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Wyandot Co., Ohio
History & Genealogy

Source: 
History of Wyandot County, Ohio
Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co.,
1884

CHAPTER I.
UPPER SANDUSKY AND CRANE TOWNSHIP

LOCATION - REFERENCE TO PRECEDING CHAPTERS - ORIGINAL PLAN OF THE TOWN AS SURVEYED -
ITS STREETS - LOTS - POINTS OF INTEREST IN THE INDIAN TOWN OF UPPER SANDUSKY -
ITS FIRST WHITE RESIDENTS - MADE OF THE COUNTY SEAT - THE RESIDENTS OF 1845 -
EARLY FESTIVITIES - COL. MCCUTCHEN'S PEN PICTURE OF THE TOWN IN 1846 -
POPULATION AT DIFFERENT PERIODS - GRADUAL PROGRESS TO DATE -
REMINISCENCES OF EARLY INHABITANTS - CORPORATE HISTORY -
BANKS AND BANKERS - MANUFACTURING INTERESTS - SECRET ASSOCIATIONS, ETC. -
CHURCH ORGANIZATIONS - WYANDOT COUNTY BIBLE SOCIETY - WYANDOT SABBATH SCHOOL UNION -
OAK HILL CEMETERY - EARLY SCHOOL TEACHERS - PRESENT SCHOOLS -

