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WARREN COUNTY, OHIO

History & Genealogy

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Biographies

Source: 
History of Warren Co., Ohio
containing
A History of the County; Its Townships, Towns, Schools, Churches,
Etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of Early
Settlers and Prominent Men; History of The North-
West Territory; History of Ohio; Map of
Warren County; Constitution of the
United States, Miscellaneous
Matters, Etc., Etc. 
- Illustrated -
Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co.,
1882

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W XYZ

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  Hamilton Twp. -
ANDREW J. WALKER
, farmer, P. 0., Murdock, was born on the old home farm in the year 1815, and is a son of Samuel Walker, a pioneer; was reared on the farm, and received only a common education in the district schools.  He was married in 1889 to Leah, daughter of Isaac Phillips, an early settler in this county.  Since his marriage he has lived on the place where he now resides, and
has prospered.  He and his wife are members of the Bethel Church, to which he has belonged fifty years.  He was Deacon of the church from 1840 to 1881, at which time he was elected a Ruling Elder.  To Mr. and Mrs. W. nine children were born, eight living, viz.: Cynthia, Hannah L., Sarah R., LaFayette, (who is a minister in the Presbyterian Church,) Edward S., Isaac N., Vira and James L.; an infant deceased.  Mr. W. owns 112 acres of excellent land, which is well improved.  Five of his children are members of the Bethel Church, which is a source of gratification to their aged parents.
Source:  History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - page 959
  Turtle Creek Twp. -
I. N. WALKER, Mayor of Lebanon; was born in Hamilton Township, Warren County, Ohio, Jan. 29, 1849.  He is a son of A. J. Walker whose sketch appears in this volume.  He was reared on a farm, and received the rudiments of his education in the district schools of his township.  He then took a two years' course at the Maineville Academy, and in 1870 entered Miami University at Oxford, Ohio, where he continued until 1871, when the institution closed.  He then taught school in Delaware Co., Ind., and Warren County until 1878, when he entered the law department of the Michigan State University at Ann Arbor.  In 1879, he commenced reading law with W. F. Eltzroth, of Lebanon, and in March, 1880, he was admitted to the bar by the Supreme Court of the State.   He then formed a law partnership ,with Milton Clark, of Lebanon, On April 3, 1882, he was elected Mayor of Lebanon.
Source:  History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - page 786
  Hamilton Twp. -
SAMUEL WALKER, farmer, P. O. Maineville, is another of the old and well-known settlers, who is a native of the township which he lives; is a son of Samuel B. Walker; was reared on the farm, and a limited education was all he got in the district, a subscription school.  He was married to Mary A. Bigham in 1839, seven children being the result of their union, viz: John B., Alexander G., (who was a member of Co. I, 2d O. V. I.  He enlisted in 1861; served nearly two years, and was killed at Murfreesboro), Luther and Sarah; three are deceased, viz: Hannah A., Gilbert and NewtonMrs. W. died in 1851.  His second marriage was celebrated with Anna Hopkins in 1852; four children have been born to them, viz.: Allen T., William H., Pluma A. and JamesMr. W. has lived in the county all his life, and has been successful in his undertakings.
Source:  History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - page 959
  Hamilton Twp. -
THOMAS D. WALKER, farmer, P. O., Murdock. The above gentleman is a son of Samuel B. Walker, who was born in Franklin Co., Pa., in 1779 or 1780.  Samuel B. was a son of Samuel and Isabelle (Brice) Walker, of the above county.  He purchased 1,000 acres of land in this township in 1798, but did not settle on this purchase until 1802.  With Samuel B. came his two sisters, Esther and Margaret, who were the respective wives of Isaac and Colen Spence, who also settled in Hamilton Township.  The father of our subject was married in 1804 to Hannah Spence, of Scott Co., Ky., after which he settled on his portion of the land that was purchased in 1798, which he cleared up, and it became his home.  He was Justice of the Peace for two terms, being first elected in 1810, and served eight or ten months in the War of 1812 under Capt. Simonton.  In 1824 he became a member of the Bethel Church, of which he was treasurer for fifteen years before his death.  His wife was an active member in the same church from its organization in 1814.  Mr. W. was a surveyor of some note.  To him were born ten children, four of whom are living, viz.: John S., Samuel, Andrew J. and Thomas D.  The deceased are:  Sarah, Isabelle, James, William H., George W. and Margaret J.  Mr. Walker died Dec. 6, 1845.  She departed this life Feb. 4, 1851.  Our subject was reared on the farm, and remained with his parents until of age. March 4, 1854, he was married to Eliza A. Chaney, of Claremont Co., Ohio.  After his marriage he lived eight years on the old home farm, when he came to his present place of residence.  He and his wife are members of the Bethel Church, to which he has been connected forty years, and as deacon of the same for twenty years.  He owns 117 acres of excellent land, which is nicely improved; in everything Mr. Walker is a representative man.
