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OHIO GENEALOGY EXPRESS

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ADAMS COUNTY, OHIO
HISTORY & GENEALOGY
 


 


BIOGRAPHIES

Source: 
History of Adams County, Ohio
from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time
by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers
West Union, Ohio
Published by E. B. Stivers
1900


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are errors with corrections next to them.

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  ADOLPH CADEN

Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 704

  GEORGE CAMPBELL was born in New Jersey, Jan. 3, 1778.  His father was in the Revolutionary War and was wounded at the battle of Trenton, Dec. 26, 1776, and died of the same in 1778.  After his father's death, his mother moved to Kentucky and married a man named Peterson.  In 1792, George, who could to get along with his step-father, ran away and went to the Stockade in Manchester.  The settlers had him drive out their cows in the morning and drive them in at evening.  In the Fall of 1793, on one occasion, when George was out in the forest to bring the cows in, he saw a party of Indians who discovered him at the same time.  They were lurking about to take a prisoner or a scalp.  George at once set up a series of Indian yells and started for the Stockade.  The Indian yell was as well understood by the cattle as by the settlers.  The cattle took fright and went for the Stockade on the run.  The boy also did the best running he ever did in his life, yelling in Indian style all the time, and he could imitate the Indian yell most perfectly.  The result was as George expected.  The settlers rushed out of the Stockade fully armed, and met young Campbell.  The Indians, unable to overtake George, and seeing  the settlers, fled.  Evidently they wanted to capture the boy as they made no attempts to shoot or tomahawk him.  George grew to manhood in Adams County and spent his life there.  He married Katherine Noland on Sept. 15, 1803, and in 1804 settled in Scott Township, where he died Oct. 30, 1854.
Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 546