 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.
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JOHN AGERTER, of the firm of Agerter, Stevenson & Co., proprietors of the Stephenson Engine Works, was born in Switzerland November 29, 1926.  He emigrated to America with his widowed mother, three brothers and one sister in 1851, reaching Upper Sandusky July 1, of that year.  His mother's death occurred in Upper Sandusky, began work on the brick-yard, subsequently pursuing the carpenter's trade twelve years, taking contracts for buildings of all descriptions.  In March, 1865, Mr. Agerter was appointed by the Commissioners of this county to fill the unexpired term of County Surveyor Peter B. Beidler, adn was afterward elected to the same office three successive terms.  In 1876, he was elected County Auditor, serving one term, and October 1, 1881, the firm of Agerter, Stevenson & Co was established.  They do an extensive business, their enterprise being the leading institution of the city.  Mr. Agerter was married in January, 1859, to Dortha E. Hottle, adn seven children have resulted from this union, namely:  William Tell, born October 16, 1859; Alice J., July 24, 1861; Paul H., April 25, 1864; Rachel C., April 9, 1867; John D., October 4, 1871; Arra R., November 23, 1874; Zora H., September 22, 1877.  Mrs. Agerter is a native of Hardy County, Va., where she was born July 8, 1830.  Mr. Agerter  served as A Mayor of Upper Sandusky two years, as Township Trustee five years, and was elected City Councilman in 1883.  He has been a member of the I. O. O. F. since 1856, and, with his wife, is a member of the German Lutheran Church, to whose support he is a liberal contributor.  He was one of the principal agents in the erection of the German Reform Church, and is a highly respected and substantial citizen.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 555
ARCHIBALD ALLEN, commonly called "Uncle Archie," and a rare representative of the colored race, was born in Frederick County, Va., April 1, 1808, son of Simon and Lucy Allen, whose deaths occurred in 1833 and 1818 respectively.  After the death of his mother, Mr. Allen resided till his twentieth year with Samuel Richardson, who gave him the advantage of obtaining an education.  In 1828, he embarked in life for himself, engaging in various kinds of labor at different places, removing to Wyandot County, May 5, 1834.  He acquired the trade of barber with Joseph Bennett, of Columbus, where he remained three winters, established a shop in Upper Sandusky in 1845, where he pursued his trade until 1866.  He then opened a feed store, and has since engaged in that business.  He has bought and sold town property to a considerable extent, and his wealth is now estimated at $15,000.  He has been a resident of the county for half a century, is a Republican in politics, and has never married.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 555
CHRISTIAN ALTHOUSE was born in Canton Berne, Switzerland, Aug. 20, 1821.  He is a son of Christian and Magdaline (Gerber) Althouse, natives of hte same locality, his father being a carpenter by trade.  His parents emigrated to this country in 1834, and settled in Holmes County, where they resided till 1847, when they removed to this county, where his father died in 1875, his mother still surviving in the eighty-fourth year.  Their children were Magdalene, Christian, John,  Barbara, Elizabeth, Peter, Samuel, Mary A. and Sophia.  The deceased are John and Barbara.  Our subject, Christian, lived with his parents till twenty-two years old.  He was educated in the schools of Switzerland, attending English schools one month only.  He learned the wagon trade, and was engaged in the same five years in Stark County.  In 1852, he purchased eighty acres of his present farm, now owning 104 acres, valued at $80 per acre.  In 1869, he erected a good barn, costing $700, and in 1873 a fine brick residence, costing $2,000.  In connection with his farming, Mr. Althouse kept a number of cows, and did a good business in the dairy line for several years.  He was married Mar. 24, 1851, to Anna Gehring, who was born in Switzerland July 8, 1829, and a daughter of William and Catharine (Brandt) Gehring, whose children were Barbara, Catharine, Mary, Christian, Anna, William and ElizabethChristian and William are deceased.  the father died in 1836; the mother in 1861.  They came to this county in 1849.  Mr. and Mrs. Althouse have eleven children, namely: Elizabeth, Dec. 13, 1851; Samuel W., Feb. 21, 1853; Harriet, May 21, 1855; John F., July 21, 1857; Caroline C., June 13, 1861; Carl D., July 16, 1863; Mary A., Sept. 29, 1865; William R., Sept. 15, 1868; George A., Aug. 9, 1870; Emily C., Nov. 20, 1871; Alvin O., Feb. 10, 1875.  Elizabeth died Oct. 17, 1852, and George A. Nov. 3, 1870.  In politics, Mr. Althouse is a Democrat, himself and wife being members of the German Reform Church.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 556
HENRY ALTSTAETTER, of the firm of Veith & Alstaetter, was born in German July 9, 1843.  He is the son of Frederick and Susannah Altstaetter, with whom he emigrated to America in1851.  They settled in Allen County, Ohio, purchasing 160 acres of land on which they resided till 1863.  They subsequently removed to Delphos, Ohio, where he died Sept. 3, 1883, aged eighty-one years.  His wife still survives in her seventy-fifth year, a resident of the above city.  They were the parents of eleven children, seven now living - Lewis, William, Christina, Emma, Henry, Mary and Augusta.  Henry Altstaetter, our subject, was a farmer boy in Allen County, and at the age of eighteen enlisted in the United States service, Mar. 23, 1862, in Company K, Fourteenth Missouri Western Sharpshooters.  He participated in the siege of Corinth, the battles of Inka and Corinth; marched from Corinth to Pulaski, thence to Chattanooga, joining in the Atlanta campaign, and with Sherman in his march to the sea.  He veteranized at Pulaski, Tenn., never losing a day's duty; participated in all battles the regiment was in, and was discharged at Springfield, Ill., Apr. 26, 1865.  He was married, Sept. 21, 1865, to Hedwig Jettinger, of Delphos.  They have seven children - Antonia H., born Sept. 22, 1879; Ida H. W., Aug. 29, 1881.  Mrs. Altstaetter was born Dec. 12, 1844.  After marriage, our subject engaged in the brewing business at Delphos, subsequently spending some time on the farm, and removing to Upper Sandusky in 1877.  He then engaged in the brewing business until 1883, when he formed a partnership with Charles F. Veith, in the grocery and queensware trade.  In connection with this establishment he operates a spoke mill, at times employing from four to five assistants.  Mr. Altstaetter is the owner of 172 acres of land in Marseilles Township, a residence on Fourth street, and a half interest in his stock of goods.  He is a member of G. A. R., and has served one term as City Councilman.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884
~ Page 557
JACOB P. ARTER was born in Richland County, Ohio, Mar. 7, 1853.  His parents were Henry and Delilah (Hattel) Arter, the former born in Maryland Jan. 22, 1799, died  May 30, 1879; the latter born in Shenandoah County, Va., Jan. 14, 1818.  They were married in Crawford County, Ohio, in 1847, their three children being David M., born Sept. 28, 1847; Harriet J., May 29, 1849, and Jacob P., our subject.  They came to this county in 1853, and purchased eighty acres of land on which Jacob P. grew to manhood.  He was educated in the common schools, and has always engaged in agricultural pursuits.  He owns 220 acres, well improved, and valued at $75 per acre.  His annual farm product is $1,200 to $1,500.  Mr. Arter  was married, Nov 27, 1876 to Belinda Morris, daughter of Benjamin and Eleanor (Walton) Morris, born in  Eden Township Jan. 26, 1855.  They have one child - Ortan M., born Dec. 2, 1878.  Mr. and Mrs. Arter are members of the United Brethren Church; he is a strong advocate of Republican principles, an energetic young farmer, and a well respected citizen.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 557
DAVID AYRES, first son of Dr. Isaac and Eliza (Coulter) Ayres, was born in Beavertown, Penn., June 11, 1809.  In 1822, he came with his parents to Richland County, Ohio, where they remained till 1847.  They then moved to Upper Sandusky, where they resided during the remainder of their lives.  The father died in December, 1848; the mother in 1858.  They were the parents of nine children, of whom but five are living - David and Jonathan, and three daughters.  The former settled in Upper Sandusky in 1845, and engaged in the mercantile trade, pursuing this occupation a number of years.  Prior to his settlement in Upper Sandusky, Mr. Ayres engaged in the mercantile business in Londonville, Richland County, when but twenty years of age, and afterward at Perrysville, Richland County,for a period of two years.  He then disposed of his establishment, and after a short period of time spent in agricultural pursuits, for the benefit of his health, again entered the field of traffic at Kalida, Ohio.  In 1839, he removed to Putnam County, and formed a partnership with C. H. Rice, father of Gen. Rice, handling a stock of general merchandise at Kalida, then the county seat of Putnam County.  He remained here two years, traveled several months, and located in Upper Sandusky till 1853, when he retired with a large amount of property.  He was married in 1835 to Abigail Rice, and four children were born to them.  The death of Mrs. Ayres occurred in 1840 or 1841, and our subject was again married, in 1851, to Miss Octave Sutherland, one child being born to them.  The death of this second wife and child occurred in 1852, and Mr. Ayres was a third time married, in 1861, to Nancy Jackson.  They have no children.  Mr. Ayres has been identified with many of the leading improvements of the town.  He is a man of high sense of honor, and is held in high esteem by his fellow Democrats.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 557
J. L. BARICK, farmer, was born in Fairfield County, Ohio, June 3, 1836.  He is a son of Solomon and Susan (Lechleiter) Barick, the former a native of Fairfield County, born Dec. 25, 1811; the latter born in Hampshire County, Va., May 5, 1816.  They were the parents of four children  - John L., George W., David and Mary A.  David was born Apr. 10 1840, died Apr. 25, 1842; Mary A., born Apr. 8, 1842, died June 8, 1842; George W., born Oct. 3, 1843, died July 3, 1862.  John L., the subject of this sketch, resided with his parents in the counties of Fairfield and Pickaway, locating in Wyandot in 1849.  His parents removed to this county in 1851, and with them he remained till 1858 receiving the benefits of the common schools.  He was married, Sept. 16, 1858, to Maria Keller, daughter of Martin and Hannah (Buskirk) Keller, native of Tuscarawas County, Ohio, born Nov. 1, 1839.  They have six children - Mahlon A., born Oct. 13, 1859; Susan H., May 15, 1862; Bertha M., Mar. 1, 1865; Mary B., Feb. 19, 1870; Emily M., May 2, 1873; John R., Feb. 8, 1881.  After marriage, Mr. Barick settled on his present farm, and has since devoted his attention to agriculture and stock-raising, making a specialty of Poland-China hogs.  He enlisted in the army, Company E, One Hundred and Ninety-second Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Feb. 14, 1865, and was sent into the Shenandoah Valley on detached service at Rood's Hill, Col. Butterfield's headquarters, till the close of the war, receiving his discharge at Columbus Sept. 7, 1865.  Mr. Burick served as Township Trustee four years, and was member of the Township Board of Education a number of years.  In politics, he is a Democrat, and alive to every public interest.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 558
MRS. MARY BEAM, widow of William Beam, is a native of Columbus, Ohio, born Dec. 8, 1839.  She is a daughter of William and Mary (Seip) Hoff, natives of Germany, who emigrated about 1838, settling first in Columbus, and, two years later, near Carey, being one of its first inhabitants.  He died at his home northeast of Carey, in May, 1877, aged seventy-four years; his widow still resides on the homestead in her sixty-eighth year.  Mrs. Beam came to this county when but one year of age, and had but meager opportunities for an education.  She was married, Nov. 4, 1858, to William Beam, a native of Knox County, Ohio, born Feb. 19, 1823, and son of Isaac and Martha (Merritt) Beam, of German and Irish parentage.  He was a prominent citizen of this county, being elected Commissioner in 1868.  He purchased the farm on which Mrs. Beam now resides in 1865, and at his death was the owner of 285 acres, which has since been properly divided among his surviving children.  He died Sept. 10, 1873.  Mr. and Mrs. Beam had five children; William H., born Aug. 25, 1859; Mary E., April 28, 1861; Anna B., May 16, 1863; Ida F., June 3, 1868; and Edward, May 22, 1870.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 558
SEVERIN BECHLER, brewer, is a native of Bezirk, Baden, Germany, and son of Mathias and Katie (Schueble) Bechler, the former still residing in his native country in which the latter's death occurred in 1866.  Severin Bechler emigrated to the United States when twenty-nine years of age, landing in New York City Oct. 10, 1868; he soon after located in the Dayton, Ohio, where he engaged six years as foreman of a brewery.  In 1874, he removed to Delphos, remaining two years in the same occupation, and in 1876 to Upper Sandusky, where he is still extensively engaged in the brewing business.  Mr. Bechler was married in Germany, Nov. 28, 1866, to Theodora Massbrugger, and five children have been born to them - three living:  Emma K., born at Dayton, Feb. 18, 1869; Louis F., Aug. 28, 1874; and Matilda I.,  born at Delphos, Sept. 26, 1876..   The deceased are Emily, born in Germany, Nov. 26, 1867, died Mar. 19, 1868; and Frank L., born at Dayton, Mar. 6, 1871, died in same city September, 1873.  Mr. Bechler is a substantial and industrious citizen and has acquired considerable property as a result of his labors.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884
~ Page 559
BROOKS BEERY, son of George and Catharine (Cradlebaugh) Beery, was born in Fairfield County, Ohio, February 19, 1820. "His father, George Beery, was born in Rockingham County, Va., in the year 1783, and emigrated to the almost unbroken wilderness of your county in the year 1800. He was the youngest of six brothers of his father's family, in the order here given: John, Isaac, Abraham, Jacob, Henry and George.  There were two half brothers, Christopher and Joseph, all of whom were among the first and early settlers of Fairfield County. He came down the Monongahela and Ohio Rivers in a flat-boat, and up the Hockhocking to the falls, thence through the woods on foot to Lancaster, and remained over winter, clearing land for others by the acre. He returned to Virginia the next spring, and finally returned to Fairfield County, in the fall of the year 1801, and settled on the Raccoon Creek, near Bremen, clearing land and working for others, thus enabling him to enter eighty acres, which he did in the fall of the year, 1807. In 1809, he married and settled on this small tract of land, continuing to live thereon, and in the neighborhood of Bremen, until in the spring of 1832, when he moved to Little Raccoon, five miles east of Lancaster, where he died in the year 1856. John Beery, his oldest brother, came to the county in the year 1805, and the other brothers soon after, all settling upon and near the streams mentioned in Rush Creek and Berne Townships. They were a hardy, stout and industrious set of men, and did their full share of clearing and improving that part of the county. They are all dead, leaving families scattered all over the country. Their education being very limited, and their habits sober and industrious, were content with the occupation of farming, except my father, who was always far in advance of his neighbors in schools and public improvements. He took an active part in the construction of the canal from Carroll to Lancaster.
     Also, in building the Zanesville & Marysville, and Hanner & Lancaster Turnpikes; was one of the Commissioners of the county, I think, in the year 1828, and assisted in locating and building the County Infirmary. In 1834, he laid out the town of Bremen, and, in the next year, in partnership with Mr. Hedges, commenced the business of selling goods, an occupation yet followed by several of his children, who received their first lessons under his supervision. In the war of 1812, he was pressed into the service with his team, and while Maj. Croghan was defending Fort Stevenson, at Lower Sandusky, with team and provisions he was camped at Fort Ball, now Tiffin, and within hearing of the guns of the fort. He was a personal friend and a great admirer of the Hon. T. Ewing, claiming that he had no superior as a lawyer and a statesman in the Union.  Such was his admiration of this truly great man, that he called his tenth and youngest son Thomas Ewing. As a citizen he was public spirited; as a neighbor, kind and benevolent; as a father, strict in his requirements, yet tenderly devoted to his children. His wife was a Cradlebaugh, a daughter of a Revolutionary soldier, a German Reform minister, and a man of considerable influence in his day. He emigrated to Western Pennsylvania soon after the war closed, and in 1810 or 1811, to Fairfield County, when he soon afterward died. She was born in Washington County, Penn., in the year 1789, emigrated to Fairfield County in 1806 or 1807, and died in 1870. She was a woman of more than ordinary force of character, positive in her opinions, and free to express them; industrious and economical, loving right ,and hating wrong; prompt, and practical in every duty, exercising a marked and controlling influence over her husband and family. A mother of the old type in every sense of the word. They had twelve children, nine of whom still survive: four are living here, one near Urbana, Ohio, and the balance in and near the family village of Bremen." (Extract from a letter written by G. W. Beery, Esq., to Hon. T. O. Edwards, in Lancaster, Ohio)  Brooks Beery, the subject proper of this sketch, was employed on the farm with his parents till twenty-seven years of age, obtaining only a common school education. He subsequently engaged three years in mercantile pursuits at Bremen, Ohio, and was attended by fair success. In 1850, he came to Upper Sandusky and established a dry goods store in a frame building on the site now occupied by the Beery Block, where for thirty years he conducted an extensive and successful business, retiring in 1880. He is the principal owner of the Upper Sandusky Gas Works; owns a half interest in the Beery Block and also in the elevator located by the C. H. V. & T. R. R. For many years Mr. Beery has been regarded as one of the prime factors of the commercial and business interests of Upper Sandusky and is well known as one of its most enterprising and substantial citizens. He is a gentleman of broad and liberal views on all subjects, and is endowed with a large and valuable business experience. Mr. Beery was married September 4, 1856, to Miss Jeannette Sherman, their only child being Frank, who was born October 20, 1857. Mrs. Beery was born in New York, August, 1828, and is the daughter of Horace and Luceppa (Harris) Sherman.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 559
FRANK BEERY, of the firm of S. F. Beery & Co., dry goods merchants, was born in Upper Sandusky October 20, 1857. Ho is the only son of Brooks and Jeannette (Sherman) Beery, and has always resided in his native city, obtaining a good education in its public schools. He finished his studies at the Wesleyan University of Delaware in 1878, and succeeded his father in the dry goods business, which the former established in 1850. The firm of S. F. Beery & Co. was established in 1879, and is composed of enterprising young men with large business capacity and experience. Their spacious room in the Beery Block enables them to display their large stock, valued at $20,000, and comprising a full line of dry goods, carpets, and everything to be found in a city establishment of this kind. The genial manners and fair dealing of the respective members of this firm have won for it an extensive patronage. Mr. Beery is a charter member of the Knights of Pythias of Upper Sandusky, and was initiated in November, 1883.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 563
Crane Twp. -
HON. GEORGE W. BEERY. Conspicuous among the eminent and notable citizens who have resided and still grace this place with their presence, is Hon. George W. Beery, who is now President of one of the principal banks of Upper Sandusky. He was born in Fairfield County, Ohio July 1, 1822. At the age of ten years he removed with his parents to a point six miles east of Lancaster, in the same county, remaining there about five years. In the meantime his father had laid out the town of Bremen and embarked in the dry goods business.  Young Beery entered his father's store, and made himself useful and valuable as a clerk until the year 1841, when he availed himself of the advantages of a two years' schooling at the Greenfield Academy. In 1843, he commenced reading law, in the office, and under the instructions of Hon. John M. Creed, a prominent lawyer of Lancaster, and after two and a half years' study, he was admitted to the bar, at Cincinnati, Ohio, in the spring of 1845. He immediately formed a partnership with Charles Borland and opened a law office at Lancaster. In 1847, he removed to Upper Sandusky and at once took a leading position at the bar in this and adjoining counties, and was noted for his ability as an able an effective speaker. He continued the practice of law here until 1862, when he "was appointed United States Assessor of Internal Revenue by President Lincoln, for the district in which he was located, and served with great credit to himself and the appointing power until the fall of 1865, when a change of administration, after the assassination of Lincoln, was not sufficient to palliate or alter his political opinions, and refusing to indorse Johnson's administration he gracefully gave way to a successor. After his official career, it was a matter of regret that he did not return to the law; and, although successful beyond the measure of most men in other pursuits, the law was undoubtedly his field of labor, and in it he would have contributed to the honor and usefulness of the profession, and gained an enviable state reputation. He was clear and logical, persuasive and earnest, and favored with all those rare and pleasing accomplishments, which are so effective and fascinating in a public speaker. Few men had these qualities to a higher degree, and his retirement from a profession which brought them in use was certainly a matter of regret In 1850, when the prospect of a railway agitated our people, and its fate, apparently, hung upon the action of the county in voting an appropriation of $50,000, and this made effective only by a vote of the people and a majority in its favor, Mr. Beery was the champion of the cause, and his able, forcible and convincing speeches in behalf of the measure at public meetings all along the line of the proposed road, from Salem, Ohio, to Fort "Wayne, Ind., are still matters of pleasurable reference, embalmed in the gratitude of those who still live and in that early day had the interest of Upper Sandusky and the county at heart. The fine thoroughfare, which a change of name has made the Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne & Chicago Railway, is a result of the movement, in which Mr. Beery took so conspicuous a part and rendered such valuable services. The opposition to this project was led by Hon. John Carey, a man of natural force and power, who saw in the road through Upper Sandusky a contingent detriment to the new town he had laid out in the northwestern part of the county, which still bears his name. The principal objection to the then new road was the enormous taxes it would inflict, and so high ran the opposition, and so earnest the interest in its behalf, that political parties dissolved and found their level in local bearings. The high standing of the Hon. John Carey, the fact that he was one of the first settlers of the territory now known as Wyandot County, and these qualities fortified with a disposition not to brook opposition, which heretofore had given him the name of " Old Invincible," was so impressive upon the minds of the people that they looked with foreboding upon any project that did not meet his pleasure, and when his protest took the prominence of a public discussion against an enterprise, without which but little could be expected of our then new town, there was a good deal of despondency, as no one seemed willing to tilt a lance with the old hero of the Tymochtee. Mr. Carey was earnest and aggressive and threw all his old-time vigor and dash into the opposition. For a time he seemed to have everything his own way, and his challenge for debate upon the stump went unheeded, until Mr. Beery (then but a short.time in the county), finding that none of. the older citizens would measure arms with Carey, took up the gauntlet in defense of the new railroad Five appointments were made for joint discussions, only two of which Carey attended. He found in the young attorney a resistance he could not encompass, and from that hour the star of Carey and his opposition to the road commenced to wane. So thoroughly did Mr. Beery, in his able and effective manner, demolish the appeals and presentments of the old hero, that he soon retired from the stump, leaving Mr. Beery the field in triumph. This caused an encouraging turn in favor of the proposed road; it instituted hope and energy, and our people were lavish in their praise of the young attorney who had wrought this favorable and unexpected change. The effective canvass in Wyandot County made by Mr. Beery attracted wide attention, and as above mentioned, he was pressed into service to publicly present the interests of the road along its line from Salem, Ohio, to Ft. Wayne, Ind. In giving a biographical sketch of this useful and prominent man, it would not be complete without adding that to him, more than to any other, is due the credit of establishing through our county the magnificent thoroughfare that has brought growth and prosperity to the town of Upper Sandusky. Without his able assistance at the time, the road would never have stretched its way from sea to Lake over the line then proposed, and to our subject is truly due the merit of being the champion of our first railway. Mr. Beery also took a prominent part in securing the Columbus & Toledo Railroad, its rights of way and franchises. He represented before the Boards of Trade of Columbus and Toledo the interests of the proposed air-line route against .John C. Lee, who favored its construction through Marysville, Ken ton, Bowling Green, etc. He labored earnestly, making speeches all along the line. In all the public enterprises that were intended to benefit or enrich the community or county Mr. Beery has taken an active part, and no man has done as much to advance the interests of Upper Sandusky and Wyandot County as he. He is an earnest advocate of protection and in every respect he has labored to maintain home industries. In the spring of 1867, Mr. Beery organized the Wyandot County Bank, and has served as its President ever since. Aside from this position he has dealt largely in real estate, more, perhaps, than any other citizen in the county, and has reaped the reward of good judgment and fair dealing; and it may be said of him in this connection that his sales and purchases were always upon a basis of fairness, in which all the parties were equally benefited. It was in the rise of real estate, or the enhancement of values in other respects, that Mr. Beery made this pursuit a profitable business. He owns a valuable farm of 220 acres in Crane and Richland Townships, and for the last six years has been engaged in rearing Durham cattle, which he regularly exhibits at the annual fairs. He, with Judge Renick organized tie County Agricultural Society, which has since become a permanent and prosperous institution. In 1881, he became a partner in the Stevenson Machine Works and still retains an interest in that industry. He owns a fine residence on Eighth street and five acres of land adjoining. Mr. Beery was married in October, 1845, to Miss Ann J. McDonald, daughter of Walter McDonald, for many years a leading manufacturer of Lancaster, Ohio. Mrs. Beery was born in Lancaster, Ohio in September, 1822. Mr. and Mrs. Beery have reared four children, three daughters and one son, viz.:  Julia C, wife of Capt. E. A. Gordon; Ida, wife of W. G. Holdridge; Emma, wife of H. R. Henderson, and George W., Jr., Assistant Cashier of the Wyandot County Bank. In political sentiment, Mr. Beery was a "Whig until the organization of the Republican party, when he united himself with it and took an active part in all the campaigns till 1880, being its principal and favorite advocate upon the stump. His pleasing and effective style of oratory attracted considerable attention, and his efforts in this direction were not confined to his own county. While forcible and argumentative,. he inclined to the humorous, adorning and clinching his well-rounded periods with irresistible comparisons.. While Mr. Beery was an active and zealous partisan, he was never bitter or uncouth, and his feelings for a friend never investigated political identity, and many of his warmest friends and personal admirers were in the opposite party. He was always a man of strong convictions, and his political opinions of years ago no doubt took their zeal from the fact that he was ardently opposed to slavery; and since this great question of public policy has been settled, he has given to party movements but little of his care or attention. Mr. Beery is yet endowed with the blessings of health, a vigorous constitution, and is rarely absent from his place of business. He is a gentleman peculiar somewhat in his ways, and those not thoroughly acquainted are inclined to esteem him distant and unapproachable, elements which have no place whatever in his nature. He has a heart full of sympathy for every appeal that comes from the right direction, a welcome for everything meritorious, and no one takes greater delight in reflecting sunshine over a neighborly communion, in which he brings in play a rare and pleasing conversational power for which this eminent citizen is so noted and admired.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 560
ISAAC H. BEERY, deceased, was born in Bremen, Fairfield County, Ohio, February 19, 1820. He is a son of George and Catharine (Cradlebaugh) Beery, and resided in the village of his nativity till twelve years of age, when he moved with his parents to a farm in Bern Township, where the family of eight sons and two daughters were reared. He was there employed in agricultural pursuits till his twenty-third year, when he entered into a partnership with his brother-in-law, John Ashbaugh, in the mercantile trade in Bremen in 1843. Here he obtained his first commercial lessons which he utilized to such good advantage in after years, and here he continued his mercantile pursuits till 1850, his brother, Brooks Beery, having been admitted to the firm in 1847. In 1850, the two brothers came to the then new town of Upper Sandusky, and in September of that year erected a frame business room on the site now occupied by the Beery Block, and opened a general store under the firm name of I. H. & B. Beery. The establishment was well founded and managed, and at once grew into a popularity that it has ever since sustained. It soon became one of the most thoroughly-stocked dry goods houses in the county, and for thirty years it stood the test of time with undiminished prosperity. Afterward the frame building gave place to the substantial brick structure which now occupies its site, and besides this, the grain elevator, the handsome residences and many other buildings erected by them in their resident town, mark the steps of their prosperity and the spirit of their enterprise. The partnership of Mr. Beery and his brother continued its existence until 1880, from which time to the date of his death, March 21, 1884, he was not actively engaged. In 1876, he became a stockholder in the Wyandot County Bank, to which his chief business interests at the time of his demise were attached. He was a thorough, energetic business man of the strictest integrity, and has ever been one of the foremost of the citizens of his community in building up its varied interests, amid all his trials and efforts " wearing the white flower of a blameless life." Mr. Beery was married, September, 1852, to Miss Leefe Fowler, daughter of Dr. Stephen Fowler, and four children were born to them—S. Fowler, Leefe, I. Foster and Minnie. All of these are living, but Fowler, whose death occurred October 15, 1883.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 563
THOMAS E. BEERY, the youngest of a family of twelve children and the tenth son of George and Catharine (Cradlebaugh) Beery, was born in Fairfield County, Ohio, July 6, 1835. In his youth, he enjoyed such school advantages as were offered by the country district schools. Attending school during the winter, and working upon the farm spring, summer and fall, but subsequently spent some time in the Lancaster High School and Otterbein University, abandoning his school life at the age of twenty. In 1855, he entered the mercantile trade in partnership with his brother Simon, at Bremen, a town laid out and named by his father. They carried a stock of general merchandise, and did a good business, continuing their operations till 1857, when our subject retired from the firm and removed to Upper Sandusky, when he entered into a partnership with his brother, Anthony Beery, in the dry goods trade, in which business he was engaged two years. Mr. Beery then disposed of his interest to his brother, Isaac Beery, and established himself in a hardware store, with G. T. McDonald, under the firm name of Beery & McDonald, continuing this business four years, withdrawing from the firm in 1863. He next engaged in the manufacture of agricultural implements, in company with F. F. Fowler, E. R. Wood and A. W. Brinkerhoff, the firm being known as F. F. Fowler & Co. In 1865, this enterprise was abandoned, and the sale of the Brinkerhoff corn-husker was engaged in for the next three years with admirable results, after which Mr. Beery assisted in the incorporation of the Wyandot County Bank, and became one of its stock-holders, retaining his interest in this enterprise till 1869. He then engaged in the dry goods trade, in partnership with J. A. Maxwell, purchasing the store room of S. H. Hunt, and the stock of Hunt & Watson. To this they added the grain business, purchasing the warehouse of Straw & Myers in 1870, and continuing their operations till 1872-73, when the firm was dissolved by mutual consent, Mr. Beery conducting the grain trade till about 1875. In 1876, in company with Samuel Walters and Jacob Agerter, he was awarded the contract for macadamizing the streets of Upper Sandusky, and in the spring of 1877 he again embarked in the dry goods business as sole proprietor of his establishment, but subsequently admitting S. H. White, who was afterward succeeded by John W. Greiger. In 1882, Mr. Beery assisted in organizing the Straw board Company, but disposed of his interest in that enterprise in 1883, and became a member of the "Upper Sandusky Gaslight Company, with which he is at this date connected. He has been one of the most useful of Upper Sandusky's citizens, having been identified with most of its enterprises, and exerted a strong influence toward the promotion of its general interests. He is a man of excellent character, and is one of the first citizens of his community, from whatever standpoint he may be considered. Mr. Beery was one of the prime movers in the establishment of the Universalist Church at Upper Sandusky, and is one of its most prominent members, having always contributed liberally to its support He is also associated with the Knights of Honor, at present holding the chair of Past Director. He was married, October 28, 1855, to Emma E. Witt, who died in April, 1858. His marriage to Harriet A. Osborn occurred in 1859, and by this union three children were born, all now deceased. Two of these died in early infancy; Edwin L., born December 14, 1861, died at Poaghkeepsie, N. Y., April 2, 1882. This son was a young man of most brilliant promise. He graduated in Upper Sandusky High School in 1879 and subsequently took a two years' course at Buchtel College, Akron, Ohio. At the time of his decease he was pursuing his studies at the Eastman Business College, of Poughkeepsie, N. Y. He was a young man of good judgment and more than ordinary intellectual ability, and these qualities combined with an innate culture and spotless character placed his prospects for a useful and eminent future in a most promising light. But alas for the hopes of youth that fall like the leaves in the autumn blast; in the midst of their sanguine beauty the shadow touched him and he was not.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 564
PETER B. BEIDLER

Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 565

JOHN BENNER

Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 566

FREDERICK BERG

Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 566

HON. CURTIS BERRY, Jr., for a number of years a prominent lawyer at the Wyandot County Bar, was born in Crawford Township, this county, Apr. 19, 1831.  He is a son of Curtis and Sally (Cavitt) Berry, of whom extended mention is made in the history of Crawford Township.  Mr. Berry was reared on the homestead until of age, and enjoyed only the advantages of the common schools.  After attaining his majority, he attended the Ohio Wesleyan University, at Delaware, Ohio, one term, after which, in the fall of 1852, he took a position in the office of the Treasurer of Seneca County.  The following winter he taught school in Senaca County, returning to Wyandot County in the spring, and the next fall he was elected Clerk of the courts to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of G. C. Worth.  He was reelected in 1857, and again elected in 1860, serving all seven years and four months.  During the interim, between his first and second election to the above office, 1854-57, he was Chief Clerk in the office of the General Ticket Agent of the Pittsburgh, Ft. Wayne & Chicago Railway, at Pittsburgh and Fort Wayne.  While serving as Clerk of the courts he read law under the instructions of Hon. Robert McKelley, and was admitted to the bar at Upper Sandusky, in 1858.  He practiced his profession alone, until in 1865, when he formed a partnership with his brother, Hon. John Berry  The law firm of Berry & Berry soon took a prominent place at the bar of this, and surrounding counties, and were both recognized as able and worthy lawyers.  In 1866, Mr. Berry, the subject of this notice, was elected to represent this district in the State Senate, and at the expiration of that term was again chosen to the same position.  He rendered efficient service as a legislator, introducing at the session of 1869, and securing the passage amid great opposition of the Homestead Law, and also other measures of no less importance.  He served as Vice President of the County Agricultural Society three years, and as Secretary five years.  He was instrumental in organizing the County Pioneer Society, and was prominently connected with it during its existence.  Mr. Berry has borne his part in all public improvements and enterprises of the county. In securing the Columbus & Toledo Railway, he took an active part, making the first speech in its favor at Marion, Ohio, and with Hon. George W. Beery at different points along the line of the road.  He was married, May 1, 1860, to Miss Emma, daughter of Col. M. H. Kirby, by whom he had six children, of these five are living, viz.: Florence, Frederick, Anna, Louise and Fanny.  Robert died at the age of two years.  Mrs. Berry departed this life July 31, 1883.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 569
HON. JOHN BERRY was born in this county April 26, 1833.  He received good education in the district schools, subsequently attending the Wesleyan University at Delaware.  In 1855, he came to Upper Sandusky and began the study of law with Hon. Robert McKelly, afterward attending the Cincinnati Law School at which he graduated with honor of 1857.  Being admitted to the bar in April of that year, he at once began the practice of his profession, which he continued with marked success till his death.  In politics.  Mr. Berry took very little interest; he was elected Mayor of Upper Sandusky in 1864; served as Prosecuting Attorney, and in 1872 was elected to Congress, being ranked among its  most worthy and respected members.  Mr. Berry was married, May 7, 1862, to Matilda L. Pierson, daughter of Christopher Y. and Delilah (Groff) Pierson, and two children were born to them, a son and daughter, the former dying in infancy; the latter is still living.  Mr. Berry was a man of great promise and his death was deeply regretted by a host of friends.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 569
ADOLPHUS M. BILLHARDT

Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 570

JOHN S. BOWERS

Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 570

ISAAC N. BOWMAN, M. D.

Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 571

CLINTON BOWSHER

Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 571

JESSE BOWSHER

Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 571

WILLIAM E. BOWSHER

Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 572

EDWARD A. BRAUNS

Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 572

EWALD BRAUNS

Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 572

A. W. BRINKERHOFF

Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 573

MILFORD H. BRINKERHOFF

Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 576

WILLIAM BROWN

Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 573

SOL. B. BUCKLES

Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 576

JOHN BUSER

Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 577

DENNIS W. BYRON, M. D.

Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 577

WILLIAM K. BYRON, M. D.

Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 578

ROBERT CAREY, attorney at law, Upper Sandusky, was born in Ontario, Canada, Feb. 17, 1845, son of Hugh and Margaret (Hamilton) Carey, both natives of Belfast, Ireland, and of Scotch-Irish ancestry.  Mr. Carey is one of a family of eight children, seven of whom are still living- Mary, Archibald, John, Robert, Margaret, James and Hugh.  His parents emigrated from Ireland to Prince Edward County, Canada, about 1832, and have since resided in that locality, the father now in his seventy-ninth, the mother in her seventy-fourth year.  Robert Carey was educated at the Toronto Provincial Normal School, where he obtained a life certificate to teach in any school in the Province of Canada.  He made teaching his profession while in Canada, beginning that work when about seventeen years of age, and continued in the same till 1873, when he removed to Upper Sandusky.  He was employed as Superintendent of the Marseilles Schools one year, and the two following years had charge of the Union Schools of Upper Sandusky.  Giving up his profession as teacher, he read law with D. W. Brooks, a prominent attorney of Detroit, Mich., and subsequently attended the Law Department of Ann Arbor University one year.  From November, 1879, to May, 1880, he studied under the instructions of Judge Mott, when he was admitted to practice in all the courts.  Since that time, Mr. Carey has devoted himself exclusively to his profession.  He is at present one of the Board of Examiners of the city schools of Upper Sandusky, and a strong advocate of Republican principles; is the owner of 160 acres of land in Marseilles Township, and forty acres in Goshen Township, Hardin County, dealing somewhat in live stock, making a specialty of fine sheep and short-horn cattle.  Jan. 22, 1876, Mr. Carey was married to Emily A. Terry, daughter of Ethan and Barbara (Heckathorn) Terry, early settlers of this county,  Mr. Terry being one of the three first Commissioners.  Mr. and Mrs. CArey are the parents of three children - Robert H., John T., and Edward.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 578

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
JAMES CRAWFORD is a native of Sycamore Township, this county, born April 15, 1836; son of James and Mary (Sparr) Crawford, the former a native of Orange County, Va., born in 1761, the latter of Fairfield County, Ohio, born Nov. 20, 1802.  Their children were Jacob V., James, William B., Peter L., and Emma E.  They came to this county in 1833, and purchased eighty acres of land, which he cleared and improved, and in 1852 removed to Noble County, Ind., when he died Apr. 19, 1854, and she in 1872.  James Crawford was reared and educated in Sycamore Township, and began life for himself by daily labor at $10 per month.  He purchased his present farm, consisting of forty acres, in 1875, and devotes his attention to agriculture and the raising of blooded stock.  HE enlisted in teh war May 2, 1864, and was on detached service in Company A, One Hundred and Forty-fourth Ohio National Guards, during his entire term spending most of his time at the Relay House, Maryland, as Post Commissary.  He was discharged at Columbus, Sept. 2, 1864.  Mr. Crawford married, Sept. 3, 1857, to Susanna Brown, daughter of Abraham and Frances (Coon) Brown.  They had four children, Louisa C., born Mar. 29, 1864, being the only living.  The deceased are: Emanuel E., born Sept. 20, 1861, died Apr. 30, 1862; William S., born Sept. 20, 1866, died Apr. 9, 1873; and an infant.  Mrs. Crawford was born Sept. 15, 1838, and died Nov. 10, 1867.  Mr. Crawford was married, Dec. 24, 1868, to Eliza Fernbaugh, a native of Ashland County, Ohio, born July 31, 1835.  Her parents were natives of Cumberland County, Penn., and York County, Penn., the father born Feb. 13, 1810, the mother Apr. 15, 1808.  By this latter marriage three children were born - John S., born Dec. 26, 1871; Sarah L., Aug. 10, 1873; and Nettie N., Mar. 28, 1870; the latter is deceased since Apr. 4, 1873.  In politics, Mr. Crawford is a Republican, and a member of the Church of God, of which he is also one of the Trustees.  His father was a full cousin of the lamented Col. Crawford, who was burned at the stake by the Indians near Upper Sandusky.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 582
MYER DANIELS

Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 583

JACOB M. DAVIS, M. D.

Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 583

SILAS DEBOLT

Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 584

JOHN DIRMEYER

Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 587

CHRISTIAN ENGEL

Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 587

JOHN K. ENGEL

Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 588

SAMUEL EWING, SR.

~ Portrait on Pg.

Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 653

WILLIAM FERNBAUGH

Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 588

DAVID FRAZIER

Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 589

BARBARA FREDERICK

Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 589

GEORGE W. FREET, Treasurer Wyandot County, was born in Loudoun County, Va., Feb. 22, 1835.  HE is the son of Henry D. and Lydia C. (Clice) Freet, of German ancestry and natives of Virginia.  They were married in their native State, and came to Ohio in 1836, settling in this county, where he engaged in the blacksmithing trade till his decease.  They were the parents of twelve children, our subject being the youngest.  All attained their majority, but at present only four are living - Amanda A., Henry C., Lydia C. and George W.  The latter was educated in the district schools of this county, and learned the blacksmithing trade of his brother, following this business till they removed to Upper Sandusky and began the manufacture of carriages and wagons, doing an extensive business.  Mr. Freet was married, March, 5, 1863, to Mary G. Hussy daughter of Stephen and Elizabeth (Plummer) Hussy.  Six children were born to them, two only surviving: Ida A., born July 7, 1867; and Clara B., born Nov. 18, 1877.  The deceased are: an unchristened infant, Mary E., Lilla and Howard.  In 1880, Mr. Freet was elected Treasurer of the county, and re-elected in 1882.  Prior to his removal to Upper Sandusky, he served three years as Justice of the Peace in Tymochtee Township, and six years as Clerk of the same.  He is a member of the F. & A. M. and K. of H.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 590
JOSEPH E. GARFIELD


Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 590

JOEL W. GIBSON, Ex-Probate Judge of Wyandot County, was born in this county (formerly Crawford) Dec. 19, 1842.  He is the son of James and Mary (Beam) Gibson, natives of Ohio and Maryland, and of Irish and English ancestry.  They were married in Crawford County, in 1839, and were the parents of seven children, of whom five survive - Joel W., Delilah J., wife of William G. Slye, residents of Barton County, Mo.; Emma, wife of John Bowsher, residing in this county; Julia, the wife of Jacob C. Miller, of Barton County, Mo.; Cornelius, also a resident of this county.  Louisa is deceased.  The mother died in 1857; the father, James is still living in his seventy-sixth year.  Joel W. Gibson, the subject of this sketch, was educated in the country schools, taking a six months' course of study in Bryant & Stratton's Business College, Cleveland, Ohio, in 1864.  Aug. 21, 1862, he enlisted in Company F, One Hundred and Twenty-third Ohio Volunteer Volunteer Infantry, to serve three years, participating in several skirmishes in 1862 and 1863, being severely wounded in the right limb in the battle of Winchester, June 15, 1863, and failing into the hands of the rebels, where he was detained three months.  The amputation of the wounded limb being found necessary, this operation was performed by Federal surgeons within the rebel lines at Taylor Hospital, Winchester, at which place he remained until it was captured by the Union forces.  He was honorably discharged Feb. 11, 1864.  Mr. Gibson was married Oct. 25, 1866, to Lucinda Condray, daughter of Andrew and Rachel (Hodges) Condray, five children being the result of their union, one surviving - Virgil H., born Nov. 20, 1868.  The deceased are James R., Capatolia, Virginia and an infant.  After Mr. Gibson's return from the war, he engaged in the stock trade in partnership with Franklin Slye until appointed Deputy Revenue Collector for Wyandot County, which position he held over two years.  In 1869, he was elected Justice of the Peace, and re-elected in 1872; and in 1873 to the office of Probate Judge, being re-elected in 1876, and again in 1879, his term of office expiring Feb. 12, 1883.  After retiring from office, Mr. Gibson formed a partnership for the practice of law with Robert McKelly, with whom he has since been engaged.  He is a member of the K. of H., the Royal Arcanum, and affiliates with the Democratic party.  He ahs served as Township and Corporation Clerk of the city of Upper Sandusky for five successive terms.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 590
WILLIAM A. GIPSON, dealer in coal, ice, etc., was born in Richland County, Ohio, Jan. 26, 1843; son of Lorenzo and Martha A. (Fenner) Gipson, natives of Vermont and Berks County, Penn., respectively.  They were married in Richland County; parents of eight children, the living named as follows:  William A., Matilda E., wife of Adam Stevens; Lucy A., wife of J. M. Craig; Alice; wife of William H. Cook; and Arlon F.  The father was accidentally killed Feb. 20, 1868, by the falling of a sawlog from a wagon; the mother is still residing in Upper Sandusky.  William Gipson obtained a fair education in the schools of his native county, and removed with his parents to Upper Sandusky in 1860.  He learned the cooper's trade with his father, and continued in this vocation till the beginning of the war; he enlisted in Company F, One Hundred and Twenty-third Regiment Ohio Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Sept. 24, 1862, and participated in the following engagements: Morefield, Winchester (where the entire regiment was captured, but exchanged after ninety days), Newmarket, Piedmont, Lynchburg, Snicker's Ford, Second Winchester, Fisher's Hill, Strasburg, Cedar Creek, Hatcher's Run, and the last at High Bridge, across Appomattox River, where the entire regiment was captured a second time, and sent to Camp Chase, receiving the news of Lincoln's assassination while en route, and detained on guard-duty over his body, in state at Columbus, Ohio.  Besides the above-named battles, Mr. Gipson was engaged in several skirmishes, receiving an honorable discharge at Camp Chase June 12, 1865.  On returning he resumed his trade for a number of years, establishing his present business in coal, ice, cement, sewer tile, fire-brick, etc., in 1874 to 1880.  He was married May 12, 1870, to Ada K. Beistle, daughter of Christian and Elizabeth (Hock) Beistle, and one child, Leora Blanch, born Mar. 19, 1874, has resulted from their union.  Mrs. Gipson is a native of Carlisle County, Penn., and was born Aug. 9, 1848.  Mr. Gipson is a member of the F. & A. M., Knights Templar, also of the Knights of Honor, G. A. R. and English Lutheran Church.  He served in the city council six years.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 591
NICHOLAS F. GOETZ


Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 592

CAPT. EDWIN A. GORDON


Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 592

JACOB GREEK


Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 593

HENRY GRUNDTISCH


Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 593

PETER GRUMMEL


Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 594

JONATHAN GUMP was born in Bedford County, Penn., Nov. 28, 1823.  He is the son of William and Sarah (Rolland) Gump, natives of Maryland and Pennsylvania respectively.  The former was born Jan. 19, 1799, and died in1839; the latter Aug. 18, 1798, and died Feb. 15, 1882.  After several removals they settled permanently in Shelby, Ohio, where they resided until the father's death.   They were the parents of nine children, five still living - Jonathan, David, Franklin, Henry and Margaret Mary, Isaac, Rosanna and George are deceased.  His father dying when his son Jonathan was a mere boy, the latter spent most of his time in assisting his mother in clearing the farm, and with her he remained until his marriage.  At the age of twenty-one, he began to learn the gunsmith trade at Plymouth, Ohio, afterward engaging in that occupation in various places, and as fireman on the B. & O. and C., C. C., C. & I. R. R. until 1848, when he returned to Sandusky City, and was married, Sept. 7, to Nancy J. Taylor; her parents were natives of Washington County, Penn., she having been reared by an uncle.  They have six children - Sarah C., born June 28, 1849; Martha A., Sept. 1, 1850; Charles W., born June 4, 1852; William B., Nov. 2, 1853; Eliza J., Oct. 14, 1855; and James P., Feb. 3, 1860.  After marriage, Mr. Gump resided some time in Mansfield and Plymouth, and removed to Upper Sandusky in 1850, where he worked three years at his trade, and then established a foundry in partnership with Mr. Bowland; six months after, Mr. Bowland retired, and John Monger was admitted, this connection existing five years.  He then closed out and resumed his old trade, which, in connection with his grocery store, he followed until 1878.  Since that time he has devoted his entire attention to his trade.  He owns a valuable residence on the corner of Crawford and Seventh streets; is a member of the Lutheran Church, and a Republican in politics.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 594
JOHN J. HAAS


Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 595

DANIEL HALE was born in Cumberland County, Penn., Mar. 30, 1831, son of John and Elizabeth (Donor) Hale, natives of Cumberland and Lancaster Counties, Penn., who removed to this county in 1852.  They had ten children, eight now living.  The father was born July 5, 1803, died Oct. 29, 1879; the mother was born Sept. 13, 1804, died Apr. 24, 1881.  Daniel Hale resided with his parents till about 1854, and was educated in the common schools of his native county.  He began life for himself by working for his father at 62˝ cents per day, and afterward lived from rented lands till he purchased his present farm, 123 acres, now worth $100 per acre.  He usually markets from $500 to $700 worth of products and is one of the model farmers of the locality.  He was married Jan. 5, 1854, to Catharine Kendig, daughter of Henry and Catharine (Bair) Kendig, natives of Lancaster County, Penn., and of German parentage.  Six children resulted from this marriage, viz., Alice J., Barbara E., Catharine J., George B., Annie M. and James R.  Mrs. Hale was born in Cumberland County, Penn., June 21, 1830.  Mr. Hale is a stanch Republican and a member of the Church of God, as are also his wife and children.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 595
CAPT. GEORGE W. HALE, of the firm of White & Hale, was born in Cumberland County, Penn., Mar. 25, 1833; son of John and Elizabeth (Donor) Hale, natives of Pennsylvania and of German ancestry.  They came to Ohio in 1852, and settled in Crane Township, this county, where they resided until the death of Mr. Hale, which occurred in 1878.  Mr. Hale survived her husband two years and died in 1880.  At the time of their decease they were each of their seventy-sixth year.  They were the parents of ten children, eight now living - Mary A., Daniel, George W., Samuel A. and Eliza J. (twins), David E., Henry B. and Margaret C.  The deceased were John M. and Francis A.  George W. Hale obtained a good education in the district schools of Pennsylvania; lived upon the farm till eighteen years of age; served an apprenticeship at the wagon trade in Leesburg, Penn., and removed to Upper Sandusky in 1854, when twenty-one years of age.  He pursued his occupation in the wagon business until August, 1862, when he enlisted in Company F, One Hundred and First Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, to serve as a private three years.  He was immediately promoted to Orderly Sergeant, and participated in the following battles: Knob Gap, Stone River and Chickamauga, being severely wounded in the latter engagement, a ball passing entirely through both limbs near the hips.  As a result of this wound he was taken prisoner and held in captivity eighteen months, being exchanged in March, 1865.  During his imprisonment at Columbia, S. C., he escaped three times, in company with a few other comrades, but each time was recaptured.  Recovering from his injuries, he joined his regiment at Nashville and remained until his term of service expired.  He was promoted to Second Lieutenant n February, 1863; to First Lieutenant in July, 1863; was commissioned Captain in the fall of 1864, and mustered out of service at Cleveland, Ohio, at the close of the war in June, 1865.  Returning home, he engaged in the hardware trade in October, 1865, and continued in this business until 1878.  Mr. Hale was married Jan. 24, 1866, to Mary E. Sockman, daughter of John and Elizabeth Sockman, residents of Zanesville, Ohio.  They have three children - Lizzie R., born Feb. 24, 1867; Harry D., June 3, 1868, and Floy, born Aug. 7, 1871.  IN 1878, Mr. Hale disposed of his stock of hardware to Isaac M. Kirby, and engaged in the manufacture of wagons and buggies till 1881.  In 1883, he entered into the grain trade in partnership with S. H. White, and still continues in that business.  He is a member of the Knights of Honor and Grand Army of the Republic, of which latter order he is Adjutant.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 595
GEORGE W. HALL, dealer in furniture, Upper Sandusky, was born in Little Sandusky, July 28, 1850; son of David and Catherine (Brewer) Hall, natives of New York, and of English and Hollandish descent.  They were the parents of seven children - two living, namely: George W. and Clara.  The deceased are Jane, Mary, Cornelius, Martin and Sarah.  The father died about 1855, aged fifty years; the mother is still living at Little Sandusky, aged seventy-two years.  George W. Hall, the subject of this sketch, was educated in the schools of Little Sandusky, engaging as clerk at the age of fourteen, with Henry Simons, in whose employ he remained seven years.  In June, 1872, Mr. Hall removed to Upper Sandusky, and engaged as clerk with Juvinall & Foucht, dealers in dray goods, remaining in their employ nearly three years.  In 1875 he engaged with L. Bowman, in whose employ he remained until the accidental death of Mr. Bowman, May 18, 1881, when he became a partner in the establishment.  The firm now carries a stock of $6,000, and is doing a good business, being one of the oldest establishments of the kind in the county.  Mr. Hall was married Jan. 7, 1874, to Emma R. Bowman, daughter of Lawrence & Matilda (Burkett) Bowman, both now deceased.  Mr. and Mrs. Hall are the parents of four children, namely: Nina E., born Oct. 18, 1874; Jessie C., born Aug. 14, 1878; Lawrence M., born Dec. 21, 1879; Douglass L., born Jul. 19, 1881.  Mrs. Hall was born in Upper Sandusky, Sept. 7, 1854.  Mr. Hall is a member of the I. O. O. F., of which he is Warden and also Trustee.  He is also a carpenter of the Royal Arcanum, and, with Mrs. Hall, of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  Martin V. B. Hall, an elder brother of our subject, was a member of the Eleventh Ohio Battery, enlisting early in the service, and engaging in many severe battles.  He was killed in the battle of Iuka, Miss., in Sept., 1862.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 596
NEIL HARDY, M. D., of Upper Sandusky, was born in Wayne County, Ohio, Jan. 20, 1846, is a son of Alexander and Mary Hardy, natives of Pennsylvania and of Scotch ancestry.  Dr. Hardy was educated at Wooster High School, Canaan and Smithville Academies and at the University at Wooster.  In 1870, he began the study of medicine at Wooster, under the instructions of Prof. L. Firestone, M. D., and graduated from the medical department of Wooster University, at Cleveland, Ohio, Feb. 27, 1873.  He began the practice of medicine in Wayne County, soon after graduating,  and continued the same for five years, removing to Upper Sandusky, where he has since resided.  Mr. Hardy was married, July 10, 1873, to Irene Smalley, daughter of Mathias and Martha Smalley, of Ashland, Ohio.  Mrs. Hardy completed a course of study at the Savannah Academy; shortly after her marriage she began the study of medicine, attending a course of lectures at Cleveland, Ohio, winter of 1877 and again in 1880, at the close of which she graduated, and has since been actively engaged with her husband in the practice of their profession.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 597
CURTIS B. HARE, second son of Levi and Jane (Berry) Hare, was born in Seneca County, Ohio, Oct. 13, 1844.  He removed to Crawford Township, this county, with his parents, and resided with them on the farm till his father's death, Dec. 14, 1869.  His mother's decease occurred ten years previous.  He obtained a common education in the district school, and engaged in farm labor till Mar. 17, 1864, when he enlisted in the Signal Corps, United States Army service, continuing in the same till Aug. 25, 1865.  Being honorably discharged at New Orleans, he returned to his farm in Crawford Township, finished his education, and engaged in a mercantile establishment at Carey, Ohio, continuing in this occupation two and one-half years.  He then purchased Mr. Jackson's interest in the grocery store controlled by Smith & Jackson, and engaged in business with the leading partner, under the firm name of Smith & Hare.  He remained in this connection one year, and removed to Upper Sandusky in 1870, remaining in the grocery trade until 1878.  He then formed a partnership with R. A. McKelly, and embarked in the hardware business, this firm still existing and known as the firm of Hare & McKelly.  They carry a full line of hardware and agricultural implements, and are doing a lively business.  Mr. Hare was married Oct. 23, 1872, to Miss Nettie J. Brown daughter of Moses and Sabrina (Farwell) Brown, natives of Jefferson County, N. Y.  They have but two children living, namely, Ada C., born Aug. 29, 1874, and Levi B., Sept. 18, 1877.  The deceased are Helen E. (died aged fourteen months), and two infants.  Mr. Hare is a member of the Knights of Honor, and a stanch Democrat.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884
~ Page 597
HON. DARIUS D. HARE, one of the leading lawyers of this county, was born in Seneca County, Ohio, Jan. 9, 1843.  His parents, Levi and Jane (Berry) Hare, were natives of Pennsylvania and Ohio respectively.  Mr. Hare was a pupil in the district schools during the period of his youth, and completed his studies at the Ohio Wesleyan University in 1863, being then twenty years of age.  In the same year he taught a four months' term of school, enlisting Mar. 20, 1864, in the Signal Corps of the United States Army, in which service he continued till the close of the war.  He was then detailed on special duty as clerk in the same service at the headquarters of Gen. Sheridan, at New Orleans, where he remained till discharged by special orders of the War Department, Feb. 16, 1866.  Returning home, Mr. Hare, in the following September, entered the law department of the University of Michigan, being admitted to the bar by the District Court of this county in September, 1867.  He immediately entered upon his practice at Carey, but removed to Upper Sandusky in May, 1868.  In January, 1869, Mr. Hare formed a partnership with John and Curtis Berry, doing business under the firm name of Berry, Berry & Hare, till 1871, when he retired from that firm and entered into a partnership with Henry Maddux, this connection being dissolved by mutual consent two years later,  since which time he has conducted his professional business independently, excepting that for a little over three years he was a partner of Hon. R. McKelly.  In 1872, he was elected Mayor of Upper Sandusky, and was re-elected in 1874.  In 1876, he was appointed City Solicitor, serving in that capacity two years.  In 1878, he was again elected mayor, and re-elected in 1880 and 1882.  He served thirteen successive years as a member of the Board of School Examiners of this county, tendering his resignation in 1881.  Mr. Hare has established an extensive and lucrative practice in his chosen profession, and is recognized as one of its leading exponents.  He is alive to every interest of his resident city, and has done, perhaps, as much as any other citizen for its general improvement.  He is a thorough, energetic business man, and for these qualities, as well as for those of a social nature, he is highly esteemed.  Mr. Hare was married Oct. 28, 1868, to Miss Elise Liddelle, daughter of William and Aldanah (Fisher) Liddelle, of Rochester N. Y.  She was born in Rochester, Nov. 23, 1845, and was educated at the St. Mary's Seminary, Raleigh, N. C., where she graduated in 1865.  Her parents both died during her childhood.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884
~ Page 597
HENRY HARMON, a leading farmer of this township, was born in this county Nov. 22, 1832; he is a son of Jacob and Rhoda (Swift) Harmon, his father being a native of Virginia.  Their children were Michael, Elizabeth and Henry.  The mother of these children died when the latter was a mere child, and Mr. Harmon was subsequently married to Jerusha Dutcher who died, leaving six children, namely:  Mary, Samuel, Lovina, Sallie, John, Jacob.  Mr. Harmon's third marriage was to Sarah (McDonald) Ada; he died Jan. 15, 1882.  Henry Harmon, the subject of this sketch resided with his parents till twenty-one; he then spent one year in Illinois, after which time he returned, and was employed in various ways till his twenty-fifth year, keeping a grocery store at Little Sandusky one year.  Closing out his business, he farmed rented land till 1864, when he purchased 120 acres which he afterward sold, buying 120 acres more three years later.  On this farm he resided eight years, dealing in stock and doing general farming; then moved to Upper Sandusky where he resided two years, in the meantime re-purchasing his first farm.  In 1877, he bought 200 acres of his present farm, adding 200 more in 1879, the whole being one of the finest tracts in the county.  In 1883, he erected a handsome brick residence at a cost of $4,000.  He was married Feb. 5, 1857, to Susanna Bowen, who was born in Marion County, Ohio, Feb. 7, 1833.  Her parents, Joseph and Margaret (Harmon) Bowen, were natives of Virginia; her father died in 1832, but her mother is still living in her eighty-first year.  They had nine children, namely: Harmon, Eli, Henry, Gideon, William, Margaret, Susanna, John and Nancy, the last two deceased.  Mr. and Mrs. Harmon have three children - Franklin E., Lutie M., and Noah L.  In politics, Mr. H. is a Republican.  He began business a poor boy, but by his energy, pluck and business sagacity has acquired a fortune of most enviable rank.  He is regarded as one of the most successful farmers of the township, and is highly esteemed as a citizen.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884
~ Page 600
GEORGE HARPER was born in Northumberland County, Penn., Dec. 18, 1810.  His parents, Samuel and Catharine (Grimes) Harper, where natives of Ireland and Pennsylvania respectively.  His father was born in 1750, and emigrated to America in 1772.  He enlisted in the Revolutionary war, and in the battle of Bunker hill, received a gunshot wound in the left arm, breaking it below the elbow.  On account of this disability, he was discharged, and soon after settled in Northumberland County, Penn., having married Miss Catharine Grimes, in Chester County, Penn.  In the fall of 1818, he moved to Ross County, Ohio, and Mar. 1, 1821, to Sycamore Township, this county, where he died on the 3d of the following October.  He was the first white settler in the above township, having moved there with ha family of eight children - four sons and four daughters.   He entered 160 acres on Section 18, where he resided till his death; also owning 160 acres in Section 6.  Mrs. Harper lived on the homestead till 1834, and then moved to Sycamore Village, where she died in 1848, having reared all her children to maturity.  George Harper, our subject proper, was reared to his eighteenth year on the farm with his parents, obtaining but a limited education.  He then learned the carding and fulling trade, to which he devoted his attention for about eight years.  In 1834 he engaged in mercantile pursuits in partnership with James L. Harper, in Mexico, where he was employed two years, then disposing of his interest in the establishment and resuming his former occupation, in which he continued till 1844.  In 1845, Mr. Harper was elected County Treasurer, and was re-elected four consecutive terms, the last expiring in June, 1854.  In 1855, he accepted a position as passenger conductor on the Ohio & Indiana Railroad, being thus employed five years.  He assisted in incorporating the Harper, Ayres & Roberts Co. Deposit Bank, being one of its stockholders and connected with its interests about four years.  He subsequently engaged in the grocery and provision trade under the firm name of Harper & Beery, but soon after returned to agricultural pursuits, in which he was engaged till he resumed the mercantile trade under the firm name of Harper, McCandlish & Co., with whom he was connected three years.  In 1880, Mr. Harper was elected County Commissioner, and in 1883 was re-elected to the same office.  He also served as an Infirmary Director two years, and was a member of the City Council eighteen months, resigning both these positions.  He has always taken an active part in local politics, and in his long official career he has honorably acquitted himself as a gentleman, and faithfully served his constituents as an officer.  He is, perhaps, the oldest settler now living in this county, and virtually its first Treasurer, and has in many ways been identified with its interests, his character under all circumstances, either as citizen or official, having been above reproach.  Mr. Harper was married Feb. 26, 1835, to Miss Lovina Griffith, and three children have blessed their union, namely: Mary A., born Nov. 26, 1835; Hattie, born July 8, 1838, and William J., born Oct. 18, 1841.  Mary A. is deceased, having departed this life Nov. 14, 1863.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884
~ Page 598
LOVELL B. HARRIS
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 599
JACOB P. HART
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 600
ALVIN M. HOUGH, of the firm of Hough Bros. and proprietor of the stove and tinware department, was born in Upper Sandusky, Dec. 31, 1855.  He is the eldest son of Milton B. and Margaret J. (Beistel) Hough, and was reared and educated in his native city.  He served an apprenticeship at the tinner's trade with Hale & Kirby three years, beginning in 1871, and as foreman of their establishment over two years.  In 1878, he purchased their stock of stoves and tinware, and began business for himself at his present stand.  In 1881, William M. Hough was admitted to the firm which controls also one of the largest furniture establishments in the city.  Mr. Hough erected his present building in 1878, and has since done a large business, employing three hands, and making a specialty of tin and slate roofing.  Besides his stock, he owns a valuable brick residence on South Sandusky avenue.  He was married in Reading, Penn., Dec. 12, 1881, to Anna E. Beidler, and one child has been born to them - Florence Viola, born Oct. 18, 1882.  Mr. Hough is one of the most energetic business men of the city and merits the generous patronage which he receives.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 605
FRANK B. HOUGH, of the firm of Hough Bros., dealers in furniture, also stores and tinware, was born Mar. 19, 1858, a native of Upper Sandusky, son of Milton and Margaret J. Beistel) Hough. He was educated in the public schools of his native town, and at the age of fifteen engaged as clerk for the firm of Foucht & King; at seventeen, he took a commercial course of study at Duff's Business College, Pittsburgh; spent two years in the employ of Widman, the clothier; at the age of nineteen, he learned the tinner's trade at Hayesville with H. J. Hough, with whom he remained two years, returning to Upper Sandusky in 1879.  He was next employed with W. A. Widman until January, 1880, when he formed a partnership with E. A. Henderson in the stove and tinware business.  He continued in this business one year, and about the same length of time in the drug business, after which he purchased a one-third interest in the stove and tinware establishment, at the same time opening a furniture store which he now has under his especial charge.  He does an extensive business, having the leading establishment of the kind in the city.  Mr. Hough was married June 15, 1881, to Ida M. Keller, daughter of Adam Keller, a prominent farmer of Ridge Township.  She was born May 12, 1860.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 605
MILTON B. HOUGH, of the firm of Hough Bros., dealers in furniture, undertaking, stoves, tinware, etc., Upper Sandusky, was born in Ashland County Feb. 24, 1830.  He is the son of William and Leah (Shoop) Hough, natives of Pennsylvania and of English extraction.  There were nine children in this family, but three now living - Milton B., Almira E., and Hiram J.  The parents both died in Crawford County, the father in 1867, aged fifty-two years, the mother in 1853, aged about forty-four years.  Milton B. Hough was educated in the public schools of Ashland, and subsequently spent three years in the cabinet trade at Bucyrus.  He removed to Upper Sandusky Dec. 27, 1851, and established himself in the furniture and undertaking business in 1854.  In 1860, he disposed of his stock and engaged several years in the trade of a carpenter and joiner; followed milling two years, butchering one year, bought and shipped poultry four years, dealt in real estate some time, and was quite successful in all these enterprises.  Mr. Hough is the owner of a fine brick residence on Wyandot avenue, valued at $5,000, and carries a stock of goods in both his establishments, valued at $10,000.  His marriage to Margaret J. Beistel occurred Nov. 12, 1852; she is a daughter of Christian and Catharine (Hank) Beistel.  They are the parents of four children, three living - Alvin M., Frank B. and William M.  The deceased, Almira O., died, aged one year, three months and fifteen days.  Mr. Hough began life without a dollar, and all that he now possesses has been acquired by patient and incessant toil.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 606
