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Wyandot Co., Ohio
History & Genealogy

Source: 
History of Wyandot County, Ohio
Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co.,
1884

CHAPTER II.
ANTRIM TOWNSHIP

ANTRIM TOWNSHIP PRIOR TO 1845 - LOCATION AND PHYSICAL FEATHRES -
EARLY SETTLERS - OWNERS OF REAL ESTATE AND PERSONAL PROPERTY IN THE TOWNSHIP IN 1845 - SCHOOLS - CHURCHES - HISTORY OF THE VILLAGE OF NEVADA - HOTELS - MERCANTILE AND MANUFACTURING INTERESTS - DEPOSITS BANK - CHURCHES - CEMETERY ASSOCIATION - SCHOOLS - SECRET SOCIETIES - VILLAGE OFFICERS -

 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.
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  JAMES ANDERSON is a native of Lancaster County, Penn., born September 9, 1813. His parents, Hugh and Sarah (Miller) Anderson were natives of the same county, were of Irish and Scotch descent, were married there and reared a family of nine children. They removed to Washington County, Penn., in 1824, and to Ashland County, Ohio, in 1833, there purchasing 160 acres of land on which he resided until his death which occurred about 1849-50, his wife's decease taking place about one year later. James Anderson resided with his parents in the counties of Lancaster, Penn., and Ashland, Ohio, and attended the schools afforded in those times. He was married in Ashland County, January 25, 1838, to Elizabeth Hillborn, born December 27, 1819, daughter of Amos and Mary (George) Hillborn, her parents being natives of Pennsylvania, and of Irish parantage. The children resulting from this marriage were Rachel A., born November 20, 1841; May M., September 3, 1843; Sarah E., May 5, 1845; James L., May 6, 1847; Peggy J., May 18, 1850; Catharine J., August 5, 1852; Hannah M., January 13, 1855. An infant and Joseph Mc. are deceased. The latter was born July 4, 1840. He enlisted in the three months' service under Capt. Kirby, in April, 1861, and at the close of his service enlisted in Company F, One Hundred and First Ohio Volunteer Infantry, for three years. He was killed in the battle at Rocky Face Ridge May 11,1864, and is buried in Southern soil. In 1846, our subject removed from Ashland to this county and purchased at the sales eighty acres on Indian Run. This farm, purchased at $2.65 per acre, he has cleared and improved and now values the same at $80 per acre. He has a comfortable home in Nevada— the fruit of hard labor, served as Trustee several years; was one of the founders of the Presbyterian society at Nevada, having been an Elder over forty years, and is highly esteemed as a citizen, favoring the Republican policy of government. Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 692
  JOSEPH BACHTELL, deceased, was born in Frederick County, Penn., September 14, 1805. His father, Christian Bachtell, was born in Pennsylvania February 11, 1772, and his mother, Catharine (Smith) Bachtell in the same State February 17, 1771. The children were Jacob, Samuel, Lanah, Susan, Christian, Joseph, Catharine and David. The father died in Stark County, Ohio, February 18, 1828; the mother in this county June 11, 1846. Joseph Bachtell was married in Stark County, Ohio, November 5, 1829, to Ann M. Moore, daughter of William and Mary (Gillet) Moore; the former born in Maryland in 1778, the latter in same State August 20, 1778, their children having been John, Ann M. and Elizabeth. Her parents were married March 31, 1805, the father dying in this county in June, 1855; her mother in Stark County November 27, 1842. Joseph Bachtell came from Stark County, Ohio, in 1845 and purchased 100 acres of land in Antrim Township, which he labored on till 1875, when he removed to Nevada, where his death occurred July 30, 1883. His wife previously departed February 9, 1872. He was a man of good character and generous impulses. His children were Susan, born August 29, 1830; Samuel, April 17, 1833; Henry, September 5, 1835; Uriah L., August 3, 1837; Mary L., March 23, 1840; Sarah E., August 27, 1842; Adah, May 11, 1844, and Emmet E., April 6, 1849.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 692
  EMMET E. BACHTELL resided with his parents till about twenty-five years of age, and obtained a good education in the common schools. He has always resided on the homestead, where his father located in 1845, and is an energetic and successful farmer. He was married, February 18, 1875, to Miss Nancy C. Castanien, daughter of John and Christina (Alspoch) Castanien, natives of Perry County, Ohio. (See sketch of John Castanien—Pitt Township). Mr. and Mrs. Bachtell have one child—Elton E., born February 17, 1876. They are members of the Emanuel Reformed Church and held in high esteem by the members of the community in which they reside. In politics, Mr. Bachtell is a Republican. He had two brothers in the late war—Uriah L. and Samuel.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 692
  SAMUEL BACHTELL enlisted in the Fifteenth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, was made Second Lieutenant, and served three months, subsequently enlisting in the three years' service, holding the same rank. He was detailed for duty in the Signal Service at Munfordville, Ky., on Gen. Thomas' staff, in March, 1863, remaining on this duty till promoted to First Lieutenant, with an order to return to his regiment. This order was countermanded by Gen. Rosecrans, however, and he was ordered by the Secretary of War to report for examination, after which he was made Captain of the Signal Corps September 1, 1864. He was assigned to duty as Chief Signal Officer of the Army of the Cumberland, on Thomas' staff, but was subsequently transferred to Gen. Sherman's staff by the request of the latter, having been complimented for getting dispatches from Marietta to Rome, Ga., thereby saving the garrison two million rations and 8,000 head of beef cattle. Mr. Bachtell was with Sherman to the sea, and in the campaigns of the Carolinas, witnessing the surrender of Johnson's army. At Washington, he was promoted to Brevet Major for meritorious service rendered in the campaign of Atlanta, Savannah and the Carolinas. He was mustered out of service in June, 1866, having been the only Captain in the regular signal corps from the State of Ohio, though twelve were presented at the Senate for confirmation. He had thirty officers and 250 men under his command, and received several letters from Gen. Sherman complimenting him on his successful management.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 693
  IRVIN BACON was born in Crawford County, Ohio, December 1, 1837. He is a son of Charles and Parmelia (Nation) Bacon, natives of Pennsylvania and Tennessee respectively, and born in the respective years, 1801 and 1811. His parents were married in Bucyrus about 1833-34, and resided in Crawford County most of their lives. His father was a carpenter and miller, and did some work at various other trades, closing his life in 1851; his mother died in 1877. The children of the family were Ralph W., Irvin, Martin F., John D. and Catharine J. Irvin, the subject of this sketch, resided with his parents until his father's death, and then began life on his own resources. He was employed two years in a carding factory at Bucyrus, and was subsequently employed in various kinds of labor till he enlisted in the army August 11, 1861. Through the unauthorized action of Col. Harland, he became a member of the Eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteer Cavalry, and participated in the battles of Big Bethel, Newport News, siege of Suffolk, South Quay, Franklin, South Anna Bridge, Ash land Station, Jackson, Bottom's Bridge, King's Court House, Garrett's Station, Petersburg, Pine Level, Roanoke Station, Ream's Station, Stony Creek, Jerusalem Plank Road, Charles City Road, Darby Town Road and many other minor engagements. He was captured at Darby Town Road, and held in custody in the Libby, Salisbury and Danville Prisons from October 7, 1864, to February, 1865. On the 22d of the latter month, he was parolled, and in the month of March, 1865, he was exchanged and joined his regiment, the war ending with Lee's surrender a few days later. Mr. Bacon was promoted to Sergeant; then to First Sergeant, 1862; Second Lieutenant, July 1, 1864; and to Captain, October 1, 1864. He served his country four years and eight days, receiving his discharge August 19, 1865. In 1866, Mr. Bacon purchased eighty acres of his present farm, where he has since been engaged in agriculture and stock-raising, now controlling 139 acres, valued at $75 per acre. He has dealt some in line stock, and usually keeps good grades. He is a stanch Republican, and served as Assessor two years; Trustee two years, and was a candidate for Sheriff in 1883. Mr. Bacon was married, March 1, 1866, to Azaba Leith (see sketch of Hiram Leith), who died May 17, 1878, leaving one child—Clara, born July 1, 1867. His second marriage to Mrs. Lydia Grove, nee Spenny, occurred May 10, 1881, and one child—Carl—was born to them October 24, 1883.
     By her first marriage Mrs. Bacon had six children, namely, Jonas E., Emma V., Aaron A., Dorsey L., James H. and William H. Mr. Bacon is a member of Grange No. 771, K. of H., 277, and G. A. R., 127. He is a very energetic and successful business man and is popular as a citizen.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 693
  SAMUEL BEVER, proprietor of the Nevada Planing Mill and Lumber Yard, was born in Seneca County, Ohio, August 30, 1833. His parents were George and Sabina (Bretz) Bever, the former a native of Rock-ingham County, Ya., born March 22, 1800; the latter born in Pennsylvania. There were eleven children in the family, the only living at the present time being Melissa A., Samuel, Joseph, Adaline, Sarah A., Gideon and Amanda. The father died in Seneca County ia 1869, the mother in 1874. Samuel Bever, our subject, resided with his parents on the farm, attending the district schools till 1860. On January 11 of that year, he was married to Chistina Miller, born in Crawford County in the year 1835, daughter of Daniel and Lovina (Stratton) Miller. By this marriage, three children were born—Ross A., October 12, 1860; Earl R., May 15, 1863; and Sabina E., July 19, 1873. In 1867,  Mr. Bever removed to Nevada, and established himself in the saw mill business, which he conducted four years. He next engaged in the walnut lumber trade one year, and erected his planing mill in 1872. He now does a flourishing business, manufacturing to order all kinds of doors, sash, store fronts, etc., usually employing six workmen. Mr. Bever served one year as Trustee of Eden Township, and four years in the Council. He is a Democrat and member of the Knights of Honor—Post Dictator. His father, George Bever, settled in this county in 1824.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 694
  WILLIAM L. BLAIR, President Nevada Deposit Bank, is a son of James and Sarah A. (Lineberry) Blair, and was born in Warren County, N. J., December 20, 1831. His parents were of Scotch ancestry, who emigrated From that country in 1729 and 1749, and settled in New Jersey to aid in establishing civil and religious liberty. They were instrumental in establishing Princeton College, New Jersey, John Blair having been Vice President and Professor, and Samuel Blair having been chosen President but resigning in favor of Dr. Wetherspoon, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. James and Sarah Blair were married in Warren County, N. J., where they resided the greater portion of their lives. After the death of his wife, which occurred August 8, 1853, Mr. Blair migrated to Ohio, settling in this county, on what is known as the Judge Welch farm, near the village of Mexico, residing here till his death, which occurred September J 17, 1867. He had served as a soldier in the war of 1812. There were eight children of the family, six of whom survive, viz.: William L., Emeline, Matilda, Theodore F., Caroline and James A. The deceased were Marshal and Malinda. The father owned nearly 1,000 acres of improved land at the time of his death. In early life, he was a prominent citizen of New Jersey, having filled several responsible county offices. He was influential as a citizen and highly respected in his community. William L., the subject of this sketch, obtained the rudiments of an education in the district schools of New Jersey. He resided on the farm till eighteen years of age, when he embarked in life on his own resources. He first came to this county in 1853, to engage in the stock business, driving cattle and sheep over the mountains to Eastern markets. Attracted by the fertile lands in the Sandusky Valley, he decided to make this county his future home, and purchased 160 acres of improved land, near Sycamore, settling here permanently in the spring of 1854. Since that time, Mr. Blair has been identified with various business enterprises; he was one of the incorporators of the Nevada Deposit Bank, which began business in May 5, 1873, and at the first meeting of its stockholders, May 5, 1873, he was elected President, still holding that position. He is also President of the Farmers' Bank, of Winfield, Kan., and one of its principal stockholders. He owns a valuable and well-improved farm, near the corporation of Nevada, and is one of the substantial citizens of the county. Mr. Blair was married December 16, 1857, to Henrietta B. Fox, daughter of Charles C. and Caroline (Boyd) Fox, natives of New York and Kentucky respectively, of Scotch descent, and residents at that time, of this county, but now deceased. Six children are the fruits of this marriage. Idella B. was born November 5, 1858; Francis P., February 2, 1860; Caroline S., August 24, 1861; James A., May 7, 1863; William C., August 18, 1866; Mary E., June 3, 1874. Mr. Blair has been highly successful as a financier, and is held in high esteem as a citizen. He is a Republican, himself and family being associated with the Methodist Episcopal Church.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 694
  EMANUEL BOWLBY was born in Somerset County, Penn., September 19, 1821; he is a son of James and Sarah (Gross) Bowlby, natives of Hunterdon County, N. J., and Somerset County, Penn., the former born September 11, 1796, the latter April 1, 1801. His parents were married in Somerset County, Penn., and resided there till March, 1831, moving to Crawford County, Ohio, in 1852, the father dying there in 1870, the mother in 1859. His father died of apoplexy, falling in the Nevada Depot. There were fourteen children in the family, nine living—Emanuel, James, Joseph, Jacob, Hannah, Elizabeth, Maria, Catharine and Sarah. Mr. B. resided with his parents till of age; he then rented land, and farmed two years in Wayne County, and seven years in Stark County, moving to Wyandot, and locating on his present farm of eighty acres in 1852. This farm was purchased while covered by a dense growth of timber, but has been cleared and improved by Mr. Bowlby till it is now valued at $75 per acre. Mr. Bowlby was married April 7, 1842, to Sarah Stall, native of Wayne County, Ohio, born November 11, 1822, daughter of Michael and Sarah (Bowers) Stall, natives of Somerset County, Penn., the former born in 1792, the latter in 1795. They had eleven children, six living—Abraham, Henry, William, Elizabeth, Sarah, Barbara. The deceased are George, Michael, Jackson, John and Susan. The father died in 1841, the mother in 1871. Mr. and Mrs. Bowlby have ten children living, namely: Samantha, wife of Levi Lawbright, deceased, born October 22, 1843; Rachel, wife of H. L. Bachtell, born December, 1844; Dr. W., July 4, 1846; Hester A., wife of Mitchel Sigler, born September 5, 1848; Lydia, wife of Lewis Dinkle, born March 7, 1850; Wellington, July 27,1851; Nelson, October 18,1854; Marshall, May 9, 1858; Alice, wife of James H. Traxler, October 16, 1860; William Sherman, April 15, 1864; James, January 11, 1868; Marshall and an infant are deceased. Mr. Bowl by has a comfortable home, and is well respected throughout his community; a Republican, politically. Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 695
  ABRAHAM BROWN was born March 3, 1822. He is a native of Wayne County, Ohio, and is a son of Henry and Margaret (Nitz) Brown, natives of Pennsylvania. His father was born February 22, 1798, was married in Pennsylvania, and removed to Wayne CouDty, Ohio, about 1818. In 1826, he brought his family to this county, and located near Wyandot Village. In 1828, his first wife died, and in 1830 he was married to Elizabeth Nitz, of Fairfield County, Ohio; he subsequently moved to Belle Vernon, residing in this county till his death in August, 1881. By his first marriage there were five children, three living—David I., Lucretia and Abraham, the former a prominent lawyer in Ottawa, Ohio; Lucretia, now Mrs. Johnson, resides in Minnesota. Abraham Brown, the subject of this sketch, resided with his parents till eighteen years of age. He then paid his father $95 for the remainder of his minor years, and began business for himself, working four years by the month for S. Bretz. He continued in this work till twenty-four; then rented land one year, purchasing fifty-three acres in 1845. on which farm he lived twenty-five years. By subsequent purchases, Mr. Brown has increased his possessions till he now owns 685 acres, valued at $60 to $75 per acre. He has done an extensive farming and stock business; his operations having all been confined to this county; he has done considerable in the sheep business, and usually keeps good grades. Mr. Brown was married March 20, 1845, to Mary J. Ekleberry, a native of Muskingum County, born May 4, 1826. Her parents were Ezekiel and Mary (Towbridge) Eckleberry, and were married in Muskingum County, subsequently moving to this county, and locating near Belle Vernon about 1830; her father and mother are both dead. Mr. and Mrs. Brown have had eleven children, seven living, namely: Ezekiel, born January 24, 1850; Mary A., April 12, 1854; Ella, April 3, 1856; Kate, December 29, 1857; Effie C., January 12, 1860; Abraham L., March 5, 1862; Charles F., March 3, 1863. Mr. Brown has been a resident of this county fifty-eight years, and has done considerable for its development; he was one of the first settlers, having worked one year on the old Mission farm, and is quite familiar with the Indian language and customs. He is ranked among the foremost farmers of the county, and one of its most worthy citizens.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 696
  JOSEPH A. BROWN was born in Ashland County, Ohio, July 16, 1844. He is a son of James S. and Rebecca (Zimmerman) Brown, the former a native of Ross County, Ohio, the latter of Huntingdon County, Penn. He was reared to manhood in his native county and educated in the district schools, enlisting May 1, 1861, in Company G, Twenty-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry, under command of Gen. Rosecrans. His regiment at length halted on the • banks of the Monongahela, West Virginia, from whence Mr. Brown made his first trip as scout, engaging in an action near 'Fort Pickens with a party of " bushwhackers," and on his return to camp at Camp Scott, his father, who was a teamster in the same company, was fatally seized with typhoid fever. He was afterward moved to Camp Lookout, where he died October 1, 1861, at the home of a colored family. In this situation, Mr. Brown had the trying experience of making his own father's coffin, of boards torn from an old corn crib, and burying him with his own hands in an old graveyard near by. He then joined his regiment, and in the winter of 1862, with a scouting party of twenty, captured twenty prisoners, and fired but three shots, after which he was ordered East in August of that year. He subsequently participated in the battles of Bull Run, South Mountain, Antietam, and others. Being wounded at the latter place, he was kept at the hospital several weeks, joining his regiment at Charleston, where he re-enlisted December 13, 1863. He was afterward engaged as scout under Capt. Blazer for Gens. Crooks and Sheridan, and passed through some thrilling experiences. On the morning of October 4, 1864, he was captured by four of Mosby's rebels, disguised as Union soldiers, while on his way to Cedar Creek, and escaped only by shooting three of the guards, this being done by the assistance of a fellow-prisoner. The history of this capture and escape is replete with incident and interest, but the limits of this sketch will not' admit its thrilling details. Besides the battles enumerated above, Mr. Brown was engaged at Opequon, Winchester, Cedar Creek, Snicker's Gap, Fisher's Hill, Cloyd's Mountain, Lynchburg, Petersburg and Fredericksburg. He was honorably discharged August 5, 1865, and returned to Wellington, Lorain County, where he engaged in the tinner's trade one year. He then removed to Ashland, where he engaged in the same business till 1867, when he came to Nevada, and went into the employ of David and William Balliet, with whom he remained five years. Mr. Brown was married, August 4,1867, to Miss Mary J. Smith, whose letters addressed to him in " care of Capt. Blazer, commanding scouts," had so nearly betrayed his position to his captors. She is the daughter of Wilson and Eliza (Simmons) Smith, early settlers of Crawford County. This marriage has been followed by four children, viz., Iona (born July 27, 1870), Adella (November 15, .1872), James W. (September 10, 1874), Daisy (November 10, 1878).  Mrs. B. was born in Crawford County December 3, 1846. Mr. Brown has been chief of the fire department in Nevada since its organization in 1870; was Marshal one term, and now a member of the Council. He is a member of the K of H, I O. O. F., and G. A. R., having passed all the chairs of the respective orders.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 696

