OHIO GENEALOGY EXPRESS

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Welcome to
Clinton County, Ohio
History & Genealogy

BIOGRAPHIES
Source:
History of Clinton County, Ohio
Its People, Industries and Institutions
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Albert J. Brown, A.M.
Supervising Editor
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With Biographical Sketches of Representative Citizens and
Genealogical Records of Many of the Old Families
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ILLUSTRATED
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B.F. Bowen & Co., Inc.
Indianapolis, Indiana
1915
Contrib. by Sharon Wick
 
A B C D E F G H I J K L M
N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

< CLICK HERE TO RETURN TO 1915 BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX >

  FRANK D. SAVILLE

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  851

  WILLIAM T. SCOTT, M. D.

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  569

  JOHN L. SEITZ

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  595

  CHARLES W. SEWELL

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  444

  EDWIN R. SHANK.  Clinton county may not only be proud of its farming districts and of the men who manage and control them, but also in its towns are found men who have risen to prominence in the business of buying and selling merchandise, and to these, too, is due a measure of praise.  Among this type of citizens is the man whose career the biographer is now to consider briefly, Edwin R. Shank having chosen to cast his lot with those engaged in mercantile business.
     Edwin R. Shank, son of Samuel A. and Mary A. (Stump) Shank, was born in Marion township, this county, on Nov. 5, 1886, his father being a native of the same county.  After serving his apprenticeship as a worker on the farm, at the same time attending the public schools, the Clarksville high school, and Wilmington College, in which latter excellent institution he spent a year.  For a time after completing his school work, Mr. Shank was engaged in various occupations, and on Feb. 15, 1915, became a merchant in the dry goods, shoes and notions line in Clarksville, where he enjoys a liberal and growing patronage.
     On Dec. 26, 1812, Edward R. Shank was united in marriage to Alice Florence Whitacre, daughter of George Whitacre, of Vernon township, this county, who was born in Warren county, Ohio, on Oct. 21, 1885.  To this union was born one child, a daughter, Mary Alma who died in infancy.
     Mr. and Mrs. Shank are stanch supporters of the Friends church.  Mr. Shank has always adhered to the principles of the Republican party, and is a believer in the benefits to be derived from membership in secret orders, for he belongs to the Clarksville lodge of Odd Fellows and to the Modern Woodmen.
     Mr. Shank, since his removal to Clarksville, has been a distinct asset to that community, for he has always stood for fair and square dealing, honor and integrity in his personal and social relationships, and represents a high type of citizenship.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  537
  LUCIUS D. SHANK.  A man's reputation among his neighbors in the community in which he has spent t he greater part of his life is a pretty certain index of his worth.  We either influence, or are influenced by others, according to our temperament and its reaction upon our environment, and when successful in life's battle, if that success has been won honorably, a study of the individual and the causes which have entered into his success, not only becomes profitable, but becomes likewise an inspiration to similar endeavor on the part of others.  In this connection, it is highly appropriate that the life of Lucius D. Shank, whose career in this county has given him prestige as a farmer and stock-raiser, be given consideration here.  Mr. Shank, who was born in Marion township, Clinton county, on Mar. 12, 1854, is the son of James H. and Margaret (Crossen) Shank, a former a native of the same township, born on Apr. 20, 1829.
     James H. Shank was a son of Henry Shank, mentioned elsewhere in this publication.  The maternal grandparents, George and Charlotte (Morrison) Crossen, braved the dangers of pioneer life when they came to this county, in which they spent the remainder of their days.  James H. Shank was a farmer, but when the fires of rebellion were raging in the South he was among the first to offer up his life, if need be, to save the Union.  And fate decreed that this should be his sacrifice, for, having been taken prisoner by the enemy, he died of starvation in a Confederate prison pen in February, 1865.  He was a Republican and a member of the Presbyterian church at Pleasant Grove.  He and his wife were the parents of five children, Lucius D., George Henry, Samuel A., Martin Elsworth (who died in infancy), and Florence May.  The mother of these children died on Mar. 21, 1906.
     Mr. Shank was reared a farmer's boy, receiving his education in the country schools near his home.  By hard work and personal sacrifice, he has acquired one hundred ninety-two acres of land, being ably assisted by the co-operation of his devoted wife.  It was on the 8th of February, 1877, that he married Mary Elizabeth Urton, who was born in this county on Jan. 24, 1854, the daughter of Daniel and Nancy Ann (Brown) Urton pioneers of this county.  To this union five children have beeen born, namely:  Otis J., Elva May, Veda Maud (decreased), Clarence D., and an infant son, who died.
     Mr. Shank is a Republican and served his community well as a member of the board for four years.  He is a  member of the Knights of Pythias and of the Grange.
     While Mr. Shank's life has been comparatively free from stirring adventure, having been spent in the quiet devoted to duty, it has been a life well spent, and its influence has been decidedly for good.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  875