COL. S. H. HUNT was born near Worthington, Ohio, Dec. 29, 1829; he is a son of Jasper and Mary A. (Andrews) Hunt, natives of Vermont and Connecticut respectively; his parents were poor, and in 1830 removed to Bowsherville, Crawford County, where they did a small business, trading in cattle and other stock, together with a small stock of groceries, which they sold to the Indians and the few white settlers of the vicinity.  Col. Hunt was early inured to the hardships of pioneer life, shoes or boots being a luxury accorded only to the wealthy; his education was limited by his surroundings, his first teacher being Joel Straw, father of Orrin Straw now a resident of this county, and subsequent instructors being W. Y. Magill, Martin and others, all well skilled in the flogging art, supposed to be a necessary qualification in those days of crude, pedagogic ideas.  At the age of ten, Mr. Hunt removed to Marseilles with his parents, his father there keeping a tavern about which our subject was useful in many ways, at the same time obtaining further education in the district schools.  At the age of fifteen (1844) his father obtained for him a situation as clerk in the dry goods store of L. J. Weaver, of Columbus, to which place superbly togged in a suit made up of butternut-colored jean coat, blue linsey pants, brown muslin shirt, cowhide shoes and coonskin cap, he repaired by the first state coach from Marion; he was employed by Mr. Weaver at $3 per month for the first year, with an increase of salary promised for the second year, and in this position he labored nearly six years.  He then returned to Marseilles, and began the dry goods business with a Mr. Dill, selling out to a Mr. Potter for $400 one year later; he then went to Cincinnati and obtained a situation in the wholesale dry goods house of Bowler & Ewing, 25 Pearl street.  In less than a year Mr. Ewing's death occurred, and Mr. H. obtained a situation  with Messrs. Stedman & Maynard in the same business, and with whom he remained one year, at the expiration of which time he accepted a partnership with his former employer, Mr. Weaver, in a retail store at Reynoldsburg, Franklin Co., Ohio.  Eighteen months later, the winter of 1854-55, he removed to Upper Sandusky where he established a general store, doing business under the firm name of Hunt, Potter & Hunt, making an investment of $600.  The enterprise proving unprofitable, Mr. Hunt disposed of his interest for $800, two yeas later, spent a short time in buying and shipping stock, and then again embarked in the dry goods trade in partnership with Mr. Holdridge, whose interest he purchased two yeasr later.  He then purchased a large stock direct from New York, preparatory to extending his business, when, being Lieutenant Colonel of a battalion of five companies of Ohio National Guards organized in this county, he was called into the United States service with orders to report at Camp Chase, Columbus, Ohio, within six days; he then disposed of his goods at a sacrifice, and was made Colonel of the One Hundred and Forty-fourth Ohio National Guards, ordered to Baltimore, and thence to Fort McHenry to guard rebel prisoners; he was soon after replaced by Col. Len Harris' Regiment, and his command was divided, three companies being sent to Annapolis and the Junction, one to Wilmington and the remainder to the Relay House to guard the viaduct at that place, Mr. Hunt having command of the latter division.  A part of his regiment subsequently participated in the battle of Monocacy.  He did full duty as soldier in the field, being placed under the command of Maj. Gen. Wright of the Sixth Army Corps.  They participated in several skirmishes, losing 150 of their 800 men in battles, skirmishes and hospitals, losing 150 of their 800 men in battles, skirmishes and hospitals during their hundred-day service.  Mr. Hunt returned home in September, 1864, with health much impaired, and in the spring of 1865, again opened a dry goods store which he conducted with success till 1868; he then embarked in the grain business in which he has since continued, now enjoying a prosperous trade.  He has been a resident of the county most of his life, and is regarded as one of its most energetic and reliable business men, being also highly esteemed for his social and civil qualities.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 607
WILLIAM D. KAIL, of the firm of Streby, Myers & Kail, millers, was born in Mifflin Township, this county, Dec. 13, 1854, son of Andrew J. and Julia V. (Lindsey) Kail, both natives of Ohio, and of German and Irish ancestry respectively.  They were the parents of three children - Samuel P., William D. and Anna E.  Julia Kail, the mother, passed away in November, 1856; the father departed this life Mar. 5, 1883, and was buried from his late residence, on his farm in Mifflin Township, where he located thirty years ago.  William D. Kail, our subject, attended the district schools of his native township, subsequently entering the Ada Normal School for a few terms, and remained upon the farm, teaching at intervals, until 1880.  In March, 1881, he removed to Upper Sandusky, and purchased a third interest in the mill where he is now engaged, since which time the business has been conducted under the firm name of Streby, Myers & Kail.  They do an extensive business, have a capacity of thirty-five barrels per day, and introduced the roller process in 1882.  Mr. Kail's marriage to Miss Mattie E. Kiser, occurred Oct. 19, 1876, Miss Kiser being the daughter of Wesley P. and Malinda (Reed) Kiser.  They have four children - Harry E., born Apr. 12, 1878; Lottie E., Nov. 6, 1879; Avery L., Dec. 13, 1881, and Mabel B., Apr. 3, 1883.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 610
HENRY KELLER was born in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, June 30, 1838.  He is the son of Martin and Hannah (Hill) nee Buskirk) Keller.  His mother being the widow of Robert Hill, deceased.  The family consisted of six children, of whom three are living:  Wesley C., Henry and Maria, the wife of John L. Barick  Their parents removed to this county in 1855, and settled in Crane Township, where the father died in August, 1870; the death of the mother occurring in Tuscarawas County while on a visit to that locality in the following December.  Henry Keller obtained a fair education in the schools of his native county, coming with his parents to this county in 1855.  In May, 1862, he enlisted in the war, joining Company K, Sixty-first Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry for three years' service.  He participated in the battles of Freeman's Ford, Sulphur Springs, Waterloo Bridge, Bull Run Second, Wauhatchie, Mission Ridge, Lookout  Mountain, Buzzard's Roost and the skirmish near Hagerstown, Md.  He was taken prisoner at Bull Run, but was released after one month on parole.  His regiment was sent to Knoxville, and subsequently went into winter quarters at Chattanooga in 1863.  Here the regiment veteranized and returned home for thirty days on furlough, during which time Mr. Keller, in defending an old lady from the assaults of a colored inebriate, received injuries which disabled him for further service; he was therefore placed in the Invalid Corps and remained at Chicago, Ill., till the close of the war, receiving his discharge in May, 1865.  He then returned to his home, and has since engaged in agricultural pursuits.  Mr. Keller was married at Sulphur Springs, Crawford Co., Ohio, by Rev. Gideon Hoover, Oct. 19, 1865, to Susan B. Kotterman, widow of Levi Kotterman, who died from the effects of wounds received in the battle of Bull Run Second.  Mrs. Kotterman was a daughter of Asher J. and Elizabeth (Hargar) Reynolds, and a native of Stark County, Ohio, born July 1, 1836.  She had two children by her first husband: Flora E., born Jan. 29,1861; and Marion L., born July 3, 1862.  Mr. and Mrs. Keller had four children, their names are as follows:  Nora W., born Dec. 31, 1868; Amber M., Apr. 2, 1871; and Clara M., Dec. 15, 1872.  Henry E., born Aug. 9, 1866, was drowned by falling into a cellar partly filled with water, Mar. 27, 1869.  Mr. Keller owns a farm of fifty acres valued at $100 per acre.  He votes for Republican principles, and is an enterprising citizen of good repute.  He voted the Prohibition ticket in 1883.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 611
LEVI W. KELLER, dealer in groceries, provisions, queensware, etc., Upper Sandusky, was born in Pickaway County, Ohio, Jan. 22, 1824.  He is the son of Henry and Christina Keller, natives of Pennsylvania, the former of Dauphin County, and the latter of Northampton County.  They were married in Piqua County, having removed there in an early day, and were the parents of seven children, namely: Elizabeth, Levi M., John M., Mary A., Jacob, Henry and Alfred.  In 1823, they removed to Seneca County, where they both died - the mother in 1840, aged forty years; the father, in 1853, aged fifty-six years.  Levi W. Keller, the subject of this sketch, was reared upon the farm, and educated in the common schools of Seneca County.  At the age of eighteen he went to Wooster, Ohio, and learned the painter's trade, operating in Wooster and Tiffin until twenty-eight years of age.  He then removed to Upper Sandusky, working at his trade about three years, after which he removed to his farm, formerly purchased, and engaged in agricultural pursuits until 1880.  He then moved back to Upper Sandusky and engaged in the real estate and butchering business until 1882, when, in partnership with his son, he purchased the grocery store of G. G. Kramer, in which occupation he is still engaged, carrying a stock valued at $6,000.  In 1881, he disposed of his farm to J. F. Myers, for a consideration of $11,000.  Mr. Keller was married Dec. 17, 1851, to Margaret Schriver, of Seneca County, and six children have blessed their union, namely: Prudence C., born Sept. 27, 1852; Levi F., Feb. 18, 1854; Sarah A., July 8, 1855; Mary A., Nov. 6, 1856; Lewis H., Feb. 24, 1858; and Emma C., Feb. 14, 1860.  Mrs. Keller was born Aug. 4, 1822.  Mr. Keller was amassed a large amount of property, located in different parts of the county.  He served as a public minister in the Church of God forty years, all his family being now connected with that organization.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 611
GEORGE G. KENNARD, manufacturer of and dealer in harness, saddles, trunks, etc., Upper Sandusky, was born in Marion County, Ohio, Feb. 15, 1857, son of Gilbert and Elizabeth (Lyon) Kennard, natives of Ohio, and of English and Scotch ancestry.  They first settled in Marion County, but removed to this county in 1871, rearing a family of three children - George G., Charles W. and Thomas J.  George G., our subject, was educated principally in the Finley Schools, his parents, after several removals, locating at Finley, and later at Carey, this county.  He closed his studies at Carey, and began the harness trade at the age of fifteen, working with his father four years.  In 1876, he engaged din agricultural pursuits for the benefit of his health, and in 1878, he opened a harness shop at Carey, where he remained till September, 1882, when he removed to Upper Sandusky.  He wasa married Apr. 22, 1881, to Ada M. Paul, daughter of Rev. William S. and Hannah (Norton) Paul, now residents of Forest, Ohio.  They have one child, Olive E., born Apr. 25, 1882.  Mr. Kennard was born Sept. 9, 1854.  Our subject is a prominent member of the F. & A. M. at Carey, a Democrat in politics, and, with his wife, a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 614
GEORGE O. MASKEY, M. D., was born in Nevada, this county, Feb. 7, 1856.  He is the son of Benjamin and Adaline (Zook) Maskey natives of Cumberland County, Penn., and Wayne County, Ohio, respectively, and of German and Scotch parentage.  They were married in Crawford County, and located at Nevada in 1853, rearing a family of three children, viz., George O., William F., and Jacob A.  William F. is deceased, his death occurring July 25, 1882.  George O. Maskey, the subject of this sketch, came to Upper Sandusky, with his parents in 1870.  He was educated in the schools of Nevada and Upper Sandusky, graduating at the latter place in 1874.  He entered the Ohio Wesleyan University in 1875, and remained at that institution three years, after which he returned to Upper Sandusky, and was engaged as Principal of the Union Schools of that place during the school year if 1879-80.  He began the study of medicine under the instruction of Robert A. Henderson in 1879, and entered the Cleveland Medical College in 1880, graduating in March, 1882.  He located immediately at Upper Sandusky, forming a partnership with Dr. R. A. Henderson in 1882, with whom he still continues in the successful practice of his profession.  He is a member of the Legion of Honor, and of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 625
CAPT. HENRY MILLER, son of Henry and Mary (Ziegler) Miller, was born in Union County, Penn., May 1, 1818.  His parents were natives of Pennsylvania, and were married in that State about 1814.  They moved to Juniata County, Penn., in 1820, and resided in that locality until 1845, when they came to Ohio and settled in this county.  They were the parents of five children, three living - Samuel, Henry and Sarah.  John, an infant, is deceased, also Mary, the wife of Michael Depler, who died in 1863.  The father died in this county in 1848, aged about fifty-five yeas.  The mother survived her husband a number of years and died in her seventy-third year.  Henry Miller, the subject of this sketch, was engaged upon a farm during his earlier years, subsequently serving an apprenticeship at the printer's trade, pursuing this occupation five years, and finally abandoning it on account of failing health.  In 1845, he removed to Ohio and engaged in the carpenter's trade with his father till June 3, 1846, at which time he enlisted in Company F, Third Ohio Regiment, in the Mexican war.  He enlisted as private, but was commissioned Brevet Second Lieutenant about six months afterward, serving until the close of his term of service - one year.  He was discharged in June, 1847, and returned to Upper Sandusky, where he engaged in the butchering business five years.  In 1854, Mr. Miller removed with his family to Iowa and engaged one year in agricultural pursuits, but returned to Upper Sandusky at the expiration of that time and engaged in various vocations until elected Recorder of the county in 1859.  During his term of office Mr. Miller enlisted in the late war, Company K, Fifty-fifth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, for three years, entering the service in 1861.  He was commissioned First Lieutenant and, in 1862, as Captain, participating in the following battles: Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Mission Ridge, and the battles of the entire Atlanta campaign.  In 1864, he tendered his resignation and returned to his family in Upper Sandusky, engaging in the grocery and provision trade from 1865 to 1878, being then appointed Deputy Auditor in which capacity he is now serving.  He held the office of Township Clerk eight consecutive years, and as member of the City Council a number of years.  He was a member of the Union School Board, and a Republican in politics.  Himself and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  Mr. Miller was married Jan. 4, 1849, to Ellen Walker, daughter of Daniel and Elizabeth (Newman) Walker, residents of Upper Sandusky, and ten children have been born to them, three now living - Virginia E., Della E. and Mary E., wife of Frank Myers residents of Upper Sandusky.  The deceased are Charles B., Henry William, McCandlish, Rhoda I., Clara E., Rose May and Harry E.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 632
GEORGE A. MITCHELL was born in Knox County, Ohio, May 30, 1819, son of Joseph and Martha (Carr) Mitchell, the former a native of Washington County, Penn., born Jan. 1, 1782; the latter of Bucks County, Penn., born Aug. 22, 1795; the latter of Bucks County, Penn., born Aug. 22, 1795; the latter died June 21, 1835; the former Aug. 23, 1865.  They were married in Knox County, Ohio, Sept. 10, 1811, and were the parents of six children, three- Nathaniel, George A. and James - still living.  The family resided in Richland County from 1821 till the father's death.  George Mitchell came to this county in 1846 and has since engaged in agricultural pursuits.  He purchased his present farm in 1865 at $40 per acre; this he has improved and provided with good buildings, now estimating its value at $100 per acre.  Mr. Mitchell was married Nov. 28, 1848, to Catharine L. Duvre, daughter of David and Amanda (Hawk) Duvre, the former a native of Philadelphia, Penn., the latter of Warren County, N. J.  The death of Mrs. Mitchell occurred Oct. 20, 1849, adn Mr. M. was again married Apr. 6, 1851, to Sarah M. Snover, daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth (Hawk) Snover, and one child has been born to them - Joseph O., Sept. 1, 1852.  Mrs. Mitchell was born in New Jersey June 19, 1828.  They have a pleasant home and hold a high position in the esteem of their fellow citizens.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 633
HON. CHESTER R. MOTT, a leading attorney of Upper Sandusky, was born in Susquehanna County, Penn., July 15, 1813.  He is the son of Orange and Ruhanna (Shattuck) Mott, native of Connecticut, and of French and English extraction respectively.  They were married in Connecticut, and were the parents of nine children, of whom eight are still living, namely, Orange, Julia, Marilla, Louis, William K., Chester R., Harriet and Amassa.  The mother died in 1821, aged thirty-nine years; the father died about 1870, aged nearly ninety-nine years.  Judge Mott, as he is familiarly known, obtained as good an education as the common schools of the place of his nativity afforded.  He became a teacher in such schools at the age of nineteen.  After teaching in his native place for two consecutive winters, he pursued a course of studies in a seminary endowed by the Hon. Gerrit Smith, of Peterboro, N. Y., and located at Florence, Oneida Co., N. Y., under the name of Florence Manual Labor Institute.  From this institution Mr. Mott went directly to Erie County, Penn., where he studied law; was admitted to the bar of the several courts of that State, including the Supreme Court and the United States District Court for the Western District of Pennsylvania.  He opened an office in Erie in 1838, and continued the same until the spring of 1844, when he removed directly to Upper Sandusky, Ohio, where he has ever since resided.  At the organization  of the new county of Wyandot, in April, 1845, he was elected Prosecuting Attorney, and again elected at the October election in 1845, for the full term of two years, and after two years' service he resigned his office, and M. H. Kirby succeeded thereto by appointment.  In 1849, Mr. Mott was elected County Auditor, and re-elected in 1851; his second term expired in March, A. D. 1854.  In 1857, he was elected by the counties of Hardin and Wyandot their representative in the General Assembly of the State, in which body he served during its sessions of 1858 and 1859.  Declining to be a candidate for a second term, he continued the practice of his profession in connection with his partner, Hon. John Berry, now deceased, until 1865, when he was again elected to the office of Prosecuting Attorney of this county, just twenty years after his first election to the same office, but, before the expiration of this latter term, he was obliged to resign the same, to assume the duties of Judge of the Court of Common Pleas of the Third Judicial District of the State, embracing twenty counties, being the largest territorial district of the State, and then embracing four subdivisions.  Judge Mott was elected in the fourth subdivision, composed of the counties of Wyandot, Crawford, Seneca and Hancock, for the term of five years, expiring Feb. 9, 1872, since which time his attention has been turned to his professional pursuits.  He was several times elected to the office of Mayor of Upper Sandusky, and for several years served as Councilman and a member of the Board of Education.  Mr. Mott was married May 17, 1838, to Eleanor Chase, daughter of Briton and Eleanor (Carr) Chase, natives of New Lebanon, Columbia Co., N. Y.  They have two married daughters now living - Harriett E., wife of James M. Orr, and Ella C., wife of S. A. Magruder.  Judge Mott has spent many years in the public service and for the public good, and his long official career has been characterized by its integrity, intelligence and firm adherence to principle under all circumstances.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 636
JAMES M. POOL, farmer, was born in Richland County, Ohio, Jan. 11, 1823.  His parents are William and Elizabeth (Harris) Pool, natives of Pennsylvania and New Jersey respectively, and of English parentage.  They were married in Washington County, Penn., and had eleven children; the four living are Mary, Annie, James M. and William H.  They removed to Knox County, Ohio, in 1809, and to Richland in 1811, where he entered 160 acres of land, on which he resided till his death, Nov. 30, 1846.  He was born Oct. 30, 1787; his wife was born Mar. 18, 1787 and died in Mansfield, Ohio, June 16, 1863.  James M. Pool grew up in his native county and engaged in carpentering and farming, removing to this county in 1850 and settling on his present farm, paying $7.50 per acre.  he now owns 140 acres, provided with excellent buildings and valued at $90 per acre.  Being a member of Company A, One Hundred and Forty-fourth Ohio National Guards, his company was called into service in May, 1864; he participated in the skirmish at Berryville, Va., where he was captured, but made his escape into the Union lines on a Confederate mule; he was also in several skirmishes prior to this, and was discharged Sept. 2, 1864.  Mr. Pool was married in Richland County, Ohio, Nov. 4, 1847, to Mary E. Hartupee, daughter of William and Rachel (Logan) Hartupee, natives of New Jersey and Pennsylvania respectively; the latter born in Washington County, Penn., Apr. 29, 1799.  She was married to William Hartupee Nov. 11, 1819, and moved with him to Ohio in April, 1822, settling in Richland County.  This had twelve children.  Their son, Rev. G. H. Haratupee, D. D., is an active and efficient member of the Northern Ohio Conference.  Mrs. Hartupee died Jan. 19, 1879.  Her husband is still a resident of Richland County, in his eighty-eighth year.  Mr. and Mrs. Pool have had eleven children, nine surviving:  Weller B., Sept. 7, 1854; Albert H., Nov. 6, 1856; Ora B., Feb. 22, 1859; Elmer E., Mar. 18, 1861; James C., Aug. 6, 1863; Frank L., Nov. 5, 1865; Harley A., Dec. 24, 1868,  The deceased were Canace A., born Mar. 7, 1855, died Oct. 8, 1855, and an infant.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 641