Source:  History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - page 958
  Hamilton Twp. -
W. H. WALKER, deceased, was born on the old home farm in 1819, and was a son of Samuel B. Walker, a pioneer.  He was reared on the farm, and in the district schools he fitted himself to teach.  Some years before his death he left the farm, which he had carried on by others, and he opened a store in Murdock.  He was a generous, kind-hearted man, and was always very kind to the poor, and his death was universally regretted by all.  He was twice married, first to Sarah J. Millspaugh, who bore him three children, viz.: Maria, Margaret. E. and Agnes J.   Mrs. W. died in 1845.  His second marriage was celebrated with Ellen Ward, of Cleremont Co., Ohio.  He was a successful man and held some of the township offices, and was a Notary Public.  He was a leading member in the Bethel Church, of which he was Treasurer.  He died June 2, 1873, leaving at his death 200 acres of land.  Mrs. W. was born in Cleremont Co., O., in 1824, and is a member of the Bethel Church.
Source:  History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - page 958
  Franklin Twp. -
SAYLES WALLING, son of Area and Lavica Walling, was born near Providence, R. I., Jan. 12, 1808.  He was reared on a farm, his father owning 150 acres.  He was married, at the age of 22 years, to Elizabeth H., daughter of Allen and Roby Thayer, born near Providence Aug. 6, 1809; they had six children, three living - Ora A., Alvin and Reuben, all married and in business.  Mr. Walling came here in 1830, in quite poor circumstances, and worked at laboring work several years then bought one-half interest in a coopering establishment south of town, which was run by water power; at the end of two or three years, he engaged in the butchering business with William Corwin, Sr.; They supplied the town with meat several years.  In 1869, he went to Dayton and engaged with his son in the manufacture of Iron fence railing eleven years, and then returned to Franklin, where he now leads a retired life; he owns two houses and lots on River street, in south part of the town; himself and son own one tenement house in Dayton, on Hermann street.  He has been a member of the Odd Fellows about forty years.  His three sons were in the army of the rebellion:  Ora  was in the 100-days service; Alvin P. and Reuben enlisted in the three-months' service, after which Reuben served  three years.
Source:  History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - page 820
  Franklin Twp. -
JOHN WARD, retired farmer, Franklin, son of William and Margaret Ward, was born about two and a half miles from Franklin, June 20,, 18224.  His grandparents came here at an early period.  He was reared on a farm, attending school till 21 years of age; he gook a full course of Mathematics and chemistry, and studied Greek and Latin; several years he taught school winters and farmed summers.  In March, 1849, he bought 90 acres of land with his uncle, in Franklin Township, on Sec. 24; several years later , he purchased his uncle's interest; he afterward bought 104 acres adjoining up the north and Hezekiah Rhoads, born in this township.  Mr. Ward, after leading a very successful life, retired, in 1868, to Franklin, where he has a fine brick residence and 1 acre of land east of Canal; he also owns one house and lot, corner River and Sixth streets,  245 acres of land in Darke County, and 100 acres in Auglaize County.
Source:  History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - Page 820
  Franklin Twp. -
JAMES WARRICK, farmer; P. O. Franklin; a native and a worthy pioneer of Franklin Township; was born Aug. 1, 1816.  He is a son of Samuel and Nancy (Frazey), natives of New Jersey and Pennsylvania; his father was born Aug. 1, 1776, and his mother Apr. 8, 1788; they came to Warren County prior to the war of 1812, and settled in this township, where they both closed their lives at an advanced age.  Our subject was reared to manhood on his father's farm.  He was married, in Dayton, Jan. 1, 1847, to Miss Lucinda Ward, a native of this township, born May 25, 1825, and a daughter of Samuel and Nancy Ward; of the six children that were given this union, four are living, vi., Ame A. born Apr. 28, 1849, wife of Daniel S. Parker; Samuel J., born Sept. 16, 1862, married Katie McQuitty; Mary B., born Sept. 25, 1859; and Flora, born Apr. 10, 1863; Eleanor J. and Robert M. are deceased.  Mr. Warrick located on his present farm in 1848; he owns a tract of 425 acres of land, situated on Secs. 24, 29 and 30; his farm is under a high state of cultivation; a brick residence, erected at a cost of $5,000, stands on the summit of a hill, which affords an excellent view of the surrounding country.  Mr. Warrick is by occupation a farmer and stock raiser, and in politics he is Republican.