William Broynton
WILLIAM BROYTON - Portrait only

Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page

  BENJAMIN F. BRYANT, son of Isaac Bryant (see sketch), was born in the house where he now resides May 29, 1858. He resided with his parents till his father's death, his mother subsequently removing to Bucyrus, where she still lives. He was educated by a governess in his own home, the truant tricks of the average school boy being unknown to him. After abandoning his studies, he engaged two years in the dry goods and grocery trade with his brother, Charles Bryant, carrying a stock of goods valued at $4,000 to $5,000, but has since devoted his time to agricultural pursuits and stock-raising, doing an extensive business. Mr. Bryant was married, March 17, 1880, to Ella De Lancy, daughter of Joseph and Rebecca (Deardoff) De Lancy, now residents of Bucyrus. She was born in Richland County, Ohio, January 3, 1863. Mr. Bryant is a young man of large business experience, good character, and genial disposition, commanding the respect of his entire community. He controls considerable property, assisted in his efforts by an accomplished wife.  Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 697
  SAMUEL BURBAUGH, son of Conrad and Mary (Beckman) Burbaugh, natives of Germany, was born in Marion County, Ohio, March 25, 1846. He resided with his parents till twenty-two years of age; then farmed rented land two years, and purchased his present farm of eighty acres in 1875. Since that date, he has been engaged in this county farming and raising stock, doing a good business. Mr. Burbaugh was married, January 19, 1872, to Barbara Weist, a native of Morrow County, born October 4, 1853, daughter of Christopher and Mary (Wilt) Weist, natives of Germany and Pennsylvania respectively. (See sketch of C. Weist, Pitt Township.) The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Burbaugh has been blessed by live children, namely: Anna C., born March 27, 1872; Mary L., March 7, 1874; Lena, July 25, 1876; Bertha E., April 5, 1878; and Frank J., May 27, 1881. Lena is deceased. In politics, Mr. Burbaugh is a Democrat. He and Mrs. Burbaugh are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 697
  CHARLES W. BURKE was born in West Haven, Vt., November 30, 1832. He is the son of Sirenve and Tirza (Wheton) Burke, natives of Hubbertown and Fair Haven, Vt., respectively, the former born April 2, 1795, the latter October 31, 1802. His parents were married by Rev. Daniel Kent March 19, 1818, and in 1850 settled in this county, where Mr. Burke died February 8, 1882, aged nearly eighty-seven years. Mrs. Burke still survives. Charles W., the subject of this notice, was brought to Ashland County by his parents in 1834, and was there reared and educated. In 1850, he came with them to this county, where he has since made his home. He was married, January 1, 1867, to Miss Henrietta A. Cavens, a native of Knox County, born January 9, 1834, daughter of John and Rachel (Paxten) Cavens, both natives of Loudon County, Va., the former born September 22, 1790, the latter August 22, 1800. Her parents were early settlers of this county, the father dying April 8, 1867, the mother April 12, 1868. Mr. and Mrs. Burke have four children living, viz.: Milo W., born April 27, 1869; Mary P., February 16,1871; Clara T., November 8, 1873, and Hattie A., May 24, 1876; Bennie F., born February 20, 1879, died July 14, 1879, and an infant son is also deceased. Mr. Burke served as Justice of Antrim Township nine years, and as Mayor of Nevada six years. He spent two summers in Colorado, and has since established a cattle ranch in Kansas, owning, with Mr. Shepherd Martin, 1,500 acres of land and 1,000 head of cattle. He is a live business man, and an active Republican, highly esteemed in his community.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 698
  JAMES BURNSIDE was born in Seneca County, Ohio, July 3, 1827. He is a son of Joseph and Sarah (Vanette) Burnside, who were natives of Butler County, Penn., and Essex, N. J., the father born September 20, 1804, the mother January 26, 1809. His parents were married in Seneca County, and resided there most of their lives, his father having located in that locality in 1817. Their children were James, Joseph W., John, Nancy J., Isabel, Rebecca and Abigail, living, and Martha, Tabitha, Benjamin F. and Abel, deceased. The father died May 6, 1875, the mother January 16, 1854. James Burnside, the subject of this notice, resided with his parents till near twenty-seven years of age. In November, 1853. he purchased 120 acres of his present farm, to which he has since added eighty acres, and has since been engaged here in tilling the soil, his farm being valued at $90 per acre. Mr. B. was married, May 1, 1855, to Catharine Neikirk, a native of Seneca County, born June 11, 1830, daughter of Michael and Christina (Smith) Neikirk, natives of Maryland and Pennsylvania respectively. Her parents were married in Pennsylvania, and soon after removed to Seneca County, Ohio, where her father died May 17, 1880, her mother August 31, 1849. Mr. and Mrs. Burnside had seven children, namely: Emmet T., born April 4, 1856; Sarah A., December 11, 1857; John O., May 7, 1859; Kate F. I., June 20,1860; Michael W., October 4,1862; James E., December 16, 1867; Estie L., November 14, 1870. Mr. Burnside is a member of the United Brethren Church, a Democrat in politics, and one of the honorable, successful and well-respected farmers of the township.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 698
  REV. DAVID S. CALDWELL was born in Washington County, Md., December 22, 1820. He is a son of William and Susanna (Curfman) Caldwell, the former a native of Cumberland County, Penn., the latter of Frederick County, Md. He was reared to manhood in Hagerstown, Md., and was there educated. In 1848, he removed to Seneca County, Ohio, and entered the ministry of the United Brethren Church, with which he was connected from 1857 to 1883. Since the latter date, he has been connected with the Tiffin classes of the Ohio Synod of the Reformed Church, and is at present date pastor of the congregation at Berwick, Seneca County, and Zion's Bloom, Hancock County. He labored in Upper Sandusky during the years 1865, 1866 and 1867, and was four years Presiding Elder of the United Brethren Church, taking up his abode in Nevada in April, 1882. Mr. Caldwell was mustered into the service at Monroeville, September 24, 1862, and recruited Company H, One Hundred and Twenty-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry, being commissioned First Lieutenant September 24, 1862, and promoted to Captain in the following February, 1863. As one of the casualties of war, he became a prisoner June 15, 1863, in a three days' engagement with rebel forces of Gen. Ewell's corps at Winchester, W. Va.; was taken to Richmond, and after eight months' confinement in Libby Prison he, with others to the number of over 100, escaped by means of a tunnel from said prison February 9, 1864, and with fifty-seven of the 100 succeeded in reaching the Union lines, the balance being re-captured and re imprisoned. Mr. C., as a result of the fortunes of war, is very much broken in constitution, but is still engaged in the ministry upon the before-mentioned charge to the extent of his ability. He was married, August 8, 1843, to Sarah Creager, four children blessing this union, viz., Susan J., Henry C, Sarah J., and Laura B. Mrs. Caldwell passed away June 1, 1859, and Mr. C. was re-married, September 20, 1860, to Sarah J. Doyle, four children being born to this union, namely, James E., Angie M., Blanch D. and Alpha O.   Rev. Caldwell is held in high esteem by the people of his community both as a citizen and a public minister.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 699
  JAMES P. CHANCE was born in Harrison County, Ohio, March 31, 1841. He is a son of Aaron and Jane (Beall) Chance, the former born in Jefferson County, Ohio, May 27, 1816, the latter in Washington County, Penn., January 6, 1817. They were married in Harrison County, Ohio, March 26, 1840, where they resided till 1852, when they moved to Crawford County, Ohio, where they still live. Their children were James P., born March 31, 1841; Sarah I., June 20, 1843; Minerva J., June 12, 1845; Zephaniah B., May 26, 1855; William A., July 10, 1859; the first three of these were born in Harrison County, the others in Crawford County. Sarah I. died September 18, 1877, and Minerva J. April 23,1869. James P., our subject, resided with his parents till twenty-one year of age. He obtained his first start in business by procuring a sheep, which has increased its value many fold. He was engaged in farming and stock-raising in partnership with his father three years, and was at home more or less till his marriage, except the years 1868-69, since then transacting his business independently. After his marriage, Mr. Chance rented land two years in Crawford County, purchasing eighty acres in Fulton County, Ind., in 1872, and residing there till 1878, at which time he traded for his present farm of sixty acres, where he has since been engaged. He was married October 27,1870, to Elizabeth J. Pendry, a native of Richland County, Ohio, born November 3, 1848, daughter of James J. and Jane (Andrews) Pendry, the former born January 25, 1823, the latter June 16, 1820.  Her parents were married in Richland County, December 3, 1846, and their children were Elizabeth J., born November 3, 1848; Mary A., November 25, 1849; Ada A., December 23. 1850; James F., December 17, 1852; Sarah E. R., January 5, 1855; Thompson G., February 28, 1857; Robert F., January 17, 1859. The infant daughter died July 16, 1847; Ada A., May 12, 1852; and Robert F., February 26, i860. Mrs. Chance's grandfather was born February 20, 1787, and her grandmother, Elizabeth (Duncan) Pendry, October 10, 1790, their children being Margaret A., Elmer J., James J. and Clarkson S. Mr. and Mrs. Chance have had six children—James M., born in Crawford County, July 30, 1871; Herbert, born in Fulton County, Ind., March 9, 1873; Louis E., born in same county April 13, 1875, died May 13, 1876; Edna E., born October 25,1877; Sarah O., born in this county September 3, 1879; Elmer, September 6, 1883. Mr. Chance's paternal grandfather, a native of Maryland, moved to Jefferson County, Ohio, where he married and had two children, the youngest of whom was Aaron. Mrs. Chance was a daughter of James P. and Sarah (Leonard) Beall. Mr. Beall was born March 3, 1795, and his wife March 22 of the same year. They were married January 6,1817, and had two children, Jane and Zenas; the latter was born September 28, 1818. Mrs. Beall died September 28, 1818, and Mr. Beall married for his second wife Minerva Huff, December 9, 1819. This union was blest with eleven children, three of whom are living—James P., born May 13, 1828; Minerva, August 28, 1839; and Zephaniah, born February 19, 1847. James P. Beall, Sr., died in Crawford County, Ohio, February 24, 1869. His widow survived him about six years, her death occurring January 15, 1875.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 699
  JAMES L. COOK, of the firm of Cook & Morris, Nevada, was born in Harrison County, Ohio, March 1, 1830. He is a son of Joshua and Elizabeth (Larkins) Cook, the former born in Steubenville, Ohio, September 6, 1800. His father's residence was then the only building in that place, and he removed with his parents two years later to Virginia, where he spent his early years, coming again to Ohio in 1824. He was married in Carroll County in 1826, and subsequently purchased 160 acres in this county, where he died December 15, 1860. The decease of his wife (born May 4, 1806) occurred in November, 1878. They were the parents of seven children— Solomon, James L., John W., Joshua and William H. surviving. The deceased are Nancy and Catharine. James L., our subject, obtained a fair education in the district schools of Seneca County, closing his educational pursuits at the Hayesville Academy at the age of twenty-four. At nineteen he began teaching in the old log schoolhouses, continuing this in connection with farming for several years, teaching fifteen terms. In 1855, Mr. Cook gave up farming and spent two years in the West, returning two years later and establishing himself in a genera] store at Nevada, where he has since been engaged in mercantile pursuits. He is the oldest merchant of Nevada, having begun as clerk in the employ of William McJunkin in 1854. He has been quite successful in business, now owning 100 acres of good land and thirteen town lots. Mr. Cook was married May 24, 1860, to Miss Jane Gregg, daughter of Samuel and Rebecca (Berrington) Gregg, six children having been born to them—Elizabeth F. was born March 17, 1862; Edith M., May 23, 1864; Alice B., April 22, 1866; Martha R., August 17, 1868; Elvaretta J., September 19, 1871. The deceased was an infant son, born March 9, 1861. Mr. Cook is a Republican. He served as Justice of the Peace in this township six years, as Notary Public twelve years, and several years as a member of the Town Council—being now a member. He is also a member of the Knights of Honor, and highly esteemed. Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 700
  LOUIS CRANER, son of Christian and Elizabeth (Smith) Craner, was born in Crawford County, Ohio, May 27, 1836. His parents were natives of Germany, and emigrated to America when quite young. They located near Galion, where they resided most of their lives, the father dying October 10, 1867, the mother in January, 1879. They had eight children. namely: Henry, Louis, Mary, Elizabeth, Christian, Caroline, Rose A. and Anna—all living but Caroline. Mr. Craner remained the allotted time with his parents and then worked out by the month, four years, at $10, $11, $12 and $15 per month respectively. He then farmed rented land seven years, and purchased 127 acres, his present farm, in 1867. His farm is in good condition, and valued at $85 to $100 per acre. Mr. Craner was married October 29, 1865, to Mary J. Beach, of Crawford County, Ohio; born April 9, 1847, daughter of Peter and Magdalene (Myers ) Beach, natives of Germany and Pennsylvania respectively. Her parents were married in Crawford County, where her father was a prominent farmer, owning 420 acres of land. He died in October, 1865. His wife is still living in Crawford County, in her sixty-fifth year. Their children were Rebecca, Mary J., Levi, Samuel, Laura A., Charley E., Elizabeth, Henry, Catharine, Isaac, Anna and an infant—the latter live deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Craner are blessed with five children, namely: Amanda M., born March 8, 1867; Charles W., March 24, 1870; Levi H., November 10, 1873; Magdalena M., May 14, 1875; Emma, October 23, 1881. Harry A., born July 19, 1880, died August 11, 1880. Mr. Craner began life a poor boy, but by honest industry has accumulated an excellent farm. He is a good Democrat, and is, with his wife, a member of the Lutheran Church.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 701
  EPHRAIM W. DAVIS, son of George N. and Eliza (Rogers) Davis, was born in Bedford County, Penn., January 14, 1834. His parents were married in the above county, and the children resulting from the union were Rebecca, Ephraim W., Charles M. and an infant daughter, deceased. Charles M. enlisted in Company H, Fifty-fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, October 11, 1861, and was shot by a sharpshooter at Cold Harbor June 5, 1863. Ephraim W., our subject, was reared to manhood and educated fairly in his native county. He taught school a few terms, but was chiefly engaged at the shoe-making trade till October 11, 1861, when he enlisted in Company H, Fifty-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and entered the service for three years, participating in the skirmishes at North Edisto Island, where his regiment was more or less engaged two weeks; in the battle of Pocataligo, W. Va., being honorably discharged by reason of disability at Port Royal, S. C, July 25, 1862. In 1865, Mr. Davis removed from Bedford County, Penn., to this county, where he has since resided, having been engaged at his trade at Little York, Kirby and Nevada, at different periods, and being now engaged as druggist clerk in the latter place when his state of health will permit. Mr. Davis was married in Bedford County, Penn., June 3, 1858, to Miss Sarah A. Blackburn, their only child being Charles S., born March 3, 1859. He was re-married, October 15, 1865, to Mary L. Fisher, and this union has been blessed with four children—Ann E., Grant B., George H and Harry F.—all living. Mr. Davis lost his health in the service. He is a member of the G. A. R. and affiliates with the Democratic party. He owns a comfortable home and other property in Nevada, and is in good standing as a citizen.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 701
  ANDREW DOTTS was born in Columbiana County, Ohio, December 2, 1829. He is a son of Simon and Margaret (Reeder) Dotts, natives of Virginia and Columbiana County respectively, his parents having married in the latter place. They subsequently moved to Stark County, where Mrs. Dotts died in August, 1853. Mr. Dotts was married a second time and moved to Owens County, Ind., where he died. Andrew Dotts, the subject of this sketch, resided with his parents till twenty-one years of age, and attended the district schools, more or less, during that time.  He then worked by the month five years, operated a threshing machine two years, purchasing his present farm in March, 1857, moving on the same in 1859. He first purchased this farm with his brother-in-law, who afterward sold out his interest to Mr. Dotts. He erected a fine brick residence in 1874, at a cost of $3,000, and has made many other improvements. Mr. Dotts was married, January 1, 1856, to Ellen Slack, a native of Stark County, Ohio, born June 10, 1837, daughter of Abraham Slack Three children have been born to this union, namely: William H., born June 4, 1858; Jesse, February 24, 1862, and Mary, September 12, 1875. Mr. Dotts is one of the most substantial farmers of this township, and is well respected as a citizen. He has an excellent farm and is very successful in his management of the same.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 701
  WILLIAM H. DOTTS was born in Stark County, Ohio, June 4, 1858. He is a son of Andrew and Ellen (Slack) Dotts, and came to this county when but one year of age. He resided with his parents till his twenty-second year, engaged in farming, in the meantime operating a threshing machine several seasons. In 1881, he purchased his present farm of ninety-four acres, on which he has since resided, doing a general farming business, dealing in stock to the capacity of the farm. Mr. Dotts was married, August 3, 1880, to Miss Fannie J. McBeth (see sketch of T. C. McBeth), and one child has blessed their union, namely, Sidney E., born April 24, 1882. Mr. Dotts has been identified with the interests of the county all his life, and is one of its most energetic and enterprising young farmers. He is a Republican in politics, and a young man of good business qualifications and excellent character.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 702