WILLIAM F. POOL, son of James M. and Mary E. Pool, was born in Richland County, Ohio, July 23, 1848.  He came to this county in 1851, and settled in Crane Township with his parents, where they still reside.  Mr. Pool obtained a good education in the public schools, closing his literary pursuits at the age of twenty-five.  He began teaching at the age of nineteen and continued at intervals in that profession for eight years.  In 1872, he began the study of law under the instruction of Henry Maddux, of Upper Sandusky, and began the practice of the legal profession in 1875, which occupation he has since continued to pursue.  He first formed a partnership with George G. Bowman, which existed eighteen months, and subsequently practiced one year with Adam Kail, this partnership being dissolved by the death of Mr. Kail in December, 1881.  Since the above date he has continued his profession independently, and has established a fair practice.  Mr. Pool was married Mar. 16, 1874, to Anna Eaton, daughter of James and Oresta Eaton, and three children have been born to them: Harley E., born Feb. 14, 1876; James C., Oct. 11, 1877; and Howard L., July 10, 1880.  Mr. Pool is an energetic business man, and in politics, a stanch Republican.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 642
JOHN SEIDER, of the firm of Seider & Ludwig, carriage manufacturers, was born in Wittenburg, Germany, Mar. 31, 1833.  He is the son of Jacob and Catharine Seider, the former being accidentally killed in his native country in 1837.  John Seider emigrated to America with his mother and six children in 1852, and located in Upper Sandusky.  He acquired a knowledge of carriage making in Germany, and on settling in Upper Sandusky, engaged with William Barringer at $6 per month, remaining in his employ four years.  At the expiration of this time he began business for himself on a capital of $150, manufacturing wagons and ox carts.  He continued this business nine years, forming a partnership with D. Hale in 1865, and conducted the business six years under the firm name of Seider & Hale.  He then purchased Mr. Hale's interest, and subsequently admitted Frank Beidler; in 1880, Mr. Beidler retired and the partnership of Seider & Ludwig was established, which continued till the spring of 1884, when Mr. Seidler became the sole owner and proprietor.  He employs from fifteen to twenty workmen, and does an extensive business, manufacturing wagons, carriages and buggies.  Mr. Seider estimates his property at about $20,000.  He was married November 22, 1857, to Rosina Agerter, four children resulting from this union, viz.:  Clara V., Minnie B. and Elizabeth.  The deceased was an infant, Harry, who died in 1861.  The death of Mrs. Seider occurred Dec. 23, 1863, and Mr. Seider was again married Jan. 5, 1865, to Amelia Meyer, widow of Jacob Meyer, by whom she had one child, Louisa A., born in Switzerland, Nov. 24, 1858.  She emigrated to America with her mother in 1861, then three years of age.  By this second marriage Mr. Seidler has had five children - four living - John J., Edwin, Anna and Alice.  Mr. Seidler has served in nearly all the city offices, and has been a prominent member of the F. & A. M. since 1872.  He is a Democrat, and member of the German Lutheran Church, and is recognized as one of the most successful business men of the city.  He is a man of excellent character, of generous impulses, and though always carefully guarding his own interests, has never lost an opportunity to lend his aid in enhancing the interests of the public generally.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 647
ALLEN SMALLEY was born in Ashland County, Ohio, Dec. 26, 1841.  He is a son of Isaac and Elizabeth (Smith) Smalley, also natives of this State.  His father was the parent of twenty-children, seventeen by his first marriage.  Of this family those still living are Allen; Katie, now Mrs. Emmerson; Nancy A., widow of William R. Bliss; Matthias A.; Lily, wife of Robert Rosendale; Mary, Tracy and Benjamin F.  By a second marriage, Jacob W. and William were born.  Elizabeth, the mother of our subject, died in September, 1870; his father still survives and resides on his farm in Crawford Township.  Allen Smalley obtained a good education in the district schools, finishing his studies in the Ohio Wesleyan University.  Mar. 3, 1862, he enlisted in Company D, Forty-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and participated in some of the most spirited skirmishes of the times, but was discharged by special order at Nashville, Tenn., on account of temporary disability.  He subsequently returned home, taught a term of school, and in the spring of 1864 enlisted in the Signal Corps, United States Army, and continued therein till the close of the war.  He was one of the number who participated in the exploits of Admiral Farragut, and Capt. Leroy, Commander of the gunboat "Ossipe," running the gantlet between the confederate strongholds of Fort Gaines and Ft. Morgan.  He participated in the capture of the rebel ram "Tennessee," and the reduction of Forts Powell, Gaines and Morgan.  He was discharged by special order at New Orleans, in November, 1865.  In 1866, Mr. Smalley began the study of law at the University of Michigan, and in 1868, graduated at that institution, being admitted to the bar soon after at Olney, Ill., where he opened a law office and did business till 1870.  He then went to the South and engaged in the wood and lumber trade one year, and after teaching a winter school in Posey County, Ind., removed to Upper Sandusky.  He superintended the schools of the latter place one year, and subsequently taught two terms at Little Sandusky, and in 1876, was re-elected, serving with credit and ability.  Mr. Smalley was married Sept. 23, 1868, to Ellen Burke, daughter of Isaac and Elizabeth Burke, early settlers of this county.  Of nine children which have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Smalley, but four are living, namely: Lily G., born Dec. 29, 1869; Isaac, Dec. 28, 1870; Lulu, Jan. 9, 1874, and Edwin M., Jan. 26, 1879. Mr. Smalley takes an active part in politics, being an enthusiastic Democrat.  He is a member of the A., F. & A. M., the K. of H., Royal Arcanum, and G. A. R., being Chaplain of the latter order.  He is a Secretary of the Agricultural Society and one of its most active members.  He is favorably known as a man of enterprise and public spirit and is held in high esteem by the citizens of the community.  He is rapidly advancing in proficiency as a lawyer, and is destined to take a place among the first of his profession in the near future.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 649
JACOB W. SMALLEY, M. D., retired physician, was born in Wayne County, Ohio, Aug. 30, 1822.  He is the son of Richard and Catharine (Emmons) Smalley, natives of New Jersey, and of Holland descent.  They were the parents of thirteen children, all attaining their majority - five living at the present time, viz., Benjamin, Richard, Isaac, Abraham and Jacob W.  They removed to Wayne County in 1816, Mr. Smalley having entered 320 acres of land one year previous, where they resided until his death in April, 1845, aged seventy-seven years.  Mrs. Smalley died in 1861, aged eighty-six years.  Dr. Smalley, the subject of this sketch, was brought up on the farm, and shared such advantages of education as the district schools afforded.  He remained at home with his parents until twenty-one years of age, at which time he entered college at Ashland, Ohio, taking a preparatory course, and beginning the study of medicine at the age of twenty-four, under the instruction of Drs. Cook & Maxwell, at Berlin, Holmes Co., Ohio.  He graduated at the Western Reserve Medical College, Cleveland, and began the practice of his profession at Shanesville, Tuscarawas County, forming a partnership with Dr. Strese.  He removed to Fredericksburg, Wayne County, in 1848, and in 1862 to Upper Sandusky, where he formed a partnership with R. A. Henderson.  In 1869, Mr. Smalley withdrew from the partnership, and resumed his practice independently, continuing the same until 1878, when he retired from the profession.  Dr. Smalley was married in Fredericksburg, Apr. 15, 1856, to Margaret C. Armstrong, nee Porter, daughter of William and Mary (McNeal) Porter, early settlers of Holmes County.  Mr. Porter was at one time Representative of Holmes County; he died about 1839.  Mrs. Porter still survives, in her eighty-second year, and resides at Peru, Ind.  Mr. and Mrs. Smalley are the parents of seven children, four now living - William P., born June 8, 1860; Walter Mc., Jan. 19, 1862; Charles E., Feb. 21, 1864; Richard E., May 10, 1871.  The deceased are MAry C., born Mar. 13, 1857, died Apr. 6, 1861; Anna E., Sept. 5, 1858, died Mar. 21, 1861; Rolla, June 25, 1867, died Sept. 30, 1868.  Mrs. Smalley was born June 8, 1832.  Mr. Smalley has been a member of the F. & A. M. since 1847, and was a member of the Upper Sandusky School Board nine consecutive yeas.  In politics, he is a strong Republican.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 649
JAMES SMALLEY was born in Ashland County, Ohio, Feb. 23, 1823, son of Isaac and Priscilla (Scott) Smalley, natives of New Jersey and Ohio respectively.  They were the parents of ten children, three now living - James, Richard and Henry.  The parents both died in Ashland County - the father in 1859, aged about one hundred years; the mother in 1874, at an advanced age.  James Smalley, the subject of this notice, resided at the old homestead in Ashland County till his twenty-first year, locating in this county in 1843.  He engaged in daily labor a number of years, purchasing his present homestead of eighty acres in 1846, since adding 163 acres, now valued at $85 per acre.  The first tract was purchased for $3.50 per acre, and with money earned by days' labor at 50 cents per day.  Mr. Smalley was married, in Eden Township March, 1847, to Catharine Ulrich, daughter of Peter C. and Catharine (Bowsher) Ulrich, natives of Maryland, and of English and German ancestry.  She was born Sept. 5, 1828.  This marriage was followed by six children, five of whom are living - John W., born Mar. 24, 1852; Catharine A., Dec. 28, 1855; James S., May 15, 1860; Dencie A., Jan. 29, 1865; and Harriet I., Dec. 2, 1866.  The deceased was Amanda, born May 11, 1849, died Feb. 23, 1871.  Mr. Smalley votes in the interest of Democracy, and is well esteemed as a citizen.
~ Page 650
JESSE SMALLEY, farmer, was born in Crane Township, this county Oct. 24, 1846, son of Isaac and Margaret (Snyder) Smalley, both deceased, the former dying in 1848, the latter in 1862.  They were the parents of three children - Jesse, Isaac and Sarah J., who died in 1860.  Jesse, our subject, was reared on the farm, and educated in the district schools of his neighborhood.  After the death of his father, he took up his residence with James B. Alden, with whom he remained till his eighteenth year, at which time he enlisted in Company A, Fourteenth Regiment Ohio National Guards, and entered the war.  He participated in a spirited skirmish with Morgan's cavalry at Berryville, though his company was stationed most of the time of its service at Raleigh on guard duty.  He enlisted May 2, and was discharged Sept. 4, 1864.  He was married, in Upper Sandusky, to Ruth Cordray, daughter of Andrew and Rachel (Franklin) Cordray, Dec. 29, 1870, and two children have been born to them - Robert Mc., born, Oct. 8, 1871, and Joel G., Nov. 7, 1877.  Mrs. Smalley was born in Salem Township, July 30, 1849.  Mr. Smalley has always engaged in agricultural pursuits, and now owns eighty acres of land, valued at $75 per acre.  In politics, he favors the Republican school.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 650
JOSEPH M. SMITH, one of the most prominent farmers of this township, was born in Seneca County, Ohio, Dec. 28, 1832.  He is a son of Daniel and Mary (Duddleson) Smith, the former a native of Connecticut, the latter of Fairfield County, Ohio.  They came to this locality in 1822, and resided here the remainder of their lives.  There were nine children in the family, of whom but four are now living, namely, John, Henry H., Antoinette (wife of Robert Gier) and Joseph M.  Mr. Smith was one of the leading stock-dealers and farmers of the county during his life, at one time controlling over 3,000 acres of land.  He died in 1865, his wife surviving till 1882.  Joseph M., the subject of this notice, was engaged on the farm with his father till 1859, spending five years as a "cowboy," herding cattle on the open land.  He was then tendered 400 acres of land, which he has since cultivated and improved, having cleared nearly 300 acres "from the sprout."  He takes an active interest in agricultural matters, generally exhibiting stock at the county fairs, and keeping improved grades, with some thoroughbreds.  He now owns 525 acres of excellent land, valued at $75 to $100 per acre, on which in 1876-77 he erected an elegant brick mansion at a cost of $12,000.  It is provided with all the modern improvements - pantries, closets, hot and cold water, baths, etc.; is excellently planned, and, without doubt, one of the finest farm houses in the county.  Mr. Smith was married, Nov. 6, 1860, to Miss Salllie M. Straw, who was born in this county July 4, 1839.  She is the daughter of Samuel C. and Christina (Staily) Straw, her father being a native of Vermont, her mother of Pickaway County, Ohio.  They had eleven children, six of whom are now living, namely, David, Malachi, Martin, Samuel, Eunice and Sallie M.  Her parents located in this county about 1830, and resided here till their respective deaths, Nov. 22, 1856, and Aug. 11, 1876.  Mr. and Mrs. Smith have nine children, all living, namely: William S., born Aug. 13, 1861; Nettie M., Aug. 16, 1863; Anna V. Aug. 10, 1865; Eunice E., Oct. 16, 1867; David S., Apr. 15, 1870; Mary C., Aug. 5, 1873; Sallie M., Nov. 24, 1876; Joseph M., Mar. 16, 1880; George R., Sept. 29, 1882.  Mr. Smith is not a politician, but favors Republicanism.  He is known throughout the county as one of its most substantial and successful farmers, and is highly esteemed, both as a citizen and business man.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 651
LANDLINE SMITH, is a native of Richland County, Ohio, and was born May 21, 1845.  He is a son of John and Teresa (Coler) Smith who are natives of Germany.  They emigrated to America in 1832 - before their marriage - and were among the first settlers of Richland County, Ohio; residing there till 1867, when they moved to this county, and located in Carey, where they resided about twelve years.  In 1879, they located in Upper Sandusky, where they have since resided.  Their children were Frank P>, John A., Teressa, Landline and Louisa now living; and Mathias, Peter and Mary, deceased.  Lindline Smith, the subject of this sketch, was reared on a farm and attended the district schools, abandoning his studies and the "paternal roof" at the age of sixteen to engage in agricultural pursuits, to which he devoted his attention two years.  He then embarked in the produce and poultry trade, which occupation he has, at intervals, since continued.  In the fall of 1878, he was elected to the office of County Auditor, and in 1881 he was re-elected to the same position, which he still retains.  Mr. Smith enlisted May 2, 1864, in Company D, One Hundred and Forth-fourth Ohio National Guard, and entered the service.  He participated in several skirmishes, and was also in the battle of Berryville, where two other companies and a number of his own were captured.  He was discharged at Columbus, Ohio, Sept. 2, 1864.  He was married, June 18, 1874, to Elzina A. Boucher, who was born in Seneca County, Ohio, Feb. 27, 1855, and two children have been born to them - Harry H., born Feb. 18, 1876; and Bernice, May 29, 1879.  Mr. Smith is a member of the K. of P., the I. O. O. F., Royal Arcanum, and though a Republican in politics in this county so largely Democratic, he has been twice elected to his present position, the duties of which he has honorably and efficiently discharged.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 652
JESSE SNYDER, one of the old pioneers of this county was born in Chester County, Penn., Sept. 17, 1799, son of Henry and Margaret (Irey) Snyder, natives of Germany and Pennsylvania respectively.  They had nine children, our subject being the only one living; the deceased were Benjamin, Samuel, Thomas, Henry, Mary, Sarah, Hannah and John.  Their parents removed to Wayne County, where the mother died about 1836; the father then moved to Indiana, where he died.  Jesse Snyder was educated in the common schools of Chester County, Penn., where he engaged in farming and wagon making for several years.  He removed to Wayne County in 1830 or 1831, and purchased 160 acres of land, on which he resided thirteen yeas.  He removed to this county in 1843, settling among the Indians, at one time occupying one end of a cabin while an Indian family dwelt in the other - living in this way two months.  He was familiar with many of the chiefs, and after the Indians' departure in 1843, he purchased 560 acres of land in Government prices.  He now owns 322 acres, valued at $75 per acre, and much other property gained by hard labor and good management.  He was married in Chester County, Penn., to Sarah Mills, who was born in 1798, and died August __, 1874.  They had twelve children, four now living - Eliza A., born Nov. 7, 1824; Isabella, wife of Robert McKelly, born Jan. 31, 1830; Jesse, born Oct. 5, 1833; and Sarah A., Sept. 27, 1840.  In politics, Mr. Snyder votes for  the best man; in religion, he associates with the United Brethren Church.  He has always been a liberal contributor to the churches, having subscribed $2,700 to the erection of the Church.  He is notable for his public spirit, always being ready to assist in meritorious enterprises.  He came to this county a poor man, but, by his pluck, energy, perseverance and business sagacity, he has wrought out an enviable fortune.  From the poor wagon-maker, by the work of his own hands- the sweat of his own brow - he has risen to the wealthy landholder; and in the brilliant success of his ripened years bears the same spirit of kindness and generosity toward his fellow-men that characterized his less fortunate days.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 652
JOHN D. STERNER, of the firm of Hale & Sterner, manufacturers of wagons, carriages, etc., Upper Sandusky, was born in the before-named city Nov. 27, 1857.  He is a son of Michael & Mary A. (Hale) Sterner, natives of Pennsylvania, and of German parentage.  The parents came to this county before their marriage.  They had nine children, seven still living - Cyrus W., John D., Sarah E., Elma M., Samuel E., George B. and Ira H.  The deceased are Mary J. and David H.  The father departed this life Apr. 3, 1882, aged sixty-one years, seven months and twenty-six days, the mother still surviving, a resident of Upper Sandusky, in her fifty-sixth year.  The subject of this sketch was reared and educated in the above-named city, and now resides with his mother in the house in which he was born.  He acquired this trade in the shop of Hale & Freet, with whom he was employed five years, purchasing Mr. Freet's interest and entering into partnership with Mr. Hale in August, 1882.  This partnership still exists, teh firm doing a thriving business, employing twelve to fourteen workmen constantly.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 655-656
MICHAEL STERNER, deceased, was a native of Pennsylvania, born Aug. 7, 1820, son of Daniel and Esther (Smith) Sterner.  He settled in this county with his parents in 1849, residing in Upper Sandusky until his death, which occurred April 3, 1882.  He was engaged in agricultural pursuits and teaming, and was well respected as a citizen.  May 2, 1871, he had the misfortune to lose his left limb.  He was marred, Nov. 20, 1854 to Mary A. Hale, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Donor) Hale and their union was blessed by nine children, seven living, namely: Cyrus W., born Jan. 26, 1856; John D., Nov. 27, 1857; Libbie S., Feb. 27, 1861; Margaret E., Mar. 1, 1865; Emmet S., Dec. 9, 1867; George B., Aug. 17, 1870; Ira H., born Jul. 12, 1872.  The deceased were Mary J., born Sept. 9, 1859, died Aug. 28, 1864, and David H., born Nov. 23, 1863, died Jul. 24, 1865.  Mrs. Sterner was born in Cumberland Co., Penn., Sept. 17, 1828.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 655
JACOB SWARTZ is a native of Schuylkill County, Penn., born July 31, 1837, son of Abraham and Christena (Celmar) Swartz, of German descent.  The surviving children are Daniel, Anna, Abraham, Christena, Polly, Lovina, Jacob and John; four others are deceased.  The parents came to Richland County, Ohio, in 1840, where the father died in 1861, aged sixty-seven years; the mother in 1882, aged ninety-three.  Our subject came to Wyandot County in 1859, having been educated in the district schools of Richland.  He erected the first circular saw mill in the county, and, in partnership with George W. Moon, continued in the milling business about two yeas.  He then purchased 160 acres of land, which, in1882, he sold to his nephew and bought his present tract of 138 acres, paying $75 per acre.  He was married in Richland County June 19, 1864, to Sarah Balliet, daughter of David and Elizabeth (Williams) Balliet, a native of Richland County, born Jan. 26, 1837.  Mr. Swartz is a good farmer, selling annually $500 to $800 worth of stock.  In politics, he favors the Democratic school.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884
~ Page 660
 
