OHIO GENEALOGY EXPRESS

A Part of Genealogy Express

 

Welcome to
WARREN COUNTY, OHIO

History & Genealogy

.

Biographies

Source: 
History of Warren Co., Ohio
containing
A History of the County; Its Townships, Towns, Schools, Churches,
Etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of Early
Settlers and Prominent Men; History of The North-
West Territory; History of Ohio; Map of
Warren County; Constitution of the
United States, Miscellaneous
Matters, Etc., Etc. 
- Illustrated -
Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co.,
1882

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W XYZ

< CLICK HERE TO RETURN TO 1882 BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX >
< CLICK HERE TO RETURN TO LIST OF BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES >

  Turtle Creek Twp. -
AMOS BABBITT and ISAAC BEALS, Union Village; Deacon and Elder. 
The above named gentlemen represent the North Family of Shakers at Union Village.  Mr. Beal was born in Knox County, East Tenn., May 1, 1804; his parents were William and Patience Beal, of North Carolina, and were both raised as Quakers.  His father was a hunter and farmer, and died on his way to Union Village.  Isaac attended school in Turtle Creek Township and learned the brick mason's trade, which he follows still when occasion offers.  In 1868, he was appointed Second Elder of the North Family, and since then has been promoted to the Eldership.
     AMOS BABBITT is a deacon in the same family as the above; he was born in Washington County, Penn., Feb. 17, 1806; he is the son of Jacob and Sarah (Craft) Babbitt.  His father joined the Shakers in 1817, previous to that time being a Presbyterian.  He died in 1823.  Amos was raided on the farm, and when 18 years of age learned shoemaking and carpentering, in both of which he became an adept.  Being a natural mechanic, he is a valuable member of the society. He was appointed Deacon in 1838. In 1878 he was appointed First Elder, and in that capacity he continued until 1879, since which time he has been Deacon and Trustee.
Source: History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - Page 725
  Turtle Creek Twp. -
LUTHER BABBITT, farmer; P. O. Lebanon; was born in the State of Pennsylvania, Feb. 11, 1808; he is the son of Jacob and Sarah (Craft) Babbitt, the former a native of New Jersey and the latter of Massachusetts, and both of English descent.  They emigrated with their family of ten children to the West in 1817, and located in Warren County, Ohio.  Our subject received a good education in the schools of Pennsylvania and Ohio, and early learned the carpenter trade, at which he worked five years; but, preferring the life of a farmer, he gave up his trade and turned his whole attention to farming.  He was married in 1840 to Miss Mary W. Duckworth, a native of Warren County, and daughter of George Duckworth, Esq.  Of this marriage, two children were born, viz., George and James, the latter being a druggist by profession and the former a farmer.  Mr. and Mrs. Babbitt are members of the M. E. Church.  He is a Republican in politics, and for ten years was  School Director in his district.  He has lived most of his life in Warren County, and is one of the county's most reliable and trustworthy gentleman.
Source: History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - Page 725
  Turtle Creek Twp. -
S. R. BAILEY, P. O. Lebanon, was born in Limestone Co., Ala., Dec. 29, 1847.  He was a son of Samuel and Nancy Bailey.  While yet a child, his father died.  His mother was married to her second husband.  In 1863, S. R. Bailey emigrated to Northern Ohio.  He has began his career without a dollar. His knowledge of books and scanty indeed, but to be thoroughly educated was then the height of his ambition.  During the fall of 1865, eh managed to save $50, which he invested in Government Bonds.  In the meantime he found employment in a factory in the city of Sandusky.  There he remained about two years, during which he managed to save a few hundred dollars.  In 1867, he lent as much of his money as he could spare to a wealthy farmer in Erie County, and entered the University of Wilberforce, Greene Co., Ohio.  There he remained about seven years, and graduated in the class of 1874.  In the fall of the same year, he went to Jackson, Miss., and engaged to teach a country school in Hinds County.  Having taught four months, he went to the city of Yazoo, Miss., and opened a notion store early in the spring of 1875, but the lawless state of affairs made it unfavorable for his business. At the beginning of 1876, he closed out and returned to Ohio.  Arriving at Xenia on January 10, he was informed of an opening in the town of Lebanon, Ohio, for a teacher.  Accordingly, he made application, and was employed as Principal in the department of the United School for the education of the colored youth, which position he still holds.  On June 22, 1880, he married Mary Stamps, of Blue Lick Springs, Kentucky, daughter of Chanie Stamps, to whose sole and protection Mary and her brother, Albert Stamps, were committed; and on the 20th of November, 1881, she was taken by the hand of death from her only two children, Mary and Albert.  On the 16th day of April, there was born from the marriage of S. R. Bailey with Mary, a girl child, who is named Alberta Allen Bailey.
Source: History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - Page 725
  W. WALLACE BAIRD, miller, Springboro, Ohio, was born at Miamisburg, Montgomery Co., Ohio, Aug. 8, 1846.  He was a son of Bedent and Margaret (Silver) Baird, who were of Scotch and German descent.  Our subject came to Springboro in 1872 and took charge of the mechanical department of the Miami Valley College, in which capacity he continued for two years.  He afterward purchased the old Spring Garden Mill, one of the early mills of the county, and in 1877 built a new mill near its site; since then, he has made milling his principal business.  He was married, June 22, 1876, to Catharine M. Maltbie, a daughter of Arthur and Nancy J. (Moses) Maltbie; by this marriage, two children were born, viz., Arthur, deceased, and Mable, now living.  In 1878, Mr. Baird built a fine brick residence on Main street, in Springboro, where he now lives; it is one of the finest residences in the town, and attracts attention by its commanding appearance and the beauty of its construction.
(Source:  History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - page 891)
  Hamilton Twp. -
JOSEPH BAKER, farmer, P. O. Morrow, was born in this township on the farm where William Ditmus lives, in the year 1833, and is a son of Abraham Baker, a pioneer of whom mention is made in this work.  He was brought upon the farm and received only a common education, remaining with his parents till of age.  He was married to Lydia, daughter of Jno. and Sarah Ertle, by whom he has had six children, three living, viz.:  Hattie L., Walter S., and Lewis D.  The deceased are Charley, Frank and an infant.  Mr. B. owns 107 acres of excellent land, which is well improved and lying in survey 1496, on which he settled in 1859.  He is one among the successful and enterprising farmers of the county and a public spirited gentleman, and has held the local offices of Supervisor and School Director repeatedly.  Is a Republican in politics, with which party he has always voted.  Mrs. B. was born in the county in 1835.
Source: History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - Page 838
  Clear Creek Twp. -
WILLIAM H. BALLARD, merchant and Postmaster, Red Lion; born in Connecticut July 1, 1817; is a son of Jesse and Thankful (Warren) Ballard, natives of Connecticut, who emigrated to the State of New York; thence, about 1843, to Ohio and located in Warren County; thence, in 1846, removed to Preble County, where he died; his wife returned to Warren County, where she resided with her son, our subject, till her death, about 1858.  She, it is believed, was a grand-daughter of Gen. Warren, of Revolutionary fame; they had three sons, one only now living - William H.  Mrs. Ballard was twice married, first, to a Mr. Smith, by whom she had one daughter - Wealthy (deceased).  Our subject was but three yeras of age when his father moved to New York State; there he grew to manhood and married, and, in 1840, emigrated to Ohio and located at Red Lion, where he has since resided - a period of forty-one years.  Here we desire to revert back to the time Mr. Ballard's arrival in this county with his family, consisting of his wife and two small children.  Their worldly possessions consisted of one bed and a few household goods in one medium-sized store-box, with $1.25 in money, which he immediately laid out for medicine to cure his wife of the ague.  