OHIO GENEALOGY EXPRESS

A Part of Genealogy Express

 

Welcome to
Clinton County, Ohio
History & Genealogy

BIOGRAPHIES
Source:
History of Clinton County, Ohio
Its People, Industries and Institutions
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Albert J. Brown, A.M.
Supervising Editor
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With Biographical Sketches of Representative Citizens and
Genealogical Records of Many of the Old Families
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ILLUSTRATED
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B.F. Bowen & Co., Inc.
Indianapolis, Indiana
1915
Contrib. by Sharon Wick
 
A B C D E F G H I J K L M
N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

< CLICK HERE TO RETURN TO 1915 BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX >


Clinton Madden
CLINTON MADDEN

 

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page 792


Moses G. Madden
Rachel Madden
Solomon Madden
MOSES G. MADDEN

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page 852


Howard McCune
HOWARD McCUNE

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page 836


Mr. & Mrs.
John C. McFadden
JOHN C. McFADDEN

ource: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page 880

  CLARENCE H. McKAY.  Another of the grandsons of the well-known pioneer family of McKay in this county is Clarence H. McKay, of Chester township, the son of Jonathan McKay, and a keen ambitious and intelligent young farmer and stockman.  He is the owner of two hundred and eighty-eight acres of land, and is also an extensive dealer in hogs and cattle, which he buys and sells.
     Clarence H. McKay was born on the farm where he now lives in Chester township this county, on January 2, 1874, a son of Jonathan and Elizabeth J. (Medsker) McKay.  Jonathan McKay was born on Aug. 3, 1834, in Chester township, this county, and was reared on a farm.  He received a good, common school education and on June 18, 1862, at the age of twenty-eight, was married to Elizabeth J. Medsker who was born on Aug. 30, 1838, a daughter of Michael and Sarah (Graham) Medsker.  Michael Medsker was born in January, 1812, near Hillsboro, Highland county, Ohio, and was reared on a farm.  On May 14, 1833, he married Sarah Graham, who was born on Mar. 18, 1811, and to this union nine children were born.  The mother of these children died in October, 1862, and in May, 1865. Mr. Medsker married Elizabeth Zink Jonathan McKay and wife were the parents of five children, two of whom died early in life, the children who survive being Francis M., who married Lucy McClintock; Luella, the wife of Walter Lackey, and Clarence H., the immediate subject of this review.  Jonathan McKay owned two hundred and twenty acres of land two miles east of New Burlington, where he was a prosperous farmer and a well-known and influential citizen of his community.  He served as a steward in the Methodist church for many years, and politically, was identified with the party.
     The founder of the McKay family in America was Andrew McKay, a native of Scotland, and a member of the Society of Friends, who, some time prior to 1766, married Jane Ridgeway, settled in Frederick county, Virginia.  They were the parents of five children, Moses, Enos, Jacob, Margaret and Patience.  Moses McKay was born on Sept. 17, 1766, and in 1793 married Abigail Shinn, who was born on May 3, 1776, in Stafford county, Virginia, the daughter of George and Rachel Shinn, and to this union were born thirteen children:  Rachel, born on Jan. 19, 1794; Robert, Dec. 17, 1795; Sarah, Nov. 11, 1797; George, Mar. 11, 1800; Francis, Jan. 19, 1802; Margaret, Jan. 16, 1804; Jonas, Sept. 9, 1806; Virginia, Aug. 22, 1808; Maria, May 23, 1811; Jonas T. May 10, 1813; Levi Feb. 29, 1816; Jacob F., June 3, 1819, and Mary E., Jul. 27, 1822.  Moses McKay and family emigrated by way of Pittsburgh and Cincinnati, to Lebanon, Ohio, about 1814, and later settled near Waynesville, in what is now known as Massey township, Warren county, Ohio.  Moses McKay died on Jan. 28, 1828, his widow surviving him but six months, her death occurring in Jul., 1828.  Their son, Francis, the fifth child in the family, was educated in the pioneer schools, and on Oct. 7, 1830, married Mary Collett, who was born on Nov. 7, 1808, the daughter of Moses and Rebecca Collett.  They were the parents of eleven children.  Francis McKay was a man well known in the community where he lived, and was greatly missed when he died, Mar. 26, 1871, not only by the loved ones of his own family, but by the poor and needy, to whom he had been a very great benefactor.
     Clarence H. McKay, the grandson of Francis and Mary (Collett) McKay, received his education in the common schools of Chester township.  At the age of sixteen years he started life on his own responsibility, on the farm which he now owns, a farm comprising two hundred and eighty-eight acres, where Mr. McKay carries on general farming and stock raising, and is accounted one of the most enterprising and thrifty young farmers of Clinton county.  In 1914 he remodeled his house and now has a splendid country home, equipped with all modern conveniences.
     On June 3, 1896, Clarence H. McKay was married to Flora Beam, the daughter of Daniel and Susan Beam, and to this union have been born four children, Albert, Eva, Ada and Mary E.
     Mr. and Mrs. McKay
are prominent members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and he is both recording steward of the congregation and superintendent of the Sunday school.  Mr. McKay votes the republican ticket, and fraternally, is identified with the Free and Accepted Masons.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page   803
  EDWIN F. McKAY.  Three grandsons of Francis and Mary (Collett) McKay are represented in this volume.  They are Welden N., Clarence H. and Edwin F., the subject of this sketch.  The family has been a prominent one in Clinton county history and was established here by the father of Francis McKay, Moses McKay, who was the son of Andrew, who in turn, was the son of Robert.  The representatives of the present generation of the family in Clinton county are not only successful men in the various vocations to which they have turned their attention, but they are among the leading citizens of this county.
     Edwin F. McKay was born on Mar. 7, 1873, on the farm where he now lives in Chester township, the son of Moses C. and Sarah (Bales) McKay, the former of whom was born on the old McKay homestead in Chester township, Sept. 10, 1832, and the latter was the daughter of Silas and Elizabeth (Smith) Bales.  Sarah Bales had been previously married to a Mr. Marshall  She was the second wife of Moses C. McKay.  He was educated in the common schools of Chester township and, by occupation, was a farmer and surveyor.  He owned about two hundred and forty acres of land at the time of his death.  On Oct. 3, 1855, Moses C. McKay married Matilda Ferguson, the daughter of Edward and Ann Ferguson, who was born on Aug. 26, 1838.  To this union there were born three children:  Emma,  who married Charles Jessup; Anna, who is the wife of Mansfield Swindler; and Charles A., who married Susan Mallow.  Mrs. Matilda McKay died on Apr. 27, 1865, and after her death, Mr. McKay married Sarah Bales, Apr. 4, 1867.  To this marriage there were born two children:  William S., deceased, who married Mary Williamson; and Edwin F., the subject of this sketch.  Moses McKay was one of the trustees of the Methodist church, and as a Republican he was elected trustee of Chester township.  He also served as land assessor in 1890, and as jus8tice of the peace for several terms.
     The remote ancestry of the McKay family goes back to Andrew McKay, a native of Scotland and a son of Robert McKayAndrew McKay, some time prior to 17966, had married Jane Ridgeway and settled in Frederick county, Virginia.  They had five children: Moses, Enos, Jacob, Margaret and Patience.  Of these children, Moses  was born on Sept. 17, 1766, and at the age of twenty-seven, in 1796, married, according to the discipline of the Society of Friends, Abigal Shinn a daughter of George and Rachel (Wright) Shinn, who was born on May 3, 1776, in Stafford county, Virginia.  They had thirteen children, as follow:  Rachel, born on Jan. 19, 1794; Robert, Dec. 17, 1795; Sarah, Nov. 11, 1797; George, Mar. 11, 1800; Francis, Jan. 9, 1802; Margaret Jan. 16, 1804; Jonas, Sep. 9, 1806; Virginia, Aug. 22, 1808; Maria, May 23, 1811; Jonas T., May 10, 1813; Levi D., Feb. 29, 1816; Jacob F., Jun. 3, 1819, and Mary E., Jul. 27, 1822.  About 1814 Moses McKay and his wife and children emigrated from Virginia, via Pittsburgh and thence by flatboat to Cincinnati, and from there to Lebanon, Ohio, after stopping a short time, they left for Waynesville, purchasing a large tract of land east of the Little Miami river and a short distance west of Caesars creek in what is now known as Massie township, Warren county.
     It was Francis McKay, the fifth child born to Moses and Jane (Ridgeway) McKay, who is the grandfather of Clarence H., Welden N. and Edwin F. McKay, of Chester township.  Francis McKay was born in Jan., 1802, in Frederick county, Virginia, and was married on Oct. 7, 1830 to Mary Collett, the daughter of Moses and Rebecca Collett, who was born on Nov. 7, 1808.  They had eleven children, seven of whom lived to minority.  In the spring of 1832, Francis McKay settled in the northern portion of what is now Chester township, Clinton county.  He had inherited several hundred acres of land, which was partially cleared, from his father, who died on Jan. 28, 1828.  He had also inherited land at the death of his mother, who died in July, 1828.  He was a man of very industrious habits, of sterling integrity and unblemished character.  He passed away on Mar. 26, 1871.  At the time of his death it was said of him:  "In his death, Clinton county lost one of her most worthy and respected citizens.  Not only is his presence missed by the loved ones of his own family, who mourn his loss, but by the poor and needy to whom he ever extended a helping hand." 
     Edwin F. McKay began his education in the schools of Chester township and later, for two years, was a student at the National Normal University, at Lebanon.  After finishing his education, he began farming in Chester township and now owns two hundred and eighteen acres, on which he carries on general farming and stock raising.  In 1906 Mr. McKay built a barn and the following year a house, where he now lives.
     On Nov. 25, 1896, Edwin F. McKay was married to Allie Oglesbee, who was born on May 8, 1872, the daughter of Solomon and Sabina (Middleton) Oglesbee.  They are the parents of two children: Cleo, who was born on Apr. 26, 1909; and Edna, April 28, 1904, and died on May 16, 1906, at the age of two years.
     Mr. and Mrs. McKay are members of the Methodist church.  He is a Republican and is a member of the Knights of the Maccabees.  Edwin F. McKay is a young, intelligent and prosperous farmer, popular in the community where he lives and honored and respected, not only for what he himself has done, but for what the many worthy members of his family have accomplished in this county.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page   678
  HOWARD F. McKAY is a prosperous and well-known young farmer and teacher of Liberty township, Clinton county, Ohio.  By birth and by marriage, he is connected with several of the very oldest families of this county and, being a young man of far more than ordinary ability, he is expected to take his place as a leader in this community.
     Howard F. McKay was born on Jan. 15, 1891, in Liberty township, this county, the son of Jacob B. and Priscilla (Haines) McKay, the former of whom was born on Mar. 14, 1859, in Liberty township, and the latter on July 13, 1860, the daughter of Eber and Mary (Mendenhall) Haines.  Eber Haines was a well-known minister in the Friends church for a long period, a former by occupation and was born in Greene County, Ohio.
     The paternal grandparents of Howard F. McKay were William Franklin and Elizabeth (Peterson) McKay  The former was born on Jan. 12, 1833, in Chester township and in 1856 was married to Elizabeth Peterson.  They located in Liberty township and became the owners of three hundred and fifty acres of land and a desirable country home.  They were the parents of six children, Azel P. (deceased), Jacob B., George E., Ulysses G., Arthur F. and Beatrice A.  The paternal great-grandparents of Mr. McKay were George Wesley and Mary (Fergueson) McKay, natives of Virginia, who moved to Ohio after their marriage.  George Wesley McKay died in 1850, and his widow in 1878.  All of their ten children grew to maturity.  George Wesley McKay, who was born in 1800, was the son of Moses McKay who was born in Virginia about 1776.  He remained in Virginia until about 1818, when he and his wife and eleven children came to Ohio, leaving one son in Virginia.  They settled in Warren county, where he became a land owner and remained until his death, about seven years after locating.  His wife died about the same time.  George Wesley McKay and wife had eight children, of whom two, George and Lucinda, are living, the deceased children being Tilman, Samuel, William Franklin, Alfred, Mary Massie and Jane.
     Mr. and Mrs. Jacob B. McKay
, the parents of Howard F., are at present living in Wilmington, at 502 North Walnut street.  Mrs. Jacob B. McKay is a member of the Friends church.  The family owns land in Union township and also property in Wilmington.  Jacob B. McKay was formerly a member of the board of education in Liberty township.  He moved to Wilmington in December, 1909.  To him and his wife have been born four children, E. Harold and Howard F. (twins), Mary Elba and Maynard J.  E. Harold McKay married Ila Haworth and lives in the Dover neighborhood of Union township.
     Howard F. McKay was born and reared on the farm and was educated in the common schools of Clinton county and at the Port William high school.  After graduating from the Port William high school he entered Wilmington College, from which he was graduated in 1910, and having won a scholarship there he attended Haverford College during 1910 and was graduated from this latter institution in 1911.  On Jan. 24, 1914, Mr. McKay was united in marriage to Edith Starbuck, who was born in Union township, this County, on Nov. 22, 1890, the daughter of William A. and Mary Anna (Bailey) Starbuck, and who was graduated from Wilmington College with the class of 1911.  William A. Starbuck is a farmer of Union township and a member of the Friends church.  He is prominent in the Friends yearly meeting and in the Sunday school, of which he is superintendent.  For some time he has been an officer and director of the Clinton Mutual Insurance Company.  For several years he served as assessor of Union township.
     On Aug. 26, 1915, a son was born to Mr. and Mrs. Howard McKay, and was named Robert Franklin McKay.
     Mr. and Mrs. Howard F. McKay
are members of the Friends church and they take a great interest in church work.  Mr. McKay was formerly in charge of the teachers; training class in the Chester Sunday school and is now (1915) superintendent.  He is also master of the Mt. Pleasant Grange in Liberty township.  Mr. McKay and his twin brother E. Harold McKay, have a farm of eighty one acres in Liberty township, which years at Bradford, Ohio, and the last two years at the Mt. Pleasant school.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page   795

