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GEAUGA COUNTY, OHIO
HISTORY & GENEALOGY

BIOGRAPHIES

Source:
1798
History of Geauga and Lake Counties, Ohio
with Illustrations
and Biographical Sketches of its Pioneers Most Prominent Men
Philadelphia - Williams Brothers
1878

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  BARTON F. AVERY was born at Aurora, New York, Sept. 16, 1796; died at Chardon, Ohio, Apr. 12, 1857.
     The Averys had their pleasant seat at the beautiful town Aurora, on the shore of Cayuga lake; were related to the Ledyards, of Connecticut, and allied to the numerous family of the MorgansDaniel Avery was a man of wealth and consideration, and for many years a member of Congress.  A younger brother, Dudley Avery, was married to Hannah Morgan, Nov. 8, 1792.  Of these were born two sons and two daughters.  Barton F. was the second son.  The eldest son, Dudley, died in infancy;  one daughter, Hannah, in 1839; and one, Mrs. Caroline Fellows, widow of Henry Fellows, now of Cleveland, survives.  The mother died in 1804.  Soon after her death, the father left them, went southwest, contracted a second marriage, became a wealthy man, living near Baton Rouge, where he died in 1816.  He never returned north, nor ever made any provision for these children, though it is said he intended it, but died ere his purpose was executed.  The three fell to the care of their uncle Daniel, who had a numerous family of his own.  Barton F. lived with him until he was eighteen or nineteen years of age, faring as children thus left may, until at the age named, with a cousin, Austin H. Avery, of about the same age, he ran away to Ohio, and arrived in Parkman in 1814 or 1815.  Here he remained until his removal to Chardon in 1834 or 1835.  By those who remember him in youth, he is described as handsome, intelligent, quiet, and very gentlemanly.  He possessed great mechanical talent, and with almost any possible tools could make anything of wood or metal and without previous apprenticeship.  His mechanical talents were in great  demand in the new, rude country, and he set up a shop for the production of various needed articles.  At Chardon he purchased the tavern-stand previously known as the Hoyt, which was afterward known as Avery's, now Benton & Co.'s which he carried on with great success till the division of the county, in 1840, which ruined the business.  In 1842, being satisfied that the traffic in strong drinks was immoral, he abandoned it, and kept a temperance house for some time, sold out the property, removed to Cleveland, where he pursued the hotel business quite successfully, returned to Chardon, and set up an express, which ran between Chardon and Cleveland.  While in Parkman he was postmaster for many years, also a justice of the peace.  While he kept Avery's Hotel he was postmaster of Chardon.  In 1848 he was elected by the Legislature one of the associate judges of the court of common pleas, and discharged his duties with ability and dignity, till the new constitution changed the judiciary.  In politics he was always a Democrat.  Of good person, pleasant manners, modest and retiring, he silently grew in the respect and confidence of men by the force and strength of the inherent excellences of his character, purity and integrity of life, joined with good sense and kindness of heart.  He was widely acknowledged as one of the best and most prominent of the citizens of his town and county.  Almost without a fault, quite without an enemy, a man of good judgment, whose friendship was sought, and whose counsel was prized, his success in the accumulation and management of property was not at all commensurate with the love and respect with which he was universally regarded.  At the age of twenty-one he was married to Betsy Brown, Sept. 23, 1817.  She was born at Rutland, Dec. 3, 1800, and not seventeen at marriage, or orphan, living with an uncle, a lively, sparkling, black-eyed brunette, pretty and attractive.  Her life, though shared by one of the kindest of men, was full of hardship, which she bravely met; cursed with infirm health, which she heroically endured.  She became the mother of seven children, of whom the eldest died in infancy.  The youngest, Mary, a beautiful girl, died at seventeen; Marie, wife of W. W. Bruce, of Cleveland, born in 1825, died Mar. 20, 1878; Caroline, second child, wife of A. G. Riddle, born in 1825, died Mar. 20, 1878; Caroline, second child, wife of A. G. Riddle, born Dec. 4, 1821; Elias, born Jan. 21, 1823, resides at Dunkirk, New York; and Frederick Dudley, of Chardon, born Jan. 24, 1834.  Mrs. Avery resides with the last named, a prominent citizen of Chardon, and in her advancing years enjoys the love and esteem of all the generations who have known her.
Source: History of Geauga and Lake Counties, Ohio - Publ. Philadelphia, Williams Brothers - 1878 - Pg.

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