Source:  History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - page 820

  Franklin Twp. -
GEORGE C. WEAVER, grocer, No. 2 Woodward Block, Franklin, son of George W. and Rebecca Weaver, was born in Miamisburg, Montgomery Co., Ohio, March 20, 1854.  When 10 years of age, he entered his father's general store, attending behind the counter when out of school; at the age of 12, he took charge of the books, which he continued to keep till 24 years of age.  In 1876, he was married in Miamisburg, to Lilly, daughter of Dr. Isaac and Mary Treon, born in Miamisburg; they have two children - Mary and Edith.  Dec. 1, 1878, he came to Franklin and opened his present place of business, where he keeps a full line of groceries, glassware, queensware and silverware; he carries a stock of goods valued at $5,000, and does a strictly cash business, from four to six men behind the counter, and doing a very flourishing business; he has a fine brick residence corner Springboro road and Hill avenue.  Mr. Weaver is a member of the Odd Fellows society.
Source:  History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - Page 821
  Salem Twp. -
ROBERT WHITACRE (deceased).  Robert Whitacre, one of the earliest settlers in the southern part of the county, emigrated to and settled near the mouth of Todd's Fork, in the year 1805; he was of English descent, his father, John Whitacre, having emigrated from England about the year 1750.  Robert was married three times; first, to Sarah Roach, by whom he had one son, Jonas; second, Hannah Young, who died without issue; third, Patience McKay, by whom he had seven children - Andrew, John, Priscilla, Jane, Aquilla, Rhoda and Moses.  He took up 4,000 acres in what is now known as Survey 1,494, it being an old military claim, deeded to Robert Whitacre by Burr Powell, he trading for it from a Capt. Hamilton, of Revolutionary fame.  Mr. W. was a stirring business man, dealing largely in stock, which he marketed in Baltimore, driving them there on foot;  to his efforts was due the erection of the first bridge across the Miami, in this vicinity; to his energy and untiring seal, many of our pioneers owe the foundation of their future success.  Upon his death, Sept. 18, 1828, Warren Co. lost a man who had largely contributed to its future greatness.  The family, of seven children, located and built their homes upon tract taken by their father, and upon which four of them lived and died; to-day (excepting three farms) the entire survey of 1494 is still held by the Whitacre descendants.  Moses Whitacre, born 1804, youngest son, succeeded to the old home of his father; his early days were passed in agricultural pursuits; at an early age, he evinced a desire to gain an education, which advantages were not to be gained in that day without the most earnest exertion upon his part; this he exhibited and soon reached the then pinnacle of fame - a school teacher - which avocation he followed some length of time.  In March, 1826, he was married to Miss Priscilla Thomas, of Belmont Co., Ohio (her parents, natives of Georgia, who emigrated to the aforementioned county at an early day); to them were born seven children, of whom but two arrived to the age of maturity - William, and Sidney T., now Mrs. Prather.  Moses Whitacre was a generous, whole-souled, public spirted man who furthered all enterprises tending to the culture and benefit of his fellow-man; a man of great energy, imbuing all with whom he came in contact with the same spirit.  At the age of 38 he was called from his sphere of usefulness by the angel of death, departing this life Jan. 8, 1842, his faithful wife following him July 16, 1847.  William Whitacre, born Jan. 17, 1835, succeeded to the old home of his father and grandfather (which he at this writing occupies), beautifully located upon the second level, lying between Todd's Fork and the Little Miami River, overlooking the thriving little village of Morrow.  His early days were passed without event otherwise than those known to the school-boy, until he arrived at the age when he had to enter the second level, lying between Todd's Fork and the Little Miami River, overlooking the thriving little village of Morrow.  His early days were passed without event other wise than those known to the school-boy, until he arrived at the age when he had to enter the arena of life; before so doing, he concluded to complete his studies by a course at the Richmond Academy, Indiana, founded by the Society of Friends; completing his course, he returned home and engaged in general dealing until the spring of 1861, when he entered the mercantile and real estate business, lotting up from his farm what is now known as East Morrow.  In the struggle of the great rebellion, he took an active interest in the cause of the Union, expending liberally for the cause which he supported, besides his services in the call for 100-days men, and the Morgan raid.  On the 22d of May, 1866, he was united in marriage to Miss Rebecca Lownes (see history of Josiah Lownes); to them have been born six children - Walter L., Horace J., Marion, Frank T., William H. and Mariana.  Mr. W. has served his township in nearly all of its official capacities; was Clerk when it was first organized, and to day officiates as one of its Trustees; retiring from mercantile pursuits to his farm, his active life would not allow him to give alone his entire attention to that pursuit, therefore, he has added the coal and lumber business.  Quiet and unassuming in manner and speech, connected with habits of industry and integrity, has won him the esteem of his fellow-men and makes him one of the foremost citizens of Warren Co.