John Campbell

  JOHN CAMPBELL.  The earliest ancestor of which we have any account was Duncan Campbell, of Argyleshire, Scotland.  He married Mary McCoy in 1612, and removed to Londonderry in Ireland the same year.  He had a son, John Campbell, who married in 1655, Grace Hay, daughter of Patrick Hay, Esq., of Londonderry.  They had three sons, one of whom was Robert, born in 1665, and who, with his sons, John, Hugh and Charles Campbell, emigrated to Virginia in 1696, and settled in that part of Orange County afterward incorporated in Augusta.  The son, Charles Campbell, was born in 1704, and died in 1778.  In 1739, he was married to Mary Trotter.  He had seven sons and three daughters.  He was the historian of Virginia.  His son, William, born in 1754, and died in 1822, was a soldier of the Revolution, and as such had a distinguished record as a General at King's Mountain and elsewhere.  He married Elizabeth Willson, of Rockbridge County, Virginia, a member of the distinguished Willson family.  They had eleven children.  Their son, Charles, was born Dec. 28, 1779, and died Sept. 26, 1871.  He was married Sept. 20, 1803, to Elizabeth Tweed, in Adams County.  He had five sons.  The third was John Campbell, of Ironton, born Jan. 14, 1808, in Adams County, Ohio.
     The Willson family intermarried with the Campbell family, who also have a distinguished record.  Col. John Willson, born in 1702, and died in 1773, settled near Fairfield, then Augusta County, Virginia, and was a Burgess of that county for twenty-seven years.  He once held his court where Pittsburgh now stands.  His wife, Martha, died in 1755, and are buried in the Glebe burying ground in Augusta County, Virginia.  His brother, Thomas, had a daughter, Rebekah, born in 1728, and died in 1820, who married James Willson, born in 1715 and died in 1809.  This James Willson, with his brother, Moses, was found when a very young boy in an open boat in the Atlantic Ocean.  They were accompanied by their mother and a maid.  The mother died at the moment of rescue and the maid a few moments after.  The captain of the rescuing ship brought the boys to this country where they grew up, married and spent their lives.
     James Willson had a large family of sons and daughters.  His daughter, Elizabeth, born in 1758 and died Feb. 27, 1832, married William Campbell, the Revolutionary General.  Her brother, Moses, was the father of Dr. William B. Willson, of Adams County, who has a sketch in this work, and also of James S. Willson, the father of Dr. William Finley Willson, who also has a sketch herein.  Judge John W. Campbell, United States District Judge, who has a sketch herein was a son of the Revolutionary General, William Campbell, who removed from Virginia to Kentucky in 1790 and from Kentucky to Adams County, Ohio, in 1798.  Our subject was a resident of Adams County from his birth until 1857, when that portion of Adams County where he resided was placed in Brown County.  He was reared on his father's farm and received what education he could obtain at home.  HE clerked for his uncle, William Humphreys, who had married his father's sister, Elizabeth, at Ripley, in 1828.  After learning enough of the business, as he thought, and he induced his uncle to go in partnership with him and they started a store at Russellville, Ohio.  Here John was popular with every one and would have succeeded, but the place and business was too slow for him.  He had $600 saved up and he sold out the business and put his capital in the steamboat, "Banner," of which he became clerk.  The boat was in the Cincinnati and Pittsburg trade.  After his second trip on the steamboat, he made up his mind that was not his vocation.  While coming down the river on this trip he met Robert Hamilton, the pioneer master of the Hanging Rock iron region and made inquiries for any opening in the iron business.  Mr. Hamilton invited him to get off at Hanging Rock.  He left the boat and accepted a clerkship at Pine Grove Furnace.  This was in 1832.  Mr. Campbell was anxious to stand well in the estimation of Mr. Hamilton.  Shortly before his steamboat venture, he had met in Ripley, a young lady named Elizabeth Clarke, niece of Mr. Hamilton's wife.  He fell in love with her.  She made her home with her aunt, Mrs. Hamilton, who was a daughter of John Ellison and a sister of William Ellison, of Manchester.  Naturally, Mr. Campbell would accept an invitation to go to Pine Grove Furnace.  He was ambitious to succeed as a business man and he believed he could do so under Mr. Hamilton's teaching.  He wanted to marry his niece who stood to Mr. Hamilton as a daughter.  He succeeded in both purposes.  The next year, 1833, he took an interest with Mr. Hamilton in building the Hanging Rock Forge at Hanging Rock.  The same year he and Andrew Ellison built Lawrence Furnace for the firm of J. Riggs & Co.  This year was formed the celebrated partnership of Campbell, Ellison & Company, of which he was a partner and which continued in existence until 1865.  In 1834, he and Robert Hamilton built Mt. Vernon Furnace and he moved there and became its manager.  The furnace was the property of Campbell, Ellison & Company for thirty years, and largely the source of the fortunes made by the members of that firm.  It was at this furnace Mr. Campbell made the change of placing the boilers and hot blast over the tunnel head, thus utilizing the waste gases, a method after generally adopted by all the charcoal furnaces of that region and in the United States.
     On March 16, 1837, he was married at Pine Grove Furnace to Miss Elizabeth Caldwell Clarke, already mentioned, and they began housekeeping at Mt. Vernon Furnace.
     In 1837, he had an interest at Vesuvius Furnace, and he induced the other owners to test the hot blast principle.  This was the first hot blast put up in this country and though it met with strong opposition through expectation of bad results, the experiment proved satisfactory in producing an increased quantity of iron for foundry use.  Mr. Campbell was always among the first to project any useful enterprise.  He was largely concerned in the first geological survey of the State, and by reason of his study of local geology he purchased lands extensively in the Hanging Rock region with a view to future development of their mineral resources.
     In 1845, he left Mt. Vernon Furnace and took up his residence at Hanging Rock.
     In 1846, he and Mr. John Peters built Greenup Furnace in Kentucky, and in 1846, Olive Furnace, Ohio to which was added Buckhorn.  In 1847, he built Gallia Furnace, and in 1848, he and others built Keystone Furnace.  In 1849, while residing at Hanging Rock, he evolved the project of establishing the town of Ironton.  The Ohio Iron and Coal Company, composed of twenty-four persons, was formed.  Twenty of the organizers were iron masters.  He became the president of the company and was its soul , so far as a corporation is capable of having a soul.  The company purchased forty acres of land, three miles above Hanging Rock, and undertook to form a model town and succeeded as near as anyone has ever succeeded.  Mr. Campbell gave the town its name, "Ironton."  He was one of the projectors of the Iron Railroad which was designed to make the furnace, north and east of Ironton, tributary to the town. In 1850, Mr. Campbell moved to the city of Ironton which thereafter was his home during his lifetime.  The same year he purchased La Grange Furnace.  The same year was built in Ironton the foundry of the firm of Campbell, Ellison & Co.  In 1851, Mr. Campbell became one of the founders of the Iron Bank of Ironton, afterwards changed to the First National Bank.  In 1852, he was one of the organizers of the Ironton Rolling Mill, afterward the New York and Ohio Iron and Steel Works.  The same year he took half the stock in the Olive Furnace and Machine Shops.  The same year he purchased the celebrated Hecla Cold Blast Furnace.  In 1853, he became one of the largest stockholders in the Kentucky Iron, Coal and Manufacturing Company, which founded the town of Ashland, Kentucky.
     In 1854, he, D. T. Woodrow and others, built Howard Furnace.  The same year he built a large establishment to manufacture an iron beam plow, and also built Madison Furnace.  This year he took stock in the Star Nail Mill, one of the largest in the country and now known as the Belfont Iron Works.  In 1855, he, with V. B. Horton, of Pomeroy, organized a company and built a telegraph line from Pomeroy to Cincinnati.  In 1866 he organized the Union Iron Company, owners of Washington and Monroe Furnaces, and was its president for many years.  From his majority he had been opposed to the institution of slavery, and was an Abolitionist.  His opinions on the subject of slavery were no doubt largely formed by his associations with Rev. John Rankin and men of his views, but as he grew older, his views against the institution intensified.  His home was one of the stations on the Underground Railroad, and there the poor, black fugitive was sure of a friendly meeting and all needed assistance.
     Mr. Campbell acted with the Whig party, and after its death, with the Republican party.  He was a delegate to the State Republican Convention in 1855.  He never sought or held any public office until 1862, when, in recognition of his great and valuable services to the Republican party and to his country, President Lincoln appointed him the first Internal Revenue Collector for the Eleventh Collection District of Ohio, and he served in the office with great fidelity and honor until Oct. 1, 1866, when he was succeeded by Gen. B. F. Coates.
    