The first work he did was cutting up corn at 50 cents per day; he then entered upon the manufacture of matches by hand, with a knife, having been fortunate enough to bring with him from the East a small amount of compound for the dipping of the matches; for these, he found a ready sale, though the demand was limited; he succeeded in making enough to procure a very scanty living; he continued on, and the demand for his matches increased, and his manufacture and sale increased in proportion.  At one time, to obtain timber for his matches, he walked four miles to the Shaker mill and obtained a large pine slab, and carried it home on his shoulder; this made him quite an amount of stock for trade.  Having thus far traveled on foot to make sale of his goods, he now built and caused to be built a rough cheap wagon, and, in the spring of 1845,  bought an old horse for $18, for which he gave his note; this was one degree of improvement in business.  When his note became due, he met its payment.  Thus little by little he plodded on.  In 1846, he obtained the appointment of Postmaster, which then paid from $7 to $10 per quarter.  He then purchased a very small stock of groceries; his wife attended the post office and store and to her household affairs.  This yielded a small profit, while Mr. Ballard continued the manufacture of a machine of his own invention for splitting out his matches; this enabled him to increase the rapidity of manufacture, commensurate with the demand.  Thus he continued onward and upward in progress, till he was able to enjoy a few of the common comforts of life.  He then purchased a vacant lot, then an old building, which he moved on to it; continued active in business; invented more improvements on his machine, and finally purchased a small engine and boiler; employed more help and increased his volume of business and profits; purchased another property, and, fromtime to time, another, till at the present time, by his business and traffic, he has become one of hte wealthiest men in Red Lion.  After Mr. Ballard had made a good start in life, he entered upon the study of law, under and through the aid of Maj. Williams, of Lebanon, and, although he has never applied for admission to the bar, he has done a large practice at home and in the Probate Court. He has held hte appointment of Postmaster continuously since 1846, ecept four years under Buchanan's administration a period of thirty-five years, unsurpassed, perhaps by any present incumbent in the county.  This is a brief sketch of one who has arisen from poverty and obscurity to wealt and prominence by his own industry and energy - a purely sellf-made man, which has few parallels and we hope that its presence upon these pages may in future times inspire many a poor young man with nerve and energy and induce him to "go and do likewise."  Mr. Ballard and wife had six children: three now survive - George, Laura (now Mrs. Kellenberger) and Mary M.
Source: History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - Page 891
  Franklin Twp. -
WILLIAM B. BALLINGER, hardware merchant, No. 3, Woodward's Block, Franklin; son of Isaac and Orinda Ballinger; was born in Union Co., Ind., May 6, 1855.  When 19 years of age, he entered a grocery store as clerk, in Liberty, Ind., for Ballinger Bros.; he remained with them one year as a clerk, when he was admitted as a partner.  In 1879, he came to Franklin and opened a hardware store, where he is at present; carries a full line of hardware, tinware, stoves, iron, steel, glass, etc.; carries a stock of $5,000, and has the leading business in his line in town.  He was married, in Butler Co., Ohio, in 1877, to Laura, daughter of Alexander and Rebecca Young, born in Butler County.  He has one house and lot in Liberty, Union Co., Ind.
Source: History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - Page 794
  JONATHAN J. BANER, carriage manufacturer and Justice of the Peace, Springboro; born in New Jersey Nov. 3, 1812; is a son of Isaac and Sarah (Jones) Baner, natives of New Jersey, the Baner ancestors being of French descent.  Isaac was a shoemaker by trade, and follows that business in his native State till 1818; he and his family emigrated to Ohio and settled near Waynesville; thence, in 1821, moved to Springboro, where he carried on trade the balance of his life; he died, in 1869, aged 80 years; his wife survived him till 1875, when she died, aged 86 years   They had four children - jonathan J.; Lydia, now Mrs. James Crosby; William, residing in New York City, and Joseph, who resides in Illinois.  The maternal grandparents were Jonathan and Mary Jones, natives of New Jersey, who lived and died in their native State.  The subject of this sketch was 6 years of age when his parents came to this county, and here he was raised and grew to maturity; when young, he learned the carriage making business, which he has followed the greater part of his life.  On Sept. 14, 1837, was united in marriage with Rebecca Ann, daughter of Isaac and Ann Thomas, natives of New Jersey, but who emigrated to Ohio and became residents of Warren County in 1805, where they lived and died, being among the pioneer settlers of the county.  They had six children, three sons and three daughters; the three daughters now survive.  Mary, now Widow Smith; Elizabeth and Rebecca Ann (who was born in Warren County in 1805).  Mr. Baner and wife had had five children, all now deceased.  Mr. Baner has now been a resident of Springboro for sixty years; has seen many and wonderful changes take place during these threescore years; is one among the few old settlers who have lived here for that long period of years and has  taken part in and witnessed the growth and progress of the village and surrounding country from its infancy to the present time.  Mr. Baner is a man of remarkable kindness of heart, beloved and respected by all who know him; whose integrity is undoubted and whose word is as good as his note, and who has the unbounded confidence of his community; has held several offices of his township and village; has been Township Clerk and is now Treasurer of the School Board and of the village of Springboro and also Treasurer of the township; the latter office he has held sixteen consecutive years, and is now Justice of the Peace.
Source: History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - Page 892
  JOHN M. BLACKFORD, farmer; P. O. Springboro; born in Clear Creek township, Nov. 9, 1846; is a son of Ephraim and Anna Maria (Bacon) Blackford, he a native of this township and she of New Jersey.  The paternal grandfather was Ephraim Blackford, who, it is believed, was born in Virginia, but became an early settler in Kentucky, and, in 1796, moved to Warren Co., Ohio, and settled on Section 31, Clear Creek Township, on the place now owned by Joseph Hare.  At this time, there was one settler by the name of Richardson, near Springboro, on Section 7, the place now owned by Mahlon T. Janney; from this to Waynesville, there was no settler but Mr. Blackford.   The raising generation can gain but a faint conception of the vast wilderness and wildness of this country in that day - not a neighbor near; nothing but Indians and wild beasts to break the solitude and monotony of the vast unbroken forest; not a road of any kind - nothing but blazed paths and Indian trails for miles around.  Who can imagine the fortitude, courage and self sacrifice it took to settle and open out a farm in the wilderness?  The present and future generations can not render too much honor and praise to these worthy ancestors and pioneers for the great work they did.  Here upon the place where Mr. Blackford first settled, he continued to live till his death, and his remains now rest in the Clear Creek Graveyard near Ridgeville.  He raised a family of ten  children, six sons and four daughters, seven of whom settled in Indiana and three in Ohio, all of whom are now deceased but Ephraim, the father of our subject.  The maternal grandparents were Benjamin and Rebecca Bacon, natives of New Jersey, who became settlers of Warren County about 1821, where they lived and died on the place where Ephraim now lives.  The father of our subject is now 71 years of age - born and raised and has always lived on the same section where he still resides, having experienced all the roughness of true pioneer life; has witnessed the wonderful changes and transformation from the vast wilderness to the now fine cultivated farms and all the present comforts of this now rich and beautiful county.  Over "threescore years and ten" spent on the same place!  Such has but few parallels in the history of men.  Mr. Blackford and wife have had five children; four now survive - Mary Elizabeth,  now Mrs. Jacob S. Pence; Rebecca Jane, now Mrs. George R. Duke, residing in Indiana; Charles W.  and John M.  Mrs. Blackford died in the fall of 1855, aged 41 years.  Mr. Blackford is one of the prominent farmers of Warren County.  Starting in life poor, by his own industry and energy, coupled with good management, he has acquired a good competency; is one whose honor and integrity has ever been the highest order and stands among Warren County's most worthy citizens.  The subject of this sketch, the youngest son, on Nov. 19, 1868, was married to Mary E., daughter of Joseph and Rhoda Morton, natives of Warren County.  By this union, they have had four children, three now survive - Anna Clara, born Oct. 1, 1869; Alice May, Aug. 26, 1871, died Dec. 31, 1876; Charles Franklin, born Jan. 26, 1875, and Walter B., born July 11, 1878.  Mr. Blackford has adopted the honorable occupation of farming and located on the place where he now lives in the spring of 1880.