  ANDREW DYE was born in Greene County, Penn., August 28, 1822. He is a son of John and Rachel (Morris) Dye, who came to Ohio about 1849, and located in Morrow County, where the former died in 1852, the latter April 29, 1883. Their children were Andrew, Pierson, Sarah, Hester, Justus, William, Owen, Eliza, Priscilla, Mary A., Minor, John, Barney, Samuel and an infant, the three latter deceased. Andrew Dye, the subject of this sketch, walked from Greene County, Penn., to Richland County, at the age of twelve years. He spent nine years in farm work in the latter locality, and then moved to Galion, where he engaged in the grocery trade a short time. He then purchased eighty acres in Morrow County, where he resided two years, when he removed to this county and purchased his present farm of eighty acres May 16, 1857. He also purchased twenty acres adjoining this May 14, 1864, and in June, 1883, purchased 160 acres in Missouri. Mr. Dye was married, October 2, 1843, to Catharine Orndorff, the children by this marriage being John P., born August 29, 1844, and Mary C., March 13, 1847. Mrs. Dye passed away March 20, 1847, and Mr. D. was married February 3, 1848, to Sarah Brewer, who was born in Morrow County March 8, 1829, daughter of Jonathan and Jane (Maxwell) Brewer, the former born March 11, 1797, the latter September 12, 1800, natives of Pennsylvania. Her parents came to Morrow County when young, and both died there. They had nine children, viz., Sarah, Susanna, Eliza J., Dilivan and Samuel, all now living, and Enoch, Mary A., Rachel and Electa, deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Dye have had nine children—John, born July 11, 1849; Sarah, July 24, 1851; Belle, October 26, 1853; Jasper, June 21, 1856; LaFayette, February 3, 1859; Winfield, November 15, 1862; Retta, April 22, 1864; Bertie, May 17, 1867; Minnie, August 18, 1870, all living but La Fayette, who died March 26, 1883. Mr. Dye is a Democrat, and one of the substantial citizens of the township.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 702
  OLIVER C. EWART, one of the partners of the Nevada Deposit Bank, was born in Knox County, Ohio, November 26, 1855. He is a son of Robert and Eliza (Kerr) Ewart, the former a native of Ireland, the latter of Knox County, Ohio. Robert Ewart was born on the Brookland, near Tempo, County Fermanagh, Ireland, December 25, 1799, and emigrated with his parents, two brothers and three sisters (all now deceased but Ann, wife of Jacob Haver, a resident of Martinsburg, Knox County, Ohio), and first settled (1823) in Greene County, Penn., where he resided seven years, then moving to Knox County, Ohio. Eliza (Kerr) Ewart was born in the above county March 29, 1816, and was married there in 1851, the children resulting from this marriage being as follows: Ira H., Carey B., Oliver C. and Mary E. Their father was the owner of 172 acres of land, which he tilled from 1830 to 1863, at which time he died, at the age of sixty-three, his wife, Eliza, being still a resident of Morgan Township, Knox County, in her sixty-eighth year. Oliver C., the subject of this sketch, was reared in his native county, and educated in its public schools. At the age of eighteen, he emigrated to White County, Ind., where he was employed as a teacher during the winter of 1874-75, and from whence he returned and entered Duffs Commercial College at Pittsburgh the following June. In 1876, July, he located in Nevada, and in May, 1877, was made Cashier of the Nevada Deposit Bank, still retaining that position. He was married, March 21, 1878, to Miss Idella Blair, daughter of William L. Blair, their only child being Robert W., born February 23, 1879. Mr. Ewart is a young man of large business experience. He is manager of the Farmers Bank of Winfield, Kan., and one of its stockholders.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 703
  ANDREW H. FLICKINGER is a native of Crawford County, born January 29, 1847. His parents were Samuel and Philinda (Healey) Flickinger, who settled in Crawford County in 1832. His father entered the lands on which his death occurred June 20, 1871, in his eightieth year; his mother died June 4, 1875. Of twelve children, ten are still living. Andrew H. was reared on the farm and educated in the district schools. He learned the carpenter's trade at the age of twenty, following this occupation at intervals for ten years. He was married, March 29, 1876, to Miss Addie Leke, and one child—Maud E., was born to them, the date of birth being May 11, 1877. In 1876, Mr. Flickinger removed with his family to Nevada and engaged in mercantile pursuits with G. W. Gregg, of whom be has since been a partner. They carry a full stock of clothing, boots, shoes, etc., and are doing a good business. Mr. F. is a Democrat, and is now serving as Township and Corporation Treasurer.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 703
  DANIEL FLOCK is a native of Crawford County, Ohio, and was born February 28, 1845. He is a son of Henry and Catharine Flock, natives of Germany. His father was a merchant. in Bucyrus, where he resided till 1853, when he opened a store at Wyandot, and conducted the same till August, 1869. He then returned to Crawford County, where he is now engaged in agricultural pursuits. Mrs. Flock's death occurred in October, 1862, and Mr. F. has since married. Daniel Flock, the subject of this sketch, resided with his parents till about twenty-six years of age. In 1869, he opened up a store of general merchandize in Wyandot Village, where he has since engaged in mercantile pursuits. He carries a full stock of dry goods, groceries, glassware, queensware, notions, etc., and enjoys a fair trade.  Mr. Flock was married, April 16, 1873, to Jane Wilson, who was born in Marion August 22, 1847. She is a daughter of Richard Wilson, who was one of the most honored citizens of Marion County, having served as its Auditor five years and as its Treasurer eighteen years. Mr. and Mrs. Flock have three children—Sophronia, born November 26, 1874; Velma, born June 1, 1877, and Richard H., born July 22, 1880. Mr. Flock is one of the leading spirits in the business interests of Wyandot.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 703
  JOHN GANGWER was born in Ashland County, Ohio, January 1, 1851. He is a son of Philip and Hannah (Long) Gangwer, natives of Westmoreland County, Penn., the former born in 1813, the latter in 1821. His parents were married in Pennsylvania, and soon after moved to Ashland County, Ohio, where his father died in 1876; his mother is still a resident of Ashland County. Mr. Gangwer resided with his parents till twenty-two years of age, and then farmed rented land five years, purchasing his present farm of 87¾ acres in March, 1878. He has made many improvements on this farm, and now values it at $70 per acre. He was married, February 2, 1874, to Miss Katy A Swartz, who was born July 25, 1257, daughter of Abraham and Catharine (Balliet) Swartz. Her father was born in Schuylkill County, Penn., February 15, 1819, son of Abraham and Christina (Zener) Swartz, and her mother was born in the same county May 19, 1822, daughter of Henry and Katy A. Balliet, also natives of Schuylkill County, Penn. Her parents resided in Morrow County, Ohio, about twenty-eight years, and then moved to their present home in this township. Mr. and Mrs. Gangwer have three children—Ira, born November 29, 1874; Iva, January 13, 1879, and Purl, June 4, 1880. Mr. Gangwer is a member of the F. & A. M., a Democrat in politics, and well respected in his neighborhood. So far he has been very successful in his business enterprises.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 704
  WILLIAM F. GOODBREAD, druggist, is a native of Rentlingen, Wittenberg, Germany, born August 5, 1828. He is a son of John J. and Agnes C. (Smith) Goodbread, natives of Germany, the former born July 15, 1788, the latter November 29, 1786. They emigrated to America May 14, 1832, and were the parents of eight children, two living to the age of maturity— William F. and Margaret B., wife (deceased) of Michael Schanweker. She was born September 18, 1815, and died in August, 1852. The grandfather of our subject was born in Edinburgh, Germany, in a house which dates back to 1426, and is still in the possession of the Goodbread family. John J. Goodbread entered the war against Napoleon in 1811, but subsequently became a soldier under him in the war against the Cossacks. William F. emigrated with his parents and settled in Richland County in 1833. He was reared and educated in this locality, serving an apprenticeship in the shoemaker's trade, which he afterward abandoned for farm pursuits. In October, 1853, Mr. Goodbread came to Wyandot County and purchased 202 acres in Eden Township, paying $18 per acre, and selling the same in 1858 at $35 per acre. In April, 1859, he moved to Nevada, where he conducted a dry goods store till 1865, being elected County Treasurer in the fall of that year. At the expiration of four years' service in this office he spent a short time in stock-dealing, establishing his present business in partnership with Dr. C. P. Jones in 1871. In 1879, Mr. Jones retired, and a son of Mr. G. being admitted, the business has since been conducted under the firm name of Goodbread & Son. Mr. Goodbread was married in Richland County, February 20, 1850, to Susanna, daughter of John and Margaret (Baughman) Wolf. Her father was born in Washington County, Penn., about 1794, and was an officer in the war of 1812, his death occurring in 1876. Margaret Baughman was a native of Richland County, her father having settled there in 1810. He was once compelled to seek safety from the Indians by entering a blockhouse, the savages having made an attack upon the neighborhood. Mr. and Mrs. Goodbread have one child, James N., born in Richland County, March 21, 1851. Mrs. G. is also a native of Richland, and was born January 12, 1828. Mr. Goodbread is a Democrat. He is a member of the A., F. & A. M, the Knights of Honor and the English Lutheran Church.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 704
  JAMES N. GOODBREAD, of the firm of Goodbread & Son, was born in Richland County, Ohio, March 21, 1851. He is the only son of William F. and Susanna (Wolfe) Goodbread, and was brought by them to this county in 1853. At the age of seven he came to Nevada and was educated in the public schools of that village. At the age of seventeen be abandoned his studies to assist his father in the duties of the Treasurer's office, in which capacity he was employed three years. In 1871, his father purchased a half interest in the drug store of Nichols & Jones, of Nevada, and our subject was employed as clerk, acting in this capacity till 1879, when he purchased Mr. Jones' interest and became a partner in the firm, the same since being known as Goodbread & Son. Mr. Goodbread was married in Nevada October 24, 1872, to Miss Mary Leith, born in Eden Township, August 1, 1852, daughter of George W. and Margaret (Steele) Leith, one child having been born to them, namely, Harry L., October 3, 1873. Mr. G. is a member of the A., F. &. A. M., K. of P, and with his wife of the Lutheran Church. He is a zealous Democrat and has held several responsible positions of public trust.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 704
  LAUREN GRAY is a native of Steuben County, N. Y., born August 15, 1823. His parents were Levi and Tryphonia (Baker) Gray, and were natives of Connecticut and New York respectively, the former born in 1792, the latter in 1793. His father moved to New York when a young man, was married there and resided in the State till his death in 1867. His mother removed to Seneca County, Ohio, a few years later and died in Tiffin in August, 1882. The family consisted of ten children, namely, Daniel, Franklin, Harriet, Lauren, Richard, Jane, Lucretia, Eunice, Samuel and Elizabeth, the two latter deceased. Lauren, our subject, resided with his parents till about twenty-two years of age. He came to this county in 1845, and purchased 160 acres of land, locating on the same in 1846, and has since resided thereon, except six months in the pine lumber business in Saginaw, Mich., 1867, and two years in the boot and shoe trade at Nevada, 1868 and 1869. Mr. Gray was married, June 18, 1849, to Phidelia A. Burke, who was born in Benson, Rutland Co., Vt., April 21, 1829. She is a daughter of Sireno and Tirza (Whilon) Burke, the former born in 1795, the latter October 31, 1802. Her parents moved from Vermont to Ashland County, Ohio, in 1835, and to this county in 1849. They resided in this county till April, 1875, when they removed to Walnut Hills, Cincinnati, which is still her mother's proper home, her father having died in Nevada, February 8, 1882. The children of this family are Sophronia M, Sarah E., James E., Phidelia A., Charles W., Lucy J. and Mileo D. Sherman W. and Martha M. are deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Gray had but two children, namely, Jennie C., born March 24, 1861, now the wife of Henry Abnett, and Carles R., born in Saginaw, Mich., June 20, 1867; the latter deceased since August 2, 1868. Mr. Gray is a member of the P. of H. He is one among the best farmers of the township and is highly esteemed as a citizen.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 706
  GEORGE W. GREGG, of the firm of G. W. Gregg & Co., was born in Crawford County, Ohio, May 25, 1849. His parents, Samuel and Rebecca (Bevington) Gregg, were natives of Harrison and Wayne Counties respectively. They were married at Wooster in November. 1839, and were the parents of eight children, five of whom are now living, namely, Mrs. Jane Cook, John H., George W., Henry F. and Franklin. The deceased are Andrew C., Francis and Thomas B. They located in this county in 1850, and after three years removed to Iowa. One year later they returned to this county and purchased fifty-six acres known as the Pool farm. The father died in March, 1859, aged forty-two years; the mother still living, aged sixty-five years, a resident of Nevada. Mr. Gregg was reared principally in Antrim Township, working on the farm till his enlistment in the army, August 7, 1864. He joined Company B, One Hundred and Seventy-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, under command of Capt. Lyman Parcher, spending most of his time in patrol and picket duty at Nashville, serving till the close of the war, being discharged at Columbus, June 29, 1865. Returning home, he was employed in a drug store three years; in the stave and heading business three years; in the lumber business at Grand Haven, Mich., one year; in general merchandise at Nevada with Cook Brothers till 1876, and later in the boot and shoe business with William Kieffer, whose interest he purchased in 1877. In the same year, Andrew H. Flickinger entered the firm with a stock of clothing, since which time the business has been conducted under the firm name of G. W. Gregg & Co. Mr. Gregg was married May 13, 1875, to Sarah A. Hilborn, daughter of Robert and Elizabeth (Eckes) Hilburn. She is a native of Crawford County, and was born July 3, 1850. Their only child. Rush M., was born June 2, 1878. Mr. Gregg was elected Township Treasurer in 1881, and Councilman in 1879 and 1883. He is a member of the A., F. & A, M.s of the G. A. R., and a Republican in political sentiment.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 705
  EDWARD HALL, retired farmer and merchant, was born in County Antrim, Ireland, October 31, 1813.  He is a son of Joseph Hall, his mother's maiden name being Conner.  She died in Ireland about the year 1818.  Joseph Hall sailed from Belfast, Ireland, in 1821, and settled in Columbiana County, Ohio, near New Garden.  After several years' residence here he moved to New Alexander, where he resided till his death, May 12, 1832, engaged in hotel keeping and merchandizing.  Edward Hall, our subject and one sister, Ann J., were the only children that attained majority, the latter dying at New Alexander in her seventeenth year.  He obtained a "log schoolhouse" education and after his father's death was employed as salesman in various establishments till he began business for himself in 1840, at Canton, Ohio.  In 1863, he came to Antrim Township, Wyandot County, Ohio, and purchased 221 acres of land (of which he still has eighty-four acres), engaging in farming fifteen years; he previously engaged in the mercantile trade eight years in Bucyrus; in the same business at Nevada from 1870 to 1872; and in 1879 retired.  Mr. Hall was marred, December 28, 1843 to Ann Fielding, a native of Leeds, England, and seven children were born to them - five living, namely: Mary L., born October 21, 1849; Elizabet A., November 28, 1851; Edward W., March 1, 1854; Josephine J., February 22, 1860; and John F., January 26, 1863.  Mrs. Hall departed this life June 11, 1879, and Mr. Hall  was re0married, December 16, 1883 to July A. Serviss.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 706
  GOODWIN HALL is a native of Bucks County, Penn., born near Philadelphia, November 10, 1808. He is a son of Goodwin and Phoebe (Carver) Hall, natives of the same county, where they resided till their death, his father having died when our subject was but a child, his mother in 3862. Mr. Hall resided with his grandfather (who was a Revolutionary soldier) till about twenty years of age. He then began operations on his own responsibility, owning and farming forty acres of land in Chester County, Penn., where he resided fifteen years. He then moved to Delaware County, Penn., where he was engaged seven years in a cotton manufactory, and  afterward to Saint Clairsville and Steubenville, where he was engaged in the same business. In 1850, he located where he now resides, and has since engaged in farming on a small scale. Mr. Hall was married in 1829, to Margaret Houpt, a native of Chester County, Penn., born September 12, 1796, and daughter of Antony and Francina (Starkey) Houpt, the latter a native of Montgomery County, Penn. By this union there were six children, namely: Anna E., born November 20,1827; Phoebe, August 20,1829; Charles, May 7, 1831; Francina, June 1, 1834; Gilbert G., June 8, 1836; and Catharine, April 25, 1839. Mrs. Hall died in November, 1860, and Mr. Hall was married in March, 1861, to Nancy Zook, nee Steel, who died December 4, 1881, aged sixty-five years five months and eighteen days. He is an old and respected citizen and has endured many vicissitudes of fortune in his lifetime. He has been a member of the I. O. O. F. forty years and of the Methodist Episcopal Church fifty years.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 707
  BENJAMIN HITE is a native of Perry County, Ohio, and was born February 8, 1815. He is a son of Samuel and Anna (Cauffman) Hite, natives of Rockingham and Shenandoah County, Va., the former born September 19, 1787; the latter December 3, 1787. His ancestors for several generations were located in Virginia, the earlier ones settling there in the days of William Penn. His parents were married in May, 1814, and came at once to Perry County, where they afterward resided; the father dying there in 1857; the mother in 1851. Mr. Hite, till his twenty-fifth year, resided with his parents and then located in this county, where he began farming and has since continued it, having resided on his present farm, with the exception of seven years, since first locating in the county. He obtained one portion of an estate by his wife's inheritance, and subsequently purchased the interests of the remaining heirs, owning at one time 300 acres of good land. He now owns 154 acres, and is still doing a good farming business. Mr. Hite was married September 3, 1840, to Anna, daughter of David and Elizabeth (DeLong) Hite, born December 19, 1821, in Perry County, her parents being natives of Virginia and Pennsylvania respectively. One child was born to them only, namely: Lorenna J., October 13, 1845. Mr. Hite is one of the most successful wheat-growers in the township, and is a substantial farmer in general. He is a Democrat, voting first in 1836 and never having missed a vote since that campaign except in 1840, then " traded off" with an opposite voter. He is also one of the pioneers, having resided in the county since 1840.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 707