  DR. FRANK R. SMITH. The Smith family has been prominently connected with the agricultural, business and political life of Clinton county, Ohio, for two or three generations. Many of the members of this family have been prominent farmers in Clinton county, but the later generations seem to have turned their attention to business and to the professions. Frank R. Smith, D. D. S., a well-known and prosperous dentist of Wilmington, who has been engaged in the practice of his profession in this city for about seventeen years, is a representative of the fourth generation of the family in Clinton county, his grandfather on his paternal side having been born in this county.
Dr. Frank R. Smith was born on January 1,1874, in Vernon township, Clinton county, Ohio, the son of George H. and Jerusha Araminta (Bates) Smith, the former of whom was born near Ogden in Vernon, in 1840, and who died on February 28, 1878, when Frank R. was only four years old, and the latter born near Springboro, Warren county, on October 15, 1846, and is still living.
The paternal grandparents of Dr. Frank R. Smith were Daniel and Ann (Hartman) Smith, the former of whom was born in Clinton county, Ohio, and the latter of whom was born in Virginia, and who was brought to Ohio from Virginia when a child. Daniel Smith owned a farm in Vernon township, where he lived and died. He and his wife and family were members of the Methodist Protestant church. They reared four sons and one daughter. Doctor Smith's maternal grandparents were William and Phoebe (Jenks) Bates, the former of whom was born in Utica, New York, in 1820, and who died in 1890, and the latter of whom was born near Saboy, Massachusetts, in 1822, and who died in 1901. William Bates came with his parents, Thomas and Sarah Bates, to Clinton county, Ohio, when a lad. Thomas Bates had emigrated from England when he was twelve years old. About 1835 the family removed from New York with thirteen children and settled in Clarksville, Clinton county, where they operated a dairy for John Hadley for several years. Thomas Bates moved from Clarksville to Springboro, Warren county where William Bates grew up. Later the father came to Washington township, Clinton county, and purchased the Woodmansee farm of three hundred acres and died there. Three of his sons divided the farm and lived there for many years. William Bates inherited a farm in Washington township and added to it in after life, living there until his death. He was a carpenter by trade and not only erected all of the buildings on his own place, but erected a good many barns on other farms. He was a dyed-in-the-wool Republican and prominent in local politics, especially in Washington township, where he served as township trustee. He and his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mrs. Phoebe (Jenks) Bates, who was the wife of William Bates, was the daughter of Patton and Polly Jenks, who were born in Massachusetts. In 1840 they settled in Washington township, Clinton county, Ohio, where Patton Jenks purchased a farm of two hundred and eighty acres. It was upon this farm that he and his wife died. They had four children, of whom Doctor Smith's mother was the eldest. The others were Elsina, who died at the age of eleven; David, deceased, who was a farmer; Sarah Jane, who married Ira Hodson, of Dayton, Ohio, and who died in 1912.
George H. Smith, who was Doctor Smith's father, grew up in Vernon township, Clinton county, and after his marriage rented land in Vernon township. He was a strong Republican and in 1876 was elected sheriff of Clinton county, passing away in 1878 at the age of thirty-eight years, while the incumbent of that office. He and his wife were members of the Methodist Protestant church. He was a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Masonic fraternity. In the latter he became a Knight Templar, a member of Ealey Commandery at Washington C. H. Dr. Frank R. Smith had only one brother, Edmond J., who was born in October, 1866, and who lives at Wilmington. He is a traveling salesman for the Champion Bridge Company, and married Elizabeth Lewis After the death of Dr. Frank It. Smith's father, his mother made her home with her parents until they passed away and then lived on the home place until 1913, when she moved to Wilmington, purchasing a home where she now lives.
Frank R. Smith was only four years old, as heretofore noted, when his father passed away, and he was taken by his mother to live on his maternal grandparents' farm in Washington township, and there he grew to manhood. After attending the district schools in Washington township, he became a student at Wilmington College, and finally entered the Cincinnati Dental College and was graduated with the class of 1896. Two years later he came to Wilmington and began the practice of his profession, where he has been engaged ever since. Doctor Smith has been successful in the practice of his profession and enjoys a large patronage.
On March 8, 1905, Frank R. Smith was married to Eleanor Madden, who was born in Clinton county, Ohio, the daughter of Arthur and Mary Madden, the former of whom is deceased, but the latter of whom is still living. Mrs. Smith's father was a traveling salesman who lived at Wilmington. At one time he served his fellow citizens as a member of the Ohio state Senate. Doctor and Mrs. Smith have no children.
Dr. Frank R. Smith is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. He is a man who has made a special study of all of the modern devices of dentistry and is thoroughly up-to-date in the practice of his profession. He takes a worthy interest in public affairs, but has never aspired to office.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  374