Source: History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - Page 892
  Franklin Twp. -
ARTHUR D. BARKALOW, farmer; P. O. Franklin; son of William and Ann Barkalow; was born in Lemon Township, Butler Co., May 2, 1846.  Sept. 12, 1861, at the youthful age of 15, he enlisted in the defense of his country in Company K, 35th O. V. I.; he served in the army of the Cumberland under Gen. Thomas, and participated in the following battles; Perryville, Chickamauga and Mission Ridge; he re-enlisted September, 1864, at the expiration of his first term of service; this time in Company K, 1st Regiment of Veterans, of Gen. Hancock's Corps.  He received his honorable discharge Feb. 7, 1866, having served almost through the war.  Oct. 19, 1871, he was married to Miss Laura Garrison, a native of Butler County, born June 12, 1851.  She is a daughter of Henry and Phoebe Garrison.  Mr. Barkalow settled on his present land in January, 1872.  He and his wife are members of the Christian Church; he owns 31 acres of land, and in politics is a Republican.
Source: History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - Page 794
  Franklin Twp. -
WILLIAM T. BARKALOW, Postmaster, Franklin; son of William P. and Mary (Tapscott) Barkalow; was born in Franklin June 24, 1810; his parents were natives of Monmouth Co., N. J., and came here in 1803, and bought over 1,000 acres of land on the west side of the Great Miami River; they paid $2.40 per acre; they sold most of it to their relatives, who came here later.  His father died in 1852, in his 83d year.  William T. now has 2 acres of the estate bordering on the river; he was reared on a farm till 15 years old, when he went to Lebanon and entered the office of Jonathan K. Wilds, Clerk of the Court of Common Pleas; he remained on year and then came to Franklin, in 1826, and engaged as clerk in the general store of John N. C. Schenck, who also acted as Postmaster at that time; he remained with him three years.  In 1830, he was married, in Lebanon, to Mary H., daughter of Joseph and Rachel Smith, born in Princeton, N. J., Sept. 27, 1810.  They had three children, one still living.  Sarah, married to Arthur B. Barkalow.  In 1832, he opened a dry goods store on the east side of the canal, which he kept three or four years; he then engaged in the manufacture of chairs and also as general house and sign painter till 1845.  He then went to Cincinnati as book-keeper for Lot Pugh & Co., butchering and rendering establishment; he remained till 1848.  In 1849, he engaged in the manufacture of soap, candles, neats' foot oil, glue, etc., in company with others; firm known as William T. Barkalow & Co. till 1860, when he again returned to Franklin and engaged in the nursery business until 1877, when he was appointed Postmaster Feb. 22, 1879; it was changed to a salary office and he was re-appointed to serve four years.  He has been a member of the Odd Fellows society since 1842.  His family are members of the Presbyterian Church.  He had one son - Arthur B.; in the late war, he enlisted in Franklin in the 100-day service; their other child, Lydia, died in Cincinnati, at the age of 14.  In 1853 and 1854, he was a member of the City Council in Cincinnati; was elected in the Eight Ward; he was instrumental in establishing a first class fire department there.
Source: History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - Page 794
  Franklin Twp. -
WILLIAM V. BARKALOW, marble-yard, Franklin; son of Moses V. and Cornelia (Burgen) Barkalow; was born in Germantown, Montgomery Co., Jan. 25, 1846; his grandparents came here at an early period; his grandmother, who still lives at the advanced age of 88 years, was Amy Vale; came here with her parents about 1800, and settled in Franklin Township, near here with her parents about 1800, and settled in Franklin Township, near Butler County line, where they bought 200 acres of land.  They lived in the first hose built in Middletown; they had twelve children, all of whom are dead, except the father of our subject, Moses V., who was married in 1845 to Cornelia Burgen, a native of Kentucky.  They had six children, of whom William V. is the eldest.  In 1866, he began to learn the trade of marble cutting with W. S. Evans, with whom he remained till 1872, when he started his present yard on Front street, near the suspension bridge, where he makes all kinds of monuments and building material.  He was married, in Franklin, in 1867, to Harriet C., daughter of Thomas Dodd.
Source: History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - Page 795
  Deerfield Twp. -
JAMES BAXTER, retired farmer; P. O. Mason.  The gentleman whose name heads this memoir is another of the well and favorably known citizens of Warren County.  He was born on Pleasant Ridge, in Hamilton Co., Ohio, in the year 1798; he is a son of James and Jane Baxter, who where born in County Tyrone, Ireland, in which they were reared and married.  At the close of the Revolutionary war, about 1790, they, with their two children, emigrated to America and settled in Hamilton County, at a time when Cincinnati was almost unknown.  He was a tanner by trade, yet he owned a farm, which he carried on in connection with his other business. They were parents of eight children, two living, viz., James and John; the deceased are Mary, William, Andrew, Samuel, Margaret and Jane.  At the time he settled in Ohio, the whole country was a dense and howling wilderness, which was overrun by murderous Indians and ravenous beast of prey.  After over thirty years of toil in clearing up his home, he was overtaken by the last foe of man - death - Sept. 7, 1821.  He was born in February, 1760; Jane Rogers, his wife, was born Dec. 7, 1766; they were married in County Tyrone, Ireland, Aug. 8 1785; she departed this life Sept. 21, 1840.  Our subject was reared on the farm, and in the subscription schools, to which he walked three and four miles; he received a meager education; the demands of labor kept the sturdy boys of the pioneers at the ax and plow, and among them a finished education was unknown; on the farm and in the tannery and distillery he labored for his father until of age.  Oct. 5, 1820, he was married to Martha, a daughter of William and Elizabeth McIntire, of Hamilton Co., Ohio; for three years following his marriage, he resided in his native county, and in 1823 removed to Warren County and located where he now resides.  To Mr. and Mrs. Baxter were born three children, one living, viz., William R.; the deceased are David, who died in 1865, and Eliza J., who departed this life in October, 1849.  Mrs. Baxter died at her home in Deerfield Township.  Mr. Baxter's second marriage was celebrated with Mary, daughter of Jacob and Mary Le Fever, of Warren County; to them were born three children, two living, viz., Martha (Mrs. Clark), and Margaret (Mrs. Harper); Mary, deceased.  Officially, Mr. Baxter has been prominently connected with the leading offices of the township, having served as Justice of the Peace for thirty-two consecutive years.  Trustee for many years, and Clerk for two years; truly, he has been a representative man, and he has earned an enviable reputation by fearlessly discharging the required duties of each and every trust.  Politically, he is a Democrat, and during his long life has voted with that party - since casting his first vote.  Whenever the name of James Baxter was put on a ticket for office, it was seldom he had no opponent, as Republicans and Democrats combined at the polls to elect him.  He has been successful during life, and all his business transactions have been discharged to the strictest letter of the moral and divine law; temperate in every habit, never indulging in liquor, profane language nor the use of tobacco in any form, the record of our subject is indeed an exceptional one, and is worthy a place on the pages of any history, and should be perpetuated and held up as a model for the young man of today to take pattern from.  For sixty years, he has been connected with the Presbyterian Church, and for forty years an Elder in the same; a consistent and unassuming Christian gentleman, a man whose ways, whose thoughts and whose deeds are ever formed from the principles of truth and love for his fellow man.