Robert F. McKay
Mrs. Robert F. McKay
 

Mr. & Mrs.
Tilghman McKay
  TILGHMAN McKAY.  The life history of the late Tilghman McKay, one of the well-known and highly-esteemed citizens of Clinton county, who passed away several years ago, shows what industry, good habits and stanch citizenship will accomplish in life.  His life record was one replete with duty well done and conscientiously performed.  Descended from one of the pioneer families of this section, in a quiet way he had much to do with the progress and prosperity of Clinton county during his day and generation.  He was a man whose interests were ever centered in his family and his home and his church.
     The late Tilghman McKay was born on Nov. 7, 1830, in Chester township, Clinton county, Ohio, the son of George Washington and Mary M. (Ferguson) McKay.  The mother of Mary M. Ferguson was a popular young man in the old colonial days of Virginia.
     The McKay family in America was established by three brothers, who immigrated from Scotland and settled in the Shenandoah valley of Virginia, where they remained for several years.  It is known that they came to America about 1690, but it is not known whether they brought their wives with them or not.  One of the brothers moved to North Carolina about 1700 and a little later another moved to Pennsylvania.  Little is known as either.  The remaining brother was the ancestor of Moses McKay, the grandfather of Tilghman the subject of this sketch.  Andrew McKay, the father of Moses, and the great-grandfather of Tilghman, was born in Frederick county, Virginia, in 1728, and in 1755 was married to Jane Ridgeway, of New Jersey.  They were members of the Society of Friends and were the parents of five children, Jacob, Moses, Enos, Patience and Margaret, all of whom reared large families.  Andrew McKay died in 1804.  His widow later came to Ohio with the Whitaker family and made her home in Waynesville.  She later married Joel Cloud in 1806 and died within a year, at the age of seventy-five.
     Moses McKay, the next member of the family in line of descent, was born on Sept. 7, 1766, in Virginia, and was married on Mar. 3, 1793, to Mrs. Abigail Shinn, in Frederick county, Virginia.  He lived in Virginia until Mar., 1818, at which time the family moved to Warren county, Ohio, where they lived the remainder of their lives.  Of their thirteen children, one who was born in 1806, died in 1810.  The remainder grew to maturity and reared large families.  The names of the children were: Rachel, Robert, Sarah, George, Frances, Margaret, Virginia, Mariah, Jonas, Levi D., Jacob T. and Mary E.  So numerous had the McKay family become by the time of the third generation, that the grandchildren of Moses and Abigail McKay, numbered ninety-seven and the great-grandchildren one hundred and seventy-nine.
     George McKay, the son of Moses and Abigail (Shinn) McKay, married Mary M. Ferguson and to them were born ten children, Moses, born on Nov. 6, 1823, married Rachel Faulkner; Samuel, May 8, 1825, married Angeline Moore; Mildred, July 2, 1827; Jane, Apr. 7, 1829, married Levi Shambaugh; Tilghman Nov. 7, 1830, is the subject of this sketch; Frank, Jan. 12, 1833, married Elizabeth Peterson; Alfred, Jun. 29, 1835, married Louisa Miars; Mary M., Sept. 27, 1837, married Joshua Oglesbee, Lucinda E., Sept. 7, 1840; and George Washington, Apr. 29, 1844, married Emma DanielsGeorge Washington McKay and his family were among the very earliest settlers in Chester township, Clinton county, Ohio.  Of their ten children, only three, Jane, Lucinda and George W., are now living.
     Educated in the common schools of Ohio principally, the late Tilghman McKay, who was the fifth child in his parents' family, was married in 1853 to Sarah Jane Medsker, who was born at Hillsboro, Ohio, June 7, 1830.  They were the parents of eight children, Mary M., who was born on Oct. 9, 1854, and who was the wife of Lewis A. Smith, died on Aug. 2, 1908; Oliver Elton Aug. 12, 1856, died on Mar. 25, 1864; Sarah Alice, May 21, 1858, married Zimri Haines; Ella Florence, June 8, 1861, married Henry Pidgeon; Lucy L., Apr. 9, 1864; Jennie E., Jan. 6, 1867; Adelia C., Jun. 1, 1869, married Horace Ellis; Daisy D., Sept. 26, 1873, married Charles W. Babb.
    