Mr. & Mrs.
James E. Smith
JAMES E. SMITH

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page 720


Simeon G. Smith
SIMEON G. SMITH

 

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page 420

  THOMAS SOUTH.  Among the earnest men of a past generation in Clinton county, whose enterprise, strength of character and engaging personality won a prominent place in the hearts of his neighbors and fellow citizens and the respect and confidence of the people of Clinton county, was the late Thomas South, who served two terms as sheriff of Clinton county.  He helped to build many of the public buildings now standing in this county, was a man of positive views and laudable ambitions, and his influence was always exerted for the advancement of his friends.  He was a very worth citizen and a good man.
     Thomas South was born on January8, 1840, in Goshen, Clermont county, Ohio, and died on Dec. 28, 1912.  He was a son of Benjamin and Mary (Brunson) South, the former of whom was born in Cincinnati, and who died in 1862 of pneumonia, contracted while he was visiting his son in the Union army.  His wife died on May 29, 1892, at the age of seventy-two years.  Benjamin South was a stone-mason, and lied near Goshen in Clermont county all his life.  All the members of his family were identified with the Presbyterian church.  He and his wife had only two children, Thomas, the subject of this sketch, and William, who died on Nov. 20, 1878, as the result of the accidental discharge of a gun while he was hunting.  He also was a bricklayer by trade. 
     Thomas South attended the district schools of Clermont county, and later one of the leading business colleges at Cincinnati, where he obtained a good education.  He was a man of more than ordinary native ability and made good use of his educational advantages and opportunities.
     On June 9m, 1861, Thomas South enlisted in Company C, Second Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and served practically to the end of the war, having been discharged on Oct. 10, 1864.  Wounded in the left hand in the battle of Perryville, Kentucky, he afterward was unable to carry a gun and served as orderly in the adjutant's office.  Before this, however, he had participated in many battles and was a courageous soldier.  Before this, however, he had participated in many battles and was a courageous soldier, a man of deep and abiding patriotism, who was willing to give up his life's blood in the cause of human freedom and in behalf of the perpetuity of the American Union.
     Shortly after the close of the Civil War, Thomas South was married on Sept. 14, 1865, to Martha Anderson, who was born at Owensville, Clermont county, Ohio, on Sept. 20, 1847, and who is the daughter of Peter and Mary (Smith) Anderson, the former of whom was born in New Jersey and at the age of twenty-one located in Clermont county, Ohio, in 1816, and died in 1851.  She was the daughter of Christopher and Margaret Smith, early settlers of Owensville, in Clermont county, and farmers by occupation.  They came to Ohio from near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  Christopher was a soldier in the Revolutionary War.
     After his marriage, Thomas South continued working at his trade which he had learned as a boy.  He worked as a brick-mason while living in Goshen, Ohio, but in 1869 he and the family removed to Wilmington, where he lived until his death in 1912.  In 1905 he built a home at the corner of Walnut and Sugartree streets, and it is in this house that Mrs. South now lives.
     In 1893 Mr. South was elected sheriff of Clinton county on the Republican ticket and served two terms, or four yeas in all.  After retiring from public office and public service, he purchased a steam laundry and was associated with his son in the operation of this enterprise until his death.
     Mr. and Mrs. South were the parents of five children, as follows: Mary, who was born on June 24, 1866, and died at the age of twenty in Wilmington, on July 26, 1886, was a student at Wilmington College; Harry, March 25, 1868, is a farmer in Adams township; Edward, February 27, 1871, died at the age of twenty-seven, on Oct. 6, 1896; Benjamin, April 2, 1874, is the present sheriff of Clinton county, having been elected on the Republican ticket; Walter, February 27, 1880, is proprietor of the South Brother's  laundry, of Wilmington.
     The late Thomas South was a charter member of Morris McMillan Post, Grand Army of the Republic.  An esteemed and valuable citizen of this great county, his death was widely mourned and he is generously remembered for the large part he had in the civic and political life of this county.  Mrs. South is a refined and cultured woman and highly respected by the people of this city.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  377
  J. LESTER SPAHR