     WILLIAM R. BAXTER, son of James, was born Feb. 9, 1826.  He was reared to farm pursuits and received only a meager education in the district schools, March 6, 1850, he was married to Miss Martha, a daughter of James and Catherine Harper, of Hamilton Co., Ohio, who has borne him one child, viz., Martha S.  In 1855, he removed to the Sixteen Mile Stand in Hamilton Co., Ohio, where he kept a general store and was Postmaster for ten years.  In 1865, he returned to the old home farm on which he has resided until the present.  During the summer and fall of 1881, he erected an elegant residence in the village of Mason, which will be his retired home for the future.  He and his estimable wife are members of the Presbyterian Church, with which he has been an Elder, and both he and his wife are much interested in matters pertaining to religion.  Like his father, he is absolutely temperate in all things.
Source: History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - Page 960

  Deerfield Twp. -
JOHN BAXTER, retired farmer; P. O. Sixteen Mile Stand, Hamilton Co.  The gentleman whose name heads this sketch was born in Hamilton Co., Ohio, in the year 1800; he is a son of James Baxter; he was reared on the farm, and when age had developed his frame and toughened his muscles, in him was constituted the material so much needed to accomplish the slavish labor of clearing up and developing the resources of a new country.  In 1826, he was married to Ruth, daughter of John Ludlow, of Hamilton Co., by whom he had four children, two living, viz., Andrew J. and Martha; the deceased are Susan J. and John.  In 1830, he came to Warren County, in which he purchased the northeast quarter of Sec. 32, in Deerfield Township.  Politically, he is a Democrat, and with the exception of one term, in which he served as Trustee, he has been identified with no office.  He is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, to which he has belonged for forty years, and is an exemplary, consistent Christian gentleman.  Like his elder brother, James, he, too, is temperate, abhorring the use of liquors and profane language, and, though in former days he indulged in the use of tobacco, he abandoned its use, thus showing his strong moral control over the force of habit.  He has been successful in life, and at present owns 140 acres of choice land, which are largely in cultivation and well improved.  Mr. Baxter departed this life Dec. 13, 1843, aged 36 years and 1 day; she was a member of the Presbyterian Church and an exemplary Christian woman.  Mr. Baxter has remained true to his early vows, and the many long years that have separated him from the idol of his youth are gradually approaching a terminus; though his frame is bending under the weight of more than eighty years, he is mentally and physically well preserved, and bids fair to enjoy life to a ripe old age.

     ANDREW J. BAXTER, son of John Baxter, was born in 1833.  He was married to Eliza Conrey in 1854, who has borne him one child, viz., Susan wife of Finley ThompsonMr. Baxter and his wife are consistent members of the Presbyterian Church, to which they have belonged for twenty-seven years, and each vies with the other in the discharge of Christian duties.  She was born in Hamilton County in 1832; her father,  Jonathan Conrey, was born in Kentucky Jan. 5, 1794; Eliza, his wife, and daughter of Thomas Whalen, of New Jersey, was born Nov. 19, 1799; she was married to Mr. Conrey in 1817; he died Dec. 20, 1855; she departed this life in August, 1878.
Source: History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - Page 961

  Turtle Creek Twp. -
WILLIAM H. BEAN*, farmer; P. O. Lebanon; was born on Section 25, in Turtle Creek Township, Warren Co., Ohio, Jan. 1, 1840.  He is a son of Samuel and Mary(Spavely) Bean, natives of Lebanon Co., Penn.; of German descent.  He received his education at the National Normal School of Lebanon, graduating from the Commercial Department of that college of 1866.  He has chosen fancy farming as his occupation, and while attending closely to it, he devotes a great deal of his time to the study of the sciences, especially natural history and botany.  He is an enthusiast in all matters of science, and being by nature a naturalist and botanist, he has collected a quantity of very fine specimens in both these branches.  He also raises the finer qualities of fruits and berries, and cultivates rare and valuable plants for his amusement.  His exhibit is always one of the great attractions at the fairs annually given by the County Agricultural Society.  He taught school for one year, and since 1875 has been Secretary of Warren County Horticultural Society.  He has served also as School Director and Treasurer of his school district.  He is one of the live, energetic and enterprising young men of the county, and has done much toward the advancement of science in his community.  He was married in 1877, to Miss Alice Botkin a daughter of Rev. Jesse Botkin, a Methodist Episcopal minister of the Cincinnati Conference.  She is a graduate of Asbury University, which she attended until 1876.  They have had one child - Edith K.  Mr. and Mrs. Bean and living with his parents in Lebanon.
-----