Source:  History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - Page 1028
  Union Twp. -
WILSON & SONS, manufacturers; P. O. South Lebanon; the gentlemen whose names constitute this firm are from the State of Delaware.  James Wilson, the senior member of the firm, is the patentee of hte double-seamed powder keg, which they are exclusively engaged in manufacturing.  Their business was founded in September, 1880.  The first year they turned out 100,000 kegs.  They give employment to a dozen skilled workmen.  TY. J. McClellan is general business manager, and son-in-law to James Wilson.  William and J. W. Wilson, sons of James Wilson, the patentee, are also members of the company.  All are new men in Warren Co., and their enterprise and business capacity will add much to our manufacturing interests.
Source:  History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - page 1065
  ROBERT BRUCE WILSON.  In the course of a long active life time Robert Bruce Wilson has performed useful service in a number of different fields, and has been a soldier, a successful Ohio lawyer for upwards of half a century, and in a more exclusive circle is now known for his interest in art and letters.  Since coming to Toledo about twenty years ago Mr. Wilson has applied himself largely to patents, patent cases, trade-marks and copyrights, and is a recognized authority in that branch of law.
     As he has now passed the three-quarter century mark in life, he does not consider himself on the role of active lawyers and is only endeavoring to wind up unfinished business, after which he will retire altogether.  A native of Ohio he was born in Warren County, Dec. 16, 1839, a son of Robert and Martha (Smith) Wilson, parents who gave him the name of the noted Scotch patriot.  His father was a native of Virginia and his mother of Ohio, and were very early settlers in Warren County, where Robert Wilson, though a farmer, too a very prominent part in local affairs, serving as county treasurer of Warren County altogether for fifteen years.  He was also for several terms a member of the Ohio Legislature, and long enjoyed an enviable position among the citizens of that part of Ohio.  He and his wife were the parents of seven sons and one daughter, and only three of them are now living.  The family was distinguished by the fact that six of the sons served in the Civil war.  One of them, Judge William W. Wilson, was a major in the Seventy-ninth Ohio Infantry, while James was a member of the Third Ohio Infantry, with the rank of captain and later breveted major.  Three of these sons attained success as lawyers.  The oldest, Judge Jeremiah M. Wilson, was a leading member of the bar of Indiana, and for two terms represented the Fourth Indiana District in Congress, and subsequently transferred his practice as a lawyer to the national capital and made a national reputation for himself.  The second son, Judge William W. Wilson, of Warren County, Ohio, was as able in the law and in the substantial virtues of citizenship as he was a gallant soldier.
     The army career of Robert Bruce Wilson began when he was in his twenty-first year.  His literary education was completed i the old Lebanon Academy, now known as the National Normal University in Warren County, and he was already pursuing the study of law when the cloud of Civil war settled upon the country.  The day following the firing upon Fort Sumter, in April, 1861, he left his law books and enlisted in Company F of the Twelfth Ohio Infantry.  Upon the organization of the regiment he was made fourth sergeant, and by faithful he was made fourth sergeant, and by faithful performance of duty was promoted to first sergeant, to second lieutenant, later became adjutant of the One Hundred and Ninety-fourth Ohio Infantry, and finally served in the field as assistant acting adjutant general in General McCook's Brigade.  Few men in the Union army served for a longer period.  He was in the army more than four years, from the very beginning of the rebellion until mustered out and given an honorable discharge Nov. 1, 1865.  He belonged to the distinguished Kanawha Division of the Union army, and in the course of his army service came to know the fellow officers in the same division who afterwards reached the distinguished eminence of the presidency, they being President Hayes and President McKinley.  Any man, whether a private or officer, might feel a just pride in having been a member of this division, which furnished to the country a number of major generals, two cabinet officers, a justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, Three governors of Ohio and two presidents of the United States.  It was the Kanawha Division which crushed Lee's right wing at South Mountain and opened up a way to his rear.  The "Damascus Blade of the Army of the Potomac," was the descriptive phrase applied to this division in an article published immediately after the battle of South Mountain in the old New York Herald.