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  394


J. W. SPARKS
JOSIAH W. SPARKS

 

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  376

  JOHN SPEER, one of the leading farmers of Liberty township, this county, and one of the best-informed citizens of that township lives on the old paternal homestead.  He was born at Ashgrove, Illinois, on Nov. 18, 1869, the son of Samuel and Eliza (Oren) Speer, the former born in Greene county, Ohio, on Sept. 30, 1835, and the latter in Clinton county on Nov. 25, 1837.
     Eliza Oren was the daughter of John and Martha (Bailey) Oren, the former a native of Tennessee, who came with his father, John Oren, Sr., to this state.  They settled on two hundred acres of land in Union township, this county, and became prominent in the affairs of the Friends church.  By Martha Bailey, who was his first wife, John Oren, Jr., had seven children, of whom Daniel B. and Henry served in the Civil War, both giving their lives to the service.  The other children were Eli, Eliza, Martha, Asa and Lewis.  John Oren, Sr., was a native of Pennsylvania, who moved to Tennessee, but not being able to reconcile himself to the presence of human slavery, came to Ohio in order to live in a free state.  Arriving in 1810, he settled in Union township and became very active in the work of the Friends church, being rated as a very valuable man in the live of the community.  Samuel Speer's parents were James and Mary (Fletcher) Speer, natives of North Carolina and Ohio, respectively, the former of whom was a mere lad when he came with his father, Samuel Speer, to this state.  James Speer owned over two hundred acres of land in Greene county, Ohio.  He and his wife were the parents of six children, Samuel, John, Sarah, Lydia, Henry and Benjamin, the latter of whom was a soldier in the Union army during the Civil War.  James Speer was a son of Samuel and Sarah (Dunkin) Speer, natives of North Carolina, who moved with their parents to Ohio and settled in Greene county where they spent the rest of their lives.  They were prominent members of the Friends church and Mrs. Samuel Speer  was a minister in that church.  They were the parents of three children, James, John and Samuel.
     Samuel Speer
, the father of James Speer, the subject of this sketch, received the rudiments of an education in the common schools, which he supplemented by extensive home reading and became one of the most enlightened farmers in this section of Ohio.  He owned one hundred and seventy-eight acres of land in Liberty townships, which is the farm his son John now owns.  He is active in the Friends church all his life.  He died on Feb. 10, 1911, his wife having died a few days previously, on Jan. 20, of the same year.  They were the parents of five children, Eli B., John, James, Henry  and Jennie, the three latter of whom died in childhood in Illinois.  Eli B. Speer, who died on Oct. 5, 1901, married Testa Spears, and at his death left two children, Frank and Ethel.
    