* In the early history of the family in this country, as the various branches of it moved into the English settlement, remote from each other, different renditions or translations of the name were given.  Our subject knows at least of four different ways.  His grandfather settling near Utica, Warren Co., Ohio, in 1824, the name was spelled Bean to correspond with the German accent, although the proper translation and orthography is Bien.
Source: History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - Page 727
  Turtle Creek Twp. -
REV. WILLIAM BELLER, farmer, P. O. Lebanon, was born in Warren Co., Ohio, Sept. 12, 1821.  His parents were Jacob and Elizabeth (Meloy) Beller, the former a native of Virginia and the latter of Pennsylvania.  Our subject attended the common schools of the county after which he took a course at the Academy of Lebanon.  H also took a theological course in Crawford County College, from which he graduated in 1854.  Since that time, he has been a minister of the Christian denomination, and for seven years had charge of a congregation in Butler County.  He is an enthusiastic advocate of temperance principles and an earnest supporter of any work tending to the advancement of the morality of the people.  He was married in 1850 to Phoebe Hunter, a daughter of Thomas Hunter, and by her he has had the following children, viz., E. F., Flora May, Anna M., Ethie, Clara, Olive M. and Raymond SumnerMr. B. is a Republican and has held many offices of trust in the township.  He tempers his actions in all things with the spirit of a true Christian.
Source: History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - Page 726
  Turtle Creek Twp. -
DAVID P. BENNETT, merchant, Lebanon, was born in Warren Co., Ohio, Mar. 31, 1815; he is the son of David and Hannay (Smith) Bennett, both natives of New Jersey, the former of English and the latter of Welsh descent.  His father emigrated to Warren Co., Ohio, in 1806, and settled in Turtle Creek Township, on what is now known as the "old Baker Farm," on which our subject was born and reared.  At the age of 18 years he commenced learning the carpenter trade, which he followed sixteen years; he then opened a store, which he has carried on continuously for over thirty three years.  He has now associated with him in business his son-in-law, Albert M. Osborn, who was for sixteen years his clerk.  Mr. Bennett was married in 1838 to Eliza M. McConnell, a native of Pennsylvania, of Irish descent.  By her, he had three children.  The oldest, Robert S. M. Bennett, now a citizen of Chicago.  At the breaking-out of the rebellion, he enlisted in Co. G, 75th O. V. I., as a private, and was afterward promoted to Adjutant, for bravery.  Mr. Bennett's second child, Mary J., is now the wife of his business partner A. M. Osborn; the third was Leroy W.,  who died in 1849.  Mr. Bennett was a Whig until the Republican party was organized, since which time he has been a stanch Republican.  During the war, he was connected with the Christian commission, and made two trips to the South, in one of which he witnessed the battle of Nashville, Tenn.  His duty was to attend the wounded and dying; write letters home for the boys who were sick or disabled and to do anything necessary for the temporal or spirited welfare of the warring heroes.  While neither a preacher or exhorter, he did not hesitate to do both or either, while among the soldiers consecutive years was a Sabbath school Superintendent.  He was President of the Warren Co. S. S. Union for eight years, and resigned in 1877.  He is an honest merchant, a consistent Christian, and a good citizen, who bears the respect and esteem of the whole county.
Source: History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - Page 726
  Turtle Creek Twp. -
THOMAS H. BLAKE, Postmaster of Lebanon.  Mr. Blake is a native of Burlington Co., N. J., where he was born Mar. 28, 1841, and when two years of age came with his parents to Warren Co., Ohio, and they settled near Waynesville.  In 1843, his father died and was followed in a very few years by his mother, leaving Thomas the youngest of four children, the eldest being John who is still living.  William who died at Camp Chase, Ohio, a soldier in the 69th O. V. I., and one sister, Mary, who still lives at Freeport, in this county.  The subject of our sketch was thus thrown upon the care of strangers, and worked his way as best he could, getting but little schooling, until, at 15 years of age, he struck out for himself.  At 19 he went to Illinois, where he enlisted as a private in the 41st Ill. V. I., on the 25th of Illinois, where he enlisted as a private in the 41st Ill. V. I., on the 25th of July, 1861, and followed the varied fortunes of his command until the battle of Shiloh, April 6, 1862, where he received a severe wound in the left thigh in charge of a rebel battery, from which portions of the bone were extracted, which he now has, preserved as a souvenir of his service, together with a lameness and debilitation of health that renders him yet an invalid.  After fifteen months of intense suffering in hospital, he was brought to this county on a bed, about July 4, 1863, where he soon was able to be about once more, and though still suffering, he applied himself resolutely to study with a determination to gain an education.  He subsequently attended school at Lebanon, afterward attended a term at Delaware College, and then he entered the Normal school at Lebanon and prepared himself for teaching.  He followed the profession of a teacher in the district schools of the county for six years.  In 1869, he received the appointment of Government Storekeeper, and was assigned to duty at Germantown, Ohio.  In the fall of 1870, he was elected to the office of Recorder of Warren Co., which position he filled so acceptably for two terms that a re-election was tendered him; but owning to his failing health, he was obliged to decline.  Always an active Republican, he identified himself with his party and all its interests.  He was appointed Postmaster at Lebanon in December, 1878, and has held the position since to the entire satisfaction of the people.  On the 6th of July, 1866, he married Sarah LeFevre, at Lebanon.  She was born near Lebanon in 1847, and they have two children, named respectively, Zetta C., aged 11, and Florence V. aged 6.  Shortly after his army service, Mr. Blake became a member of the M. E. Church, of which his wife is also a member, and he has long been identified with the I. O. O. F.  Thus his life has been one of the constant struggles but with a courage unshaken and a faith undimmed, he has trodden bravely the path of duty, an example of what may be accomplished by determination and courage.
Source: History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - Page 727
  Clear Creek Twp. -
CHRISTOPHER BLIN, farmer; P. O. Red Lion; born in Clear Creek Township July 13, 1827; is a son of Christopher and Mary Ann (Fry) Blin, he a native of Warren County and she of Virginia.  The grandfather was Adam Blin, a native a Germany, who emigrated to America in an early day, and, being without means, was sold to pay his passage, and, after serving three years, was a free man and emigrated to Ohio and located in Warren County, Clear Creek Township, on Section 5, the place now owned by George Blin, his son, here he settled right in the woods, having entered the land from the Government and was one of the earliest settlers of this township, and here he remained till his death.  Christopher, the father of our subject, was born and raised on the old home place, where his father lived and died; grew to manhood, fully unured to pioneer work; he married and located on a part of the tract of land which his father entered, and there commenced in the woods, not a stick amiss; erected his log cabin and there toiled and labored to clear up his farm and make a home.  During his life, he erected a second log cabin, much better than the first, and finally erected a good brick house; had the greatest portion of his farm cleared with good improvements.  He died in January, 1856, aged 58 years; his wife subsequently removed to Indiana, where she spent the balance of her life with her children; she died in 1878, nearly 80 years of age.  They had twelve children, two sons and ten daughters; all grew to maturity but one; three now survive - Henry, Christopher and Rachel (now Mrs. Wentle Eyers.  Mr. Blin was a man of great physical endurance, strong and hearty, and did a great amount of hard work; of his farm of 112 acres, he cleared all but about 25 acres, and brought everything in good condition for comfort and convenience; was a man whose honor and integrity were undoubted; one of the kindest and most accommodating of neighbors, too much so, many times, for his own good and prosperity.  He was a faithful and devoted member of the United Brethren Church for many years, having united with the church when a young man; was a class leader and trustee in the same for many years.  The subject of this sketch grew to manhood on his father's farm, accustomed to hard work, where he remained till 25 years of age; was married, July 25, 1852, to Miss Margaret Jane Eyer born Apr. 3, 1834, a daughter of John and Mary Jane Eyer.  By this union, they have three children - John C., born May 17, 1853; William H., Oct. 31, 1858, and Ellen Jane, born Oct. 6, 1862.  Mr. Blin has made farming his business through life; he bought and locatd where he now lives in the fall of 1853; this place he purchased of Elizabeth Fry, upon which he has erected all the buildings on the place, and has everything in good trim, constitution a pleasant home and farmer's residence.  Although Mr. Blin obtained but a limited education, yet, by his industry and careful business habits, he has obtained a fine farm and a pleasant home.  Mr. Blin and wife devoted members of the United Brethren Church, to which they have belonged for many years, he having united with the church when 18 years of age; is trustee of the church and Superintendent of the Sabbath school; is an active Christian man and a worthy citizen.
Source: History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - Page 893
  Union Twp. -
