall, as to who should first arrive upon the ground, but an accident happening to Randall, his wagon breaking down at Smithfield (now Vernon), he was detained there over night.  Tidd and family, with Hill and wife, proceeded to Kinsman, and thus bore off the honors of being the first permanent settlers.  Tidd settled on the hill north of the Seth Perkins farm, getting one hundred acres in exchange for sixty acres in Kinsman.  Randall located on the Seth Perkins farm Tidd and Randall were originally from the Wyoming valley, Pennsylvania.  The former lived a short distance below the settlement of Wyoming at the time of the massacre, his house occupying a high bluff on the banks of the Susquehanna river.  His house is said to have been used as a block-house, and during the massacre afforded a place of safety for many of the inhabitants in the vicinity.  After removing from Wyoming he went to Westmoreland county.  In 1798 he came to Youngstown with his family and nephew, Captain Hillman, where he lived until his removal to Kinsman.  Tidd possessed the true spirit of the pioneer, though he continued to live in Kinsman until his death, yet he was restless during the progress of settlement and improvement of the country, and was only prevented from "moving on" by reason of his advanced age and out of deference to the wishes of his children, who did not inherit his pioneer spirit.  He died at an advanced age.
     Randall moved from Pennsylvania down on the Ohio river, settling near Marietta, Washington county, whence he came to Youngstown in 1800.  In his frequent removals from place to place he acquired an extensive acquaintance with the Indians, with whom his dealings were always characterized by such exceptional kindliness and honesty as to invariably win their confidence and good will.  At the time of the McMahan difficulty at the salt spring, elsewhere related, he went with Captain Hillman to visit the Indians, and endeavor to prevent the retaliatory measures which they seemed determined to inflict upon the whites.
     Randall lived but a short time on the Perkins farm, removing to the farm which in 1806 he exchanged with John Allen for land in Ashtabula county.  He resided in Ashtabula but a short time, returning to Kinsman and locating on Stratton creek.  He continued to live in Kinsman until advanced in life, when he removed to Michigan, where he died at the age of seventy-two.
     As a result of the contract Mr. Kinsman and Ebenezer Reeve, previously mentioned, the latter exchanged his land in Norwich, Connecticut, for land in Kinsman, and in 1802 moved out with his two daughters, Deborah and Hannah, and erected a log house opposite the site of the Sutliff frame house, where he lived until 1807.  In that year he built a two-story frame house in front of where the house of Wayne Bidwell was afterwards built.  This was the first two-story frame house erected in Kinsman.  Here Mr. Reeve spent the rest of his life.
     Besides those already mentioned a few families settled in 1802.  Paul Rice and his mother settled on land which subsequently became the Webber farm Alexander Clark began operations upon his farm.  Urial Driggs located east of Driggs' hill.
     In 1803 Captain Charles Case came into the township, and assisted in tending the Kinsman saw-mill.  He was accustomed to give singing lessons, free of charge, and gained considerable popularity thereby.  He removed to Williamsfield, and died there.
     The same year settlements were made as follows:  William Tidd, John Wade, John Little, Walter Davis, Isaac and John Matthews - with whom their sister Betsy lived - Robert Laughlin, Peter Yeoman, George Gordon Dement, George Matthews, Joseph McMichael, Joshua Budwell, and his son Henry, and William Knox settled in the township.  Several of these men and single.  John Murray, a carpenter and a single man, arrived and lived with the Davises.
    