In 1872, Mr. Campbell reached the height of his fortune.  He was then worth over a million of dollars.  Up to that time he had invested in and promoted almost every enterprise projected inside the circle of his acquaintance.  He had not done this recklessly or extravagantly, but from natural disposition to promote prosperity.
     In 1873, the Cooke panic overtook the country and from that time until 1883, there was a steady contraction in every enterprise with which Mr. Campbell was connected.  In 1880, it was largely through the influence and work of John Campbell that the Scioto Valley Railroad was completed to Ironton and eastward.
     In 1883, the Union Iron Company failed.  For years Mr. Campbell had sustained it, and for some time had been endorsing for it personally, hoping to sustain its waning fortunes, but its failure was too much for him and he was compelled to make an assignment in his old age, but he went down with that grand and noble courage, which in his youth and middle life had caused him to go into every business venture.  No one who knew Mr. Campbell ever thought any less of him on account of his failure, but he had the sympathy and good will of every man who had known him in a business way.  His changed financial condition never affected the esteem in which he had been held or lessened, in any way, the great influence he held in the community.  He survived until Aug. 30, 1891, but owing to the condition of business affairs and his advanced age, was never able to retrieve his lost fortunes.
     In the case of Mr. Campbell it is most difficult to make a just and true character estimate which will truly display the man.  He had so many excellent qualities that there is danger that all may not be mentioned.  He had a wonderful faculty of looking forward and determining in advance what business enterprises would succeed.  The writer does not know a proper term by which to designate this feature of his character.  He could and would predict the success of a proposed business venture when all others were incredulous.  He lived to see his business judgment verified.  He never hesitated to act on his judgment of the future, and personally, he was never mistaken or wrong.  He had a wonderful influence over his fellow men.  He could bring them to his views and induce them to carry them out.  He was never haughty or proud.  He was approachable to all.  He took a personal interest in all men of his acquaintance who tried to do anything for themselves.  He was always the friend of the unfortunate.  The colored people all loved him.  In the slavery days no fugitive ever called on him in vain.  He was sure of aid, relief and comfort in Mr. Campbell.  His judgment was incisive.  He examined a matter carefully and made up his mind, and when once made up, he was immovable.  He possessed a most equable temper.  He was calm and gentle.  He was, in his time, by far, the most conspicuous figure in the Hanging Rock iron region.  He was identified with every public enterprise in Ironton from the foundation of the town.  Many of the important industries in Ironton owe their success to his excellent judgment.  No one went to him to enlist him in a worthy public enterprise who did not succeed.  No meritorious appeal for aid was ever made to him and refused by him.  He was always ready to aid any deserving man or association of men, either in business or charity.  The universal sorrow expressed on the occasion of his death and funeral show how he stood among his fellow citizens.  There was a public meeting called to prepare resolutions expressive of the sentiments of the community.  The bar of the county met and passed resolutions, though he was never a member of that body.  The city council also met and made public record of its sentiments.  He had the confidence, the respect, and esteem and love of the entire community.  The attendance at his funeral of itself demonstrated the regard in which he was held.  No greater funeral was ever held in Ironton.  The city police were mounted, the city and county officials and the bar attended as bodies.  All the church bells were tolled and all business suspended.  It was well that the whole city mourned, because  to John Campbell, more than to anyone else, was it indebted for its existence and its prosperity.  In the space allotted in this book, justice cannot be done to the career of Mr. Campbell.  We have given and can give but a partial view of his career and character.  His wife survived him.  They had five children, three daughters and two sons, who grew to maturity.  His eldest daughter was Mrs. Henry S. Neal, who died before her father.  His second daughter is Mrs. William Means, of Yellow Springs, Ohio.  His daughters Emma and Clara are both now deceased.  His son, Albert, resides at Washington, D. C., and his son, Charles, at Hecla Furnace.  His wife died Nov. 19, 1893.
Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 534

  DR. JOHN CAMPBELL  is, on his father's side, of Scotch-Irish descent.  His grandfather, William Campbell, came to this country shortly after the Revolutionary 'War, and settled in Washington County, Pennsylvania, a section of the country largely populated by Presbyterians from the North of Ireland and Scotland.  They have been commonly known as "Scotch-Irish," presumably from the fact that their ancestry, and it may also be added, their Presbyterianism, both were derived from Scotland.  William Campbell was a member of Chartier's Presbyterian Church, the pastor of which was Dr. John McMillan, a very celebrated divine of those days was Dr. John McMillan, a very celebrated divine of those days and the founder of Jefferson College.  The father of Dr. John Campbell, named John Campbell, lived on the old farm until 1846, when he moved with his family to Adams County, Ohio, near Youngsville, where one son, Richard Campbell, and two daughters now reside.  Dr. John Campbell was born in Washington County, Pennsylvania, Feb. 9, 1828, entered Jefferson College in 1843 and graduated in 1847, receiving the degree of A. B., and later the degree of M. A.  He then came to Adams County, taught school and studied medicine with Dr. Coleman in West Union in 1851 and 1852.  He practiced medicine at Tranquility until the commencement of the Civil War.  In 1861, he united with Captain John T. Wilson in recruiting Company E, of the 70th Regiment and was commissioned as First Lieutenant of the company, becoming, in process of time, Captain of Company I, of the same regiment, serving from October 1, 1861, to November 4, 1864.  He afterwards practiced medicine at West Union until 1870, when he removed to Delhi, Ohio, where he continued in the practice of his profession until 1885.  He was then appointed Medical Referee in the Bureau of Pensions, and removed to Washington, D. C.  On the change of administration in 1889, he resigned and obtained an appointment as Inspector of the Equitable Life Insurance Company of New York.  This he continues to hold and has charge of the district composed of the States of Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia and the District of Columbia, with headquarters at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he now lives.  The maternal grandfather of Dr. Campbell was James Perry, of Shenandoah County, Virginia, who was born in that state and whose family had been settled there in Colonial times.  The history of the family on this side of the house is very incomplete, but we known that some members of his maternal grandmother's family (Feeley) served in the Revolutionary War, and one of them, Captain Timothy Feeley, received from the Government a large grant of land in what afterwards became Highland County, Ohio, for his services.
     Dr. Campbell was first married to Hattie Whitacre, daughter of Amos Campbell, now a respected citizen living near Youngsville.  On October 13, 1869, he was married to Esther A. Cockerill, daughter of General J. R. daughters, Mabel, died in infancy.  The other, Helen M. Campbell, is their only child.  The son, Joseph Randolph Campbell, an Ensign in the United States Navy, died of typhoid fever during the recent War with Spain.  A separate sketch of him will be found herein.
     Dr. John Campbell might have gone into the Civil War as a surgeon but this he declined to do, and went in as a line officer in the famous company raised by the Hon. John T. Wilson.  The record of the 70th O. V. I. will show what valiant service he performed for his country.  Dr. Campbell has always been noted for his modest and unassuming manners and his diffident disposition, but he never failed in any duty before him and has always filled the important public positions held by him with the highest credit to himself and with great satisfaction to all concerned.  He is a man of the highest integrity and commands the confidence and enjoys the highest respect of all who know him.
Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 701
NOTE:  CORRECTIONS -
Charles Campbell, the Historian of Virginia, and his son William, the Revolutionary Gneral, were not in the direct line of the ancestors of the subject, but were collaterals.  The above named Charles Campbell and Charles C., grandfather of the subject, settled near Staunton, Virginia, about Fort Defiance in or before 1738.  He came from the north of Ireland and was a descendant of Duncan Campbell, located in Bourbon county in the state of Kentucky, in 1790.  In 1798, he located in the Northwest Territory in what was afterwards Adams County, and is now in Brown County.  He married Elizabeth Willison, sister of William Willison, one of the first ministers in the old Stone Church, at Fort Defiance, near Staunton, Virginia.  His uncle, Burgess Willson, was prominent in politics, being Burgess for twenty-seven years.
     Charles Campbell, one of William Campbell's sons, and grandfather of the subject of thsi sketch, in later years moved to Illinois and died leaving a valuable estate.  He married Elizabeth Tweed and he and his wife lived until about 1871, when they died at the age of about 93 years.