J. E. BOLMER, South Lebanon, book-keeper in King's Great Western Powder Mills.  The above named gentleman was born in Warren County in 1852, and is a son of A. Bolmer.  His education was received in the common schools, in which, by close application to study, he fitted himself to competently and intelligently discharge the duties required of him.  In April, 1880, he entered the employ of Mr. King, as bookkeeper of his immense business, and has since successfully and satisfactorily discharged the duties incumbent on him.  May 22, 1880, he was married to May, daughter of L. Woodrey, of Cincinnati, by whom he has had one child - Perry.
Source:  History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - Page 1051
  Turtle Creek Twp. -
JOHN BONE, retired farmer; P. O. Lebanon; was born in Turtle Creek Township, Warren Co., Ohio, Mar. 27, 1806; he is the oldest son and second child of twelve children, four boys and eight girls, born to James and Nancy (Hart) Bone.  His father emigrated to Ohio from Kentucky about 1800, and located on a farm two miles east of Lebanon.  His mother emigrated to Ohio from Virginia about 1802, and in 1803 married our subject's father.  Of their large family, two boys and two girls are the only survivors.  Our subject received his education in hi native township, and has lived in Warren County during the whole of his life.  He was married, June 28, 1828, to Christiann Maple, a daughter of Elias Maple, of New Jersey.  By this union six children were born, viz., William V., Elias M., John, James  H., George and Huston.  Of these, three are prominent farmers of Warren County, two are mechanics and one, James H., is a U. S. Marshal in Huntsville, Ala.  Mr. Bone started in life with nothing; but, by industrious habits and frugal living, he has acquired a comfortable competency, on which he has retired.  He owns a farm of 215 acres of land near Lebanon and a considerable quantity of town property, including the house where he now lives.  He is a stanch Republican, and has served his county as one of the Board of County Commissioners for six years, and as an infirmary Director twelve years.  He is a man of strict moral principles, sound judgment and rare business ability.  AS a man and citizen, socially, none stand higher in the respect and esteem of the community than he.
Source: History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - Page 728
  Turtle Creek Twp. -
WILLIAM V. BONE, farmer and stock dealer; P. O. Lebanon; was born in Turtle Creek Township Feb. 25, 1829. His parents were John Bone, a native of Warren Co., Ohio, and Christiann (Maple) Bone, a native of New Jersey.  Our subject has followed farming all his life, and for many years has been an extensive dealer in and raiser of live stock, particularly horses, which he has made a specialty.  He breeds, buys, raises and sells the finer breeds of horses.  He has a fine farm of 25 acres, which has the neat and tidy appearance that marks it at once to the observer as the property of a perfect farmer.  His fences are all standing straight, his gates swing clear, and his barns, cribs and sheds are neatly whitewashed, sure indications of the care bestowed on the place by the proprietor.  He has shipped fine horses to almost all the large cities of this country, and many of them brought him a handsome profit. He was married, April 11, 1850 to Miss Amanda Dunham, by whom he has four children, all now living, viz., Frank, the present County Surveyor of Warren County; Perry, a successful teacher of Warren County; Anna, the wife of W. S. Dilatush, an attorney of Lebanon, and Carrie, the wife of Morris Steddom, a farmer of Warren County.  Mr. Bone is one of the Board of Directors of the Lebanon National Bank, and occupies a prominent position among the thrifty citizens of Warren County.
Source: History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - Page 728
  Union Twp. -
SAMUEL BOWYER, farmer; P. O. Mason; is a son of Levi and Eliza (Dill) Bowyer, and was born in Deerfield Township in 1828; his father was a son of Stephen Bowyer, and died in 1869, at the age of about 70 years.  Our subject was reared on a farm, and in the common schools he received his education.  In 1856 he purchased land in Union Township, his present home, and at present owns 169 acres of excellent land, which is one of the best improved farms in the township.  In 1862, he was married to Ivy, daughter of Thomas and Rebecca Sargeant, by whom he has had six children, viz., Wallace W., Emma L., Horace A., Clemice S., Mary B., and Perlie R.   His wife was born in Warren Co., in the year 1841.  Levi Bowyer was the father of ten children, viz., Alexander, John D., Charlotte, Stephen H., Samuel, Mary J., William, Levi, Julia and Thomas.
Source:  History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - Page 1051
  Union Twp. -
STEPHEN H. BOWYER, farmer; P. O. Mason; was born in Deerfield Township, in the year 1826, and is a son of Levi Bowyer, who was a son of Stephen Bowyer, one of the pioneers of Warren Co.  Our subject was reared on the farm and received a common education in the district schools; he remained with his parents until he had passed his majority.  Nov. 14, 1851, he was married to Emaline, daughter of Thomas Hall, one of the pioneers of the county.  For two years after his marriage, he lived hear the Twenty Mile Stand, when he sold out, and in partnership with his brother, Samuel, purchased about 130 acres of land in Union Township; he owns at present 110 acres, which is largely in cultivation and the home farm is beautifully improved.  To Mr. and Mrs. Bowyer four children have been born, viz., Franklin P., who married Emma Fox; Charley, who married Sallie Mulford; Almira, who married Bruce Beadle, and Eliza, who married James E. TodhunterMrs. Bowyer was born in Deerfield Township, in 1832.
Source:  History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - Page 1051
  Turtle Creek Twp. -
PETER BOYD, the lawful trustee of the Shakers, Lebanon, was born in Butler Co., Ohio, Aug. 28, 1806, and in 1807, came to Union Village with his parents who settled among the Shakers, with whom our subject has since lived.  His parents, Daniel and Anna (Clarke) Boyd, were both natives of Maryland and of German English descent.  Our subject, having learned shoe-making, worked at it ten years fort he brethren.  At 30 years of age, he became to trader for the West family, and three years afterward was appointed to the ministerial charge with John Martin.  He has held almost all the offices in the society, and is now, with Mr. Parkhurst, trustee for the four families.  He is a large, well developed man, six feet high and well proportioned. His dealings with the people of Warren County have won for him a host of friends.
  Salem Twp. -
ALBERT BRANT, P. O. Morrow, was born in Warren Co., O. Feb. 12, 1842, son of Abraham  and Hester (Jeffries) Brant, the former a native of N. J., born Mar. 6, 1807, and the latter, a native of Warren Co., born Nov. 23, 1812; the father emigrated to Ohio with his parents in 1814, who in the following spring settled in Warren Co.  The grandfather of our subject served in the war of 1812; the father of our subject served for nine years as County Infirmary Director, and for a period of over thirty years as a Justice of the Peace in the township of Union.  Albert Brant enlisted in company A, 4th O. V. C., Sept. 10, 1861, and served under Gen. O. M. Mitchell as a scout or courier.  During the campaign from Bowling Green, Ky., to Huntsville, Ala., he was with his command in every engagement of that department, except Stone River (being a prisoner at that time) until after the battle of Chickamauga; he served as a scout during the celebrated Wheeler raid.  In November preceding the battle of Mission Ridge, he was sent for by Gen. Crook, who asked him if he could carry a message to Gen. Sherman, who was at that time making his way up the Tennessee River; Mr. Brant replied that "he could, if any man could."  Gen. Crook said "he could take one, or five, or a hundred men, just as he chose," so as to deliver it to Gen. Sherman safely and quickly, as it was of great importance; he chose one man and proceeded down the Tennessee River; he found the river guarded at every point, and being pursued from behind, he abandoned his horse just in time to escape capture.  Pressing forward as rapidly as possible, after three days they reached the Elk River; having endured many hardships and dangers.  Between Huntsville and Decatur, they were fired on by a company of cavalry, when they took to the swampy woods for protection; but here they were pursued by a blood-hound; the dog came near them at one time but hearing his master's halloo, left the trail.  Brant had concealed the message until the cavalry abandoned the pursuit, representing himself as a confederate soldier.  Brant secured from a planter the loan of a horse and a mule which the scouts rode to Athens; when near the latter place they were startled by a sharp "Halt; who comes there?"  Mr. Brant answered the challenge by the rebel picket who demanded the countersign.  Mr. Brant replied that he did not have it, but that he would speak to the commander; the sentry passed them and they proceeded right onward through the camp; there were probably forty or fifty men in the camp together with several teams; they, however, gave the two scouts no further trouble.  The scouts passed Athens in night; the town was full of confederate soldiers, but they kept as far from them as possible and met no serious obstacles; when accosted, they represented themselves as confederates; the rebels were not expecting to see any Yankees in that part of the country.  They came in sight of the Elk River on the third day and found there a small band of so-called State troops; the two men concealed themselves in a ditch all day to escape detection and capture; finally they succeeded in securing a canoe which they headed down stream.  They reached the Tennessee River at daylight, after a tedious and dangerous ride of twenty-four miles, and discovered two large rebel camps on either side of the river; knowing that they could not run past them with safety, they pulled their canoe upon one of several small islands and spent the day in full view of the rebel camps; so near, that they could hear all that was said, and see all that was done.