The McKay family are members of the Methodist Episcopal church.  The late Tilghman McKay was quite active in church work during his life and was a member of the church at Lumberton, in Liberty township.  Tilghman McKay owned a farm of two hundred and forty-nine acres in Liberty township, which comprises a beautiful country home.  His widow is now living on the farm with the unmarried children.  One of the daughters, Jennie, who lives at home, is an artist of no small ability.  She has done considerable landscape work and has also painted a splendid likeness of her father.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  616
WELDEN N. McKAY

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page   740


John B. McKenzie, M. D.
JOHN B. McKENZIE, M. D.

 


Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  728


Stanley T. McKenzie
and Family
STANLEY T. McKENZIE

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page 872

  HORACE G. McMILLAN.  The McMillan family in Clinton county is descended from William and Deborah McMillan, residents of York county, Pennsylvania, whose descendants immigrated to the state of Ohio at an early day in the settlement of this section of the state.  William McMillan was a native of Scotland and his wife of Wales, and they were parents of eight children, of whom David, the fifth, married Hannah Huzzey.  He settled on a farm later owned by his son, Thomas McMillan, comprising two hundred and fifty acres, situated in Chester township, this county.  Jonathan McMillan, Sr., a brother of David, made a trip to Ohio about 1805, but later returned and brought back with him to Clinton county his parents, William and Deborah McMillanDavid McMillan was born on Mar. 2, 1772, in Pennsylvania.  By his marriage to Hannah Huzzey, there were ten children, five born in Pennsylvania and five in Ohio, of whom Thomas and Jonathan were the last two pass away.  After coming to Clinton county, in 1805, with his family David McMillan settled on Turkey Run creek, in what is now known as Chester township.  He erected a log cabin and, endowed with considerable mechanical skill, made all sorts of farm implements and furniture for his own use.  He was a member of the Society of Friends and died in December, 1844, his widow surviving him but two years, her death occurring on Sept. 18, 1846.  David and Hannah (Huzzey) McMillan were the parents of Thomas McMillan, who was the father of Horace G., the subject of this sketch.
     The entire life of Thomas McMillan was spent on the farm.  He owned about two hundred and fifty acres and was a general farmer and stock raiser.  He was one of the organizers of the Clinton County Bank at Wilmington and, from the time of the organization of that bank until his death, was a director of the institution.  Thomas McMillan married Elizabeth N. Adsit, a native of Union township, this county, to which union there were born six children, namely: Isabel, who died in infancy; Mary Ann (deceased), who married Henry Spray; Deborah T. (deceased), who married John Hawkins; Eliza Jane (deceased), who became the wife of Daniel McKay; Horace G., the subject of this sketch, and Palmer, who died at the age of seventeen.  Upon the death of his first wife, Thomas McMillan married Mrs. Nancy McMillan, widow of Isaac McMillan and daughter of Seth and Sarah Ann (Moore) Linton to which second marriage there was born one child, Thomas Henry who is referred to elsewhere in this volume.  Thomas McMillan was a Republican in politics and a member of the Society of Friends.
     Horace G. McMillan was born on Dec. 25, 1853, on the old McMillan farm in Chester township, his father, Thomas McMillan, having been born on the same farm.  About 1885 he purchased one hundred and nineteen and three fourths acres and built a house on the farm.  Subsequently he made additional purchases, increasing the farm to two hundred and thirty-three acres.  Mr. McMillan succeeded his father as a director in the Clinton County Bank at Wilmington and now holds that position.
     On Sept. 11, 1884, Horace G. McMillan was married to Alice M. Peterson, daughter of Jacob S. and Catherine (Ellis) Peterson, to which union have been born three children, Esper J., Thomas W. and Carl P., all of whom are still at home.
     Jacob S. Peterson was a native of Clinton county, his father, Jacob Peterson, Sr., having been an early settler in this county.  He remained at home during his minority, during which period he attended the log school house of the township.  He later supplemented his elementary education by extensive reading and also cultivated a talent for music.  In which art he became quite proficient.  Following his early religious training, Mr. Peterson united with the German Reformed church at Xenia, still later with the Reformed organization at Caesar's Creek, and subsequently, in 1874, with the Mount Pisgah congregation.  On Nov. 23 1848, Jacob S. Peterson was united in marriage to Sarah Catherine Ellis, a native of Greene county, Ohio, granddaughter of Abraham Ellis one of the earliest settlers of that section of the state.  Mr. and Mrs. Peterson began housekeeping on a portion of the former's father's farm, where they lived for ten years, at the end of which time Mr. Peterson purchased adjoining land comprising two hundred acres.  To Mr. and Mrs. Peterson were born the following children:  Emma Clare, born on Dec. 22, 1849, who married James W. Middleton; Ida Irene, July 23, 1852, who married George A. McKay; Orville Ellis, Nov. 21, 1854, who married Luella B. Oglesbee after whose death he married Evelyn Green; Alice Maria, Aug. 16, 1860, who married Horace G. McMillan; Jacob Elmer, Sept. 20, 1862, who married Viola Farquhar, and Eva Grace, Feb. 4, 1869, who married Frank S. Colvin.
     The McMillan family are members of the Friends church and for a number of years Horace G. McMillan has been an officer in the church.  In politics, Mr. McMillan has always been identified with the Republican party.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  888
  THOMAS HENRY McMILLAN.  Thomas Henry McMillan, who owns a farm of two hundred and fifty acres in Chester township, this county, is descended from two of the very oldest families in this county.  His father, Thomas McMillan, was the grandson of William and Deborah McMillan, who immigrated from York county, Pennsylvania, to Clinton county, some time after 1805, and his mother was the daughter of Seth and Sarah Ann (Moore) LintonThomas Henry McMillan is the only son born to  his father's second marriage.
     Born on Jan. 5, 1884. Thomas Henry McMillan, an enterprising citizen of Chester township, has been a farmer all his life.  He received his education in the common schools of Chester township and later attended Wilmington College for about four years.  After finishing his college education, he began farming on the old home place and has made an exceptional success in his chosen vocation.  He is intelligent, widely informed and popular and enjoys the confidence and respect of that entire neighborhood.
     Mr. McMillan's father, Thomas McMillan, the son of David and Hannah (Huzzey) McMillan, was first married to Elizabeth N. Adsit who bore him six children: Isabel, Mary Ann, Debber T., Eliza Jane, Horace G. and Palmer, of whom Horace G. is the only present survivor.  Following the death of the mother of the above children, Thomas McMillan married, secondly, Mrs. Nancy (Linton) McMillan, widow of Isaac McMillan, and daughter of Seth and Sarah Ann (Moore) Linton, to which union there was born one child, a son, Thomas H., subject of this biographical sketch.  Thomas McMillan's family were members of the Friends church, and he voted the Republican ticket.  David and Hannah (Huzzey) McMillan were the parents of ten children, five of whom were born in Pennsylvania and five in Ohio.  David McMillan immigrated to Clinton county in 1805 and settled on Turkey Run creek, where he purchased three hundred acres of land.  He was a member of the Society of Friends.  He departed this life on Dec. 20, 1844, his widow living less than two years thereafter, her death occurring on Sept. 18, 1846.  David McMillan's parents, William and Deborah McMillan, who came to this county from York county, Pennsylvania, were natives of Scotland and Wales, respectively.  They were the parents of eight children.
     On Oct. 26, 1904, Thomas Henry McMillan was married to Mary Probasco, the daughter of C. A. and Anna Probasco, to which union there has been no issue.  Mr. and Mrs. McMillan are members of the Friends church and devoted to all good works in their neighborhood.  Mr. McMillan votes the Republican ticket and is a man of considerable influence in the general affairs of the community.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  768
  WALTER T. McMILLANWalter T. McMillan is widely known as a successful farmer in Union township, Clinton county, Ohio, where his well-directed efforts in the practical affairs of life, his capable business management and sound judgment have won for him a competence in farm property and a comfortable status in the business affairs of this county.  He owns the old Seth Linton farm of two hundred and thirty-three acres, which be purchased in 1896.  His life fully demonstrates what may be accomplished by a man of energy and ambition who is not afraid to work and who is possessed of a capacity for perseverance.  In all of the relations of life he has commanded the confidence and respect of his associates and friends, and has ably carried forward the work of his illustrious ancestors who were pioneers In this community.
    Walter T. McMillan was born near Gurneyville, Chester township, Clinton county, Ohio, Nov. 22, 1865, and is the son of Isaac and Nancy (Linton) McMillan, the former was born in Chester township in 1836, and died in 1874.  The latter was born on the farm where her son, Walter T., now lives, Mar. 1, 1840, and died on Mar. 12, 1911.  Isaac McMillan was the son of David and Sarah (Carpenter) McMillan, the former of whom was born in Chester township, Clinton county, the son of David and Hannah (Hussey) McMillanSarah Carpenter was a native of New York state who came to Clinton county. Ohio, with her parents when three years old.  David McMillan, Sr., who was born on Mar. 2, 1772, in Pennsylvania, was the son of William and Deborah McMillan.  They were residents of York county. Pennsylvania, after coming to this country, the former having been born in Scotland and the latter in Wales.  They had eight children: Thomas, William, Henry, Samuel, David and Jonathan (twins), Mary and Lydia.   Jonathan married Anne Hussey; David married Hannah Hussey; Mary married Joseph Baxter; Lydia married William Jay.  After coming to Ohio David and Hannah (Hussey) McMillan settled where Thomas McMillan later owned a farm.  They had ten children, five of whom were born in Pennsylvania, and live in Ohio.  After locating in Clinton county in 1804, David and Hannah (Hussey) McMillan obtained a land grant signed by President George Washington, purchasing the land for a dollar and a quarter an acre.  They were members of the Society of Friends.  David, Jr., and Sarah (Carpenter) McMillan had two children.  Isaac and Judiah, the latter of whom was the first cashier of the Clinton County National Bank, and who died in California.
     Isaac McMillan grew up on the farm near Gurneyville and operated this farm for his father until 1866, when he opened a hardware store and also began packing pork.  He assisted in the establishment of the Clinton County National Bank.  He was a Republican in politics and as a member of the Friends church served as clerk of the Center monthly meeting for many years.  For some time he was the proprietor of a dry-goods store.  He died while still a young man of lung trouble. His wife was the daughter of Seth and Sarah Anne Linton.  The genealogy and family history of the Linton family are presented in more complete form in the sketch of Fred Weldon Linton, contained elsewhere in this volume.
     After the death of Isaac McMillan, his widow, the mother of Walter T. McMillan, married an uncle of her first husband, Thomas McMillan.  They lived in Chester township near the Chester church.  By Nancy (Linton) McMillan's first marriage there were six children, namely: David R., born on Mar. 3, 1861, died at the age of three years; Seth L., Feb. 15, 1863, an attorney at Columbus, Ohio; Walter T., Nov. 22, 1865; Clifton, Dec. 21, 1867, died at the age of two years; Carrie E., Nov. 3, 1869, died at the age of two years; and Maria E., Oct. 4, 1874, died at the age of six months.  Thomas and Nancy (Linton) McMillan were the parents of one son, Thomas Henry, who lives on the old McMillan homestead in Chester township.  Mrs. Nancy (Linton) McMillan spent her later years among her children and died at the home of her son, Walter T.