Ensign Joseph Randolph Campbell
  JOSEPH RANDOLPH CAMPBELL, son of Dr. John and Esther C. Campbell, was born in Delhi, Ohio, Mar. 12, 1872.  His education was commenced in the Home City and Delhi public schools and continued at Washington, D. C.., until Sept. 29, 1888, when he entered the U. S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, Md., as a Naval Cadet, under appointment by the Secretary of the Navy to fill a vacancy from Wyoming Territory.  He graduated from the academy, June, 1892, with honor, and was assigned to the Newark, then about to sail for European waters as the representative of the U. S. Navy in the Spanish and Italian Columbian celebrations.  About a year later he was transferred to the San Francisco, and was in the harbor of Rio Janiero during the exciting times of the Brazilian revolt of '93 and '94.  In June, 1894, he returned to the Naval Academy for final examination, preceding his commission as Ensign.  He came through this ordeal with distinction, standing at the head of the line division of his class, and was duly commissioned as an Ensign to date from July 1, 1894.  He was assigned to duty on the New York, then the finest cruiser in the new Navy and about to sail as our Nation's representative in the grand marine pageant of the opening of the Kiel Canal.  While at Kiel, he commanded the boat of the New York which gained one of the races given by the German Emporer's Yacht Club, and received as the prize two silver cups from Kaiser William.  After serving on the New York the usual term, he was transferred to the Alliance, a training ship for Naval apprentices, for two cruises across the Atlantic and through the West Indies.  Then followed duty at the War College and Torpedo Station at Newport, R. I., until he was transferred to the Katahdin at the commencement of the recent war with Spain.  In April, 1898, while at Hampton Roads, he was attacked by a sickness which later developed into an exceedingly severe typhoid fever.  His reluctance to be off his post under the war excitement, until absolutely prostrated, added greatly to the intensity of the disease, and possibly the over taxation of his constitution by the efforts of continued duty, gave the disease its fatal direction.  However, after his impaired health had lasted nearly a month under great strain, his ship having reached Boston, he was taken to the Naval Hospital on May 4, and died May 30, 1898, at noon, while a company of marines were decorating the graves of departed heroes in the cemetery in the hospital grounds adjacent.
     He came of a military and patriotic family.  His great-grandfather, General Daniel Cockerill, was a Lieutenant from Virginia in the War of 1812 and a Major General in the Ohio Militia.  His grandfather, Joseph Randall Cockerill, was Colonel of the 70th Ohio Infantry in the Civil War, rose to that rank from private by sheer merit.
     His classmates in the Naval Academy give unanimous testimony that he was endowed with high and noble qualities of which he made the best use.  As an officer, he was admired by his juniors and esteemed by his superiors for his sterling worth.  At his final examinations he entered the Naval service as the Senior Ensign of his class.  Under circumstances of great provocation, his self-control was admirable, and yet his modesty was his most distinguishing characteristic.  By his death, his classmates lost a valued member and the Navy lost one of its brightest and most promising officers.
     Ensign Campbell was elected a Companion of the first class by inheritance from his grandfather, Brevet Brigadier General J. R. Cockerill, in the Ohio Commandery of the Loyal Legion, on Oct. 7, 1896, the number of his insignia being 11,572.  He was pure, high-minded and honorable.  During his brief career in the Navy, he had manifested talent and ability of a very high order.  The nobility of his character, his amiable qualities, his efficiency and devotion to duty, had made for him friends of all the officers with whom he served.  The many letters of condolence from them to his father and mother express their estimate of him and their sense of their personal loss.  A few are as follows:  Captain Wilde, of the Katahdin, says: "I have seen many young men enter the Navy, but never a better one than your son."  Lieutenant Potter writes: "I learned to like him sincerely, and recognized his unusual ability and high standard of professional and personal conduct.  In his taking away, we are all bereaved, and my best wish for myself would be that when I shall go, my character and my record shall be as stainless as his."
     A classmate at Annapolis says: "As time progressed, I learned to like him ore and more.  He was one of the best men I ever knew or ever care to know."
     He was taken for burial to his father's and mother's old home at West Union, Ohio, where the people showed the greatest respect for his father and uncle (Cockerhill), who so distinguished themselves for military valor in the War of 1861.

"Sleep on, brave Son, where grandsire sleeps,
A nation still they memory keeps,
And all her sons on land or sea,
Shall sacred in her memory be.

Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 712

  WILLIAM O. CAMPBELL of Peebles, was born in Locust Grove, in Adams County, Aug. 10, 1873.  His father was James Q. Campbell and his mother's maiden name was Catherine J. Manahan.  She was married May 28, 1849, to Charles Wilford Young.  He died May 7, 1856, and she married James Q. Campbell, Nov. 17, 1860.  As the name implies, Mr. Campbell is descended from Scottish Highlanders.  His father's parents were born in Maryland and removed, when young, to Butler County, Pennsylvania, where they resided until his father's death.  His grandparents located in Maryland about 1765.  James Q. Campbell was a member of the State Militia of Pennsylvania for five years.  He was a member of the Militia of Ohio for five years, and served as a Private in Company K, 141st O. V. I., in 1864.  Our subject's mother was born in Adams County in 1830 and reared there.  She is of the Tener and Porter families who settled in Maryland in 1700, emigrating from Holland and Wales.  These two families located in Ohio in 1802, part settling in Adams County and a part of Ross County.
     Our subject was educated in the Public schools of his home and began teaching in 1890 at Jaybird.  He taught thereafter in the Winters and attended Normal Schools in the Summers of 1890, 1891 and 1892.  From 1892 to 1894, he attended school and completed his studies in Cleveland, in 1894.  From that time till 1898, he followed the profession of school teacher.
     In 1898, he quit the profession of teaching and took up that of traveling salesman for art works and has made his business a great success.  In politics, he is, and has always been, a Republican.  He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  At present he is pushing a patent, No. 633,503, known as the C. & M. self-adjusting gig saddle for all kinds of harness.  In this enterprise, he is associated with William Mickey, of Peebles, and they are making arrangements for a manufacture of their patented device.  Their invention seems to have great merit and it is to he hoped they will make their fortunes by it.
     Our subject is an ambitious young man.  He early qualified himself as a teacher and showed himself very efficient and competent in that profession.  Everywhere he taught, he won the good-will and friendship of his pupils and their parents.  His success prompted further efforts and he attended a number of Normal schools and took up the study of higher branches.  He also took a business course.  He has successfully carried on an extensive work for a publishing house.  He is of a genial and social nature and is fond of music.  He has good conversational qualities.  He is free from the use of spirits,  liquors and narcotics.  He is very energetic and industrious, and is disposed to lead in everything he undertakes.
     Mr. Campbell has all those qualities which promise for him great success in life.
Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 698
  JOHN PATTON CASKEY

Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 700

  SAMUEL L. CHARLES

Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 727

  CAPTAIN SAMUEL E. CLARK

Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 728

  SAMUEL PAUL CLARK

Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 725

  JOHN CLINGER, JR., farmer of Manchester, was born Feb. 20, 1844.  His father was John and his mother Mary (Mowrar) Clinger.  His grandfather, Abraham Clinger, was born in Pennsylvania.  His father, John Clinger, was born in Pennsylvania, Feb. 19, 1815, and located in Adams County in 1832, coming down the Ohio River on a keel-boat.  He landed at Manchester, and settled on a farm in Monroe Township, where he now resides.  He married Mary Mowrar, daughter of Christian Mowrar, one of the first settlers of Adams County.  Christian Mowrar came from Pennsylvania in 1792 and joined the Massie colony in Stockade, where he remained till the treaty of Greenville.  He and his wife lived to an extreme age.  John Clinger, Senior, raised a family of three sons and three daughters, and after the death of his first wife in 1854, he married Susan Tucker, John Clinger, Jr., the subject of this sketch, received his education in the common schools of the county.  He enlisted Seventh Ohio Volunteer Cavalry and served in that organization until the first of July, 1865.  On the first if October, 1868, he married a daughter of Oliver Ashenhurst.  her father was born on the ocean on the passage from Ireland to America.  Oliver Ashenhurst married Susan Parker, and located in Manchester, where he engaged in the milling business until his death, Mar. 28, 1898.  Mrs. Clinger is the only child of his first wife.  Oliver Ashenhurst married for his second wife, Amy Phibbs, by whom he reared a family of nine children.
     The children of Mr. and Mrs. Clinger are: May Etta, wife of Stephen Thompson, of Manchester, Ohio; Leora Belle, in the employ of the Langdon Grocery Company at Maysville, Ky.  William Oliver, who served in the war with Spain and is at present in the Philippines.  Frank Arthur is a member of Company L, 22nd U. S. Infantry; Bertrha Florence is the wife of Frank Fulton Foster, of Manchester, Ohio; Amy A., is at Middletown, Ohio, and Marguarite Lucretia is at home with her parents.
     Mr. Clinger is a member of the Methodist Protestant Church at Island Creek.  He is a Republican in his political views and as a citizen highly respected by all who know him.
Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 721
  ROBERT McGOVNEY COCHRAN

Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 724

  ARMSTEAD THOMPSON MASON COCKERILL

Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 715

  JOHN A. COCKERILL

Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 713

  HON. ALFRED E. COLE

Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 728

  GEORGE DAVIS COLE

Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 706

  LEONARD COLE was born in Harford County, Maryland, in 1788, the son of Ephriam Cole and his wife, Ada Mitchell.  In 1793, his parents moved to Mason County, Kentucky, and in 1794 they joined Massie's colony at Manchester, and in 1795 is father located just south of West Union and built a home near Cole's spring.  The house is gone and the spring has been forgotten, but both were on the slope of the hill to the east of Collings graveyard, looking down into the valley of Beasley's Fork.  Here Leonard Cole grew to manhood.  He was one of the early schoolteacher's in West Union and instituted the reprehensible custom of flogging every boy in school if any mischief was done by a single one.  He was a firm believer in King Solomon's rule as to the use of the rod and applied it to both boys and girls.  As to the custom of flogging all the boys when any mischief was done, that was kept up by the successors of Mr. Cole, and the writer suffered from that custom with the other boys of his time.  Mr. Cole always thought a boy never got a like amiss, and if he did not deserve it at the time he received it, he would very soon afterward and he might as well have it in advance.  Aside from his whipping proclivities, Mr. Cole was a very good teacher.  He was a follower and discipline of Gen. Jackson.  He was a Justice of the Peace of Tiffin Township from 1829 to 1832.  He was a candidate for Auditor in 1825 and received 478 votes.  Ralph McClure received 130 and Joseph Riggs 715, and was elected.  In 1827, he was again a candidate for Auditor, and received 303 votes to 876 for Joseph Riggs.  He persevered in seeking the Auditor's office, and when Joseph Riggs resigned in 1831, he was appointed and served five months, Oct. 3, 1831, to Mar. 6, 1832.  He was elected and served from Mar. 6, 1832, to Mar. 4, 1844, twelve years.
     Mr. Cole was first married to a Miss McDonald, by whom he was the father of a large family of children.  When first married, he was emphatically an ungodly man.  He was opposed to his wife attending church, and she went secretly.  Mr. Cole was at this time a fighting and drinking man.  At one time he was indicted for seven assaults and batteries, all charged in one week.  He got so dreadful that his wife could not live with him and left him.  He did then what all prodigals did, shipped on a flatboat to New Orleans.  He came back by steamboat and when the latter was a short distance below Memphis, in the night, it ran into a snag and sunk immediately.  Cole swam to a snag.  In the darkness, he feared he would not be discovered and would be left there to die.  He vowed to the Lord that if rescued, he would devote the remainder of life to His service.  Soon after he was rescued, Mr. Cole went home, hunted up his wife, and was reconciled to her.  He joined the Methodist Church, and lived a member of it the remainder of his life.  He maintained the family worship, but would interrupt it to drive the pigs out of the yard, to drive the dog out of the kitchen, to serve a neighbor with milk, or for any other necessary work, and many tales are told of his peculiarity of his.  When James Moore, was courting Caroline Killen, he did it at the house of Leonard Cole, as he was forbidden at William Killen's home.  On one occasion when Caroline Killen and James Moore were at Mr. Cole's, they were present during family worship in the evening.  Mr. Cole prayed for those who were going to bed and for those who were going to sit up - Caroline Killen and James Moore.
     Mr. Cole
acquired the confidence of the entire community after he joined the Methodist Church, and lived the life of a model citizen.  His first wife died in 1838, and in 1839, he married her niece of the same name.  There were no children of this marriage.  In 1850, he removed to Brookville, Kentucky, where he died in 1857, and where he is buried.  Mr. Cole was an intensely earnest man in all he did.  When he was a drinking and fighting young man, he went into it with all the force of his nature.  When he reformed, his devotion to the church and to good citizenship was as earnest as human effort could make it.  He left many descendants, but none of them are known to the writer.
Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 540
  DR. DAVID COLEMAN

Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 710

  JOHN COLEMAN

Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 725

  WILLIAM KIRKER COLEMAN, M. D.

Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 720

  COL. DANIEL COLLIER was one of the pioneers of Adams County who came to the Northwest Territory in 1794.  He was born in January, 1764, and died on his magnificent farm on Ohio Brush Creek, where he is buried, April 17, 1835.  His wife was Elizabeth Prather, born December 9, 1768, and who died August 4, 1835.  She bore him twelve children:  James, John, Thomas, Daniel, Joseph, Richard, Isaac, Sarah, Elizabeth, Katharine, Luther and Harriet.  The latter was born September 17, 1815, and married Andrew Ellison, a son of James Ellison, a native of Ireland.
     Col. Collier selected the site of his future home on Ohio Brush Creek while with Nathaniel Massie and others surveying in that region.  The lands, five hundred acres, were purchased from Gen. William Lytle, who held military warrants of Jonathan TinsleyJohn Shaver and George Shaver, Virginia Line, Continental Establishment.  The site of the homestead is on an elevated terrace some forty acres in extent formed in the geological past by a drift of conglomerate in Ohio Brush Creek.  The general level of this terrace is about twenty-five feet above the bottom lands along the creek, and from it a fine view of the valley presents itself for miles up and down the stream.  At the base of this drift several fine springs of most excellent water wells forth.  The one across the public road opposite the Collier residence afforded the water supply for the old still-house owned by Col. Collier.  There was a fine young poplar sapling near it which young Tom Collier climbed and bent over while the Colonel and his wife were temporarily absent from home.  On his return Thomas received a "grubbing" for the supposed destruction of the young poplar.  That sapling is now a most beautiful and stately tree.
     Col. Collier was prominently identified with public affairs of Adams County in this time.  He was commissioned Colonel of the Third Regiment, First Brigade, Second Division, of Militia by Governor Samuel Huntington, December 29, 1809.  He served in the War of 1812 and was in the engagement at Sandusky.  On May 2, 1814, Acting Governor Thomas Looker, endorsed Colonel Collier's resignation as follows:  "The resignation of this commission accepted on account of long service, advanced age and bodily infirmities."
     Among Col. Collier's  old tax receipts in possession of one of his grandchildren, is one dated September 8, 1801, for one hundred and seventy-five cents,  his land tax for that year.  Subscribed by John Lodwick, Collector for Adams County.  In 1811, the tax on the same land was nine dollars as shown by the receipt of Thomas Massie, Collector.
Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 538
  CAPTAIN GEORGE COLLINGS

Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 705

  ELLIOT H. COLLINS is of English ancestry.  His grandfather, John Collins, was born in Maryland in 1754.  His wife was Sallie Henthorn.  He had three sons and four daughters.  In 1800 he brought his family to Washington County, Ohio.  His son, Henry, was born in 1779, and married Frances Ewart, who was born in County Armagh, Ireland.  Our subject was their eldest son, born in Grandview Township in Washington County, Apr. 23, 1812.  He married Elizabeth Rinard, Mar. 19, 1835.  They reared a family of one son and three daughters, Lycurgus Benton Allen, Cleopatra Minerva, Elizabeth Rebecca and Roxana Samantha.  His wife died Oct. 6, 1865, and on Mar. 28, 1858 he married Nancy McKay.  She was born in West Virginia, Jan. 15, 1824.  Of Mrs. Collins' children, Cleopatra  Minerva married William Wikoff, and resides in McLean County, Illinois; Elizabeth Rebecca died Aug. 24, 1868, at the age of twenty-seven years; Roxana Samantha married Joseph Nagel, and resides in Morris County, Kansas.  His son lives in Wellington, Kansas, and is a farmer.
     Mr. Collins came to Adams County in 1850, and located first in Monroe Township and afterwards in the Irish Bottoms, where he now resides. He was a man of great public spirit, and was always in the front of any movement for the public good.  He has been a Justice of the Peace for forty-nine years, his first commission being signed by Governor Vance, Mar. 31, 1838.  In that time, he never committed a person to jail, never had an appeal taken from any decision of his, never had a case from his docket taken up on error, never had a bond he took forfeited.  He has married over seven hundred couples and always presented the bride with the wedding fee and groom gave him.  He has often gone twenty miles to perform a marriage ceremony and has had parties come twenty-five miles to him to be married.  Of the years he was Justice of the Peace, twelve years were in Washington County, six in Monroe Township, Adams County.  He has been a Democrat all his life, never missed a political convention when he could get to it, never missed an elation and never scratched a ticket.  He is a member of the Christian Union Church on Beasley's Fork.  He is one of the best farmers in the Irish Bottoms, where he lives in ease and comfort.  He is a good friend, a kind neighbor, and a citizen proud of his county.  He is a good friend, a kind neighbor, and a citizen proud of his country.  He and his wife are enjoying the days of their old age.  For his years, he has the most powerful lungs and a remarkable constitution.  He bears up under the infirmities of age, though they were but temporary, and when he is called, he will answer "ready," and go, ready to give an account of the deed done in the body.  No man enjoys the company of his friends better than he, and no one is ever happier to have them visit him.   Since the preparation of this sketch his wife died in December, 1899.
Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 715
  REV. JOHN COLLINS


Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 543

  JOHN EDGAR COLLINS was born Apr. 9, 1871, two miles south of Peebles.  His father's name is John R. Collins, and his mother's maiden name was Mary Wright.  He has a brother, the Rev. H. O. Collins, a minister in the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which he is also a member.  His only sister is Mrs. Robert Jackman.  His training was such as the country school affords until he became a teacher at the age of eighteen.  Teaching during the Winter and spending his Summers in study at the National Normal University, he was graduated from the Scientific Department of that institution in 1892 in a class of seventy-seven.  The next year he was elected to the superintendency of the Peebles schools, which position he resigned in 1896 to accept a similar position in the West Union schools.  He was four times unanimously elected to this position.  At the time of his last re-election, in 1899, he was also elected to the superintendency of the Batavia schools, which place he accepted.  This school has nine departments and one of the best High schools in Southern Ohio.  Both when at Peebles and at West Union, Mr. Collins conducted a Summer Training School for Teachers, "The Tri-County Normal."  As Principal of the schools for seven years, 1893 to 1899, he did much to advance the educational interests in Adams County.  The total enrollment of the Tri-County Normal School under his management was over eight hundred, and more than eighty per cent, of the teachers actively engaged in school work in this county at this time (1900) received their training in his school.  Kentucky sent a number of students to this school as did the several counties of Southern Ohio.  Since graduating from the University, his one aim has been successful school work.  For some time he has been doing post-graduate work at the Ohio Wesleyan University, and in 1896 and 12897, respectively, he received common and high school certificates from the Ohio State Board.
     One of his most intimate friends and classmates in the Public schools speaks of him as follows:  "John Edgar Collins possesses some strong elements of character among which is his indomitable will and steadiness of purpose.  Every undertaking in which he is interested in carefully planned beforehand.  With him, there is no pensive 'It might have been.'  Thought precedes action with him.  He knows at end at the beginning.  His school work is planned with such accuracy that he sees the result as he leads his pupils to it.  By nature he is a teacher, and it is in the school that he is most at home.  Another extraordinary feature which he possesses is his power to meet exigencies.  At the most critical moment, he exercises the most deliberate judgment and meets opposition with the earnestness that brings the spoils into his hands.  He is a man of resources.  What he has become in the educational worked is much the result of his own effort.  A constant student, he has shown his power for mastery of thought best when studying for examinations or for special work.  He acquires knowledge with but little effort and has proved himself a thoughtful, careful student, not only of books, but of men as well.  In all his educational efforts, he has had the support of the best and most conscientious men.  His powers as an educator ad as an organizer have been proved not only by his public school work but by his successful training of hundreds of teachers in Normal school, as well.  His aim is high and he will leave a record which will be characterized by earnestness and many brilliant acts.
Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 718
  ELLIOT H. COLLINS.

Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 715

  JOHN DONALSON COMPTON

Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 703

  THOMAS W. CONNOLLEY

Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 702
NOTE:  CORRECTIONS - Paragraph one, line three.  For "
Eleven and Sarah Burbage," read "Levin duncan and Sarah H. Burbage," so as to agree with the two names as they appear in the article on page 657 - "The Burbage Family."


Residence of J. H. Connor, West Union, OH

  JAMES HARVEY CONNOR, of West Union, Ohio, was born Dec. 27, 1842, on the old Connor farm, in Sprigg Township.  He is of Irish lineage, his father, James Connor, being a son of Peter O'Connor, who emigrated from the South of Ireland to America in 1786, and shortly thereafter came West to the "dark and bloody ground,"  stopping in the vicinity of Kenton's Station near the old town of Washington.  Peter O'Connor had been reared in the Catholic Church, and upon his leaving for America the Parish Priest gave him a certificate of character, of which the following is a copy of the original now in the possession of our subject, J. H. Connor:
    
"I do hereby certify that Peter O'Connor, the bearer hereof, is a parishioner of mine in the parish of Clone these some years - is a young man descended of honest parents, and has behaved virtuously, soberly and regularly, and from everything I could learn his character has been irreproachable.  Given under my hand this third day of April, 1786.                                                  "DAVID CULLUM, P.P."

     In May, Peter O'Connor sailed from Dublin for America, as the following receipt for his passable aboard the Tristam shows:
     "Received from Peter Connor four guineas in full for steerage passage in the Tristam to America.  Dublin, May 13, 1786.        "GEORGE CRAWFORD."
     "This is to certify that Peter Connor comes as passenger on board of the Tristam, and this is his final discharge from the ship.  Dated this first day of August,, 1786.
                                                                           "CLARKE & MANN, Assng.
                                                                               "Aug. 2, 1786."