     After dark they started on one of the most perilous voyages ever undertaken The Elk River empties into the Tennessee at the mouth of the famous "Muscle Shoals."  These shoals consist of fifteen miles of tumultuous rapids, rushing with terrible force through a narrow and rocky channel.  Sometimes the canoe would almost strike the rocks, and almost sink.  The men kept the center of the stream, to keep as secure as possible from the rebel pickets, which lined each side of the river.  This was the fourth night from the army, and the heroic scouts were almost dead from hunger, exposure and loss of sleep, not having slept since the departure from the Elk River, and having had nothing to eat except corn bread and raw bacon, procured from the negroes in scanty supply.  Taking the last meal at 3 o'clock in the afternoon, before starting down the Elk River, they walked all that night, and lay concealed all the next day on an island, making thirty-nine hours without a bite to eat.  The men landed once in going down the Tennessee, but found nothing but a deserted plantation.  Finally, they found a plantation where they got some corn bread, and what was more to their liking, news from Sherman's advance guard.  An old darkey told them that the Yankees had come near capturing his young master that evening, together with his whole company, at Florence, Ala., and that his master was in the house at the time, while the company was encamped a short distance up the road.  Mr. Brant took the old negro into his confidence, told him his name and business and asked him the distance to Florence; he was told that it was twelve miles distant, that the river was closely guared at every point, and that the camp referred to was on the road to Florence, so that it would be necessary to exercise great caution.  Therefore, Mr. Brant and his companion took a canoe and traveled by river to Florence, where they arrived at 9 o'clock, and made their way into the Union camp without being seen by the pickets.  Making their way to headquarters, they were introduced to Gen. Hugh Ewing.  When told by Mr. Brant that he was a courier from Chattanooga, and the bearer of important message, Gen. Ewing was incredulous, but was finally convinced of the truth of the story.  Gen. Ewing received the scouts very kindly, and relieved their necessities, which were pressing, as the men had not had a meal for four days.  Mr. Brant was sent on to Gen. Sherman by Gen. Ewing with a strong guard and a personal letter to Sherman.  They reached Gen. Sherman's quarters at evening, having ridden thirty-five miles since noon, and were kindly received by the General.  Mr. Brant had been instructed by Gen. Crook not to have the message captured at all hazards, and if after destroying the message he should reach Gen. Sherman, he should tell him to drop everything east of Bear River, and make all possible speed to Chattanooga.  Gen. Sherman gave Mr. Brant letters to return to Gen. Crook, which he delivered after fully as many perils and difficulties as he had experienced in going down, none of which, however, we can give, suffice it to say, that he got back to Gen. Crook's headquarters and delivered the messages safely, in due time.  This was one of the most perilous and important trips connected with the late war, the distance, 170 miles, lying in the enemy's country, and 135 miles without seeing a friend, at the same time, Sherman was pushing the rebel army before him, and Mr. Brant had to pass directly through the rebel army.  In addition to this the country was full of paroled prisoners from Vicksburg, and these were treacherous and dangerous men to meet.  He was discharged from the service Nov. 22, 1864, and on the 16th of March, 1865, married Sarah E. Troville, a native of Warren Co. To them have been born the following children:  Dora, Berte, Clifford, Charles, Mary and Fred.
Source:  History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - Page 1020
  Turtle Creek Twp. -
J. APPLETON BROWN, horticulturist; P. O. Lebanon; is a native of the State of New Jersey; born in Trenton, on the 11th of March, 1834, and emigrated to Ohio with his parents in 1838.  They were natives, the father of Pennsylvania, where he was born in the year 1808, and the mother of New Jersey, born in 1812.  Our subject is of French descent; he received his education in the schools of Warren County.  Mr. Brown has been quite an observing man, which, in connection with extensive reading, makes him well posted and fitted for usefulness.  He is an affable and courteous gentleman, and has kept pace with the age in which he lives.  He resides on a nice little farm of 32 acres, situated three and one-half miles east of Lebanon, on the pike leading to Morrow.  He has on this land a very complete and quite an extensive cider-mill and press, where great quantities of cider are annually made.
Source:  History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - Page 729
  Franklin Twp. -
JAMES C. BROWN manager of the Franklin Pottery Company, Franklin; is the son of Joseph A. and Margaret Brown, and was born in Franklin Township June 7, 1840; his father was one of the early pioneers of this county, having come here in 1800 and settled on Clear Creek, where his grandfather had entered a full section of land; he was reared on a farm.  Apr. 16, 1861, at the first call of the President for troops, he enlisted in Company F, 1st O. V. I., under Capt. John Kell, and served three months; then re-enlisted in Company C, 69th O. V. I., under Capt. George Elliott, and served three years longer, when he was mustered out at Camp Dennison and returned to Franklin and engaged as a book-keeper and Secretary of the Franklin Paper Mills, of which he was a stockholder, seven years.  Jan. 1, 1881, he was elected manager of the Franklin Pottery Company, in which he is the largest stockholder.  Mr. Brown was married, in Franklin, Feb. 28, 1868, to Katie, daughter of George and Abbie Lawyer, born in Cincinnati in 1848.  He owns a fine residence on Center street, south of Sixth, one-half of Brady's jewelry store, between Third and Fourth streets, and 71 acres of land adjoining the corporation on the north.  He is a number of the Masonic fraternity, in which he has taken three degrees, the Odd Fellows, in which he has taken five degrees, and a member of the M. E. Church.
Source:  History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - Page 796
  Turtle Creek Twp. -
JOHN E. BROWN, hardware merchant, Lebanon, was born in Wayne Tp., Warren Co., Dec. 15, 1857; his father, Amos Brown, who died in 1863, was a native of Warren Co., and was a son of Joseph Brown, who was also a native of Ohio; his mother, Mrs. Grace (Wilkinson) Brown, was a native of Pennsylvania, and daughter of a family who emigrated from that State to Ohio at an early date.  Our subject is the youngest of a family of three children, viz., Seth W., now Prosecuting Attorney of Warren County, Lizzie L., wife of George A. Witcraft, of Warren Co., and John E., who now conducts a hardware and agricultural implement store in Lebanon, where he has been since March, 1881.  He received his education in the public schools of his native county, and when about eighteen years of age commenced working on the home farm.  In September, 1880, he went to Dayton, Ohio, where he was engaged in the hardware store of R. Barrett & Co., with whom he remained until his coming to Lebanon.
Source:  History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - Page 730
  Turtle Creek Twp. -
MARTIN BROWN, farmer; P. O. Lebanon; was born in Clermont Co., Ohio, Dec. 26, 1826.  He was a son of Caleb and Mary (Adams) Brown, natives of Essex County, N. Y.  His education consisted of instructions in reading from his sister, and twenty days' schooling in a country school.  Since then, he has endeavored in every way to educate himself, and after he grew up to a man's estate and was married, he boarded a school teacher who taught him at night and on Sundays.  In this way and by constant reading he has succeeded in procuring a good education and in keeping himself thoroughly posted in all the public events of interest.  He has followed farming all his life, except two years from 1839, when he worked at the saddler's trade, and at one time was the owner of a 200-acre farm, of which he has sold all but 40 acres.  His house stands on one of the most beautiful sites in the county.  His father died three months before he was born, leaving six daughters and one son.  Mr. Brown was married, Feb. 7, 1849, to Mary E. Randolph, a daughter of John Randolph, by whom he had five children, viz., William R., Alfred, Martin, Ella and Horace.  Mr. B. has collected quite a number of historical relics, and was for some time a member of the School Board.  His father was born in 1785, and died July 6, 1826.  His mother was born in 1807.
Source:  History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - Page 729
  Turtle Creek Twp. -
NATHAN M. BROWN, farmer; P. O. Lebanon; was born in Warren Co., Ohio, Apr. 12, 1838; he is a son of John and Nancy (Pence) Brown; his father was born Sept. 3, 1797, and emigrated to Ohio in 1812, settling in Turtle Creek Township, Warren Co., where he remained until his death in 1878; he was the oldest in a family of fifteen children.  Nathan M., the subject hereof, was reared and grew up on a farm, and has since followed the occupation of a farmer.  He was married Dec. 20, 1868, to Miss Adelia Taylor, a native of Indiana, of Irish descent.  By her he had two children, John and Sherman Wade.  Mr. Brown is a prominent and successful farmer, who has always been industrious and careful, and has thereby acquired a fine farm of 110 acres, upon which he lives.  In politics, he is a Republican.
Source:  History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - Page 729
  Clear Creek Twp. -
