OHIO GENEALOGY EXPRESS

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Williams County, Ohio
History & Genealogy

 

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BIOGRAPHIES

  Source #1
County of Williams, Ohio.

Historical & Biographical
with An outline Sketch of the Northwest Territory, of the State, and Miscellaneous Matters.
ILLUSTRATED
Weston A. Goodspeed, Historical Editor - Charles Blanchard, Biographical Editor
CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO., PUBLISHERS -
1882

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N OPQ R S T UV W XYZ

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MILTON OBERLIN, born in Holmes County, Ohio, in 1849, was brought at the age of five years to this township, by his parents, Jacob and Anna Oberlin.  They were farmers by occupation, and Milton passed his youth and early manhood in going to the district school, and in assisting his father in his farm work.  At the age of twenty-three, he was joined in matrimony with Miss Charity M. Altaffer, purchased a farm of fifty acres, and settled down to the joys and cares of married life.  His farm proved to be productive, and, by good management and industry, he has acquired all that is necessary to make his home comfortable and pleasant.  His children, two in number, are named respectively Rosanna and Jacob E., and are being reared in a manner to make them a credit to their parents and to their township.  Mr. Oberlin, in politics, is a Republican; is a wide-awake and enterprising citizen, and a young man of undoubted integrity.
Source:  County of Williams, Ohio, Historical & Biographical - Illustrated - Publ. Weston A. Goodspeed, Historical Editor - Charles Blanchard, Biographical Editor - Chicago: F. A. Battey & Co., Publishers - 1882 - Page 760
ORLANDO OBERLIN was born in Holmes County, Ohio, in 1846, and was brought to this township by his parents in 1854.  His youthful days were spent on a farm, and in 1863, at the early age of seventeen, he enlisted, at his country's call, in the Thirty-eighth Ohio Volunteer Infantry.  He joined his regiment at Chattanooga, Tenn., in the fall of the same year, and with it took part in the battles of Resaca, Dalton and the Atlanta campaign.  He was wounded in the fight at Jonesboro, Ga. and was with Gen. Sherman on his march to Savannah, through South and North Carolina and Virginia to Washington, D. C., and participated in the grand review.  His regiment was then ordered to Louisville, Ky., and thence to Cleveland, Ohio, where it was mustered out of the service in 1855.  Mr. Oberlin then returned to his home in this township and resumed his vocation of farmer.  In 1872, he married Miss Althea Reed, a native of Williams County, and to their union have been born two children - Roy E. and Theodore F.  He is the owner of a well-improved farm of eighty acres, and everything about him bears the sign of intelligent management.
Source:  County of Williams, Ohio, Historical & Biographical - Illustrated - Publ. Weston A. Goodspeed, Historical Editor - Charles Blanchard, Biographical Editor - Chicago: F. A. Battey & Co., Publishers - 1882 - Page 760
Centre Twp. -
ALEXANDER H. OGLE was born in Columbiana County, Ohio, Apr. 18, 1812, the youngest of seven children born to William and Rachel Ogle, the former born in the State of Maryland, and the latter in Pennsylvania in 1771, and married in Washington County, Penn.  Here William Ogle owned a flouring-mill, which he operated till 1803, when he moved to Columbiana County, Ohio, entered land, engaged in farming till 1845; removed to Cincinnati and shortly after to Burlington, Iowa, where he had intended living in retirement, but was removed by death Aug. 5, 1845, and was followed by his wife Dec. 8 the same year.  They had a family of seven children - Benjamin, Nancy, James, William, Hannah, Thomas and Alexander.  Alexander learned the carpenter's trade, and pursued that business in his native county until 1834, when he went to Stark County and bought some land.  In the spring of 1835, he went to Pittsburgh, Penn., bought a flat-boat, and engaged for three yeas in boating to New Orleans; then returned to Stark County, and engaged in the real estate business.  In 1843, he visited Beaver County, Penn., and March 10, of that year, there married Miss Jane Marton, returning to Stark County at once.  In the Spring of 1844, he went to Des Moines County, Iowa, conducted a hotel and real estate business till the spring of 1852; then moved to Columbiana County, Ohio; thence changed to Wood County, and again bought some property.  Here his wife died July 16, 1856.  April 26, 1860, he married Mrs. Emily Gibbs, a daughter of Robert and Susan Hunter, of Pennsylvania.  In the spring of 1866, he moved to Sherwood, Defiance Co., Ohio; engaged in general mercantile business; sold out in Order, and came to Williams Centre, where he is now doing a fine general trade.  He is a Master Mason, and is the father of ten children - Alexander J., Andrew J., James H., Nancy J., Sarah E. (deceased), Lorinda R., Lavinia, Loren L., Ida A. (deceased), and Charles W.
Source:  County of Williams, Ohio, Historical & Biographical - Illustrated - Publ. Weston A. Goodspeed, Historical Editor - Charles Blanchard, Biographical Editor - Chicago: F. A. Battey & Co., Publishers - 1882 - Page 778
Superior Twp. -
ROBERT OGLE, son of Thomas and Jerusha Ogle, was born in Superior Township, Ohio, July 22, 1846.  Our subject's education is limited, he having occasionally gone to school until his fourteenth year, when he attended a school at Bryan.  He was married in Superior Township, May 19, 1868, to Miss Margaret Hoverstock.  Our subject enlisted July, 1863, in the Ninth Ohio Cavalry, serving until August, 1865, having been in twenty-six engagements.  Since that time he has been engaged in farming, except perhaps six months, when he was in the livery business.  He has been Township Trustee two terms.  Mr. Ogle's present farm consists of 200 acres, with considerable stock; he has also 100 acres one and a half miles south.  Mr. and Mrs. Ogle are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and have four children - George, ALma, Blanche and RayMr. Ogle's parents were pioneers of Williams County, having come here in 1835.  Mr. Ogle is a native of Superior Township, and her parents, George and Mary Hoverstock also residents of this township, were born respectively in Ohio and Pennsylvania.