Reared on the farm and educated in the common schools of Clinton county, John Speer was married on July 25, 1800, to Tacy Smith, who was born in this county, ,Jan. 26, 1872, the daughter of Samuel and Ester (Smith) Smith.  Samuel Smith was a native of Greene county, Ohio, and a shoemaker by trade.  During the latter part of his life, he was engaged in farming.  He was a soldier in the Civil War, a member of Company H. Seventy-fourth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and was once wounded in a skirmish.
     After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Speer located on the farm where they now live and where five children have been born to them, of whom two, Henry and Harold (the children.  Frederick married Louise Turner, and is at present a student in the veterinary college.  The remainder of the children are unmarried.
     Mr. and Mrs. Speer own altogether two hundred and sixty-four acres of land.  They are members of the Friends church and regular attendants at the Dover Sunday school and meeting.  Mr. Speer is a member of the board of education of Liberty township and he and his wife are warmly interested in all good works in that vicinity, being held in the very highest regard by all their large circle of acquaintances.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  686
NOTE:  For Reference, see Henry Spears in Portrait and Biographies of Shelby and Moultrie Counties, Illinois - Page

Friend P. Spence


Mr. & Mrs.
Friend P. Spence
Photograph taken at the time of their marriage, in 1873

FRIEND P. SPENCE

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  628

  LEWIS J. SPICKARD, M. D.