  JOHN HITE was born in Perry County, Ohio, October 19, 1844, and is a son of Martin and Emily (Swick) Hite, the former born February 28, 1819; the latter July 22, 1821. His parents were married in Perry County, and resided there till their death—the father passing away July 25,1863, in Perry County; the mother March 12,1879, in Wyandot County. Their children were Rebecca, John, Benjamin, Isaac, Simon, Ambrose B. and Margaret A. In October, 1864, the family moved to this county and purchased 120 acres, which has been divided among the children, the parents being now deceased. John Hite, our subject, began work for himself in his twenty-second year; he worked for wages three years; farmed, rented land four years, and purchased sixty acres of his present farm in April, 1872. He also owns two other tracts of twenty and forty acres each. In 1879, Mr. Hite erected a fine frame dwelling at a cost of $1,500, his former house having burned February 12, 1877. He has also a good barn, built at a cost of $800. Mr. Hite was married January 23, 1868, to Margaret A. H. Sherwood, who was born in Delaware County, Ohio, February 19, 1842. Her parents were David and Margaret (Bishop) Sherwood, natives of Smith County, Va., her father born October 27,1802; her mother August 17, 1802. Their children were Levi B., Louis D., Jesse H., Catharine, Rachel, Margaret A. H. and Sarah E. Their father died January 23, 1873; their mother July 12, 1877. Mr. and Mrs. Hite have seven children, viz.: Levi V., born August 14, 1869; Laura E., December 4, 1871; Emily J., August 23, 1873; Bentson C., July 4, 1875; Amos T., January 30, 1877; Julia E. A, March 31. 1881; and Rebecca A., September 3, 1883. Mr. and Mrs. Hite are members of the Regular Baptist Church, in which Mr. Hite has been officially appointed Deacon several years. Mr. Hite united with the church March 27, 1867, and Mrs. Hite December 19, 1858. Mr. Hite is a Democrat in politics, and has served as Township Trustee.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 707
  SIMON HITE was born in Perry County, Ohio, December 22, 1850, and is a son of Martin and Emily Hite. (See sketch of J. Hite.) He resided with his parents till twenty-one years of age; worked one year by the month for his mother, farmed rented land about five years, purchasing his present farm of forty acres in 1878. He also owns thirty-seven acres, which he inherited from his father's estate. Mr. Hite was married February 18,1875, to Maria E. Bosa, a native of Marion County, born August 24, 1852, daughter of Charles W. and Barbara (Cope) Bosa; the former now living in Nebraska, the latter deceased, her death having occurred in 1859. Four children blessed this marriage, three of whom were cut down by the reaper, Death, in one week. Fred L. was born January 12, 1876; Clarence A., May 20, 1878; Orrin F., March 28, 1880; and Alma F., July 14, 1882. The deceased are Fred, Orrin and Clarence; the dates of their respective deaths being December 20, 26 and 27, 1880—dying of scarlet fever. Mr. Hite is a good farmer, and well respected as a citizen.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 708
  BENJAMIN HOPP, dealer in furniture and undertaking, son of Frederick and Susan (Gamby) Hopp, was born March 16, 1824. He is a native of Seneca County, N. Y., his parents being natives of Pennsylvania, and of German extraction, They were married in New York, and were the parents of ten children, the surviving being Aaron, Benjamin, Commodore P., Lavina Ann, Sarah A., Cornelia, Christina and George G. Mary died in 1874. The family located in Seneca County, N. Y., in 1822; moved to Niagara County soon after, and to Richland County, Ohio, in 1837, the father's death occurring there in the year 1839, at the age of forty-five. The mother died at the home of her son, Benjamin, Nevada, January 22, 1883, in her eighty-fourth year. Our subject was reared in Richland County, obtaining the rudiments of an education in the district schools of that locality. He learned the carpenter's trade at twenty-four, and plied his trade till 1873, then establishing the first undertaking business in Nevada. He moved from Richland to Crawford in 1853, and to this county in 1862. He opened up his business in Nevada, with Andrew Benedict as partner, with a stock of furniture, which was destroyed by fire May 15, 1875. Mr. Hopp afterward established the business on his own resources, and has since conducted it, having the leading store of the place, and doing a good business. Mr. Hopp was married in Richland County, January 6, 1850, to Mary A. Bare, a native of the State of Pennsylvania, daughter of Benjamin and Mary Bare. Of their live children but one survives—Nellie B., born in June, 1867. Mr. H. has served one term as City Marshal; is a member of the I. O. O. F., Vice Grand of the order; member of the F. & A. M., and of the Advent Church, being a Trustee of the same; in politics, he is a Republican.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 708
  PHILIP M. HOWE was born in this county, November 29, 1846. He is a son of William and Rachel (Longwell) Howe, who came to this county with their parents about 1821. His father was one of the substantial farmers of this locality, and resided here all his life, his death occurring April 9, 1874. His mother, Rachel, is still living on the old homestead. She was born in Licking County, Ohio, in 1820, daughter of Isaac and Phoebe Longwell, her parents also among the first of the few settlers who located there in 1821. Her marriage to William Howe occurred about 1845, their children being Philip M., Amelia—now Mrs. BowersCicero, James G., Fremont and Alice. Philip M., the subject of this notice, was brought up on a farm, and resided with his parents till his twenty-fourth year. He then farmed rented land four years, after which time he purchased with his brother his present farm of eighty acres, since purchasing his brother's interest. He is a good farmer, keeps good stock, and is in the front as an agriculturist generally. His farm gives an average yield of $1,200 to $1,500 per annum, and is valued at $80 per acre. Mr. Howe was married, January 5, 1871, to Rebecca Hite, who was born in Perry County, Ohio, June 11, 1843 (see sketch of John Hite). They have no children. Mr. Hite has an elegant home and enjoys the respect of his entire community, being one of its most energetic and successful citizens.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 709
  EARNEST R. IRMER is a native of Rosslau, Germany, born May 16, 1849. He is a son of William and Sophia (Bock) Irmer, also natives of Rosslau. His father was born November 23, 1808, and died in Germany, March 5, 1875; his mother is still a resident of her native land, and was born December 18, 1812. Ernest learned the baker's trade in Germany and emigrated to the United States in July, 1871. After being engaged at his trade for several years in the various places of Newark, N. J., Syracuse, N. Y., Cleveland and Chicago, he finally located in Nevada November 6, 1875, at which time he purchased his present grocery store in partnership with Philip Ruhlman, buying the latter's interest and conducting the business alone since 1876. He was married in Nevada, June 1, 1876, to Miss Henrietta Woolsey, their only child living being Inez M., born. October 7, 1882. Three infants are deceased. Mrs. Irmer is a native of this county, and was born November 22, 1849. Mr. Irmer has established a good trade, and owns the brick storeroom-which his stock occupies, and other property. He is a member of the F. & A. M., and is well respected as a citizen.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 709
  CHARLES P. JONES, M. D., was born in Wales September 3, 1834. His parents were David E. and Ann (Price) Wales, also natives of Wales, and emigrated to America with their six children in 1837. They settled at Utica, N. Y., where they resided till 1847, when they removed to Ohio, locating in Portage County, where they purchased fifty acres of land, on which the father died in 1856, aged sixty-nine years; the mother passed away August 29, 1882, aged eighty-three. Five of their eight children are still living— Jane A. (widow of Robert Jones), Winnifred (wife of John C. Jones), Mary L. (wife of Asba P. Burris), Charles P. and John C. The deceased are Edward, Ann F. and David E. Charles P., the subject of this notice, was educated in the public schools of Cleveland, abandoning his studies at eighteen. He subsequently engaged in a mercantile establishment as salesman, attending school at intervals, and began the study of medicine at. Toronto, Canada, in 1856, under the instruction of  Dr. F. Tumblety, remaining with him nearly four years. In 1857, he entered the Toronto Medical Institute, graduating in 1859. In 1860, he began the practice of his profession at Chicago, Ill., where he remained one year, when, on account of failing health, he was compelled to suspend his practice for about one year. He subsequently resumed his practice, and in 1865 located at Nevada, where he has since been engaged. He has a good practice, and has accumulated considerable property as a result of his labors, owning a good house and a two-story brick building on Main street, Nevada, the same costing $5,000 in 1880. Dr. Jones is a member of the Northwestern Medical Association; Medical Examiner of the Knights of Honor, of which order he is also a member; member of the Lutheran Church, and a Republican in politics. He was married at Bucyrus, June 27, 1860, to Emma E. Caldwell, daughter of Judge Hugh R. and Ann (White) Caldwell, three children having been born to them; Gussie E., born May 14, 1875, is the only one living: Lewis A. and Charles N. are the deceased.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 709
  JOHN R. JURY was born in this county October 2,1839. He is a son of Abner and Prisciila (Winslow) Jurey, natives of Virginia and New York respectively. His parents were married in what is now this county about 1835-36, and were therefore among its first settlers, having located in this section of the country about 1821-22. Mrs. Jury is still living, and is perhaps the oldest resident of the county, though she and Mr. Welsh located here about the same time. The children of this family were Henry, Sarah, John R., Margaret, Samuel W., Olive and Cyrus, the latter deceased. John R., our subject, resided with his parents till twenty-one. He then enlisted in Company I, Fifteenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, for three months, at the expiration of which time he re-enlisted in the Eleventh Ohio Battery, and served three years. He participated in the battle of Island No. 10, first and second battles of Corinth, Iuka, siege of Vicksburg, Champion Hill, Jackson, Little Rock and several minor engagements, having the good fortune to escape either wounds or capture, yet never absent from his command twenty-four hours. On his return home, Mr. Jury farmed rented land about two years, after which he engaged in farming in Marion County about nine years. In 1875, he purchased his present farm of 126 acres, where he has since been engaged in agricultural pursuits. His farm is valued at $70 per acre. Mr. Jury was married, October 11, 1866, to Miss Anna Campbell, who was born in Marion County, Ohio, September 24, 1841. Her parents are Michael and Mary (Bibler) Campbell, and have spent most of their lives in Marion County. The children of the family are Ezra, Samuel, Anna, John, Barbara, Ellen, Catharine and Lizzie, the two latter deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Jury have had seven children, four living, namely, Byron, born September 13, 1867; Bertha, March 31, 1873; Arthur, March 24, 1875; Lewis, May 22, 1877. Ellen, Maggie and an infant are deceased. Mr. Jury is a member of the K. of H., G. A. R., and is a Republican in politics.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 710
  JACOB KELLER, one of the oldest citizens of this county, was born in Virginia, in 1797. He is a son of John and Susan (Stengley) Keller, natives of Virginia and Pennsylvania respectively, and came to Ohio about 1799, locating at Chillicothe, removing to the Pickaway Plains six years later. They died in Franklin County, Ohio. Mr. Keller left his father's home and began business for himself at twenty-three. He was engaged eleven years at teaming, and then began farming, spending eight years in that business in Marion County, then moving to Wyandot, where he has since resided. He came to this county in 1825, and purchased 160 acres, which he afterward sold and then procured his present farm of forty acres, on which he has since resided. Mr. Keller was married in 1820, to Maria Warren, who was born in Ohio and daughter of Parker Warren, a native of Delaware. They have nine children, six living: Alfred, John, Nelson, Harrison, Steward J. and Ann. The mother of these died March 24, 1868, and Mr. Keller was married February 10, 1870, to Elizabeth Schrull n6e McNickle, widow of Jacob Schrull. Mr. K. is now in his eighty-seventh year, and one of the representative pioneers of the county. He was inured to hard labor early in years, and has experienced most of the trials incident to pioneer life.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 711
  JOHN KELLER was born in Marion County, Ohio, April 23, 1843. He is a son of Harrison D. and Susanna (Young) Keller, his father being a native of Pickaway County, Ohio, born February 9, 1812. His parents were married in Marion County, Ohio, April 5, 1838, and thirteen children were born to them, eight of whom are now living, namely: John, Henry C, Mary J., George W., Adaline, Charles Turney D., Chase and Levinia. The mother died October 2, 1862, the father still living, a resident of Nevada. John Keller resided with his parents till twenty-one years of age, and after four months' employment as fireman of a saw mill enlisted in Company B, One Hundred and Seventy-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and was mustered into service at Camp Chase in September, 1863. He was on post duty during most of the time of his service, having participated in no battles. His discharge was received in June, 1864. On his return from the war, Mr. Keller engaged at general job work about one year; farmed, rented land three years, and then purchased forty acres of his present farm, to which he has since added, till he now owns 136} acres, valued at $80 per acre. Mr. Keller was married August 22, 1856, to Jane Leith, who was born in this county June 17, 1840 (see sketch of Hiram Leith), and eight children were born to them, namely: Florence N., January 14,1868; Edward M., July 14, 1870; Chancy B., May 7, 1872; Mary J., March 10, 1874; Laura E., May 28, 1876; Gracie, January 3, 1879; Charles L., January 1, 1880; and Maggie L., August 16, 1882.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 711
  THOMAS KENDALL is a native of Clinton County, Penn., born July 11, 1817. His parents, Richard and Elizabeth (Hayes) Kendall, were natives of England and Ireland respectively, both born in 1775. They emigrated to America when quite young, and located in Pennsylvania, where they were married and reared two children—Thomas and Robert. By a former marriage in England, our subject's father had four children—Jane, John, Mary and Ellen—who. emigrated to America. Thomas Kendall, the subject of this sketch, resided with his parents till twenty-one years of age; he then rented land several years as a farmer, coming to this county in 1867, and purchasing his present farm of forty acres, where he has since resided. He values his farm at $80 per acre. His father died in 1853; his mother in 1861. Mr. Kendall was married, December 27, 1838, to Miss Hannah Lunger, a native of Northumberland County, Penn., born November 10, 1819, daughter of Isaac and Mary Langer, also natives of Pennsylvania. Her parents are deceased, her father having died in 1851, her mother a few years later, leaving six children, viz., Eliza, Christopher, Hannah, John, Margaret and William J.  To Mr. and Mrs. Kendall were born Mary E., July 26, 1840; Sarah E., April 11, 1842; Martha J., May 11, 1844; Henrietta, March 26, 1846; Robert, December 21, 1848; Richard, April 10, 1851; Alice C., September 19, 1853; Marguerite, June 23, 1856; John, August 30, 1859; Anna E., January 19, 1863. In politics, Mr. Kendall favors the Republican policy. He owns a comfortable home, and ranks well among the farmers of the community.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 710
  ROBERT KERR, one of the most widely known of the pioneers of Wyandot and Marion Counties, was born in Mifflin County, Penn., October 22, 1807, and is a son of James and Betsey (Arbuckle) Kerr. His grandparents, James Kerr and William Arbuckle, were both natives of Ireland. His father migrated to Knox County, Ohio, in 1818, and purchased a farm of 160 acres in Clay Township, where his wife Betsey died in her forty-second year. He afterward sold his farm to his son Robert, and moved to Licking County, Ohio, where he resided with his son-in-law, Aquilla Barber, till his death at the age of eighty-seven years. Robert Kerr remained in the employ of his parents until nineteen, obtaining a very limited education. He then began an apprenticeship at the tanner's trade with Joseph Rogers, Sr., at Martinsburg, Ohio, serving two years and five months, after which he was employed to drive hogs to the city of Baltimore at three shillings per day "and no dinner." Returning home, he was employed about a saw mill for some time at $11 per month, and subsequently engaged in clearing land for different parties at $2.50 to $3 per acre, his part of the contract being complete when everything under twelve inches was cleared from the ground. In this manner, he cleared the bottom land, also the brow of the hill lying between the Sandusky River and the town of Upper Sandusky, in 1830, and also cut 100 cords of wood west of the town, delivering the wood to George Garrett and Matthew Walker at 37} cents per cord. He cleared ten acres for an Indian chief named Hicks, and five acres for another by the name of Jack Oak. While engaged in this work he removed the timber from more than one hundred acres of land; cut about one thousand cords of wood at 20 cents per cord, and made many thousand rails at 50 cents per hundred. About this time he purchased two tracts of eighty acres each in Scott Township, Marion County, paying for them $100 and $200 respectively. He was married, August 29, 1833, to Matilda Swaggert, daughter of Daniel and Betsey (Coonrod) Swaggert, and from this time gave his attention to farming, clearing $100 cash the first year. He soon began dealing in stock, and in about three years purchased 360 acres more land in the same township at $1,500 on five years' time, the amount to be paid in payments of $300 yearly—interest sis per cent. He stocked his land with sheep, acting on the advice of an old Pennsylvanian, Stephen Ulery, and was able to meet his payments promptly. The prices he obtained for his wool in the seven years in which he was dealing extensively, were 21 J, 22}, 29, 33}, 40, 50 and 80 cents respectively; the last season his receipts on sale of wool and sheep aggregating $33,000. He continued the business up to 1876-77, when the prices lowered, and Mr. Kerr sold out and quit the trade. He now owns 1,059 acres of land in Crawford County, 443 acres in Wyandot County and 2,573 acres in Marion County, all free of incumbrance. He was one of the original stockholders in the Farmers' Bank, of Marion, and of the Nevada Deposit Bank, of Nevada, and now owns a large amount of stock in each. He is also stockholder in a bank recently established at Winfield, Kan. He built (and owns) the Kerr House at Marion, at a cost of $60,000, and also the Kerr House at Nevada at a cost of $18,000, both being fine buildings that speak well for the enterprise of the builder. He donated $53,000 to Hiram College and $23,000 to Bethany College, of Virginia, and has contributed liberally to other institutions. He is, perhaps, the wealthiest citizen in this section of the country, his property being worth more than $600,000. This large fortune was wrought out by hard labor and untiring energy, combined with excellent financial ability and strict integrity in all business transactions. Mr. Kerr was a member of the Disciple Church for many years, but withdrew on account of what he considered the unchristian conduct of some of the members. His wife, Matilda, died in February, 1859, having been the mother of eleven children, six of whom are living, namely, Elizabeth, Sarah. Stephen, Mary, John and Amanda.. By his second wife, Martha Williams, to whom he was married in July, 1861, Mr. Kerr has one child—Addie. On New Year's day, 1883, Mr. Kerr accidentally fell on the icy street at Caledonia, Ohio, dislocating his left hip joint, from the result of which injury he has not since been able to walk. He lived forty-four years in the place where he began housekeeping, but for ten years previous to the accident mentioned, he had lived in a house erected on his land in Scott Township, Marion County, a short distance from his old home. He is now a resident of Nevada, this county.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 712