     Walter T. McMillan obtained the rudiment of an education in the public schools of Chester township, and later became a student at Wilmington College.   He was nine years old at the time of his father's death, in 1874, and after his death lived with his grandfather, Seth Linton, until thirteen years of age.  After this he worked for his stepfather, Thomas McMillan until his death, when in partnership with his mother he purchased the old Seth Linton farm in Union township, where he now lives.  Mr. McMillan has since remodeled the house and buildings and greatly improved the farm.
     On Dec. 24, 1894, Mr. McMillan was married to Martha Blanch Kirk, a native of Adams county, Ohio, the daughter of Albert DeWitt and Phoebe D. (Mclntyre) Kirk.  The father of Mrs. McMillan is a resident of Winchester, Ohio, where he is a merchant tailor.  His wife is deceased.  To Mr. and Mrs. Walter T. McMillan have been born six children; Florence Nancy, born on Nov. 22, 1865, is a graduate of Wilmington College; Damaris, Jan. 22, 1898, is a student in the Wilmington high school; Isaac DeWitt, Sept. 7, 1899; Leontine, died at the age of one year; Kirk, Jan. 1, 1917; and Harriet, Dec. 15, 1912.
     Mr. and Mrs. McMillan are members of the Center meeting of the Society of Friends.  Mr. McMillan Is an ardent Republican.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  675
  HENRY B. MIARS.  There is no positive rule for achieving success and yet in the life of the successful man there are always lessons which may well be followed.  The man who succeeds is the man who can see and make use of the opportunities which fall in his way.  Henry B. Miars, a prominent citizen of Wilmington, this county, and a representative in this section for the International Harvester Company, is a man who has risen steadily, by careful and honest application, to the business responsibilities imposed upon him.  His qualities of discrimination, his sound judgment and his executive ability have contributed largely to his material success.  He is the scion of an old family and was born in the old stone house erected by his grandfather, David Miars, who settled in the county one year after it was organized.
     Henry B. Miars was born in Union township, this county, Nov. 9, 1868, son of Isaiah F. and Matilda (Babb) Miars, the former of whom was born in the same house as his son, Henry B., Aug. 6, 1833, and who died on Jan. 6, 1911.  The mother was born in Union township, this county, on Feb. 23, 1837, and is still living with her children.
     Isaiah F. Miars was the son of David and Sarah (Stout) Miars, the former of whom was born in Virginia in 1795, the son of Martin Miars, who settled in Clinton county, Ohio, in 1811, and who purchased a large tract of land at a dollar and a quarter an acre.  David and Sarah Miars were the parents of ten children, all of whom grew to manhood and womanhood.  He and his wife lived on a farm of one hundred and thirty acres, which was a part of his father's homestead and included the dwelling.  Subsequently, Isaiah F. Miars came into possession of this farm and now Henry B. Miars, the subject of this sketch, owns it.  In fact, it has never been out of the family since it was covered with virgin forest and to this day stands the old stone house which the grandfather, David Miars, built over one hundred years ago.  It is still in a good state of preservation and still used.  The stone walls are two feet thick and the window casements are equally as deep.  It is a two-story house and was regarded as a local wonder when first built, at that time having been considered the acme of luxury.  In the days when this old house was built the builders there-about did not use derricks and it was necessary to build a track and begin scaffolding one hundred feet from the building in order to get the stone up to the second story, the stones being hauled on a wooden track in a wheelbarrow.
     David Miars became a well-to-do farmer and held four different farms.  He was a Republican in politics and had a blacksmith shop on his farm in which he made most of his money.  He died at the age of eighty-three years.  His wife, who before her marriage was Sarah Stout, was burned to death.  While sitting in front of an open fireplace, here clothes caught fire and she lived only a few hours, dying in great agony.  She was a splendid Christian woman and highly respected in this community.  For several generations, the Miars family have been members of the Friends church.
     Matilda Babb, the mother of Henry B. Miars, is the daughter of Henry and Ann (Woodruff) Babb, who were early settlers in Union township and who lived in the same neighborhood as the Miars family.  They also were stanch Quakers.  Henry Babb was twice married, the first time to Matilda Woodruff, upon whose death he married her sister, Ann, who bore him ten children.  There were three children by the first wife.  Henry Babb died during the Civil War.
    Isaiah F. Miars grew up on the farm which his grandfather, Martin Miars, had entered and was one of the younger children of a large family.  He was married on Oct. 25, 1855, to Matilda Babb.  Although he was a cripple and owned a farm, he spent most of his time in managing his stone quarry on Todd's Fork, which he worked extensively.  Isaiah F. and Matilda Miars were the parents of six children of whom Henry B. is the youngest, the others being, Luella, who married Frank Hazard, a hardware salesman of Wilmington; Elva, who married Orlando Walker who lives on a farm near Wilmington; Anna B., who married O. C. Babb, a carpenter, of Xenia, Ohio; Mary, who married Arthur Harold, of Indianapolis, and who is quite a noted preacher in the Friends church, and Corwin, who died at the age of twenty-six.
     Henry B. Miars grew up on the farm and attended the country schools of Clinton county and subsequently Wilmington College.  After leaving college, he worked four years as a clerk in David Peeble's hardware store at Wilmington and for a time was a traveling salesman for the Bailey Auger Bit Company, of Lancaster, Ohio.  In 1892 Mr. Miars became a salesman for the International Harvester Company and is still thus engaged in the service of that firm.  At first he was merely a local salesman, but he quickly became an expert and now has full charge of five counties in Ohio, with headquarters at Wilmington, and is the manager, not only of sales, but of deliveries and collections.  Since 1906 he and his family have resided on Lincoln street in Wilmington.
     On Mar. 26, 1891, Henry B. Miars was married to Elva Jay, who was born at New Burlington, this county, the daughter of James and Elida Jay, well-known farmers, now living at Martinsville in this county.  To Mr. and Mrs. Miars one son has been born.  Ralph J., born on May 15, 1892, who is a draughtsman employed in the office of the Champion Bridge Works Company at Wilmington.  He is a graduate of the Wilmington high school and of Wilmington College.
     Mr. and Mrs Miars and son are members of the Friends church, all three holding birthright membership in that church.  It is needless to say that Mr. Miars is a highly respected citizen, well known, not only in Clinton county, but in surrounding counties, where he is frequently called on account of his business connections.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page   935
  ISAAC C. MILLER, a well-to-do farmer of Jefferson township who was born in Clinton county, on June 27, 1878, is the son of C. C. and Electra E. (Kibby) Miller, and a brother of Ephraim Kibby Miller, whose biographical sketch is contained elsewhere in this volume.
     Mr. Miller's father was born near New Vienna, this county, on Mar. 26, 1837, and his mother was born near Clarksville, in Clinton County.  The father farmed all his life in Clinton county with the exception of a short period in which he was engaged in school teaching as a young man.  He owned a farm in Washington township, but the last thirty years of his life were spent in Jefferson township.  He was a soldier in the Civil War, and after the war was a member of General Sherman Post No. 360, Grand Army of the Republic.  To C. C. and Electra E. (Kibby) Miller were born ten children, E. T., L. N., P. V., Malcolm, Cora, Nine, Grace, E. K., Bertha and Isaac C.
     Mr. Miller
's paternal grandparents were Isaac and Margaret) Hildebrant) Miller, the former of whom was born on July 30, 1812, near Farmers Station, and the latter.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page   847
  J. WILLARD MOCK is a successful photographer and artist, who has enjoyed a wonderful and diversified experience in photographic and art work, has worked in many parts of the country and today has a first class studio in Wilmington and a large and flourishing patronage in that city and throughout the county, which demands the help of an assistant.
     Mr. Mock was born on October 15, 1854, near Jamestown, Ohio, where he was reared, and is the son of John and Mary (Pearson) Mock, the former of whom was a native of Fayette county, and both of whom were natives of the old Buckeye state.  John Mock was a successful farmer and large landowner, possessing two hundred and fifty acres of land.  He died on the farm, in 1899, at the age of seventy years.  During his life, he had been a devout member of the Baptist church and a deacon in the church for twenty years or more in Fayette county.  In early life, he had voted the Democratic ticket, but later became a Prohibitionist.  John Mock was of a family of seven children, consisting of four daughters and three sons.  He was married to Mary Pearson in Fayette county, and they owned the first cookstove in their section of the country.  They had personally made all of the furniture used in their house, and had a comfortable home during their entire life.  Mrs. John Mock died in 1906, at the age of seventy-eight years, at the home of a daughter in Jamestown, Ohio.  She and her husband had seven children.
     Of the seven children born to John and Mary (Pearson) Mock, O. Martin Luther lives in Enid, Oklahoma.  After serving four years in the Civil War, he re-enlisted and served until finally mustered out.  For many years he was a pension attorney and real estate dealer in Guthrie, Oklahoma.  He is married and has three children.  Alfred Pearson, the second born, died in middle life, while attending the World's Fair at Chicago.  Lavenia Katherine is a widow of Arthur Boteler, and lives at Jamestown.  J. Willard was the fourth born.  Frank died in middle life.  Charles Edgar died in young manhood, shortly after his marriage,  Lona married Willis McDorman, and lives at Jamestown. They have two children.
     J. Willard Mock received a common school education, and supplemented this by a course in the Art School at Cincinnati, finishing the course under James Jessup, a noted English artist and photographic educator.  Mr. Mock also worked under Joseph Appleton in Dayton, Ohio, and, at the age of twenty years, took up art work for himself.  After graduating, he worked for various photographers in Ohio, and, in 1883, opened a gallery at Washington C. H., where he remained one year.  After selling out there, he moved to Lima, Ohio, where he was in business for seven years.  He then sold out at Lima and traveled as an expert demonstrator for a photographic plate company for three years, and then settled in Marion, Indiana, where his establishment burned.  He then became head operator for James F. Ryder, of Cleveland, and held that position for three years.  He then returned to Jamestown, Ohio, and engaged in business there, so that he might be near his parents in their declining years.  After being at Jamestown for fourteen years, Mr. Mock moved to Wilmington and opened his present establishment after his parents had died.  He has been very successful and employs one assistant at the present time.
     On Dec. 28, 1876, J. Willard Mock was married to Ida Frances Horney in Fayette county, Ohio.  She is the daughter of William J. and Sallie Ann (McMillan) Horney, and was born in Fayette county, Mar. 3, 1860.  To Mr. and Mrs. Mock three children have been born Lorena, who died at birth; Wenona Ruth, who is the wife of E. I. Bennett, of Dayton; and Russell Eugene, who is living at home with his parents.
     The entire history of the Mock family does not disclose that any member has ever been addicted to the use of intoxicating liquors, nor can anything be sold detrimental to the character of any one who bears the Mock name.
     Mr. Mock is independent in his political views.  Political parties have no charm or fascination for him, and he chooses then men for whom he votes, without regard to their party affiliations.  He is a devout member of the Baptist church, and is a leader of the choir.  Mr. Mock is also a student of music.  While living in Jamestown, he served as treasurer and clerk for the school board for some time.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page   964
  RUTHERFORD B. MONFORT


Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page   375

  BURGESS J. MOON.  Among the successful teachers of Clinton county, Ohio, is Burgess J. Moon, who was born on the farm where he now lives in Clark township, Aug. 21, 1878, the son of David S. and Ruth (Rhonemus) Moon.  The father was born at Farmers Station but was brought to the farm, where his son Burgess J. now lives, in infancy.  Mr. Moon's mother was born near Westboro in Jefferson township.
     The paternal grandparents of Burgess J. Moon were Simeon and Priscilla (Sewell) Moon, the former of whom was born on the farm where his grandson now lives and who lived and died on this farm.  Simeon Moon was born on February 23, 1820, and was married on Mar. 24, 1842, to Priscilla Sewell.  Five children were born to this marriage:  Samuel M., who was born on Feb. 3, 1843; David S., May 28, 1845; Jefferson, Nov. 3, 1848; and Franklin, May 1, 1851.
     The parents of Simeon Moon were Samuel and Martha (Routh) Moon, the former of whom was born on Apr. 17, 1781, and the latter born on Mar. 5, 1781.  They were married in Tennessee, Nov. 5, 1801, and in 1808 came to Clark township.  Samuel Moon died on Mar. 25, 1846, at the age of sixty-five and his wife on Feb. 19, 1852, in her seventy-first year.
     Ruth Rhonemus, the mother of Burgess J. Moon, who was married to David S. Moon, Sept. 2, 1877, was born in Jefferson township, Mar. 21, 1850.  She was the daughter of Jacob and Mary (Thornhill) Rhonemus, the former of whom was born about one mile southwest of Cuba, on a farm now owned by the widow of William Riley Brown, and the latter of whom was born about two miles west of Martinsville on the farm where Roy Hunter now lives.  Mary Thornhill was the daughter of Barnett and Ruth (Jones) Thornhill, natives of Knox county, Tennessee, who settled near Martinsville.  They were among the pioneer farmers of Clinton county.  Jacob Rhonemus and his wife spent most of their married life on one hundred and forty acres of land, three and one-half miles east of Westboro.  He was a soldier in the Civil War and served in the Eighty-second Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry.  Jacob Rhonemus  was the son of Jacob, Sr.,  was a soldier in the War of 1812 and a farmer by occupation. He died at the age of forty-five years, after immigrating to Clinton county.
     David S. Moon was educated in the public schools, familiarly known as "Greasy Creek".  He lived and died on the farm which his son and sister now own.  Six years, however, were spent in Westboro.  Burgess J. is one of two children born to his parents, the other being Delilah, who was born near Westboro,  Dec. 31, 1886.
     Burgess J. Moon was educated in the New Vienna high school and at Miami University.  From 1902 until 1908, he taught in Clark township and in 1913-1914, he taught in the Washington township schools at Morrisville.  Aside from his experience in the schoolroom, he is a farmer and specializes in breeding hogs.
     Mr. Moon is a member of the Free and Accepted Masons and the Eastern Star.  Formerly, he was a member of the Knights of Pythias.  At the present time he is a clerk of the Farmers Station special school board.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page   563
  DARIUS HOFFMAN MOON.  Ohio has been particularly fortunate in the character of her citizenship.  In every county, there have been conspicuous men who by force of personality have naturally risen to leadership in vocational and professional life.  A business man of superior ability, a man of prominence in military affairs, and a citizen of integrity and honor, Darius H. Moon has made an impression on the life of this state of which he is a distinguished son.  He is a native of Martinsville, Clinton county, Ohio, having been born there on September 5, 1837, the son of Henry H. and Mary (Paxton) Moon, the former of whom was born in Tennessee on July 14, 1808, and the latter of whom was born in Champaign county, Ohio, on Feb. 27, 1816.
     The paternal grandparents, William and Mary (Hudson) Moon, traversed the wilderness on their way from Tennessee to their new home in this county during its early days, and lived here the remainder of their lives.  The maternal grandparents, Dr. Reuben and Mary (Hoffman) Paxton, were natives of Virginia, but came from Champaign county, Ohio, to Greenfield, where after useful careers they died.
     Henry H. and Mary (Paxton) Moon were well-known in their community.  Henry H. Moon, who was a farmer, died in 1881, three years after the death of his wife, who passed away on July 3, 1879.  He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and a Republican.  Their family was large, according to present-day standards, consisting of eleven children, as follows:  Reuben P., deceased; Jeptha Davis, deceased; Sylvester B., M. D., of Wilmington, eighty years of age; Darius Hoffman, the subject of this sketch; Francis Marion; Milton W.; Lydia M.; William, deceased; Lawson P., and two who died in infancy.
     Darius Moon spent all of his early life on his father's farm, this comprising a period of twenty years, during which time he learned the carpenter's trade.  When war was declared, he was among the brave youth who enlisted, being enrolled in Company B, the One Hundred and Tenth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry.  He served for two years and seven months.  He was of the famous Sixth Corps of the Army of the Potomac, being first and second lieutenant of his company.  He was in the battles of Winchester, the first and second Wilderness campaigns, and Cedar Creek, and was wounded at Manassas Junction, Maryland.  During his long period of military service, Mr. Moon was popular both with officers and men.
     At the close of the war, Mr. Moon purchased a drug store, and engaged in this business for the following thirty-four years, being successful enough to retire about thirteen years ago.  Mr. Moon owns the valuable property on the corner of Broadway and Main Streets besides other houses and lots.
     Darius H. Moon
was married to Osee Frances Strawn, who was born on Aug. 24, 1845, in Lebanon, Warren County, Ohio, the daughter of Thomas S. and Margaret (Williams) Strawn, pioneers of Warren county.  Mrs. Moon's grandfather, Enos Williams, has the distinction of having been the first teacher in the township in which Lebanon is situated, having also held the position of county auditor, as well as other public offices in the county.  The father of Mrs. Moon was a Republican, and formerly a Whig.  He died in 1886, his wife living three years longer, and passing away at the age of seventy-seven years.  Mr. and Mrs. Moon are the parents of an only son, Alden M., who is a druggist of San Antonio, Texas.  His wife was Pearl Scott, a daughter of David Scott, an attorney of Blanchester.  Alden M. Moon and wife have one son, Marvin Scott.
     Mr. Moon
has been for many yeas, a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, and has been a Mason for fifty years.  He is a man of estimable character, a citizen whom his city is proud to honor, a business man of strict adherence to principle, and a friend deserving of friendship.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  502
  LINDLEY MURRAY MOON.  After an honorable, faithful and efficient service of twenty-eight years as a member of the able teaching corps of the Clinton county public schools, Lindley Murray Moon retired from that form of service and engaged in farming, since 1905 having devoted his attention to agriculture in Washington township, where he has a well-kept farm of more than two hundred acres, upon which he is living in comfort, enjoying the confidence and respect of the whole countryside.  The same diligent attention to the duties in hand which made Mr. Moon's service as a teacher so successful has been given to the operation of his farm and during the ten years he has followed this vocation he has prospered, being now numbered among the substantial residents of that section of the county.  He has been honored by his neighbors and in now serving his second term as township trustee, having been for three years president of the township school board.
     Lindley Murray Moon was born on a farm east of Martinsville, in Clark township, Clinton county, Ohio, on March 21, 1857, son of Pleasant and Hulday (Pike) Moon, the former of whom was born in this county on May 20, 1819, and the latter of whom was born in Highland county, this state, on June 16, 1817, daughter of William and Lucy (Butler) Pike, pioneers of that county.
     Pleasant Moon was born in Clark township, this county, son of Joseph and Rachel (Hockett) Moon, members of the celebrated Moon colony that came from Sevier county, Tennessee, and settled in Clark township in the year 1809, the year before Clinton county was organized as a civic unit.  Pleasant Moon was reared in the forest wilderness surrounding his boyhood home, receiving such education as was provided in the "backwoods" school of that neighborhood.  Upon reaching manhood's estate he married and moved to Washington township and for twenty-six years lived on a rented farm west of where his son, the subject of this sketch, now lives.  Following the death of his wife, in 1863, Mr. Moon returned to Clark township, taking a farm near Lynchburg, where he spent the rest of the life, his death occurring in 1885.
     To Pleasant and Huldah (Pike) Moon were born sixteen children, twelve sons and four daughters, namely: Lucy, Parker, Rachel, Sarah E., Mary A., Samuel, James A., Lindley M., Daniel, Carey, Joseph P., William, Harvey, Stephen R., Elwood and Murray (or Manara).  The mother of these children died on May 25, 1863, and in April, 1868, Pleasant Moon married, secondly, Mrs. Susan Boyd, widow of Samuel Boyd and daughter of John and Jane Terrell, who was the mother of five children by her former husband, Jane M., Sylvester W., John T., James and Suzana.