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  850

  MARTIN J. SPINKS

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  463

  ALFRED SPRAGUE

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  556

  ROBERT TURNER STANFIELD.  The name of Robert Turner Stanfield is one familiar to the residents of Vernon township, this county, as that of a hard-working, energetic and neighborly farmer, whose toil in the cultivation of the soil has brought him a competence, but who has not limited his activities to one occupation.  Mingling with men, he has found other lines of work equally as absorbing, and for years has served the public in the capacity of assessor, an office which he has filled most creditably.
     Robert T. Stanfield was born in Greene county, Ohio, on Mar. 22, 155, the son of James and Mahala (Turner) Stanfield, both born in the same county, the former in 1824, and the latter four years later.  James Stanfield was the son of Samuel and Massey (Kennedy) Stanfield, the former, Samuel, was a native of North Carolina, whose father, William Stanfield, was a pioneer of Greene county, this state, where he died after a worthy and useful life.  Massey Kennedy was born in Georgia in 1901.  She died in Green county, this state, in 1873, having outlived her husband nearly twenty years, his death having occurred in 1854.  Mahala Turner was the daughter of Robert and Christena (Hegler) Turner, the latter a native of Pennsylvania.  Robert Turner was quite a young man when he migrated to Green county, where he afterwards married.  After the death of his wife in 1868, when they still resided in the above-named county, he moved to Warren county, to make his home with his daughter, and there he spent the rest of his life, living to the extraordinary age of ninety-even years, his death occurring in 1892.
     James Stanfield came from Greene county to Clinton county in 1876 and soon afterwards purchased a farm across the line in warren county, near the present home of the subject of this sketch.  This piece of land consisted of one hundred and ninety-five acres.  He passed away in Vernon township, in 1905, his wife's death following five years later.  They were the parents of ten children, as follows:  William, John (deceased), Christina (deceased), Robert T., Frank, Elva, Aaron (deceased), Samuel, Sarah and Mattie.
     Robert T. Stanfield
was born and reared on the farm of his father, receiving the usual common-school education, after which he was privileged to attend the Spring Valley high school.  In 1876 he began a residence in Warren county which lengthened into twenty years, after which he and his family removed to this county, and the following year, he bought the farm of fifty acres which he still owns and on which he has become a successful stock raiser..
     In 1881 Robert T. Stanfield was united in marriage to Florence E. McCray, who was born in Clarksville, this county, in July, 1855, daughter of Joseph and Amanda (Seaver) McCray, who had lived in this county since its early days.  Joseph McCray died in 1897, having been a widower since 1877.  To Robert T. and Florence (McCray) Stanfield two children have been born, Zula M. and Albert H.  The former married Charles Camp and has four children, Leland, Leona (deceased), Nina and EvelynAlbert H. Stanfield married Mary Pagenkopf, of Wisconsin, and has four children, Virgil, Virgene, Augusta and Neda.
     The man who can remain in one public office for fifteen consecutive years must be a man of sterling worth; otherwise, keen competition would see to it that he took another line of work.  Robert T. Stanfield has been township assessor of Vernon township for this length of time and has fulfilled the obligations of the office in such a way as to win the respect and confidence of the public.  Having lived in the county for so long a time, he is one of the best known farmers in the vicinity, and has a great many warm friends.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  703
  ARTHUR W. STARBUCK.  Among the enterprising and energetic merchants of the city of Wilmington, this county, few are better known or have a wider repute for the careful manner in which their several mercantile enterprises are conducted than has Arthur W. Starbuck.  The popular book dealer, whose well-appointed book store is one of the well established concerns of that city.  Mr. Starbnck practically "grew up" in the mercantile life of Wilmington, having taken his place in the commercial circles of the town upon reaching his majority, thirty-five years ago, since which time he has been continuously and actively identified with the business interests of the county seat.  In that time having so thoroughly acquainted himself with the needs and the tastes of the people that he is able to cater to these tastes in the most competent possible manner.  For fourteen years he was identified with the retail shoe trade of the city, after which he was engaged in the restaurant business for thirteen years, at the end of which time he became prominently connected with the local gas company's office, a position which he retained until 1909, in which year he engaged in the book and stationery business and has been thus successfully occupied since, his store being recognized as one of the most prominent establishments of the city.
     Arthur W. Sturbuck was born at Dover, in Union township, this county, on February 19, 1859, the son of Thomas and Elizabeth (Ellis) Starbuck, both natives of this county, the former of whom was born in Union township in the year 1834 and the latter of whom was born near the village of Port William in the year 1830, both being members of pioneer families of this county.
     Thomas Starbuck, who now lives in California, is the son of Latham Starbuck, the latter of whom was the son of Hezekiah Starbuck, a native of North Carolina, who settled in this county about the year of 1812.  Edward Starbuck, the first of the Starbucks to immigrate to this country was a native of Nantucket, England, who came to America about three hundred years ago and was one of the original purchasers of Nantucket Island from the Indians.  He was the founder of a large and prominent family and his numerous descendants are found in many parts of the country, a vigorous progeny, all doing well their various parts in the grand social scheme of this nation, Hezekiah Starbuck was a sailor, but during the War of 1812 he found his occupation practically gone, as nearly all American commerce was swept off the seas during that stormy period.  In consequence of this state of affairs he decided to try pioneering in the unsettled wilds of the great country to the west and he and his family immigrated to Ohio, locating in Clinton county, entering a farm from the government in the Dover neighborhood, where the family became permanently established.
     Latham Starbuck, son of Hezekiah, was a grown boy when the family located in this county and he presently bought a farm of one hundred and fifty acres in Union township, on which he spent the rest of his life, becoming one of the most prominent and influential settlers of that section of the county.  He and his wife were Quakers and their children were retired in accordance with the rigid tenets of their birthright faith, they, in turn becoming useful and influential members of the community.  Thomas Starbuck, son of Latham, was reared on the home farm in Union township, remaining on the farm until some time after his marriage.  He then engaged in the manufacture of tile at Bowersville, Ohio, and was thus successfully engaged until the year 1870.  In 1895 he moved to Armada, California, where he immediately entered prominently into the public life of his new home town and for some years past has been postmaster of Armada.  Thomas Starbuck is a Republican and is a member of and active worker in the Christian church, being widely recognized as a lay preacher of much power in that denomination.
     In 1858 Thomas Starbuck was united in marriage to Elizabeth Ellis, who was born near Port William, this county, the daughter of James and Susannah Ellis, also natives of Clinton county, the former of whom was the son of a Pennsylvanian, a soldier in the patriot army during the Revolutionary War, who settled in this county early in the last century.
     To Thomas and Elizabeth (Ellis) Starbuck were born live children, of whom  the immediate subject of this sketch is the eldest, namely: Arthur W., a prominent merchant of Wilmington: Emma L., who married William Utter and died in 1904; Florence E., who lives with her parents in California; Granville E., a music teacher of San Bernardino, California, and Elmer E., a cabinet maker, who lives in the same city.
     Arthur W. Starbuck was ream! on the home farm in Union township, until two years of age and moved to near Bowersvllle, where he received his elementary education in the Palmer district school of that township, supplementing the same by a course in the public schools at New Antioch.  He worked on the farm until he had attained his majority, after which he located in Wilmington, which ever since bas been his home.  Upon coming to Wilmington.  Mr. Starbuck entered the employ of Harry Walker and for fourteen years was engaged as a clerk in th_ latter's retail shoe store.  At the end of that time he formed a partnership with J. T. Carroll and for five years was engaged with the latter in the restaurant business.  At the end of that time this partnership was dissolved and Mr. Starbuck conducted the restaurant alone for eight years, he then sold the business and was engaged as office man for the Wilmington Gas Company until 1909, in which year he bought Harry H. Walker s book store, a business which he has since conducted with much success and in a manner most gratifying to his extensive trade.
     On Nov. 13, 1883, Arthur W. Starbuck was united in marriage to Alberta Vandervort, who was born at New Antioch. this county, daughter of Richard and Catherine Vandervort, prominent farming people of that neighborhood, both of whom are now deceased.  To this happy union two children have been horn, Mabel, who was born in 1884, married Clifton T. Hazard, teacher of mathematics at Purdue University, and lives at West Lafayette. Indiana, and Charles R., born in 1889, who is a clerk in the Clinton County National Bank of Wilmington.
     Mr. Starbuck is a Republican and takes such part in the political affairs of his home community as all good citizens owe to the commonwealth, being active in furthering such measures as are designed to promote the common good. H e has given much and thoughtful attention to the affairs of the public schools of Wilmington and for six years was a very efficient members of the city school hoard. He is a member of the Wilmington lodge of the Knights of Pythias, in the affairs of which he takes a warm Interest.  Active in commercial, political and social circles of Wilmington.  Mr. Starbuck has created for himself a very definite place in the life of the county seat and is one of the best-known men in Clinton county, enjoying the confidence and regard of all.  He and his wife are diligent in promoting all good works and are held in the highest esteem by all who know them.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  382

