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WARREN COUNTY, OHIO

History & Genealogy

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Biographies

Source: 
History of Warren Co., Ohio
containing
A History of the County; Its Townships, Towns, Schools, Churches,
Etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of Early
Settlers and Prominent Men; History of The North-
West Territory; History of Ohio; Map of
Warren County; Constitution of the
United States, Miscellaneous
Matters, Etc., Etc. 
- Illustrated -
Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co.,
1882

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W XYZ

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  Turtle Creek Twp. -
RICHARD DAVIS, retired farmer; P. O. Red Lion, Ohio; was born in Pennsylvania, Nov. 1, 1803; his parents, Richard and Elizabeth (McLaughlin) Davis, were natives of Pennsylvania, of Welsh descent; his father was a spy for the patriots in the war of the Rebellion; he came to Ohio with his family in 1813, and settled on the land where our subject still lives; he (our subject) received a limited education, and served two years at the glass blowing trade; he then turned his attention to farming, and has since continued to be a tiller of the soil.  He was married in 1824, to Rebecca Bowersock, a native of Pennsylvania, of Dutch descent, and by her has had ten children, namely: Elizabeth, Remembrance W., Hezekiah, George W., Sarah J., James G., John M., Margaret D., Mary and Darthula - five of whom are living.  It is said that his father contracted with the Government for the land upon which Indianapolis, Ind., has since been built.  His father died at the advanced age of 101 years.
Source:  History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - page 734
  Clear Creek Twp. -
ISAAC N. DEARTH, farmer; P. O. Springboro; born on the place where he now lives Mar. 12, 1841; is a son of Samuel and Keturah (Townsend) Dearth.  The paternal grandparents were Edward and Elizabeth (Roberts) Dearth, whose history is given in sketch of William Dearth.  The maternal grandparents, Jesse and Judith (Smith) Townsend, natives of New Jersey; he lived and died in his native State; subsequently, his widow married Philip Pedrick, and became settlers of Salem, Columbiana Co., Ohio, thence removed to Warren County, Wayne Township, where they resided fifteen to twenty years; thence removed to Wayne Co., Ind., where they died.  Samuel was 8 years of age when brought to this then wilderness of a country; he was the seventh son of his father's family, and here was raised and grew to manhood, inured to the roughness of pioneer life; was married, Dec. 7, 1820, and became the father of five sons and five daughters; four now survive - Eleanor Jane, now Mrs. Crane; Ambrose T., Mahala A. and Isaac N.  Mr. Dearth served as a soldier in the war of 1812, under Gen. Wayne, for which he obtained a land warrant for 160 acres of land; he was a prominent, substantial farmer, who gave his whole attention through life to that occupation; was a man very prompt and peaceable in his habits, never holding office to much extent, and never having a lawsuit in his life; an excellent neighbor and a worthy citizen, and a devoted member of the Christian Church; he died July 19, 1862, aged 72 years; his wife died Dec. 31, 1868, aged 70 years.  Our subject grew to manhood on the old home farm, and married, Dec. 4, 1862, Cornelia, daughter of Isaac and Tacy (Wilkinson) Peacock; he was born in New Jersey Apr. 19, 1803, and she in Virginia.  He came to Warren County when 12 years of age; was married, near Springboro, in 1826; he was Surveyor of Warren County for nine years or more; was quite a prominent leading man of the county; he removed to Hamilton, Ohio, in 1863, and served four years as civil engineer, and still resides there; they had ten children: six now survive - Rachel, Maria, Angeline, Eliza, Cornelia and EllenMr. Dearth and wife have four children - Edith, born July 27, 1864; Anna, Apr. 27, 1866; William E., Jul. 27, 1858; and Mary E., born Apr. 30, 1875.  Mr. Dearth has devoted his life to agricultural pursuits, with the exception of three years' residence in Franklin, and has resided on the old home place of his father and grandfather, which has now been in possession of the Dearth family for eighty-three years.
Source:  History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - page 899
  Clear Creek Twp. -
WILLIAM L. DEARTH, farmer; P. O. Springboro; born on the place where Samuel Dearth now lives, Nov. 7, 1810; is a son of James E. and Elizabeth (Long) Dearth, he a native of Fayette Co., Penn., and she of Virginia.  The grandparents were Edward and Elizabeth Dearth, natives of Pennsylvania, who emigrated to Ohio and located in Warren County, on the place where Isaac Dearth now lives, in 1798, and there spent the balance of their lives; they were among the true pioneers of the county, enduring all the many deprivations and hardships of the log cabin life; he finally purchased more land and became owner of 1,150 acres, all in one body of land.  The first burying place was at Franklin, where many of the early settlers were buried - their last resting place.  But, as public improvements advanced, the canal was built and passed through the burying grounds.  The bodies were then removed and buried further back; and again, when the railroad was built, it passed through where the bodies were deposited, and again they were taken up and removed to Springboro.  Thus were they troubled in early times, being unable to see the progress and demands of the future.  They had five sons and one daughter, all deceased.  James E., the father of our subject, was a young man of 19 years of age when the family came to Warren County, and here was married and became the father of seven children; five now survive - Allen, now resides in Iowa; Elizabeth now Mrs. Bedford; William L., Samuel, and Eleanor S., now Mrs. Earnhart.  Mr. Dearth passed his entire life on a part of the old home place; was one of the prominent farmers of this community; was a Justice of the Peace for many years; a good neighbor and an excellent citizen.  He died Mar. 24, 1856, aged 77 years; his wife died Dec. 18, 1860, aged 78 years.  William L., our subject, at 15 years of age was placed as an apprentice at the tailor's trade, in Richmond, Ind., where he remained five years, thence returned to Springboro and carried on the business twelve years; then engaged in farming, which business he has since followed.  He resided in Clinton County six years, and while there served as Township Trustee two years.  In the spring of 1854, he located on his present farm, where he has since resided.  He was married, Jan. 1, 1833, to Elizabeth Ann, daughter of Thomas and Jane Bedford, he a native of England and she of Pennsylvania; by this union they have had six children, two now living - James B. and Cornelia Jane, now Mrs. Crockett, residing at Lima, Ohio.
(Source:  History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - page 899)