     Lindley M. Moon
was reared on the home farm in Washington Township and attended the district schools of that township until he was nineteen years of age, at which time he entered the training school for teachers at Martinsville and equipped himself for teaching, engaging in this profession the following winter, the pay for his first term's service being at the rate of thirty-five dollars the month.  The next winter he was engaged as teacher at the Brown school, near his home, at a somewhat better wage and continued as teacher in that school for four years, working for his father for his board.  He then was engaged as a teacher at Macedonia for two years, at a further advance of wages, and then for five years served as principal of the graded schools at Cuba, this county.  Following this service he was engaged for two years as teacher at Farmers Station.  At this period of his career he moved to Washington, where he made his home, and for two yeas was engaged as teacher at Burtonville, after which he went back to the Brown school in Washington township, teaching there for four years, at the end of which time he was engaged to serve as principal of the central school building at Wilmington, a position which he filled for five years, after which he returned to Cuba, where he concluded his service as a teacher three years later, having for twenty-eight years been engaged in instructing the youth of Clinton county, a service of inestimable value.  During that time Professor Moon made many enduring friendships, his students, now men and women of affairs in this county, entertaining for him to this day feelings of the most sincere esteem and deepest gratitude.
     While thus engaged in teaching, Professor Moon was looking ahead to the future and made some judicious investments in land.  In 1892 he brought a small farm of sixty-one acres in Washington township, later adding an adjoining small farm of fifty-three acres, this being the tract on which he now lives; to this latter adding another tract sixty-five acres in extent, to which seven acres later were added and still later a tract of seventy acres, all adjoining, which gives Mr. Moon a fine farm, all of which is under an excellent state of cultivation and to which he has given his personal attention since the year 1905.  This farm has three dwelling houses on it, and Mr. Moon rents the larger part of his land to responsible tenants, giving his chief attention to the tract on which his home is situated.  In connection with his general farming, Mr. Moon is engaged extensively in the dairy business and has derived considerable profit from his fine herd of dairy cows.  He also is much interested in poultry raising, giving particular attention to Black Langshans, and has found this department of his agricultural operations quite profitable.
     On May 22, 1890, Lindley M. Moon has united in marriage to Alice B. Brown (one of his former pupils), who was born in this county, daughter of Isaiah and Elizabeth (Anson) Brown and to this union two children have been born, Vivian, who died in infancy, and Vera Alice.  Mr. and Mrs. Moon have a very pleasant home and entertain their friends with the most cordial hospitality.  They are interested in all measures designed to advance the common welfare of their community and are held in the highest regard by all.  They are members of the Christian church and Mr. Moon is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, being looked upon as one of the leaders in the lodge to which he is attached.  For years he has given close attention to public affairs in his neighborhood and is now serving his second term as a township trustee.  He has been a member of the Cuba Special District board since 1907 and has been president of that board since 1912, in both of these official positions having given faithful and valuable service to the public.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page   413
  ROLLA E. MOON.  Even before the organization of Clinton county, in 1810, the Moon family was established and prominently known in this section of the state, the founder of the family in this county having been Thomas Moon, a native of Sevier county, Tennessee, who came here in 1809 with the famous "Moon Colony."  Thomas and Elizabeth (Hocket) Moon, the latter of whom also was a native of Tennessee, were the parents of several children, including Joel and Jason Moon, who became two of Clinton County's best-known residents.  The latter for many yeas was one of the county's most successful teachers.  Among his self-acquirements was a fine technical knowledge of surveying, a form of knowledge which he often was called on to put into practical use in the laying of lines in the original divisions of property hereabout, and for one term he served as deputy in the county surveyor's office, under Hiram E. Moon.  He also served for six years as clerk of Jefferson township.  Jason Moon's wife was Lydia E. Cravens, daughter of John and Elizabeth Cravens.
     Joel Moon
was born on the old Moon homestead in Jefferson township, this county, on May 5, 1827, and was married on Mar. 8, 1851, to Rebecca Jane Moore, born in Washington township, this county, on Oct. 8, 1835, daughter of Micajah and Rebecca (McGee) Moore, pioneer residents of this county, to which union were born six children, namely: Ella J., born in October, 1852, who married Wilson Peele; Emerson E., Aug. 13, 1855, who married Florence E. Hale; Americus E., Dec. 26, 1859; George F.,  Apr. 27, 1866; Rolla E., the immediate subject of this biographical sketch, and Harley A., Mar. 21, 1869.  Joel Moon owned a well-kept farm of sixty acres in the Westboro neighborhood and was regarded as one of the leaders in the community life thereabout.  He and his wife were earnest members of the Christian church and were active in all good works in their community.  Mr. Moon was a Republican and gave thoughtful attention to the political affairs of the county, for many years having served as a member of the board of trustees of Jefferson township.  He was one of the most active workers in the Odd Fellows lodge at Westboro and was highly regarded throughout that whole region.  Upon the death of his wife, Joel Moon retired to the home of his son, Rolla, where his last days were spent.
     Rolla E. Moon, son of Joel and Rebecca Jane (Moore) Moon, was born on the old home farm near Westboro, in Jefferson township, this county, on Jan. 26, 1868, and was educated in the district schools of that neighborhood.  Just before reaching his majority he bought the farm of one hundred acres in Washington township, where he now is living, and ever since has made his home there.  This was practically an unbroken farm when he bought it and all improvements on the same have been made by Mr. Moon, whose enterprise and industry have combined to give him a most comfortable home, his well-tilled acres also giving him an ample competence.
     In 1889 Rolla E. Moon was united in marriage to Sarah Bond, who was born in Union township, this county, daughter of John Edward Bond and wife, well-known residents of that part of the county, and to this union seven children have been born, Libbie, Ella, Golda, Emmet, Ruby, Marjorie and Jason, the latter of whom now is the only one of these children remaining at home, the others having gone out in the world to do for themselves, and all are doing well.
     Mr. and Mrs. Moon
are interested in the church work or their neighborhood, the former being a member of the Baptist church and the latter a member of the Christian church, and both are held in high esteem by all who know them.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page   949
  WALTER I. MOON.  Among the well-known farmers of Clark township, Clinton county, Ohio, is Walter I. Moon, a native of this township, born on July 24, 1860, and a son of John W. and Jemima F. (Moore) Moon, the former of whom was born on the old home farm northwest of where Walter I. now lives, the latter of whom was born near Cuba.  The paternal grandparents were Isaac and Edna (Smithson) Moon, and the paternal great-grandparents were Samuel and Martha (Ruth) Moon.  The former were early settlers in Clinton county.  The maternal grandparents were Micajah and Rebecca (McGee) Moore,  the former of whom was an early settler near Cuba, and the latter of whom came with her parents, early in the history of Clinton county, to Clarkesville.  They were pioneer farmers.
     John W. Moon was educated in the public schools of Clinton county, and was a grain, and stock buyer in Farmers Station and at Lynchburg and Martinsville for many years.  He is now retired and living at Burtonville.  He had one hundred and forty acres of  land in this county, but has now sold out and is living retired.  Of the seven children born to John W. and Jemima F. (Moore) Moon, two are deceased.
     Walter I. Moon was educated in the public schools of Clark township, and engaged in farming upon attaining maturity.  He owns sixty-six acres of land and is engaged in general farming near Martinsville.  Mr. Moon's farm has been greatly improved since he purchased it.
     Walter I. Moon was married on Sept. 17, 1881, to Rebecca Garner, who was born on Dec. 28, 1864, a native of Clark township and a daughter of Silas GarnerSilas Garner was a son of Joseph Garner.  Joseph was the son of James and Mary (Moon) GarnerJames Garner was the son of John Fusha GarnerMary Moon was the daughter of Joseph Moon.
     Mr. and Mrs. Walter I. Moon
have had two children, Ralph H. and Blanche.  Ralph H. married Susie Grindel  of Green County, and they have three children, Morris Melvin, Alice Bell and Helen Ester.  Blanche married L. O. Preston, of Farmers Station, Ohio.
     Mr. and Mrs. Walter I. Moon are members of the Universalist church.  Mr. Moon is a member of the Free and Accepted Masons.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  557