Asa & Almira Starbuck
ASA STARBUCK.   The name Starbuck is said to have been given by an ancient king to a hunter on account of his great skill in killing a buck deer by starlight.  The family is of English descent and was established in America by Edward Starbuck 1, who was born at Derbyshire, England, in 1604.  He married Catherine Reynolds, a native of Wales, and settled first in Dover, New Hampshire, in 1643.  He served as a representative to Massachusetts from 1643 to 1646, and became an elder in the church.  In 1650 he was one of nine persons who purchased Nantucket Island.  He died on Dec. 4, 1690.
     Asa Starbuck, who is a representative of the eighth generation of the Starbuck family in America, was born in Union township on the old Starbuck homestead, Mar. 3, 1846.  He had the advantage of a good education and during his long life has become one of the prominent farmers and stockmen of Clinton county.  He is also a well-known business man and honored and respected throughout the length and breadth of Clinton county.
     The parents of Asa Starbuck, were Jesse G. and Amy (Cox) Starbuck, the former of whom was born on Oct. 8, 1819, and died on Jan. 4, 1913, and the latter of whom was born on Feb. 1, 1823, and died on Apr. 13, 1892.  Jesse G. Starbuck was educated in the common schools of Union township, and was married at Fairfield meeting, in Hendricks county, Indiana, Oct. 20, 1842, to the daughter of Harmon and Martha CoxAmy (Cox) Starbuck was born on June 1, 1823, and removed to Hendricks county with her parents when a child.  After their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Starbuck settled on a farm, where they resided until their death.  During the first ten years of his married life Mr. Starbuck was engaged in running a steam saw-mill, which had a run of burrs attached for grinding corn.  The balance of his life was devoted to farming.  He and his wife reared a family of five children, others having died early in life, as follow:  Adin L., who was born on May 10, 1844, was married on Oct. 12, 1865, to Louisa M. Pidgeon, who was born in Guilford county, North Carolina, Nov. 21, 1847, a daughter of Charles and Catherine Pidgeon; Asa, the subject of this sketch, was the second son; Martha, Jan. 29, 1848, was married on Feb. 16, 1876, to William D. Moorman, who was born on Apr. 3, 1845, a son of Samuel and Lucy (Johnson) Moorman; William R., May 12, 1858, graduated from Wilmington College and became a school teacher and farmer; and Jesse H., Nov. 11, 1864.
    