GEORGE BUNNELL, farmer; P. O. Red Lion; born in Bourbon Co., Ky., Mar. 15, 1802, is a son of Jonas and Sallie (Tomlin) Bunnell, he is a native of New Jersey and she was raised in Tennessee.  The grandfather, Stephen Bunnell, was a native of New Jersey, but emigrated to Kentucky after the Revolutionary war, and resided there during the great trouble with the Indians.  Subsequently, on account of slavery and its evils, he removed to Warren County, and about 1806-08 located on Section 10, Clear Creek Township, where William Bean now lives, and there he resided till his death, during the war of 1812.  Jonas Bunnell, the father of our subject, was quire young when his father moved to Kentucky, and while living there was married and moved to Ohio, and located east of Cincinnati about four miles north of the Ohio River, remaining there one year, or little more, during which time his wife died, leaving him with nine children; these were most of them placed among friends and relatives.  About two years after, he married for his second wife, Betsey Hathaway; she lived but a short time and died with consumption.  She bore him one child (deceased).  During the war of 1812 he removed to Clark Co., Ohio.  His oldest son, William, served two yeas in that war and his son John served a short time.  Mr. Bunnell died in Clark County about 1817.  He has four children now living.  William, who resides in Missouri; Sytha, now has four children now living.  William who resides in Missouri; Sytha, now widow Hayes, living in Indiana; George E.; and America, now Mrs. Huggins, living in Kentucky.  Mr. Bunnell and his brother in law, Mr. Tomlin, served in the war of the Revolution, in which Mr. Tomlin was killed.  Mr. Bunnell saw his full share of pioneer and frontier life, first in Kentucky, and then in Warren and Clark counties.  The subject of this sketch was about 15 years of age when his father died, and was then thrown mainly upon his own resources.  He came to Warren County and lived a short time with an older brother; thence  he worked by the month for wages for several years; was married Mar. 15, 1821, to Miss Sallie, daughter of John and Mary Peck, natives of Pennsylvania who became settlers of Kentucky and subsequently of Warren County, where their children all grew to maturity and married.  Mr. Peck died at Fairfield, Greene Co., Ohio, and his wife near Germantown, Montgomery Co., Ohio.  Sallie was born in Kentucky, Aug. 29, 1799, and was 11 years of age when her father with his family came to Ohio  By this union, Mr. Bunnell and wife have had nine children.  All grew to maturity, married and have children seen still living - Richard, Archibald, Isaac, William, Lucinda now Mrs. Boyer, John and Henry.  Mr. Bunnell has followed farming as his principal business through life, and all in Warren County, but three years spent in Montgomery County, near Centerville.  In September, 1832, he bought the farm where he now lives, and moved on it in April 1833, where he has since resided, a period of almost half a century.  Mr. Bunnell and wife commenced in life without a dollar and have worked their way through life dependent upon their industry and good management; they experienced their full share of the trials and hardships of log cabin life, but they toiled on knowing no such word as "fail;" they raised a large family of children, were blessed with health and prosperity, and today they "sit under their own vine and fig tree'" and enjoy the competency their own hands and united labors have won for them.  He owns 179 acres of fine land, has erected all the buildings on the place and has a good home and residence.  Mr. Bunnell and his companion have traveled the journey of life together bearing its burdens and enjoying its pleasures for the remarkable period of three score years, and have witnessed the wonderful changes in the transformation of the wilderness into these fine cultivated farms; the log cabins replaced by fine brick and frame houses; the vast improvements in farm implements, and the means of transportation of the products of the farm to distant markets all this they have seen and experienced, and when their time shall come to leave all these earthly scenes, as it must come to all these worthy old pioneers - these brief records of their lives may serve to their grandchildren as a kind remembrance that shall call forth praise and honor for their noble lives and labors.  Mr. Bunnell has been a member of the Christian Church for sixty years, during which period his noble wife has borne him company on the heavenly road.
Source:  History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - Page 894
  Hamilton Twp. -
WILLIAM BURTON, retired carpenter, P. O. Maineville, was born on the old home farm in 1824, on which he lived until 19 years old, when he learned the carpenter trade, which he actively followed till a few years ago, when he learned the carpenter trade, which he actively followed till a few years ago, when he retired from active business and has since lived a retired life in the village of Maineville.  He is a member of Emery Lodge3, of Loveland, No. 258; joined at its organization in 1854.
(Source:  History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - Page 939)
  EDWARD B. BUTTERWORTH, farmer; P. O. Waynesville; born in Clermont Co., Ohio, July 14, 1827; is a son of Samuel and Hannah L. (Taylor) Butterworth, he a native of Campbell Co., Va., and she of Chester Co., Penn,.  The paternal grandparents were Benjamin and Rachel Butterworth, natives of Virginia, who emigrated to this county in 1812 and purchased land in the southern part of the county, near Clermont County, where he was among the early settlers, and resided and died on the same place where he first located, aged about 65 years.  Samuel was 14 years of age when they located in Warren County; here he grew to manhood and was married and became the father of six children - three sons and three daughters, two now living - Jessie T. and Edward B.  Mr. Butterworth bought a farm in Clermont County, where he resided until 1848; thence removed into Warren County, where he purchased the farm known as the Benjamin Evans farm, and here resided till his death, Feb. 21, 1872, aged 74 years; his wife died Sept. 5, 1850, aged 47 years.  Mr.  B.,  as were his ancestors, was a devoted member of the Society of Friends.  He was a man of great energy and industry, and, as an early pioneer, did a vast amount of hard labor, having cleared with his own hands and labor, 100 acres right from the woods, which was seldom, if ever, equaled by the labor of one man; the town of Loveland is now built upon a portion of the land he cleared.  He was a man of undoubted integrity, of firm principles and correct and just in all his dealings, and, in his death, the community lost a worthy citizen and his family a kind father and husband.  Our subject was brought up to farm labor; was married, Mar. 28, 1849, to Hannah, daughter of Josiah and Abigail Rogers, whose ancestors are given in the sketch of Samuel W. Rogers; by this union, they had six children; four now survive- Samuel, born Dec. 12, 1851; Ellen B., Mar. 6, 1856; Mary Sept. 11, 1858, and Josiah, born Oct. 3, 1861; his wife died May 1, 1873, aged 48 years.  On July 7, 1875, he was again married, to Percilla, daughter of John W. and Sophia Wroten, natives of Baltimore, Md., who became residents of Warren County in 1846, where they have since resided; they have had ten children; five now survive - Percilla, Mary F., Martha L., Henry H. and James H.  Mr. Butterworth first located upon the old home place of his father, having erected new buildings, and there and at the old homestead place he remained until 1874, when he accepted the position of Superintendent of the Agricultural Department of the Miami Valley Institute, which position he filled for one and a half years; in the spring of 1876, he bought and located where he now lives.  This place he purchased of Stephen Barnett, being the property formerly owned by Samuel Gause; it consists of 44 acres of good land, with good buildings and improvements, constituting a pleasant home and residence.  Mr. Butterworth has entered quite extensively upon the culture of small fruits, which he intends to make his leading business.
(Source:  History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - page 824)
  Hamilton Twp. -
WILLIAM BUTTERWORTH, retired farmer and teacher, P. O. Maineville.  The gentleman whose name heads this sketch is another of the old and prominent settlers of Warren Co.  He was born in Campbell Co., Va., Sept. 27, 1802, and is a son of Benjamin and Rachel (Mormon) Butterworth, natives of the same State.  Benjamin was born Feb. 11, 1766; he was a Southern farmer, a member of the Society of Friends, and a near relative of Col. Lynch, the celebrated author of the "Lynch law."  Rachel was born Jan. 26, 1765.  Their marriage was celebrated, August 31, 1786, and to them were born children as follows:  Polly, Betsy, Milly, Mary M., Mormon, Benjamin, Isaac, Samuel, Rachel, William and Henry.  In 1812 the Butterworth family emigrated to Ohio and settled in Wayne Township, Warren Co., and two years later removed to Hamilton Township in the same county.  Later the father purchased 500 acres of land on a portion of which was afterwards laid out the village of Loveland.  This pioneer was a modest and unassuming man, was successful in business, and accumulated considerable property.  He died Jan. 20, 1833, and his wife Mar. 10, 1848.  Our subject was reared on the farm, and received his education in the district schools, in which he fitted himself to teach, a profession he followed for forty years, becoming a popular and successful educator.  On the 21st of June, 1826, Mr. Butterworth was united in marriage with Elizabeth, daughter of Nathan and Rachel (Smith) Linton, who was born in Clinton Co., O., July 29, 1807.  Her parents were born, the father on the banks of the Delaware River, in Bucks Co., Pa., Jan. 17, 1778, and emigrated to Ohio in 1802, settling in what later became Clinton Co., where he was employed as a surveyor in 1803; he was appointed County Surveyor in 1810, on the organization of that county, and held the office for twenty years, and the mother near Greenville, Tenn., Jan. 18, 1790.  They were married on the 31st of Jan., 1806, and died in the years 1858 and 1859, respectively.  To our subject and wife have been born seven children, five of whom are living, namely: Kalista, the wife of Henry Eastman, Esq., of Maineville, with whom the parents are now residing; Rachel L. Hadley, Susan B. Murdock, Benjamin Butterworth and Elizabeth B. Crowell.  The deceased are Nathan and Louisa.  Benjamin was born Oct. 22, 1837, and was educated at Athens College.  He read law in Cincinnati, O., and was there admitted to the bar.  He is now a member of Congress, representing the first district of Ohio, and is a man of ability and sterling worth.  Our subject has been successful in life, and is now the possessor of over 400 acres of valuable land.
Source: History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - Page 939

.



 
CLICK HERE to RETURN to
WARREN COUNTY, OHIO
CLICK HERE to RETURN to
OHIO GENEALOGY EXPRESS

FREE GENEALOGY RESEARCH is My MISSION
GENEALOGY EXPRESS
This Webpage has been created by Sharon Wick exclusively for Genealogy Express  2008
Submitters retain all copyrights