In July, 1804, after a journey of seven weeks, John Kinsman and family arrived in the township.  His family then consisted of himself and wife and four children - John, Joseph, Sally, and Olive.  Accompanying him were several persons whom he had engaged to assist him in erecting a house and other buildings for his family.  In this party of settlers were Chester Lewis and family, also his mother-in-law, Mrs. Manning, and her son Samuel.  Lewis drove an ox team loaded with household furniture and farming implements.  Mr. Kinsman came with a number of teams.  On his way he bought a stock of goods, and placed them in charge of Joseph Coit, who came out to act as clerk in the store.  Louisa Morse, afterward the wife of Isaac Meacham, and Eunice Morgan, afterward Mrs. John L. Cook, came with the company; also Cook and Jahazel Lathrop, carpenters.
     In 1804 Plumb Sutliff settled on the creek, but moved to a farm on the center road a year later, where he died, in 1834, aged eighty-three.  He married, the year of his settlement, Deborah Reeve, of Kinsman.
     William Scott settled on the ridge in 1804.
     Deacon William Matthews settled during the same year.  He was a Revolutionary soldier.  In 1808 he was appointed justice of the peace.  Deacon Matthews was one of the most earnest of working Christians, and was largely instrumental in promoting the cause of religion in the new settlement.  He was always in attendance upon the religious meetings  Whatever the weather and frequently conducted the services, as clergymen were seldom in the township during its early years.
     Thirty families comprised the inhabitants of the township in 1805, together with twenty or thirty young unmarried men, and twelve or fifteen young women, who were single.  Some of the settlers whose names have not yet been mentioned were John Neil, Thomas, John, and William Gillis, Stephen Splitstone, Captain William Westby and his sons, James, John, and Ebenezer, William and Andrew Christy, Thomas Potter, Leonard Blackburn, David and Elam Lindsley.
     John Allen
, of Norwich, Connecticut, came to the township in 1806.  The Allen family has played an important part in the affairs of this township.
     David Brackin, a native of Ireland, located in this township in 1806.  The same year came John Andrews.  He married Hannah, the youngest daughter of Ebenezer Reeve, to whom eight children were born.  Mr. Andrews was born in Connecticut, in 1782, and died at the age of eighty-one.  About 1812 he engaged in business as a merchant.  He was a useful member of society, and a warm supporter of schools and churches.  As early as 1825 a boarding school in Kinsman grew up under his patronage, and ten years later, at his house, built for such a purpose, a female boarding school was opened and successfully conducted until 1840.
     Jesse Meacham came from Hartland, Connecticut, in 1806, Lester Cone in 1807, Peter Lossee in 1808, Jairus Brockett in 1809, Michael Burns in 1808, Ira Meacham in 1812, Joshua Yeomans in 1814, Obed Gilder in 1815, Ebenezer Webber, John Yeomans, Simon Fobes, and others later.
 

EARLY EVENTS.

 

ROADS.

 

SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL BUILDINGS.

 

KINSMAN ACADEMY.

 

NOTES ON SETTLEMENT.
pg. 305

     CHARLES BURNHAM, oldest son of Jedediah Burnham, (a sketch of whom is given elsewhere) and Sophia Bidwell, was born in Kinsman, Ohio, Mar. 17, 1817.  He remained at home until 23 years of age, and in his younger days was engaged in clerking in Kinsman and elsewhere.  He purchased the place where he still resides, the old Ford place, in 1853.  He was married June 1st of the same year, to Elizabeth A. Galpin, daughter of Elnathan Gilpin, born in 1825.  They have three children, as follows:  Abbie S., born Mar. 15, 1857; Lizzie G. Feb. 19, 1859; Charles B., Feb. 20, 1861 to 1865, and was elected again the latter year, but declined to serve; has also served as assessor three terms.  His brother Thomas was a soldier in the Union army in the Rebellion, and was killed at Kershaw mountain, Georgia.

     BENJAMIN ALLEN

     LYMAN P. ANDREWS

     ISAAC MEACHAM

     ALLEN W. GILLIS

     ROBERT GILLIS

     T. B. SCOTT

     JOHN S. ALLEN

     JOHN W. McCURDY

     JOSEPH REED

     CHARLES B. WEBBER

     JAMES W. STORIER

     WILLIAM B. EDWARDS    

     LESTER MATTHEWS

     L. A. COLE

     HARMON COLE

     EDWIN YEOMANS

     J. M. KING

     GORDON BURNSIDE

     JAMES J. CHRISTY

     ISAAC T. ALLEN

     WILLIAM A. THOMAS

     L. W. ROBERTS

     JOHN SISLEY

     GEORGE H. NICKERSON

     WILLIAM R. CHRISTY

     CHRISTIAN BETTS

     JOHN M. ALLEN

     WILLIAM CHRISTY

     ALBERT W. MATTHEWS

     DAVID S. GILLIS

     FRANCIS GILLIS

     JOHN CRAIG

     PETER LOSSEE

     A. H. PORTER

     MRS. HARRIET B. PARKER

     MRS. RHODA SPENCER

     GEORGE BALDWIN

     DR. LUMAN G. MOORE 315

     LYMAN ROOT 315

     DANIEL C. CLINGINSMITH 315

     CAPTAIN E. C. BRIGGS 315

     WAYNE BIDWELL 316

     J. W. CHASE 316

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