Mr. & Mrs.
John B. Moore
JOHN B. MOORE

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page 912

  ORVILLE B. MOORE

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page 758


Mr. & Mrs.
Frank H. Morris
 

 


Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page 692

  IEMCIL B. MORRIS - Few citizens of Clark township, this county, are better known or more highly respected than the venerable Iemcil B. Morris, who was born near New Antioch, Ohio, on November 9, 1831, a son of William C. and Defcy (Bales) Morris, the former of whom was born on November 13, 1789, in Fairfax county, Virginia, and who died on September 7, 1887.  Mr. Morris' paternal grandfather was Nehemiah Morris, who lived and died in the Old Dominion state.  His maternal grandfather was Eldridge Bales, for many years a resident of Virginia, whose death occurred in Alabama.
     Iemcil B. Morris was educated in the Martinsville high school, principally under the tutelage of Prof. Charles Oren, a pioneer educator of considerable note.  After completing his education, he taught school near Centerville, Ohio, for four years, at the end of which time he married, since which time he has been engaged in farming.  He owns eighty-two acres of land where he lives in Clark township and one hundred acres of land near New Antioch.  His home farm is an excellent tract of land. 
     Mr. Morris' father, William C. Morris, emigrated to Adams county, Ohio, where he lived until his marriage, after which he came to Clinton county, settling later near Huntsville, Alabama.  After a sometime residence there he returned to Clinton county, where he and his wife spent the rest of their lives.  They were the parents of eleven children and were devout members of the Christian church.
     On December 21, 1865, Iemcil B. Morris was married to Mary Jane Canney, who born him one child, Tasman P., who was born on December 24, 1869, and who was educated in the district schools near Macedonia and in Wilmington College, where he spent three years.  After leaving college he was employed for seven years in a wholesale candy firm at Columbus, Ohio, being promoted from shipping clerk to manager, with the offices also of secretary and treasurer of the corporation.  Finally, however, he returned to the farm.  He is a member of the Free and Accepted Masons and the Junior Order of United American Mechanics.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page   570
 