     Having acquitted himself so worthily in behalf of his country's integrity, Mr. Wilson returned home, resumed the study of law, and in 1867, after passing the examination, was admitted to the bar.  He did not begin practice immediately, but instead accepted and held for three years the position of deputy assessor of internal revenue.  His first work as a lawyer was done at Dayton, Ohio, but a year later he removed to a larger field at Cincinnati, where he practiced from 1871 to 1895.  It was on account of ill health that he gave up general practice in that year and removed to Toledo, where for a time he lived quietly without making an effort to accumulate a practice.  After recovering in a measure his health he found idleness irksome, and he then opened his office and confined himself exclusively to practice as a patent attorney.  Few members of the bar in Northwest Ohio have found so congenial a success in the field of patent law as Mr. Wilson.  In every way he seems adapted to the work of a patent lawyer, and though for more than a year he has endeavored to retire he finds it impossible to absolve himself entirely from business that ahs accumulated in the past.  Mr. Wilson keeps an office at 610 Spitzer Building, and few besides his old clients know that he is still contracting business as a lawyer.
     His principal business now is an invention perfected by one of his clients.  Mr. Wilson has some financial interest in this invention, which is still pending before the patent office at Washington.  For years metallurgists have sought a practical combination of iron and zinc in an alloy which could be depended upon and which could be manufactured on a commercial scale.  The great value of such an alloy is that it prevents rust absolutely and would be a great factor in prolonging the existence of iron, tin and other metal and would eliminate the necessity of painting, which is a continuous expense for iron structures, especially bridges and such structures as are exposed to the oxygen of the air.  This alloy was discovered by one of Mr. Wilson's clients in Pennsylvania accidentally, and when the process is patented it will doubtless mean a fortune of many millions of dollars to the owners of the patent.
     Mr. Wilson has always been a lawyer, devoted to his profession, and has had little part in practical politics.  He is an enthusiastic member of the Grand Army of the Republic and of the Loyal Legion, is a member of Toledo Post, Grand Army of the Republic, and has never given up his membership with the Fred C. Jones Post at Cincinnati.  He finds his recreation in painting and in various other branches of the fine arts, and for many years has taken part in artists' exhibitions, and is considered one of Toledo's most interesting figures in artistic circles.  He has painted a number of landscapes, figures and other bits of form and color, and some of these have been exhibited in the Toledo artist' collection at the Toledo Museum of Art.  At his home he has a number of paintings, including the coat of arms of the Loyal Legion, done in oil, and including his full record of service in the Civil war.  He is a member of the Collingwood Presbyterian Church.
     He has an interesting family and enjoys a beautiful home life at 934 Grand Avenue, where since the death of his wife, who was his devoted companion for over forty-five years, his daughter, Grace M., has presided over the home.  On Oct. 30, 1869, Robert B. Wilson married Miss Isabella Gould, daughter of John Franklin Gould, who at one time owned Franklin Furnace, one of the large iron furnaces along the Ohio River in Southern Ohio.  Mrs. Wilson was also a niece of Amos Akermann who served as United States attorney general during President Grant's administration.  Mrs. Wilson was born at Franklin Furnace in 1845, and died in the Toledo Hospital at Toledo, Sept. 26, 1913.  She is buried in the Spring Grove Cemetery at Cincinnati.  Her early life was spent at Lebanon, Ohio, and later she lived in Cincinnati until she and Mr. Wilson came to Toledo about eighteen years before her death.  Of her three children, Grace Margaret was for some years a writer on the Toledo News-Bee, and is now dramatic editor on The Toledo Times.  The son, Sterling G., is now deceased, while Cedric Harold is a deputy at the Woodward High School at Cincinnati, while Cedric graduated from the Toledo High School.
~ Page 960 ~ A History of Northwest Ohio by Nevin Otto Winter, Litt. D. - Vol. II - The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago and New York, 1917
  Franklin Twp. -
WILLIAM M. WILSON, farmer; P. O. red Lion; was born in the township of his residence July 7, 1834.  He is a son of Matthew and Eleanor (McClure) Wilson, natives of Pennsylvania and Kentucky; the father was born Sept. 18, 1799, and the mother Sept. 19, 1895.  Mr. Wilson came to this county with his parents in 1800; they settled near Red Lion, and, in 1802 removed near Dayton, where they lived till 1806, when they returned and purchased the farm our subject now occupies.  Mr. Wilson, the father of William, died Apr. 9, 1881, and his mother died June 22, 1855.  William, the subject of this sketch, was reared on his father's farm.  Jan. 11, 1865, he was joined in marriage to Minerva E. Iddings, daughter of Alexander and Elizabeth Iddings, born near Dayton June 18, 1846; three children were added to this union; two are living - Mary E., born May 5, 1867; and Edward I., born Oct. 8, 1870.  Mr. and Mrs. Wilson are members of the Presbyterian Church.  Mr. Wilson is a Republican.  He owns 106 acres of the old homestead, and is engaged in agriculture and stock raising.
Source:  History of Warren Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882 - Page 821

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