Source:  County of Williams, Ohio, Historical & Biographical - Illustrated - Publ. Weston A. Goodspeed, Historical Editor - Charles Blanchard, Biographical Editor - Chicago: F. A. Battey & Co., Publishers - 1882 - Page 644
  JUDGE SELWIN N. OWEN, son of Horatio and Clarissa (Ransom) Owen, is a native of Steuben County, N. Y., his birth occurring July 5, 1836.  Horatio Owen was a native of New York State where he was reared, educated and married.  He served an apprenticeship at the tailor's trade, and afterward worked as a journeyman tailor.  He came with his family to Columbus, Ohio, in about 1837, shortly afterward moving to Huron County, where he engaged in merchandising and dealing in grain.  He was killed October 6, 1860, at one of his elevators in Havana, Huron County, by the breaking of a rope used in drawing cars of wheat up in the elevator on an inclined track from the office below.  His widow yet survives him, and resides with a daughter in Butler, Ind.  Judge Owen is the second of a family of eight children, five of whom are yet living.  He was reared to manhood in Huron and Seneca Counties, receiving a good common school and academic education.  For four years he was a student of Norwalk Institute, paying for his tuition and books by acting as janitor.  He finished his literary education by an elective course at Antioch College.  The winters of 1856-57, he was Principal of a seminary in Clark County, Ky., succeeding which he came to Norwalk and began the study of law with Kennan & Stewart, attorneys of that place.  He attended the Cincinnati Law School, beginning in 1861, and graduating in 1862.  Mr. Owen began his career as an attorney at Fremont, Ohio, but remained there only until November, 1863, when he came to Bryan and engaged actively in law pursuits.  This has been his home ever since, and, with the exception of one year, he ahs followed his profession alone.  He is a Democrat in politics, and in 1876 was elected without opposition Judge of the Common Pleas Court for five counties of the Third Judicial District.  He served his first term of five years, and during this time the Territory of which he was then Judge was redistricted.  In 1881, he was re-elected, and was assigned to the Judgeship of the subdivision, at present comprising Paulding, Defiance and Williams Counties.  In 1880, he was elected one of the Judges of the Inter-State Oratorical Contest, comprising the States of Ohio, Illinois, Missouri, Indiana, Wisconsin and Iowa.  His Associate Judges in this contest were Elihu B. Washburne, of Illinois, Gov. Foster, of Ohio, and Thomas A. Hendricks, of Indiana.  Judge Owen has been one of the leading lawyers of the bar of William and neighboring counties.  He was united in marriage in 1870, with Miss Beulah B. Barret, of Rochelle, Ill., and to this union has been born one daughter - Gertie LJudge Owen owns, besides a valuable town property, a farm of seventy-five acres adjoining the city of Bryan.  He is a member of the A., F. & A. M., and the Universalist Church, and is one of the most prominent men in Northwestern Ohio.
(NOTE:  See Death Notice)
Source:  County of Williams, Ohio, Historical & Biographical - Illustrated - Publ. Weston A. Goodspeed, Historical Editor - Charles Blanchard, Biographical Editor - Chicago: F. A. Battey & Co., Publishers - 1882 - Page 582
JOHN OPDYCKE, the son of Albert and Elizabeth Opdycke, were born in Trumbull County, Ohio, in 1819, and came to this township with his parents in 1836.  At that time the county was a dense wilderness;  Defiance was the county seat and the only psot office in the county.  On the farm located by his father in this forest, our subject labored at clearing up and improving until the year 1847, when he married Miss Harriet C. Baird, of this county, and began farming on his own account.  To this marriage were born four children, viz., Emerson B., Anna B., Charles D. and Wilber G., the last named dying in 1872.  Mr. Opdycke's mother died in 1853, and in 1873 his father followed, when he took charge of and conducted the homestead farm.  He is now the owner of one hundred and sixty acres of land in a fine state of cultivation, improved with an excellent dwelling and a good barn and other outbuildings.  Mr. Opdycke is an ardent Republican, and is looked upon as one of Jefferson's most enterprising and trustworthy citizens.
Source:  County of Williams, Ohio, Historical & Biographical - Illustrated - Publ. Weston A. Goodspeed, Historical Editor - Charles Blanchard, Biographical Editor - Chicago: F. A. Battey & Co., Publishers - 1882 - Page 760
JONATHAN OXENRIDER is a son of William and Mary Oxenrider, who were natives of Pennsylvania, but came to Wayne County, Ohio, at an early day, and remained until 1840, when they moved to this county and township, where, in due course of time, both died.  They had eleven children, viz., Anna, James, Joseph, William, Sarah, Jonathan, Catharine, Nancy, Elizabeth, David and Mary.  Jonathan Oxenrider was born in Wayne County Nov. 26, 1829, and came with his parents to Centre Township.  He was married, Sept. 25, 1851, to Elizabeth Archibald, and shortly after bought a small place near his father's farm, and attended to both farms until about two years after his father's death, when he sold his land and bought his present home.  Shortly after moving hereon, Mrs. Oxenrider died, leaving him three children - Amos, William and Sarah.  Jan. 17, 1865, he married Harriet Priest, who has borne him a daughter and son - Rebecca and Myron.  His farm comprises eighty-three acres of good land, which is well improved and cared for.