  JOHN M. KLINGLER is a native of Wittenburg, Germany, and was born April 25, 1835. His parents were John M. and Anna (Bartole) Klingler, his father dying in 1836. He was therefore reared by his grandfather, Jacob M Bartole, with whom he resided ten years. He then served an apprenticeship of three years at the shoemaking trade, and afterward worked at the same in Germany eight years. In April, 1857, he sailed for the United States, and located for a short time in Sandusky City. In 1860, he located in Nevada, where he has since plied his trade most diligently. He has devoted his entire life to "the bench," and has acquired a comfortable home by his industrious efforts. His marriage to Elizabeth Dinkle occurred February 19, 1861, their children being Mary A., born July 7, 1862; Lena, October 1, 1863; Anna L., February 17, 1865; and Matilda, January 11, 1866; John E., December 12, 1869, died January 9, 1883; two infants are also deceased. Mrs. Klingler was a native of Germany, born February 17, 1842. She emigrated to America in 1845 and died October 4, 1874. Mr. K. was married, September 9, 1875, to Mary E. Rowinsky. He has been a member of the F. & A. M. since 1879; himself and family being associated with the English Lutheran Church.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 713
  JOSEPH H. LAYMAN is a native of Union County, Penn., where he first saw the light of day April 20, 1825. He is a son of Christian and Maria (Botts) Layman, natives of Berks County, Penn., the former born January 1, 1798, the latter October 25, 1786. The parents were married in Pennsylvania, and resided in that State about twenty years, his father having been a soldier in the war of 1812 in the three months' service, being in hearing of the cannons at the battle of Baltimore. His mother was a pensioner of the Government. In 1836, they came to Crawford County, Ohio, where they resided many years, though afterward making several removals; the father dying in Noble County Ind.. March 16, 1866, the mother in Crawford County, Ohio, August 5, 1879. Mr. Layman's uncle, Isaac Botts, now resides on the farm formerly owned by the father of Maj. Andre, the British spy of Revolutionary fame. Our subject lived with his parents till nineteen years of age. He then worked by the month for a few years, and, in 1848, traded a Mexican land grant for eighty acres in Steuben County, Ind., to which he subsequently added forty acres more, selling out three years later and purchasing property in Bucyrus, where he engaged five years in the plastering trade. In 1859, he purchased 108 acres, one-half of which now forms his present farm, to which he has since added forty-six acres, the whole valued at $85 per acre. He moved to this farm February 17, 1859, when there were no roads cut out, and erected a typical log cabin, where he has since resided. Mr. Layman was married, December 15, 1853, to Phidelia A. Nye, who was born in New York, January 17, 1833. She is a daughter of William and Rebecca (Nye) Nye, natives of Vermont, in which State they were married. Her parents moved to Utica, N. Y., and later, to Wayne County, Ohio, coming to Crawford County in 1846. Her mother died in 1850. Her father is still living, in his seventy-sixth year, a resident of Nevada. Mr. and Mrs. Layman have five children living, namely: James F., born October 27, 1855; Ida F., January 2, 1858; Susie, February 22, 1860; Maria, January 1, 1864; Hattie, March 9, 1866. Lucretia, L. W., G. B. Mc. and Harry H. are deceased. Mr. Layman is a citizen of good standing, and a Democrat in politics.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 713
  HENRY G. LEA is a native of Lycoming County, Penn., born September 25, 1829. He is a son of Zaccheus P. and Elizabeth (Davis) Lea; his father born in Kidminster, England, September 26, 1756, his mother in Lycoming County. His father emigrated 1776, and settled in the above county, where he resided till 1837, at which time he came to this county, settling in what is now Eden Township, remaining there till his death. He was the father of fourteen children; by his first marriage, John B., Thomas P. and Sarah A.; by his second marriage, Mary J., James D., Elizabeth, Zaccheus and Lydia; by a third marriage, Henry G., Catharine A., Andrew H. and Rebecca A. The subject of this notice, Henry G., resided with his parents during his boyhood, coming with them to this county at eight years of age. He obtained what education the schools of his neighborhood afforded, and, with no assistance, took up the blacksmith trade, to which occupation he has devoted most of his life. Mr. Lea was married, in Upper Sandusky, October 1, 1863, to Julia E. Kraken, daughter of Ernest M. and Mary R. (Roades) Kraken, her father having been the first surveyor of this county. The children resulting from this marriage are George W., Frank D., Norba H., Emma E., Louis L. and Ernest—the two latter deceased. Mr. Lea and his wife are members of the United Brethren Church, and well respected as citizens, he being a Democrat in political sentiments. In early life Mr. Lea had the Indian youths for playmates, they giving him his first lessons in archery, at which he is still an expert. Among the more noted of his dusky associates were Scott and Steward, sons of Aaron Coon, an Indian Chief.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 714
  HIRAM LEITH is a native of this county and was born January 9, 1836. He is a son of John and Elizabeth (Siple) Leith, who were natives of Guernsey County, Ohio, and Rockingham County, Va., respectively, the former born in 1807; the latter December 31, 1803. His grandfather Leith was born at one of the two old sites of Upper Sandusky, and resided most of his life in Fairfield and Guernsey Counties. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, and spent all his life on the frontier. His great-grandfather, John Leith, was captured by the Indians while employed as clerk at the present site of Lancaster, Ohio, in an Indian trading-post of the Delaware tribe, by whom he was kept in captivity twenty-nine years. He was taken at the age of fifteen, and was employed at the agencies, being closely guarded for one year, after which he was given the privileges of the tribe. He was adopted into the family of Capt. Pipe, the famous chief of the Delawares, and while in custody was married to Miss Sallie Lowry, a white woman, who was captured by the Mingo Indians at Big Cove, Perm., in 1762. After twenty-nine years of savage life they made their escape and joined the whites at Ft. Pitt (now Pittsburgh), being closely pursued by their captors, who appeared on the opposite side of the river in the same hour in which Mr. and Mrs. Leith and two children had crossed over in safety. The details of their history are full of interest and thrilling in the extreme. John Leith, father of our subject, located in this county about 1832-33, moving at that date from Fairfield County. He first leased land in this township, of the Wyandot Indians, and after seven years made a purchase of eighty acres. He was universally esteemed, and after a life of frontier hardships for many years died January 14, 1860. His aged companion, Elizabeth Leith, is still living and resides with her former son-in-law, Capt. Bacon. Hiram Leith, the subject of this sketch, resided with his parents till twenty-one years of age, obtaining the rudiments of an education in the crude schools of his time and vicinity. He began work on a farm for his uncle, and by making payments as his means afforded, has acquired a fine farm of 121 acres, now valued at $75 per acre. He has always engaged in the common routine of farm life and has been fairly successful, though his competence has been gained chiefly by hard labor. Mr. Leith was married, January 29,1865, to Elizabeth J. Scott, a native of Knox County, Ohio, born January 25, 1845. Her father, Matthew Scott, was born in Ohio and died in 1849; her mother, Mary (Wilson) Scott, in Maryland. They were married in Wayne County, Ohio, but resided in Knox County, where her father died in 1842. Her mother subsequently married T. J. Hinkle, and now resides in Nevada. Mr. and Mrs. Leith have eight children living— Teffie, Frank M., Mary E., Elveretta, Emma A., Clara M., Alta J. and Grace A. Cora is deceased. Mr. Leith is a Republican. He is regarded as one of the thoroughly reliable citizens of the township, and is ranked among the first for his qualities as a man.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 714
  JAMES S. LEITH, son of George W. and Margaret P. (Steele) Leith, was born in this county March 6, 1838. His parents were of Scotch and French descent respectively, his father a native of Ohio, and his mother, of Pennsylvania. They were married in Seneca County and soon after settled in Wyandot County, where they resided from 1837 to 1867. In the latter year they moved to Nevada, where the mother died in August, 1868, the father March 10, 1883. The latter was a prominent citizen in his locality, a Whig in politics, serving as Associate Judge from 1845 to 1852. He devoted the greater part of his life to agricultural pursuits, owning 400 acres of land and having a family of ten children, five of whom survive—James S., Mrs. Mary Goodbread, Martha S., Mrs. Jessie Balliet, Mrs. Josie Baglin, the two latter twins. Three of the daughters are residents of Nevada; the latter a resident of Pittsburgh, Penn. James S., the subject of this sketch, resided with his parents till 1862. He continued farming till 1866, when he engaged in the dry goods trade at Nevada. He remained here two years, selling his stock and entering the wholesale dry goods establishment of Lathrop & Luddington, of New York City, and remained with this firm till it became insolvent, December, 1869. During the seasons of 1871 and 1872, he engaged in the sale of agricultural implements at Nevada. He was one of the incorporators of the Nevada Deposit Bank, and was made one of its directors, disposing of his stock to Robert Kerr, in 1877. In 1875, he was appointed Railway Postal Clerk, which situation he held till 1882, since which time he has not been permanently engaged. Mr. Leith is a Republican; was one of the organizers of Company H, One Hundred and Forty-fourth Ohio National Guards, being elected First Lieutenant. His regiment was called into service May 1, 1864, participating in the battle at Berryville, August 13, 1864, serving four months in all. His marriage to Melissa Pease occurred October 1, 1862. She was a daughter of James and Eliza (Hall) Pease, now residents of Sycamore Township. One child—Maggie E., was born to them, her birth occurring November 8, 1865, Mrs. Leith died April 15, 1866, and Mr. L. has never since married.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 714
  ERNEST LIDLE, saddler, Nevada, was born in Wittenburg, Germany, April 4, 1842. His father, Christopher, was also born in Germany in 1814, and emigrated to the United States in 1854, locating in Seneca County a short time, but moving to this county in 1855-56, stopping at Upper San-dusky, where he still resides. His mother, Mary (Saner) Lidle, died in Germany in June, 1850. Four of the seven children emigrated—Charles, Frederick, Ernest and Frederica. Our subject landed in New York City September 26, 1865, and was then employed six months at the harness trade, which he had pursued in Germany from the age of fourteen. He subsequently spent two months in Buffalo, thence moving to Cincinnati, where he was employed till March 1867, when he permanently located in Nevada, and was married, May 4, 1867, to Louisa Deerer, who died in 1868. He was married, January 14, 1870, to Sarah E. Parker nee Walker, and seven children have blessed this union—Matilda, born October 20, 1870; Jessie M; Mary E.; Frederick and Edward (twins), born October 4, 1879; an infant, deceased. Mr. Lidle is the owner of his present business room, and has the leading establishment of the kind in the town, carrying a full stock of harness, saddles, trunks, valises, etc. He also owns a comfortable residence on Garret street, and is well respected as a citizen, being a member of the Knights of Honor.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 715
  CONRAD LOHR is a native of Bavaria, Germany, born February 6, 1815. He is a son of William and Christina (Meedman) Lohr, his mother having died in Germany September 30, 1831, and his father, while on their voyage to this country in 1843. They were the parents of three children, Conrad being the only one living. He located in Wayne County in 1843, but removed to this county in 1848, purchasing forty acres of land in Antrim Township, where he was engaged till 1875, when he removed to Nevada, since living a retired life. Mr. Lohr was married in Germany in 1837 to Julia Rittenspach, and five children were born to them—Phoebe, born May 12, 1839, died November 28, 1856; Jacob B., August 6, 1841; Elizabeth, February 26, 1845; George and John (twins), April 12, 1849. Phoebe and Jacob B. were born in Germany. Mrs. Lohr's demise took place in April, 1849, and Mr. L. was married in 1850 to Catharine (Shull) Layman, and three of the four children by this marriage are living —Daniel, born April 10, 1852; Henry, August 13, 1854; and William, May 9, 1858; Mary, born September 19, 1850, died November 28, 1856. The mother of these children dying September 19, 1858, Mr. Lohr was married January 5, 1860, to Mrs. Elizabeth Johns, formerly Miller. He is now enjoying the fruits of his early labors, leading a retired life. He is a Democrat in politics, and a member of the English Lutheran Church. He has been a resident of the county about forty years.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 715
  WILLIAM M. MASKEY, son of Joseph and Mary A. (Simmons) Maskey, was born in Nevada October 16, 1861. His parents were natives of Pennsylvania, their children being William M., Charley and Ida. William M. was educated in the public schools of Nevada, and abandoned his studies at the age of seventeen years to accept a clerkship in the grocery store and bakery of E. E. Irmer, with whom he was engaged from 1879 to 1881. In the latter year he purchased a stock of groceries of J. W. Morris & Son, and embarked in business on his own resources. He carries a full line of groceries, provisions, fruits, etc., and enjoys a good trade. He is a young man of efficient business experience and of good character, being well esteemed as a citizen.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 716
  JOHN McBETH occupies a position in the front rank of the farmers of this township. He was born in Washington County, Penn., June 15,1827, and is a son of Thomas and Jane (Campbell) McBeth. He came to Marion County, Ohio, with his parents in 1844, and resided with them till his twenty-first year. He then engaged at monthly labor for two years, after which time he purchased eighty acres of land of his father on which farm he resided twenty-four years. He then traded for his present farm of 195 acres on which he has since resided. He also owns 17 acres of the old homestead and 84 acres in Putnam County, Ohio. Mr. McBeth has spent the mature part of his life farming in this county and is one of the most successful of its agriculturists. On his farm is located a large mound, in which has been found the bones of human skeletons, either of Indians or a previous race. John McBeth was married April 3, 1851, to Margaret J. Swayze, who was born in Fairfield County, Ohio, February 9, 1834, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Thompson) Swayze. Her parents were born in Pennsylvania where they were also married soon after moving to Fairfield County, where they resided till 1848, when they came to Wyandot and purchased in this township, the old Peacock farm, on which still stands the log cabin erected by the Indian Chief of that name. Her mother died in Fairfield County in 1848; her father afterward sold his farm and removed to Putnam County, where he died in February, 1865. Mr. and Mrs. McBeth have four children, namely: Frank C., born April 19, 1854; Jenie, October 6, 1856; Martin M., August 9, 1867; Truman B., February 26, 1870. Mr. McBeth is a Republican in politics, and has served several years as Trustee. The family is associated with the' Methodist Episcopal Church.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 717
  THOMAS C. McBETH, one of the most successful farmers of this township, was born in Washington County, Penn., August 16, 1830. His parents, Thomas and Jane (Campbell) McBeth, were born in the north of Ireland, the father in 1800, the mother about 1805, being of Scotch ancestry. They emigrated to America in 1825, landing May 1. They located in Washington County, Penn., on the Monongahela River twenty miles above Pittsburgh, where they resided till the spring of 1844, when they removed to Marion County, Ohio. In 1849, they located on Broken Sword Creek in this township, where they purchased 400 acres on which they resided till their death; the father passing away in June, 1877, the mother May 1, 1875. The old home in which they shared the joys and sorrows of life for more than a quarter of a century, is now deserted, and a massive willow stands weeping over its desolation. There were ten children in the family, namely: Eliza, John, Thomas C, Robert, William, Mary, Ellen, Jane, Fannie and Alexander—the latter deceased. Thomas C., the subject of this memoir, resided with his parents till in his twenty-second year. He then was employed two years as a farm hand for F. Campbell, of Marion, at $12 per month, after which he farmed rented land four years, beginning operations in 1859 on eighty acres given him by his father. In 1358, he purchased forty acres, adding forty more in 1865, and in 1870, traded these tracts for his present farm of 202 acres, paying $4,000. On this farm he has erected an elegant residence, and is conducting an extensive and successful agricultural and stock-raising business. Mr. McBeth was married January 25, 1855, to Sidney C. Lamberton, a native of Mansfield, Ohio, born September 8, 1834, and daughter of Robert M. and Eliza M. (Edsall) Lamberton. Her grandparents were among the first settlers of Richland County, her grandfather Edsall assisting to raise the log storeroom owned by Mr. I. Wiler on what is now the site of the noted "Wiler House " of Mansfield. Her father when first located in that vicinity, sold Mr. Wiler ginseng, snakeroot and other medicinal roots and herbs. Her grandfather, Lamberton, was a native of Scotland and graduated in the University of Glasgow. He emigrated to America and became one of the most able lawyers of Mansfield, his death occurring in 1858, his wife's following. Mrs. McBeth's parents were natives of Carlisle, Penn and Mansfield, Ohio, her father born May 12, 1811, the latter, October, 1817. They were married near Mansfield and resided there most of their lives, her father having died in 1839; her mother is still living in that vicinity in her sixty-eighth year. Mr. and Mrs. McBeth have had six children, viz.: Thomas N., born November 26, 1856; Pleda M., September 9, 1858—wife of Frank Blair, Fannie J., August 26, 1861—wife of William H. Dotts, Venemen, May 21, 1864; Minnie I., December 2, 1866; Maud, twin to the latter, died January 17,1869. Mr. and Mrs. McBeth are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church and highly respected in their community.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 717
  WILLIAM McBETH, one of the foremost farmers of this township, was born in Washington Co., Penn., July 12, 1834. He is a son of Thomas and Jane (Campbell) McBeth, natives of Ireland and of Scotch ancestry. (See sketch of T. C. McBeth). Our subject resided with his parents till twenty-eight years of age and engaged in farming, obtaining a fair education in the district schools. He inherited eighty acres from his father's estate, and purchased forty acres in 1860, to which he has added till he now owns 263 acres of land, valued at $75 to $80 per acre. He has done much hard work, having assisted in clearing two large farms of their forest growth. He deals quite extensively in stock, keeping extra qualities of cattle, sheep and hogs. Mr. McBeth was married February 3, 1863, to Miss Rhoda Harmon, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Minor) Harmon, natives of Bartley County, Va., and Madison County, Ohio, respectively. Her parents spent most of their lives in this county, where her father died September 18, 1853; her mother November 28, 1867. The family consisted of ten children, namely: Margaret, Osborn, Mary A., Francis, Sarah, Rhoda,. Elizabeth, John, Michael and George. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. McBeth has been blessed by four children, namely: Gladys, born September 30, 1864; Blanch, September 6, 1869; Cora. March 11, 1873; Harry, October 22, 1877. Mr. McBeth has resided on his present farm since 1863. He has been very successful in his business affairs, his efforts having been crowned by an estate of not less than $27,000. He and Mrs. McBefch are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, the family ranking among the first in their community.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 718