JOHN E. DEY
Turtle Creek Twp. -
  JOHN E. DEY

Source:  History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - page 295


HENRY DILATUSH
Union Twp. -
  HENRY DILATUSH, farmer; P. O. South Lebanon; the gentleman whose name heads this sketch was born in New Jersey in 1823, and is the largest land-holder in Union Township; he is a son of Nicholas V. and Catalina Dilatush; he was born in Monmouth Co., N. J.; she in Mercer Co., in the same State; in 1838, they removed to and settled in Turtle Creek Township, in which they lived six years, and, during the winter of 144 and 1845, removed to Union Township, and settled on land they had bought, on which they lived till their death; he died Jan. 6, 1870, aged 72 years, 3 months and 14 days; she departed this life in 1876; they were parents of eight children, seven of whom are living, viz.: Margaret, Sarah A., Henry, Susan (deceased), John, George, Thomas and William.  Mr. D., Sr.,  was one of the successful and enterprising men of the county during his life, and his labors were rewarded by the accumulation of large property; our subject was reared to farm pursuits, and his early education was such as a studious boy could get in the district schools, in which he fitted himself so as to successfully cope with the demands of business.  In 1853, he was married to Eliza Hunt, who bore him three children, viz.:  Walter s., Harry and Charley.  Mrs. D. departed this life in the fall of 1878, at the age of 44 years.  Mr. D. has been Trustee of Union Township for several years, and Infirmary Directors for six years, and to the Agricultural Society of the county for eighteen years.  He owns upward of 400 acres of land, which is largely in cultivation and comfortably improved.
Source:  History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - page 1053
  Union Twp. -
WILLIAM J. DILATUSH, farmer; P. O. Lebanon; the gentleman whose name heads this memoir was born in New Jersey, Oct. 30, 1837, and is a son of Nicholas Dilatush, of whom mention is made in the sketch of H. Dilatush; he was but a child when his parents came to Ohio, consequently has no recollections of "Old New England;" like his brother Henry, his early educational training was confined to local schools, and the extensive school of experience gave him the practical knowledge which makes him a practical and successful business man.  Jan. 22, 1880, he was married to Susan, a daughter of Timothy Perrine, of Warren Co.; he owns 206 acres of choice land, and is one of the enterprising and thrifty farmers of the county.  During the war he was a member of the ""State Guards," and participated in the chase after John Morgan in his famous raid.
Source:  History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - page 1053
  Union Twp. -
W. F. DOWNEY, miller; P. O. Morrow; was born in Warren Co., Ohio, in the year 1850; he is a son of Eleazer Downey; the rudiments of his education were received in the district schools, which was afterward developed in the Lebanon Normal School, from which institution he graduated and received the degree of "Bachelor of Science;" previous to graduating he taught five years, and mostly in the schools of Warren Co.; after graduating, he taught one year in the county and two in Illinois; his health failing him, he was obliged to abandon the profession of teaching, when he turned his attention to the farm and mill; he is a member of the Christian Church, with which he has been connected thirteen years.
Source:  History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - page 1053
  Turtle Creek Twp. -
JOHN DRAKE, farmer; P. O. Lebanon; was born in Turtle Creek Township on the farm he now occupies Aug. 10, 1805; his great-grandfather, Samuel Drake, emigrated from England to America in 1676; his grandfather's name was Joseph; his grandfather's name was Joseph; his father, Lewis Drake, was born in New Jersey June 19, 1764, and, during the war of 1812, served as one of the minutemen.  He moved from New Jersey to Pennsylvania, where he married Miss Mary Russell, a native of Delaware, of Welsh descent.  In 1800, he emigrated to Ohio with his family of four children, three girls and one boy, and located on the land now occupied by our subject.  During his residence in Ohio, eight more children, five boys and three girls, were born to him; his son Samuel was a cavalryman in the war of 1812; of his twelve children, only two boys and two girls now survive.  Our subject was reared on the farm and received his education in the schools of his native township; he was married on Christmas Day (Dec. 25, 1832) to Miss Sarah Evans, a daughter of Thomas and Ann (Griffith) Evans, natives of Pennsylvania.  This marriage was blessed with issue as follows:  Lewis, who is married and farming in Warren County; Anna the wife of Joseph Mull, of Warren County; Frank, who is married and farming in Warren County; Thomas, a merchant of Lebanon; John, a liveryman of Lebanon, and Isaac, who is married and now lives on the home farm.  