Source:  County of Williams, Ohio, Historical & Biographical - Illustrated - Publ. Weston A. Goodspeed, Historical Editor - Charles Blanchard, Biographical Editor - Chicago: F. A. Battey & Co., Publishers - 1882 - Page 779
WILLIAM PAGE was born in Sussex, England, Nov. 27, 1820.  His parents William and Martha (Eason) Page, were English, and their family consisted of nine children.  William Page came to Canada in 1840, where he purchased a farm of fifty acres.  In the fall of 1852, he came to Mill Creek Township, and bought forty acres of land, subsequently adding forty acres more, and now owns a rich and finely improved farm of eighty acres, with good buildings, which he has acquired by his own energy and perseverance.  The parents emigrated to this country in 1860; came to William County, making their home with their children until their death.  Mr. William Page was for a long time identified with the Republican party, but subsequently became a Greenbacker.  Nov., 19, 1847, he married Miss Sarah Wilson, a native of Vermont, and their family of five children are all living in this township, viz.: Mrs. Sarah Shaffer, Mrs. Maria Kuney, George O., Mary E. and William.  Mr. Page is a member of Hamer Grange, No. 606.  He enlisted in 1864, in the One Hundred and Ninety-seventh Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry ,and served until the close of the war.
Source:  County of Williams, Ohio, Historical & Biographical - Illustrated - Publ. Weston A. Goodspeed, Historical Editor - Charles Blanchard, Biographical Editor - Chicago: F. A. Battey & Co., Publishers - 1882 - Page 806
ELI F. PARKER is one of the eight children born to Celius E. and Melinda (Fast) Parker, and had his both in Ashland County, Ohio, May 19, 1850.  The father still lives in Ashland, and with him Eli made his home till he was nineteen years of age, when he came to Bridgewater Township, and resided with his brother for a time, and then with his sister.  In 1873, he married Miss Julia P. Brandebery, a native also of Ashland, but a resident of this township.  He brought his bride to his present home, then owned by his father, from whom he purchased it in 1875.  It includes seventy-four acres of as good land as there is in the township, and the present owner is keeping it up to its full yielding capacity.  Mr. and Mrs. Parker are members of the United Brethren Church,  and in politics Mr. Parker has always been on the side of the Republicans.  He takes rank among the most intelligent and enterprising young farmers in the township.
Source:  County of Williams, Ohio, Historical & Biographical - Illustrated - Publ. Weston A. Goodspeed, Historical Editor - Charles Blanchard, Biographical Editor - Chicago: F. A. Battey & Co., Publishers - 1882 - Page 795
ISAAC PARSON, one of the eleven children of Isaac and Mary A. (Reimer) Parson, was born in Northampton County, Penn., July 26, 1820.  He is a carpenter and joiner by trade and worked at that business about twenty years, and worked also at gunsmithing about three years.  He left his native State at the age of twenty, and took up his residence in Medina County, Ohio, where he married Mary A. Long Dec. 10, 1843.  In 1852, he removed to this township and settled in a twelve-acre clearing, buying, for use as a dwelling, that first school building ever erected in Northwest Township.  His farm now comprises 209 acres, well-improved, with all necessary buildings and largely under cultivation.  He has had the misfortune to lose his two children - John A. and William H., and he is the only member of his father's family living within the limits of this State.
Source:  County of Williams, Ohio, Historical & Biographical - Illustrated - Publ. Weston A. Goodspeed, Historical Editor - Charles Blanchard, Biographical Editor - Chicago: F. A. Battey & Co., Publishers - 1882 - Page 816
ROBERT N. PATTERSON, editor and proprietor of the Bryan Democrat, is a native of Delaware, Ohio, his birth occurring January 19, 1831.  His father, Gen. A. H. Patterson, was a native of Huntingdon, Penn., his father being a native of Scotland.  This gentleman, Thomas Patterson, came to America in 1773, a single man, served the colonies in the war of the Revolution and was wounded at the battle of Brandywine.  After the war, he married a Quaker lady, Jane Slack, a native of England.  There was a large family born to this union, Andrew H., father of Robert N., being the fourth son.  Andrew H. learned the saddler's trade, was an active politician thirty or forty years ago in Ohio, and held various positions of honor and trust, among them being that of State Representative.  He married our subject's mother, Roxanna Vining, for his first wife, and by her had six children.  This lady was a direct descendant of the Vinings and Carters of Puritanical fame, who settled in Massachusetts.  She died in 1839, and Gen. Patterson then married Miss Lucy Bixby, who bore him three children.  Gen. Patterson died in Bryan in August, 1863, aged fifty-five years.  Robert N. Patterson lived with his father until the age of seventeen, when he began learning the printer's trade in the office of the Buckeye Eagle at Marion, Ohio.  Since that time, he has worked on different papers in Ohio until 1862, and the spring of 1863 came to Bryan and established the Bryan Democrat, of which he has ever since continued publisher and proprietor.  The Democrat has flourished and thriven under his management, and is the leading Democratic paper of Williams County, and among the best newspaper of Northwestern Ohio.  Mr. Patterson was married, in 1852, to miss E. J. Fulkerson, and to this marriage were born six children, only the following named yet living: Cora, Addie, Medary M. and Mary.  Mr. Patterson is a Democrat in politics and principles, is a Knight Templar of the Masonic fraternity, a Patriarch of the I. O. O. F.'s and a member of the K. of  H.  He is a charter member of the Grand Temple of the Patriarchcal Circle, has served nine years as Secretary of the County Agricultural Society, and is the present incumbent.