  ISAAC MILLER, one of the most worthy and notable pioneers of this county, was born in Pendleton County, Va., May 24, 1818. His paternal grandfather, Anthony Miller, was a native of Hardy County, on Lost River, Va., and was all through the Revolutionary war. He was present at the massacre of Little Wheeling, Va., where bat a very few escaped the tomahawk of the savages. He was Lieutenant of the company that followed the Indians to Little Wheeling. His maternal grandfather was a native of the same county, was also a Revolutionary soldier, and a Methodist minister. Isaac Miller is a son of Isaac and Margaret (Lair) Miller, the former born in Hardy County, on Lost River, Va., October 26, 1784; the latter July 28, 1783. His parents were married in their native county and subsequently removed to Pendleton County, on the South Fork of the Potomac, where they resided until April 14, 1834, when they started for Ohio, and located on the Delaware Reserve, now within this county, where they remained two years, when they moved to the Wyandot Reserve, near where the town of Nevada is now situated. They first leased land in 1836 of Jacob Young, a Wyandot, on which land they resided seven years. They were the first white settlers of Eden Township; the father then purchased land—80 acres —with his son Lair, and after the death of his wife, May 29, 1845, resided with his son. He died February 21, 1862. In this family there were seven children, viz.: John, born March 20, 1808; Mary, February 1, 1810; Catharine, November 11, 1813; Elizabeth C, May 12, 1816; Isaac, May 24, 1818; Lair, February 10, 1820; Jacob, March 31, 1825. Isaac, our subject, resided with his parents till twenty-seven years of age. He was married October 10 1847, to Barbara Fredregill, daughter of James and Sarah (Wever) Fredregill, natives of Westmoreland County, Penn. By this marriage one child was born, namely: Reuben, the date of his birth being June 29, 1848. His wife's decease occurring August 9, 1849, Mr. Miller was again married February 7, 1850, to Sarah Clayton, born in Wayne County, in Ohio, March 12,1820, daughter of Samuel and Cynthia (Hampshire) Clayton, natives of Virginia and Pennsylvania respectively, of English and Welsh descent. Her parents were married in Richland County, Ohio, June 27, 1819, and later moved to Knox; then to Seneca, and then to Wyandot County in July, 1836. Her father died February 5, 1879; her mother, November 9, 1883—both in Nebraska. After his marriage, Mr. Miller farmed rented land six years, operating a saw mill two years in the meantime. He located on his present farm August 23, 1854, purchasing first forty acres, to which he has added by subsequent purchases till he now owns eighty-five acres. His present dwelling was built originally by Dr. Grey-eyes, a " medicine man " of the Wyandot tribe, the logs having been hewn by one McGrew and John Hicks Standstone, an Indian. Mr. Miller has been a lifelong farmer, and has witnessed the growth of this county since 1834, having done much for its development. He has had several hand-to-hand combats with the " redskins," and after the strife, has partaken of their bounteous pots of pork, deer, raccoon, 'possum and skunk broth most freely. He is still quite conversant in their language and can yet give the savage war-whoop in all its weirdness and terror. He was supervisor of the Indians while they were cutting out the Osceola road from Indian Run to Rock Run, and was intimately acquainted with most of the members of the tribe. Mr. and Mrs. Miller are both members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and highly esteemed by all who know them. Mrs. Miller was a schoolteacher in her young days, closing her last term at noon before marriage.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 718
  REUBEN MILLER is a native of this county, born in Crane Township, June 29, 1848. He resided with his father, Isaac Miller (see sketch), till twenty-two years of age, farming and attending the common schools. He was married December 29, 1870, to Mary J. Keller, daughter of Harrison D. and Susanna (Young) Keller, and three children have been born to them —Myrtie B., July 8, 1874,; Lillie M., January 24, 1878, and Lefee, September 27, 1883. For eight years after his marriage Mr. Miller tilled his father's farm. He then purchased his present farm, where he has since been engaged in agricultural pursuits. He is one of the model farmers of the township, and makes a specialty of good grades of sheep and hogs. He owns eighty-five acres within the corporation of Nevada, valued at $125 per acre, the land being drained by five miles of tile drainage. Mr. Miller served as Trustee of the township in 1882, and in 1883 was elected member of the Village Council. He is highly esteemed as a citizen, is an energetic farmer and an active Republican.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 719
  WILLIAM MONTEE, proprietor of the Kerr House, Nevada, is a native of Plattsburg, N. Y., born June 27, 1829. He is a son of A. and Hester (Wilson) Montee, the former a native of New York City; the latter of Nova Scotia, of French and Scotch-Irish parentage respectively. They were married in Clinton County, N. Y., and were the parents of twelve children, eight now living—Emeline, Elizabeth, Theodore, William, Edward, James, Franklin and Finley. After marriage, they settled at Plattsburg, N. Y., moving to this county in 1833. In 1852, they migrated to Illinois, where the father died in 1876, aged seventy-six; the mother in 1883. The former was a soldier during the entire war of 1812, entering the service at twelve years of age. He was in after years a Quartermaster in the militia at Little Sandusky. William Montee was reared on the farm in this county among the Indians, one of his principal playmates being Moscoe Sarrahas. He continued in agricultural pursuits till he enlisted in the army in September, 1862. He was a member of Company K, One Hundred and Twenty-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and participated in the battles of New Market, Piedmont, Lynchburg and Winchester. At the latter place, he was placed on detached service as Hospital Regimental Cook, serving in this capacity two years. Being disabled by sickness, he was discharged at Washington in August, 1865, and returned to Little Sandusky, where he engaged in the hotel business four years. In 1878, he removed to Nevada, where he has since engaged in the same occupation. He does a flourishing business, and is the owner of 160 acres of Kansas land, and fourteen acres in Pitt Township. Mr. Montee was married January 16, 1851, to Lorinda Coon, their children being six in number, two living—Anna E., born April 5, 1856, and John H., born December 11, 1873. Mr. Montee is highly esteemed as a citizen, is a Democrat in politics, and member of the G. A. R.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 720
  BENJAMIN B. MYERS was born in Crawford County, Ohio, July 2,1849. His parents, Gen. Samuel and Hannah Myers, are both residents of Bucyrus. The former was born in York County, Penn., December 4, 1802. He settled in the vicinity of Bucyrus in an early day, 1826, and was a prominent and influential citizen. He represented the counties of Crawford and Richland two terms in the legislature, and was ten years Treasurer for the county of Crawford. Benjamin Myers was educated in the public schools of Bucyrus, and subsequently learned the tinner's trade, which he has since engaged in, forming a partnership first with John Scharf, of New Washington, but disposing of his interest in 1874, and establishing himself in the hardware, stove and tinware business in Nevada, under the firm name of S. Myers & Son, in 1875. In 1879, he purchased his father's interest, and has since conducted the business independently, enjoying a good trade—carrying a full stock of shelf hardware, stoves, tinware and agricultural implements. Mr. Myers was married, September 10, 1872, to Miss Lizzie Delancey, a native of Crawford County, born December 21, 1855, daughter of Joseph and Rebecca Delancy, and two children were born to them—both dying in infancy. In politics, Mr. Myers is Democratic; he is a member of the F. & A. M., I. O. O. F., and also of the English Lutheran Church. He is one of the substantial citizens of the town and well respected.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 720
  JAMES NEALLY, son of David and Debora (Goodrich) Neally, was born in Tioga County, N. Y., July 2, 1820. His parents were natives of Oswego, N. Y., where they were married and spent their entire lives, the mother dying about 1825, the father in 1873. Mr. Neally was reared from his seventh to his twenty-first year in Steuben County, N. Y., working on a farm. He then learned the carpenter's trade and followed this trade twelve years. In 1855, he came to this county and located on his present farm, then containing ninety-five acres, now 110, valued at $90 to $100 per acre. He was married, March 14, 1852, to Eunice Gray, born in Steuben County, K. Y., May 17, 1826, daughter of Levi and Tryphena (Baker) Gray, natives of Connecticut and Tioga County, N. Y., respectively, the father born June 26, 1790, the mother June 8, 1793. Her great-grandmother bore the name of Hoose and was a cousin of Martin Van Buren, deceased President of the United States. Her parents were married in Steuben County, N. Y., in 1810, and in 1811 located in Wheeler Township, where her father died in 1864: her mother soon after removed to Illinois, where she resided several years, and then in other places with her children, till her death, which occurred in Tiffin, Ohio, August 15, 1882. Mrs. Neally's grandfather Baker was one of the pioneers of Western New York, and his wife a woman of marked ability. Mr. and Mrs. Neally have had seven children, namely, Elizabeth, wife of Charles White, born in New York June 4, 1853; Ella, wife of D. P. Caldwell, born April 18, 1855; Mary T., wife of James Wort, born August 31, 1857; Charles D., March 15, 1860; Prudence, July 2, 1862; Fannie F., August 15, 1864: James L., June 15, 1869. The latter died September 24, 1874. Mr. Neally is one of the many good farmers of Antrim Township, and is kindly regarded in his social sphere. In politics, he is a Republican.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 723
  JOHN E. PALMER was born in Richland County, Ohio, April 23, 1827. His parents, Charles and Anna (Ward) Palmer, were natives of England, the former born in London October 8, 1796, the latter in Repton November 15, 1804. His great-grandparents, John E. and Martha (Sandwell) Palmer, were married in England January 20, 1763, and his grandfather, John E. Palmer, was born to them September 18,1768. His grandmother, Mary (Sharp) Palmer, was born in England December 14, 1769. They were married in London November 12, 1789, and their children were Stephen S., born August 20, 1790, lost on a voyage to South America, off Ushant, on the coast of France, December 13, 1817; Mary A., February 1, 1792; John E., July 28, 1793; William P., May 19, 1799; Charles S., October 8, 1796. The father of these died January 27, 1801, the mother November 25, 1803. Charles S. Palmer, the father of our subject, was born in London, his father being a noted printer in that city. He, Charles S. Palmer, emigrated to America in 1819, and was married in Richland County, Ohio, February 10, 1821, to Anna Ward, the children resulting from this marriage being Charles S., born December 18, 1821; Francis R., April 25, 1823; Mary, February 25, 1825; John E., April 23, 1827; Elizabeth W., March 10, 1829; Fannie, January 25, 1831; Martha, March 25, 1833; Amanda, April 15, 1835; Phcebe J., January 19, 1837; William, March 18, 1838; Henry G., August 14, 1839; Joseph, July 24, 1841; Mary A., January 8, 1844. The deceased are William, Mary and Amanda; the mother died August 15.1865, the father January 29, 1878. John E. Palmer, the subject proper of this notice, was engaged on the farm with his parents till twenty-six years of age. In 1853, he moved to this county and purchased eighty acres of his present farm, on which, with the exception of three years, he has since resided. He at one time owned forty acres in Hardin County, but subsequently sold the tract and purchased sixty acres in Crane Township. Mr. Palmer was married September 12, 1854, to Susan Bachtell, daughter of Joseph Bachtell (see sketch of Emmet E. Bachtell), and three children were born to them, namely: Olive L., September 14, 1855; Clinton R., December 7, 1857; Morris E., November 22, 1864. Mr. Palmer is one of the model farmers of the township and a man of excellent character and a Republican in politics. Mrs. Palmer is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 723
  LOREN A. PEASE, one of the early settlers of Wyandot County and its first Sheriff, was born at Burton, Geauga Co., Ohio, March 10, 1818. His parents were Luther and Nancy (Pease) Pease, were natives of Connecticut and of French and Welsh ancestry respectively. Their children were Nancy L.. Luther L., James C. and Loren A. The parents were early settlers of Geauga County, Ohio, locating there about 1817, the fathers decease occurring there in 1825, in his thirty-seventh year, the mother surviving till 1842 and dying in this county. Loren A. Pease, the subject of this sketch, was reared in his native county and obtained a fair education, considering his advantages. He learned the blacksmith trade at Painesville, Lake County, and pursued this occupation until 1850, doing an extensive business in the manufacture of wagons and buggies, principally at Sycamore, this county, to which place he removed and permanently settled in 1839. He erected the first frame dwelling in that village, and there established, in connection with his brother James, the first wagon shop in the county, paying $75 for one acre of land. He then employed five to six workmen and manufactured thirty to fifty wagons yearly. During the war Mr. Pease was extensively engaged in the manufacture of sorghum molasses, in which business he was financially successful. Beginning life with limited means, he at length became the owner of 178 acres, which he has since exchanged for business rooms and a home in Nevada. Mr. Pease was married first to Miss Maria E. Vaugh, and two children were born to them. namely, Eugene C. and Victor C., both deceased. Their mother passed away in April, 1842, and Mr. Pease was remarried at Cleveland, Ohio, to Nancy A. Parsons, who died March, 1875. His third marriage to Jennie A. Agnew, nee Bibler, occurred March 15, 1877. Mr. Pease was elected Sheriff at the organization of the county in 1845, and was therefore the first to share the honors of that office. He was nominated for re-election, but was defeated by two votes by Thomas Baird, Democrat, the tallies standing , 658 and 660. He has served in several of the township offices, and, with his wife, is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He has been a Republican since the organization of the party.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 724
  JACOB RANCK is a native of Crawford County, Ohio, and was born December 30, 1843.  He is the son of David and Frances (Betzer) Ranck, natives of Lancaster County, Penn., and Ross County, Ohio, respectively; the father was born October 18, 1802; the mother December 6, 1806.  His parents were married in Ross County November 21, 1829, moved to this county in 1833 and leased land seven years of William Betzer.  They then moved to Crawford County, where his father purchased land on which he resided until his death, which occurred October 14, 1865; his wife preceding him July 15, 1851.  By his first marriage eleven children were born, namely:  Catharine, Rachel, Ephraim, Sarah, Amanda, Francis, Lydia, Lewis Co., Jacob, Delilah and Jane.  By his second marriage, January 11, 1855, to Nancy (Feller) Sterne, there were born Wesley S., Anna M. and Peter F.,  Jacob Ranck, the subject of this sketch, resided with his parents till his nineteenth year, and in his nineteenth year enlisted in Company H, One Hundred and Twenty-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and entered the service August 19, 1862.  He was mustered in at Camp Monroeville, and participated in fourteen engagements, chief among which were, Winchester, New Market, Piedmont, Berryville, Fisher's Hill, Cedar Creek, Petersburg and High Bridge.  He was captured at the first battle of Winchester and kept in prison one month, being exchanged and joining his regiment after four months parole.  He was again captured by Lee's army at the battle of High Bridge, April 6, 1865; but was released three days later by Lee's surrender.  He received his discharge in June, 1865, having served thirty-four months.  Returning home, Mr. Ranck worked by the month and rented land about seven years.  He then purchased eighty acres, which he sold two years later and purchased his present farm of 1836 acres, where he has since resided.  He has married February 27, 1868, to Caroline Gottier, who was born in Holmes County, her parents having died when she was but ten years old.  Three children have resulted from this union, namely: Jesse G., born December 1, 1868; Ida B., July 20, 1871; Clara L., January 16, 1876.  Mr. Ranck is an industrious farmer and well respected.  Mr. and Mrs. Ranck are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 724
  NICHOLAS RATZ was born in Canton Berne, Switzerland, November 6, 1833. He is a son of John and Barbara (Wies) Ratz, John, Jr., Mary and Nicholas being the only children of the family now living. Their father died in 1839; the mother in 1849. Mr. Ratz was a farmer in Switzerland. He came to America in 1855, and located at Upper Sandusky, where he engaged in various kinds of work—chiefly farming—till the fall of 1870, when he purchased his present farm of eighty acres, and where he has since resided. His farm is well improved and is valued at $75 per acre. In 1882, he erected a fine barn at a cost of $1,500. Mr. Ratz was married March 20, 1862, to Miss Magdalene Mitsch, a native of Crawford County, born December 20, 1842, and daughter of Henry and Elizabeth Mitsch. They have two children, namely: William H., born November 29, 1862; and Mary E., born April 3, 1874. Mr. Ratz and wife are members of the Reformed Church, and are highly respected in their neighborhood. Mr. Ratz is a Democrat in politics. They are industrious people, and have earned for themselves a comfortable home.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 725
  CAROLINE REX, nee Decker, one of the most successful and able business women in the county, was born in New Jersey, August 16, 1824. She is a daughter of Aaron M. and Mary (Vandruff) Decker, her parents having come to Crawford County, Ohio, in 1831; her mother dying there in her forty-seventh year. Her father died in Illinois in 1858. Mrs. Rex lived with her parents until her mother's death, and then embarked on the sea of life on her own responsibility. She was married April 25, 1844, to Andrew Waters, who died February 24, 1857. He purchased the farm of fifty acres (to which Mrs. Rex added ten acres by a second purchase), and where she has since resided. This farm has been paid for chiefly by money earned by her own exertions, and is a comfortable home, valued at $100 per acre. She was married, April 14, 1859, to J. D. Rex, a native of Pennsylvania, born August 4, 1816. He was fatally injured by a runaway team, dying from the effects of his injuries, October 16, 1876. Since his death, Mrs. Rex has taken care of her farm and managed the same herself. In this she has been very successful, having cleared her property of debt, besides adding much to its improvement. She perhaps has done more hard work than most any other woman of her years in the county, and amid all her trials has born up most bravely. Besides her housework she has been much engaged in the corn and harvest fields, having, in one season, raked thirty acres of wheat from the cradle-swath. She has given liberally to her step-children, and has yet a handsome competence, on which she can safely rely in the closing years of her life. Mrs. Rex has been a member of the Lutheran Church thirty years, and is one of its most devoted members. Indeed, few women have born the burdens of life more bravely or fought its battles more victoriously than she.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 725