Mr. Drake is a Republican, and, for six years, served his county as  Director of the Infirmary; he is a member of the Baptist Church, in which his wife also held a membership until her death, Aug. 20, 1880.  Mr. Drake now has in his possession a walking-cane that his great-grandfather brought from England at the time of his emigration.  On his farm, in Turtle Creek Township, there is a Lombardy poplar tree, two and a half feet in diameter, that has grown from a walking staff his father used in walking from Mad River, in Montgomery County.  Upon his arrival home, one of his sons stuck the staff in a marshy spot near the house without any particular reason, and in the years that followed it grew into the beautiful tree of to-day.
Source: History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - Page 735
  Turtle Creek Twp. -
JOHN R. DRAKE, liveryman, Lebanon, was born in Warren Co., Ohio, Mar. 15, 1844; his father, John, was born on the farm where he now lives, in August, 1805, and, in 1832, he married Sarah Evans, a daughter of Thomas Evans, of Pennsylvania.  She came to Ohio with her brother at an early day.  They were the parents of six children.  Our subject worked upon the farm until 26 years of age, going to school during the winter months.  On the 7th of April, 1870, he married Miss Ella B. Clegg, daughter of John and Rebecca (Owens) Clegg, of Dayton, Ohio, by whom he has had two children, Lida and Rollin.  In 1869, he entered into the hardware business in Lebanon with R. B. Corwin, but six months afterward withdrew and returned to the farm, where he remained two years; he then moved to Dayton, and, in company with John Mull, Esq., embarked in the grocery business, in which he continued three years, and again returned to the farm.  After two years spent on the farm, he purchased the livery stable of John H. Evans, Esq., of Lebanon, where he now holds forth.  In May, 1864, he enlisted in Company F, 146th O. N. G., and, after four months' service, was discharged at Camp Dennison, near Cincinnati, September, 1864.  He is a warm-hearted social gentleman, a good citizen, and a thorough business man, understanding his business in every particular and conducting it with good financial success.
Source: History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - Page 735
  Wayne Twp. -
WILLIAM H. DUKE saw-mill and farmer; P. O. Waynesville; born in Virginia Oct. 30, 1833; is a son of William and Rebecca (Roland) Duke, natives of Virginia.  The grandparents were Richard and Elizabeth Duke, natives of Maryland, but became residents of Virginia when he died, when William was 8 years of age, who, with his brother John, 2 years older, was raised by their mother; William married and became the father of five sons and five daughters; all grew  to maturity; six now survive - Elizabeth, now Mrs. Compton, living in Indiana; George, also in Indiana; Martha, now Mrs. Corron, residing in Dayton; Richard M., William H. and Rebecca (now Mrs. Sides, residing in Dayton).   Mr. Duke with his family and his mother emigrated to Ohio in the fall of 1839 and located and spent the winter at Rushville, and, in the spring of 1840, came to Warren County and located on the place known as Ichabod Corwin farm where they resided six years; thence to the Arnet farm, near Ridgeville, where, in September, 1869, his wife died; his mother died in June, 1840.  In the spring of 1870, he made a sale and moved to Raysville, where he has since resided with his son, our subject.  Mr. Duke made farming his business and met with fair success.  He began in life with no capital, and, by his own labor and industry, raised a large family and obtained a good competency.  He is now in his 80th year, is quite spry and active, and says he has never paid $10 for a doctor bill in his entire life.  Our subject was about six years of age when he came to this county with his parents, and here grew to manhood; was married, Jan. 8, 1857, to Anna Eliza, daughter of Moses and Sarah (Eulas) Crosley, natives of Kentucky, whose families were among the first settlers of Warren and Montgomery Counties.  Moses was a son of William Crosley, who was one of the leading and prominent men of that day.  Moses and Sarah were parents of eleven children, eight now survive Marian, Anna Eliza, Jacob, Luken, Powell, Jane, Milton, Fremont.  Mr. Duke and wife have had nine children, eight now living Marion, born Mar. 18, 1860; Elmer, born June 26, 1862 (deceased); Jesse May, Mar. 25, 1864; Frank H., Aug. 12, 1865; Etta Adelia, Mar. 8, 1868; Polka Evalenia, June 17, 1871; Jennie, Aug. 5, 1873; Clara Charlotte, June 7, 1876, and Anna Zoe Ella, born Oct. 8, 1879.  