Source:  County of Williams, Ohio, Historical & Biographical - Illustrated - Publ. Weston A. Goodspeed, Historical Editor - Charles Blanchard, Biographical Editor - Chicago: F. A. Battey & Co., Publishers - 1882 - Page. 583
JAMES PAUL, civil engineer, is a native of Portage County, Ohio, his birth occurring June 16, 1844.  His mother, a widow lady, married Jacob Byers in about 1850, and this couple, to better their circumstances, moved west in 1853, locating in Superior Township, Williams County, Ohio.  They purchased eighty acres of land, partly paying for the same, and engaged in agricultural pursuits and are yet residents of Superior Township.  James Paul was but nine years old when he came to Williams County, and he made his home with his parents until twenty-five years of age.  His educational advantages were very limited, but through the influence and persuasions of his mother and a cousin, J. M. Welker of Bryan, he succeeded, by close application, in obtaining an excellent practical education.  Having an ardent liking for mathematics, he passed many hours in the study of that science, and while a student at the Normal School in Bryan perfected his knowledge in civil engineering.  Mr. Paul has for many years been one of the most successful school teachers of Williams County.  He taught the schools of Pulaski a number of terms, and in 1870 went to Stryker as the Superintendent of the schools of that place.  Through his influence and management, the schools of Stryker became second best to none in the county, which reflects much credit to Mr. Paul as an educator, as he took charge when they were considered in very poor shape.  Mr. Paul is a Republican in politics, and has served two terms as Surveyor of Williams County and one term as School Examiner.  He is chief engineer of what is known as the "Forty-five-Mile Ditch," now attracting much attention in the county.  In 1873, he married Miss Emma J. Carver, who became the mother of three children - Mary N., Charles C. (deceased) and Alice M.  Mrs. Paul was a member of the Presbyterian Church; she died March 1, 1881, and her remains now repose in Bethesda Cemetery, Superior Township.  April 27, 1882,  Mrs. Paul  married his present wife, Miss Dr. Jennie Buckley, a graduate of the Woman's Medical College, of Chicago.  Mr. Paul is a member of I. O. O. F. Lodge, No. 611, of Stryker, and is a popular man in his party, and with the community in general.
Source:  County of Williams, Ohio, Historical & Biographical - Illustrated - Publ. Weston A. Goodspeed, Historical Editor - Charles Blanchard, Biographical Editor - Chicago: F. A. Battey & Co., Publishers - 1882 - Page 584
THOMAS PENNINGTON, son of Paul and Ruth (Cunningham) Pennington, was born in Huntingdon County, Penn., Aug. 6, 1801.  Our subject passed his boyhood in Pennsylvania, attending a district school a portion of the time.  When sixteen years old, he came to Ohio with his parents.  On Jan. 20, 1825, he was married to Analiha Holloway, in Clark County, Ohio.  To this union twelve children were born - Phebe, Amanda, Serilda, William F., Joel, John, Rebecca, Marion, Isaac, Merilla, Cynthia and Mary A.  Mr. Pennington farmed on rented lend for about ten years, when he purchased 100 acres in Champaign County, which he cleared.  This he sold and purchased 160 acres in Williams County about 1837.  This he exchanged for the present farm, in 1854, on which he lived until his death, in 1864.  He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, having united there with in 1817.  Mrs. Pennington, since his death, has managed the farm.  She was born in Ross County, Ohio, the daughter of William and Phoebe Holloway, who were born in New Jersey, and who died in Clark County, Ohio.
Source:  County of Williams, Ohio, Historical & Biographical - Illustrated - Publ. Weston A. Goodspeed, Historical Editor - Charles Blanchard, Biographical Editor - Chicago: F. A. Battey & Co., Publishers - 1882 - Page 645
WALTER I. PEPPLE was born on Dec. 13, 1839, in Stark County, Ohio, and is one of seven children born to William L. and Amelia (Irwin) Pepple.  The elder Mr. Pepple was by trade a carver and fuller, and followed the same in Stark County for thirty years.  In 1857, he came to Brady Township and purchased land, on which he lived until his death in June 1875.  Walter I. Pepple, until thirty-three years old, worked with his father, with whom in 1868, he commenced the making of sand brick, and later, of drain tiles; still later they began to manufacture pressed brick.  They had a hard struggle in the beginning, running by horse-power, but now by team, and it is the largest place of the kind in the county, and yet the demand for their wares is greater than their ability to supply it.  Mr. Pepple was married, Feb. 4, 1868, to Sarah J. Kelty, of Columbiana County; six children have been the issue - William F., Ella, Lida, Nellie, Carrie and Birdie.  Mr. Pepple is a member of the Town Council of Stryker, an Odd Fellow, and a Democrat.
Source:  County of Williams, Ohio, Historical & Biographical - Illustrated - Publ. Weston A. Goodspeed, Historical Editor - Charles Blanchard, Biographical Editor - Chicago: F. A. Battey & Co., Publishers - 1882 - Page 730
MARTIN PERKY, Probate Judge of Williams County, was born in Westmoreland County, Penn., Jan. 18, 1819, one of ten children, five yet living, born to Christopher and Elizabeth (Slater) Perky, who was also natives of the Keystone State.  Christopher Perky was a farmer, and at an early day emigrated to Seneca County, this State, and there died in 1833, his widow surviving him till 1852.  Martin Perky was reared and educated in Seneca County, and followed farming there till 1839, when he came to this county and located in Florence Township, where he entered 140 acres of Government land and resumed his vocation as farmer.  In 1843, he married Catharine Gaudern, whose parents came to the county in 1840.  He joined the M. E. Church in 1843, and in 1853 joined the North Ohio M. E. Conference, and from that time till about 1865, was engaged in pastoral work over Northwestern Ohio.  In 1861, he was appointed Champlain of the Sixty-eighth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and remained with them until the fall of 1862, when ill health caused him to resign.  In 1865, he engaged in mercantile pursuits in Pioneer; he sold out in 1878, and he elected Probate Judge of Williams County, and re-elected in 1881.  The Judge is a Democrat, a member of the Masonic and Odd Fellows orders, and he and wife are old and honored members of the M. E. Church.  He is the father of two daughters, viz., Eugenia (now Mrs. Hilton), and Abbie L. (now Mrs. Lewis).  The Judge is widely known because of his long residence in the township (there having been but thirteen voters in it when he located here), and is universally respected and esteemed.