  HENRY RITTERSPACH was born in Bavaria, March 2, 1819, and is a son of George and Christina (Wend) Ritterspach, also natives of Bavaria. There were five children in the family, Henry, our subject, being now the only living. He came to America in 1840, when twenty-one, to escape conscription, and had great difficulty in eluding the officers, while making his escape. On landing in this country, Mr. Ritterspach went direct to Wooster, Ohio, near which place he was engaged in farm labor about eight years. He moved to this county in August, 1848, and purchased forty acres of his present farm, paying $150 for the same, this amount having since been obtained by the sale of three walnut trees, which grew on the lot. By subsequent purchases Mr. Ritterspach obtained 300 acres, of which he gave his children 60 acres each, and now owns but 120 acres, valued at $75 to $90 per acre. He began at monthly wages, locating here in the woods, and has earned for himself an enviable fortune. He was married in 1844, to Anna M. Mann, a native of Bavaria, born October, 1818, daughter of Michael and Barbara (Binder) Mann. She emigrated to America in 1843. By this union four children were born, namely Jacob, Simon, Barbara and Catharine, the latter deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Ritterspach are members of the Lutheran Church, and he is a Democrat in politics.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 726
  JACOB W. RITTERSPACH was born in Wayne County, Ohio, June 20, 1845, and came with his parents to this county in 1848. He resided with them till twenty-eight years of age, engaging in farming. He was married April 17, 1873, to Saloma Jacobs, a native of Bavaria, born August 14, 1848, daughter of George and Saloma (Reinboldt) Jacobs, also natives of Bavaria. She came with her parents to America in 1850 and located in Bucyrus, Crawford County, where her mother died in 1878, her father still living, their children being Nicholas, Mary, William, Frederick and Saloma. Mr. and Mis. Ritterspach have four children, namely: Clara, born June 17, 1874; Henry, January 21, 1876; Freddie, June 22, 1879; Valeria, October 25, 1883. At his marriage Mr. Ritterspach inherited sixty acres of land, to which he has added by subsequent purchases, till he now owns 145 acres, valued at $75 to $100 per acre. He deals some in stock, keeping good grades generally and some thorough-bred. He is a Democrat in politics, and is now serving as Trustee. Both he and his wife are members of the Lutheran Church.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 726
  SIMON RITTERSPACH, second son of Henry and Ann M. Ritterspach, was born in Wayne County, Ohio, March 16, 1847. He resided with his parents till his marriage, October 8, 1875, to Louisa Zulauf, who was born in this township, December 2, 1854, and daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth Zulauf. At his marriage Mr. Ritterspach obtained sixty acres of land from his father, on which he erected, in 1881, a handsome frame residence at a cost of $2,000. He has since purchased ten acres, and now values his farm at $85 to $90 per acre. He keeps a good grade of stock, does a general farming business, and has resided in this township since his boyhood. Mr. and Mrs. Ritterspach have four children, viz.: Willie A., born September 25, 1876; Minnie M., July 7, 1879; Eddie Z., September 28, 1881;.Lona L, June 23, 1883. Mr. Ritterspach is well respected in his community, being a supporter of Democratic principles and a member of the German Lutheran Church.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 726
NOTE: (See Samuel Zulauf , brother of Louisa)
  GEORGE ROOD was born on the homestead where he now lives, July 25, 1848. He is a son of Wine and Catharine (Harten) Rood, the former born near Glastonbury, Somersetshire, England, February 27, 1802; the latter in Dauphin County, Penn., October 22, 1809. His father emigrated to America in 1817, and purchased lands in Marion and Hardin Counties. He was engaged for several years at wagon-making, in the towns of Marseilles, Mt. Vernon and Bucyrus, moving to this county in 1844, and purchasing eighty acres, where Mr. Rood now resides, owning 145 acres at the date of his death. Our subject, George, was the only heir. The father died May 26, 1870; the mother, December 27, 1882. Mr. Rood has always resided on the old home farm. He was married November 25, 1869, to Melissa Pendry, a native of Richland County, Ohio, born November 25, 1849, daughter of James and Jane Pendry, also natives of Richland County, Ohio, now residents of Larimer County, Colo. Mr. and Mrs. Rood have three children, viz.: Franklin G., January 3, 1871; Willie W., April 4, 1872; Venus A., October 5, 1874; Marcellus M., April 21, 1876. Willie died April 29, 1875. Mr. Rood is a Republican, and one of the substantial farmers of the township, taking an active interest in general matters.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 727
  JOHN RUSSELL was born in Stark County, Ohio, July 20, 1842.  He is a son of Thomas and Wealthy (Adams) Russell, the former born in Wheeling, Va., Feb. 12, 1809; the latter in New Hampshire in 1816.  His parents were married in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, and reared in a family of five children, all yet living, viz., John, Joseph A., Ann, Cordelia F. and Martha J.  His father still resides in Sparta, Stark County, where the mother died in November, 1863.  John Russell, grandfather of our subject, was a soldier almost through the entire war of 1812.  Mr. Russell was brought up on a farm in Stark County.  He obtained a good common school education, and entered Oberlin College, but was compelled to abandon his studies on account of failing health.  Mr. Russell enlisted in Company D, One Hundred and Seventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Aug. 11, 1862, and participated in the battle of Gettysburg (being one of nine left in a company of forty men); bombardment of Charleston, including the skirmishes.  He then went to Florida with his regiment, and was in the battle at Jacksonville.  He was discharged at Charleston, S. C., July 2, 1865.  In the spring of 1866, Mr. Russell came to this county, taught school one term, and was marred June 18, 1867, to Lydia J. Smalley, school one term, and was married June 18, 1867, to Lydia J. Smalley, daughter of Abraham and Elizabeth (Dwire) Smalley, and six children were born to them, three living, viz., Martha S., Elizabeth W. and Joseph W.; Harrold, Anna M. and Florence are deceased.  After marriage, Mr. Russell engaged in farming and lumbering two years in Crane Township; in brick making three years at Upper Sandusky; removing with his family to Nevada in 1873, where he has since been engaged in the manufacture of brick and tile, the latter since 1878.  He does a large business, employing from eight to sixteen workmen during the summer.  Mr. Russell served as Trustee of township three years, and has been one of the School Board five years; he is a member of the K. of H., G. A. R., and, with his family, of the Advent Church.  In politics, Mr. Russell is a Republican.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page  727
  JOSEPH SEIGER was born in Baden, Sept. 22, 1839, and is a son of John and Magdalene Seiger, also natives of Baden.  He emigrated with his parents in 1848, and located near Little Sandusky.  His father died May 11, 1870; his mother, September 18, 1871, the former in his sixty-sixth year, the latter in her fifty-ninth.  Mr. Seiger resided with his parents conducting the farm, till thirty years of age.  He then engaged at fence-making for C. R. Fowler, working chiefly at that business for eight years.  He then farmed rented land one year, and in 1878 purchased ninety acres of land where he now resides.  Mr. Seiger was married Jan. 14, 1875, to Catharine Maley, who was born in this county Dec. 9, 1853.  They have three children, viz., Iva E., born Feb. 14, 1877; Della M., Mar. 29, 1879; and Myrtie P., Nov. 29, 1883.  In politics, Mr. Seiger is a Democrat.  He is a hardworking, honest farmer, and well respected in his neighborhood.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 728
  JAMES A. STEWART, of the firms of Stewart & Hall and Stewart & Wallace, was born in Allegheny County, Penn., Feb. 29, 1844.  His parents, George and Rosanna (Rinehart) Stewart, natives of Ireland and Pennsylvania, were married in Allegheny County in 1841, residing there until 1860, when they came to this county, where his father established a shingle factory, which he conducted till his death, which occurred Mar. 22, 1869.  His father came with his parents from Guilford, County Down, Ireland, in 1806.  James A. is one of nine children, five of whom are living -  Mrs. Mary S. Wallace, of Steubenville; James A., Mrs. Carrie B. Welty, of Charleston, W. Va.; Mrs. Millie S. Seaton, of Harvard, Neb.; Mrs. Ella M. Seaton, of Pullman, Ill.  The deceased were William A., Maria, Annie and George W., who died in infancy.  Our subject removed to Ohio with his parents in 1860.  In 1862, he entered the army in Company F, One Hundred and First Ohio Volunteer Infantry, under Capt. Kirby of Upper Sandusky, enlisting for three years.  He participated in the battles of Perryville, Knob Gap, Stone River, Liberty Gap and Chickamauga, being wounded at the latter place, carrying the ball yet, which was lodged in his right shoulder.  After three months in the hospital, he joined his company at Bridgeport, Ala., Dec. 24, 1863, and subsequently took part in the battles of Rocky Face Ridge and Resaca; but, owing to his disability, was sent to the hospital, and was afterward appointed clerk at department headquarters, serving in this capacity until the close of the war, receiving his discharge at Camp Cleveland, June 26, 1865.  Returning home, he resumed work in the shingle factory, where he remained as partner with his father until his death in 1869, and in 1870, formed a partnership with W. H. Wallace, under the firm name of Steward & Wallace, in the manufacture of staves, heading, etc., rebuilding the factory in 1874, which is still running and doing an extensive business.  In 1876, established a hub factory at Charleston, W. Va., with firm of Stewart, Wallace & Welty.  In 1878 he bought the hardware stock of M. R> Hall removing to Nevada, where he has since resided.  In 1882, the present partnership of Stewart & Hall was formed, they purchasing W. H. Wallace's interest in the hardware store.  Mr. Stewart was married, Oct. 20, 1870, to Mary L. Hall, daughter of Edward and Ann (Fielding) Hall, and six children have been born to them - Mary F., born July 29, 1871; George E., May 12, 1873; Annie M., Apr. 9, 1875; Gertrude A., Dec. 16, 1876; William A., Oct. 27, 1878; Stanley G., May 22, 1882.  The deceased are Annie M., who died May 2, 1875, and William A., Dec. 29, 1880.  Mr. Stewart has served in several of the city and township offices, is a Republican and member of Leith Post, No. 127, G. A. R.  He was the first Post Commander, serving two terms, and was a member of the National Encampment at Baltimore, in June, 1882, having been elected as one of the State delegates.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 728
  ROBERT M. STEWART, M. D., was born in Seneca County, Ohio, May 28, 1839.  He is the youngest son of Archibald and Martha (Johnson) Stewart, both natives of Lycoming County, Penn., and of Scotch-Irish and English parentage.  Six of ten children are yet living - Mary, Nancy, Sophia, James W., Charles J. and Robert M.  Their father was born June 2, 1797; their mother in 1795.  Archibald Stewart settled in Seneca County about 1820, and still resides there; his wife has been deceased since Dec. 24, 1854.  Robert M., our subject, grew up on the farm with his parents and attended the district schools, subsequently taking an academic course at Republic. He then engaged in teaching and farming alternately till he enlisted in the service, Feb. 23, 1862.  He became a member of Company G, Fifty-fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and was engaged in the battles of Moorefield, Strasburg, Rappahannock, Bull Run, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg; then joining the Army of the Cumberland, and participating in the actions at Buzzard Roost, Resaca, Kenesaw Mountain, Peach Tree Creek, front of Atlanta, and after the Atlanta campaign with Sherman to the sea; in this latter movement being chiefly engaged with five other comrades, as scout, and among the first to enter Savannah.  Mr. Stewart was discharged at Hardeeville, S. C., Jan. 24, 1865, and returned home to take up the study of medicine with Dr. B. A. Wright, of Maumee, Ohio.  He attended the Cincinnati Medical College in 1865-66, and in 1870 graduated at that institution.  He soon after began the practice of his profession at Mexico, this county, under the physio-medical theory, being among the first to practice the same in the county.  In October, 1866, he located in Nevada, where he has since been engaged, meeting with merited success.  He was engaged in the drug business from 1875 to 1878, with the firm of R. M. Stewart & Co., but subsequently disposed of his interest and erected a brick block containing six business rooms in Kansas City.  Mr. Stewart was married, Sept. 10, 1867, to Miss Susan A. Funk, daughter of Jacob and Margaret (Nichols) Funk, and seven children have been born to them - Mattie E., Margaret M., Archie J., Annie V., Hattie G., Charley J. and Alwilda, and latter deceased.  Mr. Stewart and wife are members of hte Advent Church; he is surgeon of the G. A. R., Leith Post, No. 127, and a Republican.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 729
  PATRICK TIVENS was born in Ireland, Mar. 25, 1839, and is a son of Hugh and Bridget (Conlon) Tivens, also natives of Ireland.  There are six children in the family yet living - Patrick, Charles, Hugh, James, Winifred and Bridget.  Their father is still living but their mother died in 1882.  Patrick, the subject of this sketch, came to America in 1857, and stopped a few months in New York State, then came to Sandusky City, from which place, about four months later, he came to this county.  He was engaged at farm labor for Mr. F. Fowler, one year, and for S. P. Fowler, sixteen years, after which he rented land two years, purchasing his present farm of 100 acres in 1877, paying $60 per acre.  He was married Mar. 30, 1872, to Susanna Maloy, who was born in this county, May 29, 1852.  Her parents, John C. and Anna M. (Dinkle) Maley, were natives of Germany.  Five children have been born to them - Patrick E., Dec. 18, 1872; Winnifred, Oct. 6, 1874; Emily N., Sept. 2, 1877; Hugh, Mar. 29, 1879; Charles, Oct. 23, 1882.  In politics Mr. Tivens is Democratic, in religion Catholic.  He has a good farm valued at $75 per acre, and is a good citizen.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 729
  DANIEL TRAXLER is a native of Cumberland County, Penn., born April 2, 1818. He is a son of Daniel and Elizabeth (Cramer) Traxler, also natives of Cumberland County, where they were married. In 1824, they came to Ohio, and located in Summit County, moving to Crawford County in 1841, residing there until their deaths. The children of the family were Mary, Elizabeth, Catharine, George, Daniel, Henry, Peter, John and SusanDaniel, Peter and John now the only ones living. The father died in 1848, the mother in 1845.   Daniel Traxler, our subject, lived with his parents till about twenty years of age; he they rented land in Stark County, Ohio, and farmed until 1861, when he moved to Wayne County and purchased 104 acres, on which he resided till 1879, when he came to this county and purchased his present farm of 136 1/2 acres, where he has since been engaged in agricultural pursuits. Mr. Traxler was married, January 3, 1839, to Josephine Phillips, a native of Columbiana County, Ohio, born June 12, 1818, daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth (Smith) Phillips, natives of Ohio and Pennsylvania respectively. Her parents were married in her native county, and resided there until 1828, when they removed to Wayne County, in where her mother died in 1839, her father in 1851. Their children were George, Lewis, Catharine and Josephine—the two sons now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Traxler's children are Rose A., born December 12, 1839; Elizabeth L., August 5, 1842; William E., April 18, 1845; Flora A., October 18, 1848; Joseph O., June 6, 1849; Mary (same date); Franklin P., October 17, 1851; Ottomon D., February 12, 1855; John H., August 18, 1858; Charles L., March 20, 1861. All these attained maturity, and all are now deceased but the two latter, John H. and Charles L., being one and all of good habits and character. Mr. and Mrs. Traxler are members of the Reformed Church, and are well respected in their community.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 730
  DANIEL C. TRAXLER, freight, ticket and express agent, Nevada, was born in Crawford County, Ohio, September 4, 1847, son of Peter and Catharine Traxler (see sketch of Eden Township). In 1852, he came with his parents to this county, where he has since resided. He obtained the rudiments of an education in the district schools, supplementing this by one term in the Heidelberg College, Tiffin, Ohio, closing his studies at the Upper Sandusky High School. He afterward engaged in teaching during the winter seasons, working on the farm during summers in this locality till 1869, when he emigrated to Missouri, and thence to Texas, making the trip between the latter points (about 600 miles) on foot. He engaged in teaching in the above-named States, also spent some time in herding and branding cattle in Texas, passing fifty-two days and nights in the saddle. After three years, Mr. Traxler returned home, and took up his abode with his father, engaging a few years in farming, subsequently spending one year with Stewart & Wallace in the stave and heading business. In 1879, he located in Nevada, accepting a clerkship of the Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne & Chicago Railroad Company, of which he was made ticket, freight and express agent in June, 1882, Mr. Traxler was married, October 22, 1874, to Miss Mary E. Kroft, a native of Stark County, born June 3, 1853, daughter of John and Rebecca (Prouse) Kroft, of English and German ancestry respectively. The children by this marriage are Gertrude A. C., born July 7, 1875; Guendoline M., March 5, 1877; Garrold J. P., September 30, 1878; Herman P., May 12, 1880; and Harry N. J., November 18, 1883. In politics, Mr. Traxler is a Republican. He served as Assessor two terms, and is now a member of the Union School Board. He is associated with the F. & A. M., and, with his wife, is a member of the Presbyterian Church.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 730
  HENRY TRISH  was born in York County, Penn., Mar. 22, 1833.  His parents, Louis and Elizabeth Trish, were natives of Germany, the former born Nov. 11, 1801, the latter Aug. 3, 1804.  They were married in Germany, and emigrated to America in 1832, stopping two years in Pennsylvania, then removed to Bucyrus, Ohio, where the father was engaged nineteen years in the manufacture of wagons and buggies.  In 1853, he came to this county and purchased fifty acres of land, to which he added till he owned 234 acres.  He died July 4, 1859; his wife surviving till Feb. 16, 1882.  The family consisted of ten children, namely, Margaret, Louis, Henry, Elizabeth, Mary, Frederick, John, Barbara, Lydia and Anna.  Louis and Lydia are deceased.  Mr. Trish, our subject, resided with his parents till his twenty-third year, and then went to Indiana, where he was engaged five years at the wagon trade in the respective towns of Goshen and Warsaw.  Returning home, he entered into a partnership with his brother Frederick with whom he was engaged in farming till 1882, when the partnership was dissolved.  He has been very successful financially, now owning 348 acres of the undivided estate.  He does quite an extensive farming and stock-raising business, and in a straightforward, energetic citizen of good character.  Mr. Trish is still living the quiet life of a bachelor, his two sisters taking care of his household. 