DAVID A. MURPHY is a well-known farmer of Green township, this county.  He was born in this county in 1860, the son of David and Hannah (Dennis) Murphy, the former of whom was born in Berkley county, Virginia, July 31, 1816, and the latter, in Clinton County, Ohio, Sept. 1, 1831.
     The paternal grandparents of David A Murphy were Jacob and Mary (Lohman) 1791, and the paternal grandmother was born on March 4, 1791, and the paternal grandmother, March 9, 1793.  They came to this county in 1826 and settled west of Wilmington.  In 1834 they removed to Green township, settling where Isaiah Murphy now lives, and there the grandfather died on Dec. 29, 1871, and the grandmother, January 26, 1873.  Jacob Murphy and wife, who were married on April 20, 1813, reared the following children:  Rebecca J., David, William, Susannah, John, Catherine, Abraham, Nancy, Isaiah and Mary AnnJacob Murphy and his wife were members of the Christian church and Mr. Murphy was a Democrat.  The maternal grandfather of David A. Murphy was Richmond Dennis, a biographical sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work.
     David A. Murphy was reared on the farm and received his education in the public schools.  He took up farming as a vocation after leaving school and now rents sixty-eight acres of land in Clinton county, belonging to his aunt, Sarah Fenner, and is there engaged in general farming and stock raising.
     In 1881 David A. Murphy was married to Ella Clark, of Butler county, Ohio, a daughter of Sylvester and Sarah Ann (Gerard) ClarkSylvester Clark, who served for three years in the Union army during the Civil War, died at New Antioch, this county, in 1888, and his widow still survives him at the advanced age of eighty years.  To Mr. and Mrs. Murphy six children have been born, Hamilton C., Leona, Walter, Preston, Norval Clifton and Sarah Frances, all of whom are living.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page   931


Ulysses G. Murrell, M. D.
 
  JOHN THOMAS MYERS is a self-made farmer of Vernon township, this county.  He was born on July 21, 1869, in Kentucky, and son of Abram and Elizabeth (Myers) Myers, both natives of Kentucky, who died when John Thomas, who was the youngest of four children, was only twelve years of age, at which time he was compelled to shift for himself.  He had three sisters, Margaret, Martha and Susan.
    
Beginning at the age of twelve years, Mr. Myers worked for James Villers, of Clinton county, at seven dollars a month.  After working for seven years, his wages had been raised to thirteen dollars a month.  Later he worked for Charles Richardson and received sixteen dollars a month.  Altogether he worked by the month twelve years, and his largest wage was twenty dollars a month.  When he was about twenty-four years old, he rented the James Losh farm for one year and then rented the farm he now owns, comprising one hundred and thirteen acres of land. Mr. Myers did not purchase the farm for some sixteen years after he had first moved to it.  In the meantime, he had lived on another farm for three years.  He also owns thirty-one acres of land in Vernon township, in another tract, and has a total of one hundred and forty-two acres, upon which he has made many substantial improvements.  He is an extensive raiser of hogs, and a general farmer and stockman.
     On Jan. 7, 1883, John T. Myers was married to Mary Elizabeth Hoover, a native of Grant county, Indiana, born on May 4, 1862, the daughter of Levi P. and Christina (Tharp) Hoover.  Mrs. Myers'  parents were both natives of Ohio, her father having been born in Clinton county in 1836 and her mother in Greene county, Oct. 7, 1835.  Levi P. Hoover died in 1862, and his widow died on July 16, 1915 at the age of eighty years.  Mrs. Myers' maternal grandparents were John and Matilda (Gerard) Tharp, former died in Grant county, Indiana.  Mrs. Myers was one of four children, born to her parents, the others being Charles Franklin, Rosella Ann and John William.
    
To John Thomas and Elizabeth (Hoover) Myers ten children have been born, of whom, Lelia, the sixth born, is deceased, the living children being Clyde C., Edith Orilla, Creola May, Gladys Marie, Mary Christina, Hazel Rosella, Mabel Wilota, Charles Franklin and Harold John.
     Mr. and Mrs. Myers
are members of the Methodist church.  Mr. Myers votes the Republican ticket, but he has never been a candidate for office and has never aspired to office.   
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page   864
  SIDNEY D. MYERS, V. S.  No more prominent veterinary surgeon may be found in the state of Ohio than Sidney D. Myers, V. S., a resident of Wilmington, Ohio, who was graduated from the Ontario Veterinary College, at Toronto, in 1894, and who has served as president and as secretary for two terms each of the Ohio State Veterinary Medical Association.  Doctor Myers is now a member of the Ohio state board of veterinary examiners, and is a member of the American Veterinarian Medical Association, which is an international body.
     Born on July 1, 1872, in Wayne county, Ohio, Sidney D. Myers is the son of S. B. (familiarly known as Doc) and Sadie (Christy) Myers, the former of whom was born on January 9, 1846, in Wayne county, Ohio, and who died on Dec. 31, 1873, and the latter of whom was born on Nov. 8, 1848, in Wayne County, Ohio, and who died on Dec. 29, 1873.  Sidney D. Was only a little more than a year old when both of his parents passed away.  His paternal grandparents, John and Mary J. (Kauke) Myers, were natives of Columbiana county, Ohio, and of Pennsylvania-Dutch descent.  They were farmers by occupation and owned about two hundred acres of land in Wayne county.  Both were members of the Baptist church.  Doctor Myers maternal grandparents were Peter and Margaret (Hardy) Christy, the former of whom was of Irish descent and the latter of Scottish descent.  They were born in western Pennsylvania and early in life located in Wayne county, Ohio, where he was a farmer and well-to-do citizen.  They were members of the Presbyterian church. 
     The late S. B. and Sadie (Christy) Myers were married on Jan. 26, 1871, and about two years later both died in typhoid fever, the mother two days before the death of her husband.  The young couple were just ready to go to housekeeping and had not left the parental roof at the time of their death.  Doctor Myers had only one sister, who is younger than himself, Laura B., who married W. H. Troxel, a retail hardware dealer of Denver, Colorado.  After the death of his parents, Doctor Myers was reared by his grandparents, both maternal and paternal, and later by his uncle, George Hutton, and family.  Until twenty years of age he worked on the farm and attended the Wooster, Ohio, high school.  Later he was a student at the Ohio Normal School at Ada, Ohio.
     In 1892 Doctor Myers entered the Ontario Veterinary College, at Toronto, Canada, and after his gradation, in March, 1894, began the practice of his profession with Walter Shaw, V. S., at Dayton, where he remained only a few months.  In the fall of the same year he located at Wilmington, and here he has practiced ever since.  He has a model barn and takes care of horses in his barn.
     On March 4, 1896, Sidney D. Myers was married to Elizabeth Hayes, who was born in the province of Ontario, Canada, at London, and who is the daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth (Ralph) Hayes, the latter of whom was born in County Tipperary, Ireland, and who came to America when six years old.  The former was born in Blanchard township, Perth county, Ontario, Canada, and was a farmer by occupation.  He died in 1899, at the age of forty-seven and his wife died on Feb. 1, 1914, at the age of seventy.  They were members of the Episcopal church.  To them were born nine children: John McIntosh, Georgia and Russell.  All of these children are living near London, Ontario.  Doctor and Mrs. Myers have only one child, Neil, who was born on May 29, 1901.
     Doctor Myers is a Republican.  Doctor and Mrs. Myers are members of the Presbyterian church and he is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and the Modern Woodmen of America.  He is also a director in the Union Loan and Savings Company of Wilmington.  
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page   380

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