CHARLES O. TILTON
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 661
JOHN TILTON
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 662
ELIZABETH J. TOBIAS
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 662
HAZARD P. TRACY
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 662
PHILIP TRACHT, manufacturer of and dealer in boots and shoes, Upper Sandusky, was born in Crawford County, Ohio, Apr. 1, 1834.  His parents, Adam and Ann Elizabeth Tracht, were natives of Germany and emigrated to America Sept. 17, 1831, settling permanently in Crawford County, where he purchased 200 acres of land, upon a portion of which he resided until his death, which occurred May 14, 1871, aged ninety-one years and four months.  The death of Mrs. Tracht occurred Sept. 5, 1862, her age being about sixty-five years.  They were the parents of eighteen children, eleven attaining their majority, seven now living - Eva E., Adam, Barbara, Philip, John, Ann M., and Michael J.  Philip Tracht, our subject, was reared upon the farm and obtained his education in the Crawford County schools.  At the age of sixteen he abandoned the farm and served as apprenticeship at the shoemaking trade with J. M. Schneider, of Mansfield, Ohio, where he remained two years.  He afterward spent six years in Galion, a short time in Cleveland, and removed to Upper Sandusky, Mar. 7, 1858.  He immediately opened a boot and shoe store on the old "Yellow Corner, No. 2," forming a partnership with Michael Katzenmeyer.  In 1863, this partnership was dissolved by mutual consent, and Mr. Tracht began business with his brother, Michael J., which partnership lasted three years.  They then sold out, and the subject of this sketch started on his individual account in 1870, in the "Old Yellow Corner," which place he occupied till Apr. 1, 1884, when he moved to the room occupied by the late Central Bank.  He employs from three to five assistants, and carries a stock valued at $2,500 to $3,000.  He is the owner of a fine residence on the corner of Finley and Fifth streets, and an adjoining lot and building. He was married at Bucyrus, Ohio, Oct. 28, 1858, to Lucinda Kile, and five children have been born to them - W. A., born Apr. 17, 1860; H. A., Aug. 26, 1862; Cora E., Aug. 29, 1867; Mary M., May 19, 1870, and Emma S., Aug. 31, 1875. Mrs. Tracht was born Mar. 20, 1837.  The family are members of the German Lutheran Church.  Adam Tracht, father of our subject, was ten years a soldier under Napoleon, serving in the countries of France and Spain.  He participated in several severe battles and was twice captured, but each time made his escape.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 663
FRANK TRIPP, SR.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 663
CHRISTIAN TSCHANEN
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 664
GEORGE W. TSCHANEN
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 665
WILLIAM T. TSCHANEN
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 665
CARL F. VEITH
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 665
CHARLES F. VEITH, JR.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 666
CASPER VEITH
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 666
JOHN H. VON STEIN, senior partner of the firm of Von Stein & Berg, druggists, Upper Sandusky, was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, January 10, 1853. He is the son of George and Margaret (Runck) Von Stein, natives of Germany, who emigrated to America about 1848, and were married in Cincinnati in 1849. They were the parents of five children, four of whom still survive—John H., Malinda, George P., William C. and a half-brother, Frederick Shaffer. John H. Von Stein, the subject of this sketch, came to Upper Sandusky with his parents in 1857, and was educated in the public schools of that city. He completed his education at the age of fifteen, when, his father dying, he was thrown almost entirely upon his own resources. At the age of nineteen, he engaged with Dr. Billhardt as clerk in his drug store, serving in this capacity five years. In 1877, Mr. Von Stein formed a partnership with Frederick Berg, and this connection still exists. They do an extensive business, and carry a large and complete stock of everything in their line, including a fine assortment of wall-paper, stationery, etc. Mr. Von Stein was married, September 14, 1876, to Emma C. Stutz, daughter of Adam and Caroline Stutz, natives of Germany, now residents of this county, Mr. Stutz at one time serving in the office of County Recorder. Mr. and Mrs. Von Stein are the parents of two children, one living, viz.: Edna C. M., born May 4, 1880; Rudolph, born in June, 1879, is deceased, dying in infancy. September 2, 1879, Mr. Von Stein assisted in the organization of the Ohio State Pharmaceutical Association at Columbus, Ohio. The association has grown from a membership of forty-five to eight hundred, and is now a permanent institution of the State. He also is Secretary of the Business Men's Union, and a member of the Royal Arcanum. Mr. Von Stein was elected City Clerk of Upper Sandusky three consecutive terms, now serving his sixth year. He is Treasurer of the Northwestern Ohio Volunteer Firemen's Association, is one of the Board of Trustees of the Supreme Lodge of P. O. of A.; also Deputy Supreme Ruler and Past Ruler. He is the owner of valuable town property on Sandusky avenue, and, with his wife, is a member of the German Lutheran Church. In politics Mr. Von Stein is a Democrat.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 666
LEONARD VON STEIN, M. D.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 667
FRANK VOGEL (deceased), of the firm of F. Vogel & Sons, merchant tailors, Upper Sandusky, was born in Baden, Germany, June 28, 1829, and emigrated to America in August, 1853, first settling in Sandusky City, but after six months removing to Mansfield, where he was employed as salesman four years.  He removed to Upper Sandusky in 1861, and began business in merchant tailoring on borrowed capital, and by strict attention to business has established a good trade.  He has replaced his borrowed capital, and in 1879 erected a large two-story brick building at a cost of $7,000.  He carries a stock valued at $9,000, and owns a large amount of valuable town property.  He landed in New York without a penny, being compelled to borrow ten cents with which to buy a loaf of bread to relieve his hunger.  His property in now valued at $50,000, the fruits of a life of incessant toil.  He was married at Sandusky City, three months after his emigration to that place, to Miss Susie Fleck, Nov. 7, 1853, and twelve children are the fruits of their union, ten yet living, namely, Frank, John, William, Henry, Anthony, Joseph, Katie, August, Eddie and Lena.  The deceased are Susannah and Elizabeth.  The ten children living are all well educated in both English and German languages, the father having received his education in the "Fatherland."
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884
~ Page 667
LYMAN P. WALTER, M. D.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 668
HENRY WATERS
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 668
JAMES W. WHITE, M. D.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 669
DARIUS H. S. WILLIAMS is a native of Lorain County, Ohio, born July 13, 1822, and son of Dr. Hiram S. and Julia (Hays) Williams, natives of Berkshire County, Mass., and of English and Scotch ancestry respectively.  They were married in their native county, and were the parents of six children, three of these - Darius H., John Q., and Charlotte C. - are still living.  Dr. Williams removed from Massachusetts to Lorain County, Ohio, in 1817, where, with the exception of two years in Chippewa County, he enjoyed an extensive practice till 1838, his wife's decease occurring in that year.  His death took place, Mar. 2, 1841, in his forty-eighth year.  Darius Williams, the subject of this sketch, spent his childhood and youth in the counties of Lorain and Medina, removing to Wisconsin at the age of twenty and engaging in various callings in that State, till his return to Medina County in 1852; he resided in Medina County, engaged in agricultural pursuits, till 1871, at which time he removed to this county, purchasing sixty acres of land in Crane Township.  From 1868 to 1871, he was agent of the Ohio Farmer's Insurance Company, and traveled over Wyandot County.  In the spring of 1872, he was appointed Superintendent of the County Infirmary, holding this office five years, after which he returned to his farm, which he sold in 1881, subsequently purchasing his present farm of eighty acres, where he is now engaged in general farm pursuits.  Mr. Williams was married, Jan. 1, 1853, to Mary Parmenter, a native of Pennsylvania, born in 1825.  Two children were born to them - George I., born Jan. 22, 1859, and Myrta M., born May 22, 1857.  Mrs. Williams' death occurred Mar. 8, 1869 and Mr. W. was again married, Mar. 22, 1870, to Mrs. Annie H. Ward, widow of Enos B. Ward, deceased.  She was a daughter of Cyrus F. and Mary (Bidwell) Beebe, born in Franklin County, Ohio, Jan. 1, 1840; her parents were natives of Vermont and Ohio respectively, and of English ancestry.  Mr. and Mrs. Williams have but one child - Frank D., born Dec. 23, 1870.  Although a Republican, Mr. Williams held his position as Superintendent of the Infirmary five years, with a full Democratic Board of Directors; he is a member of the I. O. O. F., and a substantial and well-respected citizen.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 669
WILLIAM WITZEL is a native of Prussia, born October 1, 1827; his parents were Gotlieb and Theresa (Byron) Witzel who died while he was yet an infant; he resided with his uncle, Charley Brange, till fifteen years of age, and then learned the trade of house carpenter, which he followed ten years in Germany; he came to America in 1853, and located in Marion County; he enlisted in Company B, Sixty-fourth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, September 22, 1862, and entered the war, participating in the battles of Chickamauga, Mission Ridge, siege of Knoxville, Buzzard's Roost, Resaca, Kenesaw Mountain, and others. In the engagement at Kenesaw Mountain he was wounded in the shoulder on account of which. he was discharged at Columbus, .February 9, 1865. Mr. Witzel purchased his present farm of fifty-one acres in April, 1865, and has since engaged in agricultural pursuits; he was married June 13, 1855, to Frances A. Kramer, a native of Franklin County, Ohio, born October 3, 1837. Eight children were born to them, two deceased—August W., was born April 5, 1856; Gustavus G., January 20, 1861; Anna M., June 14, 1863; Maria A., August 2, 1866; Jacob H., December 26, 1873; Clara P., December 27, 1880; Charley H., July 23, 1858. The latter died November 22, 1861, and an infant is also deceased. In politics, Mr. Witzel is an Independent, himself and family being members of the German Lutheran Church at Upper Sandusky.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 669
SAMUEL J. WIRICK
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 670
HON. SAMUEL M. WORTH
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 671
ELIZABETH ZIMMERMAN
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 ~ Page 671

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