Source:  County of Williams, Ohio, Historical & Biographical - Illustrated - Publ. Weston A. Goodspeed, Historical Editor - Charles Blanchard, Biographical Editor - Chicago: F. A. Battey & Co., Publishers - 1882 - Page 584
BENJAMIN C. PICKLE, one of the early settlers of Florence Township, was born in Northumberland County, Penn., Feb. 22, 1818, being one of five children born to Joseph and Sarah (Campbell) Pickle.  They are all living.  His father was a farmer.  Our subject worked for his parents until his majority.  He was married, Feb. 6, 18404, to Olive S. Benson, and at once moved to Fulton County, residing there five years before coming to Williams County.  He settled on the farm he now owns in 1847.  At this time, Florence, with nearly all the eastern por-of the county, was a wilderness.  Previous to this time, he had sold fanning-mills during the summer, and taught school during the winter, and from money thus saved he bought his farm.  This farm, which he cleared and improved, contains ninety-five acres.  In 1854, he purchased a store and ashery, so continuing until 1861, when he sold the store, and returned to farming.  His wife died in 1861, leaving a family of seven - Irene M., Lodema J., Joseph W., Silas B., Adelmer B., Myron S. and Phylena A.  He married his present wife, Agnes Bostater, Dec. 25, 1864, and has by her six children - Ella, Elva, Ellie, Effie, Clyde and Lloyd.  Mr. Pickle was elected Justice of hte Peace of Florence in 1875, holding the office of six years.
Source:  County of Williams, Ohio, Historical & Biographical - Illustrated - Publ. Weston A. Goodspeed, Historical Editor - Charles Blanchard, Biographical Editor - Chicago: F. A. Battey & Co., Publishers - 1882 - Page 752
JOSEPH W. PICKLE, son of Benjamin and Olive S. (Benson) Pickle, was born in Lucas County, Ohio, Jan. 18, 1845.  His parents came from Knox to Lucas County in 1840, and to Williams County in 1847.  His father is a farmer, his biography appearing in this work.  Joseph W. Pickle has a fair school education.  He enlisted during the recent war, but was rejected from his miniority and under-size.  In 1862, however, he was passed as a substitute, entering the Sixth Ohio Cavalry under Gen. Sigel, and afterward under Gens. Averill and Kirkpatrick; he fought at Gettysburg and Chancellorsville, as well as at other minor engagements; he remained in the field one year, when he was discharged and sent home, but re-enlisted in 1864, continuing until the war was closed; he followed farming from this time until 1870, when he opened a general store at Union Corners, keeping a good and large line of dry goods, groceries, boots, shoes, etc., and farming somewhat in this connection.  He was married Dec. 1, 1875, to Laura E. Bowser, of this township.
Source:  County of Williams, Ohio, Historical & Biographical - Illustrated - Publ. Weston A. Goodspeed, Historical Editor - Charles Blanchard, Biographical Editor - Chicago: F. A. Battey & Co., Publishers - 1882 - Page 752
ELWOOD ALBERT PIFER, son of Michael and Caroline E. Pifer, was born in Williams County Mar. 9, 1854.  His parents came from Pennsylvania and settled in Richland County, Ohio, about the year 1830.  In 1850, they came to West Unity, where Mr. Pifer opened a harness shop, which he conducted till his death, Nov. 30, 1875, to Mary E. Zeigler whose father came from Pennsylvania, and mother from Germany.  Three children are the result of this union - Somerton, born Feb. 14, 1876; Clara, Dec. 12, 1877, and Bertha Belle, Aug. 20, 1879.  Mr. Pifer learned harness making with his father, and followed that business until May 20, 1882, when he went into the hotel business at the Kenyon House, West Unity, where he remained three months, then purchased the McIntire House and its appurtenances, and is now conducting that famous establishment in a most successful and popular manner.
Source:  County of Williams, Ohio, Historical & Biographical - Illustrated - Publ. Weston A. Goodspeed, Historical Editor - Charles Blanchard, Biographical Editor - Chicago: F. A. Battey & Co., Publishers - 1882 - Page 681
C. W. PITCAIRN is a native of New Lisbon, Columbiana Co., Ohio, and was born March 23, 1849.  His father, John Pitcairn, is a native of  Scotland, a tailor by trade, and he came to the United States when about eighteen years of age.  He married Catharine Small, a native of Columbiana County, Ohio, and of German descent.  He followed his trade till about 1864, when he retired from business, and he and wife are now living in New Lisbon.  They were the parents of nine children, C. W. being the eldest son and second eldest child.  C. W.  was reared in his native county, receiving a fair education.  When in his sixteenth year, he enlisted as a member of Company H, One Hundred and Ninety-fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and served one year in the Army of the Shenandoah Valley.  After his discharge, he returned home and engaged in clerking.  In 1870, he began the study of law in the office of Clark & McVicker  He attended the Law Department of the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, the winter of 1872-73, and on April 1, 1874, was admitted to the bar.  In December, 1874, he came to Bryan and began practicing his profession.  In August, 1881, he discontinued practicing and accepted the Secretaryship and Treasurership of the Morrison & Fay Manufacturing Company, of which he was a stock-owner, at which he is yet employed.  He is a Republican in politics and has been Mayor of Bryan about two years, having been elected in 1878.  He was elected Prosecuting Attorney in 1879, but resigned to fill the position he now occupies.  He was married Oct. 8, 1878, to Miss Ella Garver, daughter of John A. Garver.  Mr. Pitcairn is an Odd Fellow, and Mrs. P. is a member of the Universalist Church.