     Peter O'Connor,
or Connor as he was now called, arrived in Baltimore in August, 1786, and after getting from the proper authorities a permit to travel across the State, went to New York City and thence to Philadelphia.  Afterwards he went on a prospecting trip over the mountains to the frontier of Kentucky, and in 1796 bought of Andrew Ellison, "two hundred acres of land lying between Big Three Mile Creek and the Ohio River, it being a part of a tract of five hundred acres entered in the name of said Andrew Ellison and adjoining a tract now belonging to William Brady on the North."  This title bond gives the place of residence of Andrew Ellison as Hamilton County, Territory Northwest of the River Ohio (this was a year previous to the organization of Adams County), and the place of residence of Peter Connor, as Washington, Mason County, Kentucky.
     The date of his marriage to Elizabeth Roebuck is not known, but it is presumed to be about the time of the purchase of this tract of land in 1796.  It is also supposed that it was previous to his marriage that he paid a visit to his old home in Ireland, as disclosed by the following:

     "March 11, received from Peter Connor the sum of four guineas, passage money on board the Hamburg from Philadelphia to Cork.
                                                                                                                                                                                         "STEPHEN MOORE."

     The father of the subject of this sketch was James Connor, son of Peter Connor, and was born Nov. 2, 1802.  He was christened in the Catholic faith, although his mother was a Protestant.  James Connor married Margaret Boyle, a daughter of Thomas Boyle, for many years an elder in the Presbyterian Church at Manchester.  James Connor died May 4, 1896.
     Our subject, James H. Connor, attended the common schools and the academy at North Liberty under Prof. Chase.  He resided on the farm till 1874, when he moved to Manchester and entered the dry goods store of W. L. Vance as a clerk.  The following year he was elected on the Democratic ticket Treasurer of Adams County, and re-elected in 1877.  In 1881, he became a member of the dry goods establishment of Connor, Boyles and Pollard, in West Union, which firm was changed to Connor and Boyles in 1889.  In 1895, on the retirement of Mr. Boyles, the firm name was changed to J. H. Connor.  The first six years in business, the firm of Connor, Boyles & Pollard handled annually over $50,000 worth of goods.  With close competition, the house now does a business of over $30,000 annually.
     In 1891, Mr. Connor was nominated by the Democrats in the Adams-Pike District for Representative in the Ohio Legislature, and although the district is largely Republican, was defeated by only thirty-nine votes.  July 21, 1893, President Cleveland commissioned him postmaster of West Union, which position he held to the entire satisfaction of the community for four years and six months.
     Mr. Connor is a member of West Union Lodge, F. & A. M. No. 43; of DeKalb Lodge, I. O. O. F., Manchester; Crystal Lodge, K. of P., West Union, and a charter member of Royal Arcanum, Adams Council, No. 830.  He is also a member of the M. E. Church, West Union.
     In 1864, July 27, Mr. Connor enlisted in the 182d O. V. I., and was honorably discharged July 7, 1865, under Col. Lewis Butler.  And it is a fact worthy of notice that not until every other man of his company had applied for and received a pension did our subject do so.
     In all matters pertaining to the public good, Harvey Connor, as he is familiarly known , is always found in the foremost ranks.  He has done well, accumulated a competency, not from parsimony, but from liberal and honest dealing with his fellow men.
Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 717

  JAMES F. CORNELIUS

Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 719

  MRS. HANNAH AMANDA CORYELL

Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 707

  WILLIAM C. CORYELL

Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 716

  LARKIN N. COVERT,

Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 698

  MARTIN COX

Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 709

  MARTIN L. COX of Hills Fork.

Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 727

  EDWARD A. CRAWFORD was born December 28, 1861, near West Union, the son of Harper and Jane Willson Crawford.  His father, Harper Crawford, enlisted in Company K, 70th O. V. I., January 6, 1862.  He died in 1885 at the age of forty-five.  His eldest brother, William S. Crawford, enlisted June 13, 1864, in Company D, 24th O. V. I., Adams County's first company in the war and was transferred to Company D, 18th O. V. I., June 12, 1864.  This company was in sixteen battles and Crawford was mortally wounded at the battle of Nashville, December 15, 1864, and died December 29, 1864.  He is interred in the Nashville cemetery at Nashville, Tennessee.  He had a brother Gabriel who served in the Second Independent Battery of Ohio Light Artillery, enlisting at the age of nineteen.
     Our subject attended school at West Union until he completed all which could be taught him there.  He attended the Normal school at Lebanon in 1878 and 1880 and taught school in parts of the same year and was engaged in teaching school thereafter until 1890.  From 1881 to 1885, he taught school at Waggoner's Ripple, Sandy Springs, Bradyville and Quinn Chapel.  From 1886 to 1888 he taught at Rome; from 1888 to 1889, he was engaged in the grocery business at West Union, and in the Summer of 1890, he taught a Normal school at Moscow, Ohio.  In the Fall of 1890, he bought the People's Defender from Joseph W. Eylar, and has conducted that newspaper, a weekly, at West Union, ever since.  In 1897, he bought out the Democratic Index, edited by D. W. P. Eylar, and consolidated it with the Defender.
     He was married August 13, 1883, to Miss Mattie J. Pennywit, daughter of Mark Pennywit and his wife, Sallie Cox.  He is a member of the Presbyterian Church.  Politically, he has always been  Democrat.  In 1887, he was the candidate of that party for Clerk of the Court, but was defeated by W. R. Mehaffey, by seventy-three votes.  He was a delegate to the National Democratic Convention at Chicago from the Tenth Ohio District in 1896.  His paper has been well and ably conducted since he has controlled it and is one of the best in Southern Ohio.
     Mr. Crawford is a self made man.  He has made his business a success.  He is known for his strict fidelity to his party.  He is public spirited and takes an active part in church and social matters as well as political.  He was elected Secretary of the Democratic State Executive Committee of Ohio in September, 1900.
Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 721
  CRAWFORDS Stables
     There were many Indians in this region when the first settlers came, after the treaty of Greenville, and they annoyed the pioneers greatly by begging and pilfering, and occasionally stealing horses.  William Crawford, in order to protect a valuable horse from being stolen, built a stable in one end of his cabin in which he secured the animal at night.
Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 736 - Liberty Twp.
  CHARLES CRAIGMILES

Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 723

  MARION FRANCIS CRISSMAN

Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 722

  SAMUEL CULBERTSON

Source:  History of Adams County, Ohio from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time - by Nelson W. Evans and Emmons B. Stivers - West Union, Ohio - Published by E. B. Stivers - 1900 ~ Page 709

..

NOTES:

 

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