Mr. Duke followed farming in Wayne and Clear Creek Townships till 1866, when he located at Raysville, and entered upon the saw mill and lumber business, which, in connection with farming, he has since followed; he has also dealt extensively in fruit and other products of the country in fact, has been a man of general business; a man of great energy and activity, and a leading spirit in all the public progress and improvements of Raysville and vicinity.  The present good roads and pikes, the schools and churches have been established through his aid, energy and efforts more probably than by any other one man.  And his last great effort has been to obtain the building of a railroad, which is accomplished, and is now constructed, connecting the village of Raysville with Cincinnati and Dayton.  And, in conclusion, we may hope that Mr. Duke's labors and efforts for the public interests may be duly appreciated, and that in both time and eternity he may be duly rewarded.
Source:  History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - page 835
  Union Twp. -
JOHN E. DUNHAM, farmer; P. O. South Lebanon, was born in Union Township in the year 1841.  He is a son of Thomas G. Dunham, a pioneer, who was born in Warren County July 4, 1810; he was a son of Edward and Elizabeth (Gibbs) Dunham, natives of New Jersey, who settled in Warren County in a very early day.  Thomas G. Dunham was reared a farmer's boy, and in the early schools of the county he received a common education.  In 1835, he was married to Eliza, daughter of John and Nancy Benham, pioneers of Warren County.  To them were born five children, viz., Cynthia A., Peter B., John E., James F. and Jennie.  Mr. Benham began life a poor boy, and, by his indomitable energy, pluck and perseverance, in which he was seconded by his amiable wife, they together succeeded in accumulating a large property, which at his death was left his wife and children in good circumstances.  His death occurred Nov. 18, 1874.  His wife was born in Warren Co., Ohio, in 1816,.  Their youngest son, James F., was born in 1812, and was married to Elvira, daughter of Abner Burdsal, Dec. 29, 1872.  John E., the subject of this sketch, is a farmer by occupation, and only received the advantages of a common school education.  Mar. 13, 1864, he was married to Letitia, daughter of James Jameson, of Warren County, who has borne him four children, three living, viz.:  Burns B., Seldon G. and Raymond; an infant deceased.  In 1861, he enlisted in Co. F, 60th O. V. I., for one year; served his time, and was honorably discharged.  Was taken prisoner at Harper's Ferry, September , 1862, and was immediately paroled.  He was in the engagement at Cross Keys, VA., and numerous smaller engagements.  He owns 160 acres of excellent land, which is largely in cultivation and well improved.  His wife is a native of the county and was born in 1845.
Source:  History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - page 1054
  Union Twp. -
PETER B. DUNHAM, South Lebanon; of the firm of Kelley & Dunham packers and dryers of sugar corn.  Mr. Dunham was born in Turtle Creek Township, Warren County, in 1839; his early life was passed on the farm, and he received a common education in the district schools.  He followed the fortunes of the firm until 1873, at which time he became interested in drying corn.  In 1879, he became connected with Mr. Kelley, and together they do the largest business in that line in the county.  In 1859, he was married to Rebecca, daughter of Harvey Randolph, by whom he has had one child - Ida B. (deceased), aged six years.  Mr. D. was a member of Co. A, 169th O. N. G.; enlisted in 1863, served this time, and was honorably discharged.
Source:  History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - page 1054
  Turtle Creek Twp. -
GEORGE W. DUNNEGAN, farmer; P. O. Lebanon; was born in slavery in Franklin Co., Tenn., in 1823; he was the property of Gen. Samuel Weakley; at the age of eleven years, he was taken to Alabama by J. I. Dunnegan, a son-in-law of Gen. Weakley.  He was married, when 18 years of age, to Jane Jones, with whom he lived until 1858, when she died, in Huntsville, Ala.  In 1862, Mr. Dunnegan was again married, to Mary Kelley, a slave owned by a Mr. Kelley, of Tennessee.  They came to Ohio in 1866, and purchased a small farm north of Lebanon, where they have since continued to reside.  They are both exemplary members of the African M. E. Church, in which Mr. Dunnegan has held all the principal offices, and in which he was for twenty years a local preacher.  This old couple manage the affairs of their little farm with the greatest precision, and, by industry, care and frugality, have succeeded in placing themselves far above want and in the front rank of their people in the North.
Source:  History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - page 736

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