Source:  County of Williams, Ohio, Historical & Biographical - Illustrated - Publ. Weston A. Goodspeed, Historical Editor - Charles Blanchard, Biographical Editor - Chicago: F. A. Battey & Co., Publishers - 1882 - Page585
M. B. PLUMMER, son of Jacob and Lucy (Berkshire) Plummer, is a native of Ross County, Ohio, where his birth occurred Jan. 2, 1818.  He was reared in Ross County to manhood, where he acquired a fair district school education.  By trade he is a woolen manufacturer but his life has been diversified with a number of different employments.  At the age of twenty-two he began his career as a school teacher at which he engaged both in his native county and in Williams.  In November, 1841, he came to Williams County, Ohio, stopping first in Springfield Township, where he began teaching, and Williams County has ever since been his home.  He was married, Oct. 13, 1844, to Miss Emily Moudy, and the spring of that year moved to West Unity, and embarked in merchandising.  In 1848, he was elected County Recorder by the Democratic party and moved to Bryan.  The spring of 1851, he was appointed County Auditor to fill the unexpired term of Jacob Bowman, resigned.  He continued as such until his term expired, afterward acting as Deputy County Auditor three years.  In 1856, he engaged in merchandising in Bryan, at which he continued until 1860.  He was one of the Census Enumerators for that year, and in 1862 he was appointed route agent on the Toledo & Wabash Railroad.  The fall of 1863, he resigned this position to fill the position of Clerk of Courts of Williams County, to which he had been elected by the Union party, and in 1868 was appointed postal clerk on the same railroad on which he had been route agent.  In 1870, he engaged in business in Bryan, at the same time embarking in a manufacturing enterprise at Pioneer.  In 1874, he was elected Mayor and Justice of the Peace of Bryan, and in 1877 was reelected Justice of the Peace.  In 1870, he engaged in a general insurance business at which he is yet engaged.  Mr. P. is a Democrat in politics, and he and wife are members of the M. E. Church and the parents of nine children - John M., Charles W., Edward E., Lizzie Z., Leroy D. and Alice, living; and Eliza J., Udora and Frank W., deceased.
Source:  County of Williams, Ohio, Historical & Biographical - Illustrated - Publ. Weston A. Goodspeed, Historical Editor - Charles Blanchard, Biographical Editor - Chicago: F. A. Battey & Co., Publishers - 1882 - Page586
JOHN W. POLLOCK was born December 28, 1825, in Richland County, Ohio, and is one of a family of thirteen children, ten of whom are yet living, born to Samuel and Frances (Wilkin) Pollock,  who were natives respectively of Ireland and Pennsylvania.  Samuel Pollock came with his parents to America when six years old; was reared in Pennsylvania and Harrison County, Ohio, at the latter-named place marrying in 1818.  He served in the war of 1812; was a farmer by occupation; moved to Richland County in about 1820, where he died in 1876.  His widow still survives him at the age of eighty-two years, residing in Mansfield.  John W. Pollock was reared in Richland County, receiving in youth only such education as limited means in the common schools of that early day afforded.  In August, 1848, he came to Williams County for the first time, purchased a piece of land directly across the county line and then returned to Richland County, remaining there until the winter of 1849, when he returned to Williams County, where he remained one year, working at this trade of carpenter and joiner.  The winter of 1850, he returned to Richland County, when, on the 16th of June, 1851, he was united in marriage with Miss Mary A. Finny.  He remained in his native county until August, 1851, during which time he erected two barns.  He then moved to Williams Centre, Williams County, and recommenced working at his trade, which was that of barn building chiefly, until the breaking out of the war.  September 1, 1861, he enlisted as private in Company E.  Thirty-eighth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and remained with them until November, 1863, participating in all the movements of his regiment until it was veteranized.  He was sent home for recruiting services in November, 1863, and in April, 1864, was commissioned Second Lieutenant of Company C, Thirty-eighth Ohio Volunteer Infantry.  They went into active service, but soon after starting out, Lieut. Pollock was placed in the Quartermaster's Department, remaining therein until June, 1865, when he participated in the grand review of Sherman's army.  In December, 1864, he was promoted to First Lieutenant, mustered into Company D of the Thirty-eighth, and in about June, 1865, was advanced to Captain of Company F.  After the war, Mr. P. returned to Bryan, on the place he had purchased in 1852, and to which he had moved a year or two later.  He has remained here ever since, first engaging in saw-milling, subsequently at his trade and farming.  He owns twenty-four acres where he now resides, and 160 acres in Pulaski Township.  His wife died January 15, 1877.  To her marriage with Mr. Pollock there were born three children - James F. (deceased), Clayton E., and Ella B. (deceased).  April 21, 1878, Mr. Pollock married his present wife, Mrs. Hattie (Newman) Eaton.  To their marriage has been born one daughter, Fanny f.  Mr. Pollock is a Republican in politics, and is one of the present Trustees of Pulaski Township.  He is a member of the G. A. R., and he and wife belong to the Presbyterian Church.
Source:  County of Williams, Ohio, Historical & Biographical - Illustrated - Publ. Weston A. Goodspeed, Historical Editor - Charles Blanchard, Biographical Editor - Chicago: F. A. Battey & Co., Publishers - 1882 - Page 586
WILLIAM POOLE, farmer, brick-maker and tile manufacturer, is a son of Bannister and Mary Poole.  His father was born in Virginia in 1784, and his mother in Pennsylvania in 1803.  They were married in Adams County, Penn., where they remained some time, and then moved to Stark County, Ohio, and a few years later to Summit County, and then, in 1836, came to Williams County, where the father died, the parents of fourteen children.  William Poole was born in Summit County, Sept. 9, 1831, and came with his parents to this county, where he has since remained.  June 10, 1852, he married Maria Gardner, who died June 23, 1857.  His second marriage, Feb. 26, 1858, was to Mary E. Connell, and shortly after this he bought a part of the old homestead, built a house, moved in, and there still lives.  He owns 118 acres of well improved land, and has had born to him twelve children, as follows:  Ruby J. and Emery C., by his first wife; and Ira A. and Irving A. (twins), Betha, Franklin W., Roland L., Mary E., Mattie E., Altie M., an infant son deceased, Mintie B. (deceased), and Charles W., by his second wife.  Mr. and Mrs. Poole are members of the Granger Lodge, and among the highly respectable people of the township.
Source:  County of Williams, Ohio, Historical & Biographical - Illustrated - Publ. Weston A. Goodspeed, Historical Editor - Charles Blanchard, Biographical Editor - Chicago: F. A. Battey & Co., Publishers - 1882 - Page 779 - Centre Twp.