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 731
  JOSEPH TURNEY, M. D., was born in Franklin County, Ohio, July 22, 1825.  His parents were Joseph and Margaret (Weber) Turney, his father having been born in Westmoreland County, Penn., Apr. 12, 1792; his mother in the same vicinity in 1793.  His maternal grandfather, John W. Weber, was a prominent minister in the German Reformed Church.  Joseph Turney, Sr., was married in 1812, and moved to Ohio in the year 1819, settling on the banks of Allen Creek, Franklin County.  He soon after removed to Delaware, where he resided twelve years, engaged in the tin and copper business;  he then moved into the country near the village of Ostrander, where he died at the residence of his son, Benjamin Turney, Jan. 29, 1872, in his eightieth year; his wife, Margaret, died Oct. 27, 1860.  They were the parents of eleven children, the youngest of whom died in his twenty-eighth year, the first death in the family.  Dr. Turney obtained the rudiments of an education in the school districts of the village of Delaware, Ohio, finishing his education at the Woodstock Seminary.  He began the study of medicine in Marion, under the instruction of Dr. John Norton, in 1848, entering the Starling Medical College at Columbus, in 1849, graduating Feb. 22, 1851; he began the practice of his profession, and after several removals located in Nevada in 1864, since which time he has been there permanently established; he has built up a lucrative practice, and been highly successful in his profession.  He owns a comfortable home in Nevada, and eighty acres in Crawford County.  In 1862, Dr. Turney spent some time in the late war, as surgeon in the field hospital, and in 1864, again was employed in the same capacity; he was married Mar. 28, 1852, to Louisa Welch, daughter of Benjamin S. and Rebecca (Drake) Welsh, natives of Ohio and Virginia respectively.  Three children have blessed this union - Florence, born Jan. 24, 1853; Eugene W., Jan. 13, 1857; Tully C., May 21, 1860; the mother was born Aug. 4, 1832.  Dr. Turney is a member of the Ohio Medical Association, and a Republican in political faith. 
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 731
  WILLIAM WELCH was born in Huron County, Ohio, Apr. 25, 1818; he is a son of John and Sarah (McMillen) Welch, natives of Beaver County, Pen., the father born about 1792, the mother a few years later; his parents left Beaver County about 1816, and located in Huron County, moving to Seneca County in 1820, being the fourth white family of the early settlers.  They resided there twenty-three years, and then moved to this county; he served as County Assessor two years; was Justice of the Peace nine years, and twice elected to the Legislature; he located near Nevada about 1843, and subsequently served as Justice of the Peace two or three terms, and as Commissioner nine years.  He died in 1860.  William Welch, our subject, resided with his parents till twenty-three years old; he came to this county in 1843, and purchased fifty-five acres at the land sales, residing on this farm seven years; he then sold out and purchased 108 acres in Nevada, where he lived twenty-three years, owning at the same time his present home of sixty acres; he was twice engaged in the livery business, and for fifteen years dealt more or less in live stock, doing some shipping.  He laid out thirty-nine lots to the town of Nevada.  Mr. Welch was married, Nov. 4, 1841, to Margaret A. Smith, a native of Montgomery County, Pen., born Jan. 1, 1818, daughter of George W. and Margaret (Hart) Smith her father a native of New Jersey, a soldier in the war of 1812, and dying at the advanced age of ninety-five years.  Mr. and Mrs. Welch have had six children, namely: Jasper M., born Nov. 3, 1842; Miranda J., May 22, 1844; James A., Aug. 14, 1846; Amanda A., July 15, 1848; William Mc., June 13, 1851; Ransom H., Aug. 17, 1853. Miranda J., died Dec. 14, 1869; Ransom H., Dec. 11, 1863; William Mc., Oct. 17, 1883.  Mr. Welch is a Democrat "dyed in the wool;" he served as Trustee several terms, and is, with Mrs. Welch , a member of the Lutheran Church.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 732
  JAMES A. WELCH was born in Eden township, Aug. 14, 1846.  He is a son of William and Margaret (Smith) Welch, and was reared and educated principally in Antrim Township; he resided with his parents on the farm till his marriage to Sarah Keller, May 13, 1869.  Mrs. Welch is a native of Crawford County, Ohio, daughter of Henry and MAria (Geib) Keller, and was born July 13, 1847.  The children born to them are Leona, Mar. 1, 1870; Cuba L., Dec. 3, 1871; Bartie M., July 9, 1874; and Leefe E., Aug. 14, 1876. Bartie M. died Sept. 27, 1876.  After his marriage, Mr. Welch devoted his attention to the various avocations of farming, teaming and threshing (introducing the first steam thresher in Antrim and Eden Townships), residing in Nevada till 1879, when he moved to his farm of fifty-three acres, purchased in 1875.  To this he has since added 20 acres, the whole being well improved, and valued at $100 per acre.  He is the owner of the livery stable building, which he erected in Nevada in 1882, conducting the business two years, and keeps on his farm eight cows, from which he supplies the village with milk.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 732
  HENRY M. WELSH, one of the prominent farmers of this county, was born in Crawford County, Ohio, May 2, 1840.  He is a son of E. R. and Sarah A. (McClain) Welsh, his father having come to this county about 1820, doing an extensive business in stock dealing in this and Crawford County.  He also dealt to some extent in real estate and controlled a large amount of property up to the date of his death, in 1880.  Henry M. Welsh, the subject of this sketch, was engaged on the farm with his father till he attained his  majority, soon after which he enlisted in the eleventh Ohio Battery and entered the United States service.  He participated in the battles of New Madrid, Island No. 10, and Iuka, but was chiefly employed on the march or post duty.  He was wounded in the battle of Iuka, Miss., by a musket ball, which fractured his lower jaw, resulting in the loss of half of the osseous structure of that member.  He was discharged in November, 1862, returned home and has since engaged in farming and stock dealing.  In 1861, he obtained 450 acres fro his father's estate, and has increased that number by subsequent purchases till he now owns 1,436 acres, valued at $60 to $75 per acre.  He dies an extensive farming business, usually s owing 300 to 500 acres of wheat and planting 200 to 400 acres of corn.  Besides his large farming and stock-raising interests in this county Mr. Welsh has always conducted his business independently, and may fairly be considered one of the most successful operators in the county.  He was married Nov. 24, 1863, to Miss Emily Hoover who was born in Crawford County, Ohio, her parents being early settlers in that locality.  She is a daughter of William and Phoebe (Swisher) Hoover, her father being one of the leading farmers and stock-dealers of Crawford County.  By this marriage three children were born, namely: Edmond T., Sanford C. and Myrtie E., aged seventeen, fifteen and fourteen respectively.  Mr. Walsh is known throughout the county as a thorough business man, and is highly esteemed as a citizen.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 732
  MANINGTON WELSH was born in Fairfield County, Ohio, Feb. 4, 1816.  He is a son of Zachariah and Hannah (Stein) Welsh, who were probably born in Virginia.  His parents resided there in Washington's time being neighbors to one of his brothers; they subsequently moved to Fairfield County, where they lived many years, moving to this county in 1821 and locating near what is now the village of Wyandot.  At the date of their settlement, there were but two white families in the township, the Kirbys and the Garnetts.  His father entered 160 acres, on which he resided till his death in 1842, the mother following in 1864.  Mr. Welsh resided with his parents till twenty years of age, and when twenty-one purchased forty acres in Crawford County.  In the fall of 1853, after the purchase and sale of several tracts, Mr. Welsh obtained 120 acres of his present farm, to which he made additions till he owned 288 acres, valued at $75 per acre.  He has always dealt largely in sheep and cattle, and has also done an extensive farming business, having been one of the leading business men in the county.  He was married in May, 1839, to Mary Snyder, and two children were born to them - William H. and Mary J., the latter deceased.  His first wife having departed this life Mr. Welsh was married in May, 1849, to Nancy Comstock, who was born in Pickaway County, Ohio, July 4, 1824.  Her parents, Gibson and Lucy (White) Comstock, were natives of New York and Virginia respectively, and spent most of their lives in Pickaway County.  By this marriage Mr. and Mrs. Welsh had eight children, namely: Winfield S., June 15, 1851; Charles W., Apr. 27, 1853; Rebecca A., July 20, 1861; Alice P.  Mr. Welsh is perhaps the oldest resident of the township, if not the county, having been identified with its resident of the township, if not the county, having been identified with its interests sixty-three years and done much for its development.  He was formerly a Whig, later a Republican, and now a Democrat, being one of the most honored citizens of this community, and, as a pioneer, one of its most distinguished members.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 733
  EDEGAR R. WILLIAMS is a native of Adams County, and was born Mar. 18, 1862.  His parents were Dr. A. N. and Martha M. (Rothrock) Williams, the former a native of Highland County, Ohio, born June 18, 1827; the latter of Pennsylvania, born Mar. 8, 1834.  Their ancestors were natives of Holland and Germany; Edegar and Marella were their only children, the latter born Aug. 15, 1854, died Oct. 16, 1859.  Dr. Williams was reared and educated in Highland County.  He graduated at the Columbus Medical College, and spent thirty years in the practice of his profession in Pike and Adams Counties.  In September, 1882, he came with his son, E. R., to Nevada, and purchased a stock of drugs of R. M. Stewart & Co., conducting the business till his death, Sept. 6, 1883.  Mrs. Williams' death occurred Oct. 20, 1874.  Our subject was reared in Adams County; obtained a fair education in the country schools, finishing his studies in the Lebanon Normal School in 1879.  After a two years' clerkship in Wheat Ridge and Springfield, Ohio, in the wholesale grocery store of W. T. Robb, of the latter place, he came with his father to Nevada, and at the latter's death became the possessor of his entire property.  He is an energetic, young business man, has a fair patronage, and the general esteem of the citizens of his community.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 734
  JOHN WOESSNER was born in Wittenberg, Germany, Sept. 27, 1827, and is a son of John and Catharine Woessner, also natives of Germany.  He emigrated to America in 1856-57, landing in New York.  He soon after went to New Jersey, and one year later came to this county, through the influence of "Stuff" Halterman, who employed German laborers from the East, and paid their railroad fare to Marion County, where he resided.  He labored as a farm hand several years and, in 1864, being a "home-guard," was called into service, and participated in the battle of Monocacy Junction, doing guard duty during the rest of his four months' service, losing health by exposure.  In 1855, he purchased a small farm, where he still resides.  Mr. Woessner was married, Jan. 1, 1858, to Jane Hughey, who was born in this county Aug. 27, 1835.  Her parents, William and Eliza (Louis) Hughey, were natives of Ohio and New York respectively, and were early settlers of this county.  Mr. and Mrs. Woessner are the parents of six children, namely, Eliza J., born Oct. 20, 1858; John, May 2, 1861; Robert L., Oct. 14, 1866; Peter S., Sept. 10, 1875; Charles E. and Clyda E.  Eliza is now wife of O. H. Jacobs, and has four children.  This marriage occurred Oct. 24, 1878.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page
734
  DAVID B. WOLF, proprietor of dry goods store, Nevada, was born in Richland County, Ohio, Jan. 15, 1833.  He is a son of John and Margaret (Baughman) Wolf, natives of Pennsylvania and Ohio respectively, his father having been an early settler in Richland County, where he died, his wife's death having occurred several years previous to his own.  Their children were Susanna, David B., Abraham E., Minerva M. and Margaret, all living; the deceased are Rachel, Rebecca, Adam, Amanda and Solomon S.  David B., our subject, obtained a fair education in the district schools, and farmed with parents till twenty-one years of age.  He subsequently learned the carpenter's trade, which he pursued almost continually till 1872.  In the meantime, he spent nearly two years in the wilds of Montana and other western points.  In 1872, in partnership with H. H. Welsh, he established a store of general merchandise, and has since engaged in that business, purchasing Mr. Welsh's interest five years later.  Mr. Wolf has been a resident of Nevada since 1855, and has built up an extensive and profitable trade.  He was married, Sept. 27, 1859, to Almira B. Souder, daughter of William and Nancy (Stevens) Souder, then residents of Crawford County, both now deceased.  Five children have resulted from this union - William A., born July 18, 1860; Myrta L., Feb. 2, 1862; Anna M., Mar. 21, 1878.  The deceased are Otho C., born May 16, 1872, died Aug. 20, 1873; Paul, born Mar. 7, 1876, died Apr. 4, 1876.  Their mother was born in Crawford County, Ohio, Nov. 6, 1836.  Mr. Wolf owns some valuable town property and eleven acres of land within the village corporation; he also carries a stock of goods estimated at about $5,000.  He is a Democrat in politics; has served in the Town Countil seven years; has been a member of the School Board six years, and is also a member of the F. & A. M., having served as Worshipful Master in that society two years.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 734

John Wood
JOHN WOOD - Portrait only

Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 721

  WILLIAM B. WOOLSEY, Postmaster, Nevada, Ohio, was born March 10, 1847.  He is a native of this township, and is a son of Walter and Harriet (Fraser) Woolsey, natives of New York and Pennsylvania respectively.  They were joined in marriage at Little Sandusky in 1832.  Their children were nine, four now living - Almira, wife of A. J. Peters; Martha, wife of James Reynolds; William B., and Henrietta F., wife of E. R. Irmer.  The father came to this county in 1831, his death occurring October 6, 1851.  Alexander Fraser was a soldier in the war of 1812, serving till the surrender of Hull at Detroit.  He was taken prisoner, but was released, and made his way home on foot to Pickaway County, Ohio, in company with a comrade.  In the course of their journey they narrowly escaped death by the hand of an Indian, who found them "napping," and snapped his gun at one of them. Mr. Fraser, awakening, killed the Indian on the spot. Mr. F. was one of the first settlers of Wyandot County, locating at Little Sandusky in 1831. Harriet Woolsey died May 20,1883. She had remarried in 1855 to Benjamin Kerns, two children, Scott and Joseph, being born. In 1865, she was again left a widow, and died as above stated. William B. Woolsey was reared on the old homestead, and obtained a fair education. At the death of his step-father he took charge of the farm, where he resided several years. In 1874, he located in Nevada, and engaged in the grain and wool trade under the firm name of Hunt, Elliot & Co., in which business he continued four years. In 1881, he received the appointment of Postmaster, since serving in that capacity. He was married October 23, 1872, to Miss Mary E. Smith, daughter of John H. and Sarah (Wirick) Smith, one son, Franklin H., born September 12, 1874. Mr. Woolsey served as Treasurer of Antrim Township three terms, as Corporation Treasurer four years, and was elected Mayor of Nevada in 1883. He is a member of the Knights of Honor and I. O. O. F., and a Republican in politics. Jerome Woolsey, an elder brother, was a member of the Eleventh Ohio Battery, and died of typhoid fever, being buried on the banks of the Tallahassee River, Fla.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 735
  JOHN R. YOUNG was born in this county December 13,1851. He is a son of Tobias and Elizabeth (Klinger) Young, and was the only child. The former was born in Crawford County, Ohio, in October, 1824, and the latter in the same county May 15, 1825, They were married December 2, 1849, and April 11, 1850, erected a log cabin in Crawford County, into which they moved without a door or window. Wild animals were numerous. Mr. Young died March 10, 1853. His widow subsequently married Stephen Crawford, and had one son, William H.  His father purchased eighty acres of land in 1846; his mother subsequently marrying Stephen Crawford, with whom she is still living. Mr. Young resided with his mother till twenty-four years of age, but preferring the out-door sports to the tedious tasks of the schoolroom, he obtained but a limited education. He inherited eighty acres from his father's estate, where he has resided most of his life and is still located. He was married March 9, 1876, to Rachel E. Mollenkopf, a native of Lucas County, Ohio, and daughter of Philip and Dora (Hinely) Mollenkopf. Her parents were born in Germany, were married there, and emigrated to America about 1855, locating three years in Lucas County. They then moved to Crawford County, where they still reside. Their children now living are Dora, Philip, John, Rachel, Lewis, Mary and Jacob. Mr. and Mrs. Young have three children—Lewis T., born March 4, 1878; Clara J., December 21,1879; and Huldah, July 28,1882. In politics, Mr. Young is a Democrat.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 735
  SAMUEL ZULAUF is a native of this county, and was born December 7, 1849. He is a son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Christman) Zulauf, natives of Switzerland and Bavaria respectively. His parents were married in this country, and removed to this county from Wayne County about 1843-44. They first purchased eighty acres of land, on which they resided for several years. They subsequently added forty acres more to their possessions, but have now abandoned the farm, and reside in Upper Sandusky, enjoying the fruits of their toil. Samuel Zulauf resided with his parents till twenty-one years of age. He then worked by the month one year, rented land, and engaged in farming five years, purchasing forty acres in 1876. In 1882, he added eighty acres to this tract, and since has obtained sixty acres as a gift to his wife from her father. His farm is well improved, and valued at $75 per acre. Mr. Zulauf was married April 1, 1875, to Barbara Ritterspach, a native of this county, born June 25, 1849 (see sketch of Henry Ritterspoch). They have four children—Charles E., born January 21, 1876; Mollie G., November 27, 1877; John H., March 6, 1879; Harry S., December 10,1881. Mr. Zulauf deals somewhat in stock, and is an energetic and enterprising young farmer. He is a Democrat, and is serving his second term as Township Trustee.
Source:  History of Wyandot County, Ohio - Chicago: Leggett, Conaway & Co., 1884 - Page 736

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