J. C. POUCHER, son of Rev. J. and Mary (Colton) Poucher, was born in Lancashire, England, Mar. 23, 1847.  Previous to coming to American, his father was engaged in keeping a bakery and confectionery in Manchester, England.  Business reverses, consequent upon the Anglo-Russian war in 1854, caused him to emigrate to our country.  On the voyage he experienced a shipwreck, the passengers and crew being rescued by a passing vessel, and carried back to England.  He had a second attempt, and arrived in safety in New York, when he moved West, living in portions of Ohio and Indiana until 1858, when he came to Williams County.  He has been engaged in the ministry for many yeas.  Our subject came to America the same year as his father, but not with him.  Previous to coming to Williams County, he had attended school and acted as book-keeper.  On coming into the county he settled at West Unity, engaging as book-keeper and salesman for the late G. H. Pearce during eight years, afterward opening a store, which he still continues, in West Unity, having one of the leading dry goods and notion trades in the place.  During the present year, he has charge of the late G. H. Pearce's store in Columbia, Ohio.  On May 7, 1872, he was married to Clara Stephens, daughter of C. A. Stephens.  They have three children - James L., Clara and Pansy.  Mr. Poucher is a member of Superior Lodge, 179, A. F. & A. M., West Unity Lodge, 638, I. O. O. F. and of Brady Lodge, 1676, K. of H., also of the Uniformed Camp, of Bryan.
Source:  County of Williams, Ohio, Historical & Biographical - Illustrated - Publ. Weston A. Goodspeed, Historical Editor - Charles Blanchard, Biographical Editor - Chicago: F. A. Battey & Co., Publishers - 1882 - Page 682
REV. JOHN POUCHER was born in Lincolnshire, England, Dec. 10, 1824.  His ancestors were English farmers, with the exception of his maternal grandmother, who was of French descent, and whose father was a clebrated Baptist minister, and died about the year 1818.  Grandfather John Poucher died at Digby, Eng., about 1840; father John Poucher died at Cunningsby, Lincolnshire, in 1876.  Mother Poucher died in 1854.  Rev. John Poucher has been twice married.  First to Mary Colton, daughter of Peter and Elizabeth Colton, of Lincolnshire, Nov. 8, 1842, and to his marriage five children were born - Elizabeth, John Colton, Mary Ann, Sarah Ann and Laura.  Mrs. Poucher died in Bowling Green, Wood Co., Ohio, July 19, 1868.  His second marriage was with Mrs. John Poe, Mar. 30, 1869.  She was born in Massachusetts Dec. 15, 1836; her first husband died during the late war, a prisoner in the hands of the enemy.  To this union there were five children born - Frank, Carver, Edward Thompson, Nellie Naomah, George Wesley and Robert Colton.  Mr. Poucher came to America in the fall of 1854, and passed the winter following in Shanesville, Tuscarawas County, Ohio.  In the spring of 1855, he engaged in milling at Bridgewater, this county, and has ever since continued the business, and is now one of the proprietors of Unity Mills, West Unity.  He joined the Central Ohio Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church in 1857, and is still an honored member, and has charge of the Montpelier Circuit.  At the outbreak of the recent war, Mr. Poucher was elected by his regiment and commissioned by Gov. Tod, Chaplain of the Thirty-eighth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, in which capacity he served till the close of the war.  While acting as Post Chaplain at Nashville, Tenn., he received a severe internal injury while assisting a wounded soldier to the cars, and is still a sufferer therefrom; otherwise he escaped unscathed.
Source:  County of Williams, Ohio, Historical & Biographical - Illustrated - Publ. Weston A. Goodspeed, Historical Editor - Charles Blanchard, Biographical Editor - Chicago: F. A. Battey & Co., Publishers - 1882 - Page 681
VOLNEY POWERS was born in Steuben County, Ind., Mar. 17, 1838, and was the first white child born in York Township, in that county.  He is the sixth of nine born to Stephen A. and Mary A. (Campbell) Powers, of which number five survive.  His parents were natives of New York, and moved to Steuben County in 1837, where they lived in Steuben County.  Volney Powers lived with his parents until manhood, employed in farming and teaching school.  In 1858, he came to Williams County, settling in this township on the farm he now owns, embracing 160 acres, of which 180 are improved, and adorned with good buildings.  At the first call to arms in our late war he responded, but was not enlisted until August, 1861, being enrolled in Company C, Seventh Michigan Volunteers.  The company was ordered to Washington, where Mr. Powers became sick.  Shortly afterward he was appointed Second Lieutenant in Company H, First Michigan (colored) Regiment; he was later promoted First Lieutenant, serving until his discharge, Nov. 1, 1865; in one of many engagements he was shot through the hand.  Mr. Powers was married Apr. 18, 1866, to Mattie Kimmell, of Richland, but at this time of Williams County, Ohio.; the result of this union was six children - Ellen, Viola, Oliver, Jennie, Stephen A. and Vadia.  Mr. Powers has been Township Trustee three terms, Assessor six terms, and Justice of the Peace one term.  Both himself and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church.  His father and two brothers were also soldiers in the late war.
Source:  County of Williams, Ohio, Historical & Biographical - Illustrated - Publ. Weston A. Goodspeed, Historical Editor - Charles Blanchard, Biographical Editor - Chicago: F. A. Battey & Co., Publishers - 1882 - Page 816
A. M. PRATT, lawyer, was born in Berkshire County, Mass., December 26, 1825.  His father, Michael Pratt, was a native of Taunton, Mass., a direct descendant of the Puritans, and dated the advent of his forefathers in America as far back as 1623, and it is said that one of them surveyed and laid out the town of Plymouth.  John the father of Michael, served in the Revolution as a Massachusetts minuteman.  Michael married Lydia Douglas, of New London, Conn., a distant relative of Stephen A. Douglas, of Illinois.   This lady died, leaving no children.  His second wife, Sophia Humphreville, of Fair Haven, Conn., became the mother of eight children, five of whom survive their parents, the father dying January 6, 1862, and the mother in September, 1867.  Our subject was the sixth child born to this union, and was reared on his father's farm in his native county.  In 1846, he entered Williams College, and graduated in 1850.  In December of that year, he came to Ravenna, this State, and under the instruction of John L. Ramsey, there began the study of law, and was admitted to the bar in Medina in 1853.  The same fall, he came to Bryan, then a town of about 450 inhabitants, and began practice in partnership with Edward Foster, and here he has carried on his profession with gratifying success ever since.  January 17, 1855, he married Elizabeth C. Atwood, of Portage County, who died July 20, 1870, leaving two daughters, Mabel E. and Cornelia A.  His second and present wife was Mary W. Northrop, who he married October 26, 1871.  Mr. Pratt is a Republican, has served as Mayor of Bryan, and was a delegate to the last State Constitutional Convention.
Source:  County of Williams, Ohio, Historical & Biographical - Illustrated - Publ. Weston A. Goodspeed, Historical Editor - Charles Blanchard, Biographical Editor - Chicago: F. A. Battey & Co., Publishers - 1882 - Page 586
LOUIS W. PRETTYMAN was born June 19, 1828, in Pickaway County, Ohio, and is one of five living children of Thomas J. and Lydia W. (Wyatt) Prettyman, from Delaware.  The elder Prettyman was a soldier in the war of 1812, and by trade was a carpenter.  He was married in Delaware, moved to Philadelphia, and then came to Pickaway County, this State, where he bought to farms, aggregating about 320 acres, and engaged in farming and stock-raising.  In 1833, he brought his family to this township, where he had entered 200 acres of land two years before, and entered 600 additional acres.  Here he built a cabin on Bean Creek, and began clearing up a farm, in nearest market being Defiance, which could be reached only by poling down the river.  On this farm he died July 28, 1835.  He was the first Treasurer of the township, and held that office at the time of his death.  He was a local minister in the Methodist Episcopal Church, and preached probably the first sermon ever heard in Williams County, it being the discourse at the funeral of a Miss Knipe, whose death was the first on record in this township.  Louis W. Prettyman received a fair common-school education, and after his father's death lived on the home farm with his brother-in-law, Jones P. Slusses, until he was thirteen years old; he then went to live with another brother-in-law, Davis King with whom he made his home until he was twenty-four.  In 1849, he attended Otterbein University, Westerville, Ohio, several months, but was obliged to relinquish study on account of ill health.  After his recovery, he attended high school at Bryan and Evansport, about two years, and afterward taught several terms in this and Defiance Counties.  Apr. 15, 1852, he married Hannah R. Kintigh, of Westmoreland County, Penn., and daughter of John and Hannah (Evans) Kintigh, natives respectively of Pennsylvania and New Brunswick, and to their union were born thirteen children.  In the fall of 1852, he moved upon his present farm of 1858 acres, where he has ever since resided.  Mr. Prettyman has served two terms as Township Trustee, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
Source:  County of Williams, Ohio, Historical & Biographical - Illustrated - Publ. Weston A. Goodspeed, Historical Editor - Charles Blanchard, Biographical Editor - Chicago: F. A. Battey & Co., Publishers - 1882 - Page 731
JAPHETH L. PRICKETT was born in Burlington County, N. J. twenty miles east of Philadelphia, Penn., Aug. 5, 1815, and his ancestors, as far back as he can trace them, where also natives of New Jersey.  He was reared a farmer, and came on foot nearly all the way to Clinton County, Ohio, in April, 1838.  He was married to Miss Phebe Borton in Wilmington Ohio, Dec. 27, 1838.  For four years he worked at cabinet-making in Lumberton, and then moved to a farm he had purchased in Lucas County.  Four and a half years later, he came to West Unity, where he had bought the first saw-mill erected in the place, and ran it about twelve years; he then bought a portable mill, which he ran two yeas, and then moved on his farm on Section No. 4, where he still resides.  Mrs. Prickitt was born in Clinton County, Ohio, on the same day with his husband, August 5, 185, and her parents also came from New Jersey.  She has reared to maturity six children, and has lost three.  Two of the sons, Daniel J. and James H., served in Company H, Third Ohio Cavalry, four years, lacking sixteen days, during the late war.  James H. sustained such injuries by falling from his horse while on duty as to almost incapacitate him for work since, but otherwise the brothers were uninjured, although always at the post of danger.
Source:  County of Williams, Ohio, Historical & Biographical - Illustrated - Publ. Weston A. Goodspeed, Historical Editor - Charles Blanchard, Biographical Editor - Chicago: F. A. Battey & Co., Publishers - 1882 - Page 681
JOEL PRIEST, the eldest of six children of Levi and Ellen (Smith) Priest, natives respectively of Virginia and Ohio, was born in Holmes County, in the last-named State, Dec. 12, 1832.  Having received a good common-school education, Joel left his parents when about eighteen years old, and came to Bryan, this county, where he was employed for twenty years running stationary engines, at which he was an expert.  Sept. 27, 1860, he married Catherine Swartz, a native of Ohio, and to their union have been born eight children - Mary A., Alice, Frank, John, Emma, Cora, Leo and James V.  About 1870, he came to this township and located on his present farm, comprising eighty acres of excellent land, on which he has ever since resided, with the exception of one year passed at milling.  He is a Democrat in national politics, and has filled the local position of Township Trustee.  He is a member of Fountain City Lodge, No. 314, I. O. O. F., and also of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and is an intelligent man and public spirited citizen.
Source:  County of Williams, Ohio, Historical & Biographical - Illustrated - Publ. Weston A. Goodspeed, Historical Editor - Charles Blanchard, Biographical Editor - Chicago: F. A. Battey & Co., Publishers - 1882 - Page 795

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