Reverting to the earlier ancestry of the Starbuck family, Edward Starbuck, who married Catherine Reynolds, had a son, Nathaniel, who was born in 1636, who married Mary Coffin, died on June 6, 1719.  They had a son, Jethro, born on Dec. 14, 1671, who married Dorcas Gayer, "among friends," and who died on Aug. 12, 1770.  Jethro and Dorcas (Gayer) Starbuck had a son, Thomas, who was born on Oct. 12, 1796, who married Rachel Allen and who died on July 5, 1777.  They had a son, Hezekiah, who was born on Feb. 10, 1749, and who died on Jan. 10, 1830.
     Of Thomas and Rachel (Allen) Starbuck it may be said further that the latter was born in 1710 and died on May 31, 1789.  Hezekiah Starbuck, their son, was born on Nantucket Island and was married to Mary Thurston, Nov. 19, 1771.  He was a seafaring man and captain of a whaling vessel for some years.  He was on a cruise when the Revolutionary War broke out and on his return he had great difficulty in entering the harbor which was blockaded by the enemy.  In 1785 he emigrated to Guilford county, North Carolina, where he raised a family and where his wife died, June 9, 1806.  He afterwards removed to Clinton county, where he remained until his death, which occurred on June 10, 1830.  During their residence in Guilford county, North Carolina, they lived at New Garden.  Hezekiah and Mary (Thurston) Starbuck had ten children.
     One of these ten children, Gayer Starbuck, the third born, was the paternal grandfather of Asa Starbuck, the subject of this sketch.  The ten children, in order of their birth, were as follows:  Mary, was born on Aug. 17, 1772; George, Apr. 8, 1775; Gayer, Aug. 10, 1777; Clarissa, Jan. 28, 1780; Hezekiah, Jr., Oct. 14, 1782; Jethro, May 15, 1785; Samuel, Jan. 10, 1788; Mary, Mar. 3, 1790; Latham, Feb. 3, 1793; and Rebekah, Jan. 14, 1880.
     Gayer Starbuck was born on Aug. 10 1777, on Nantucket Island, and removed with his parents to Guilford county, North Carolina, where he spent the early part of his life.  He learned the blacksmith trade and for many years followed that vocation.  On Jan. 17, 1799, by permission of the New Garden monthly meeting, he was married to Susannah Dillon, the daughter of Jesse and Anna DillonJesse Dillon, who was of Irish descent, was born in North Carolina in October, 1753, and on Apr. 29, 1778, married Hannah Ruckman, who was born on Mar. 20, 1754, a daughter of Joseph and Sarah Ruckman.  They came to Ohio in 1807.  To Gayer and Susannah (Dillon) Starbuck five sons and five daughters were born, of whom one died at the age of twenty-two, the remainder living to marry and rear families.  In 1807 Gayer Starbuck and family emigrated to Ohio, locating in Greene county, near where Paintersville is now situated.  In 1810 they came on to Clinton county and located on the farm later owned by Jesse G. StarbuckGayer Starbuck died on Dec. 30, 1866, but his wife preceded him about five years, dying on Mar. 12, 1861.
     Gayer Starbuck was a director of the first agricultural fair ever held in Clinton county and was one of the pioneer movers in the organization.  Jesse G. Starbuck served as vice-president of the agricultural society in 1856, 1857 and 1858.  Gayer Starbuck was also active in the first movement of importing Shorthorn cattle from England about 1834.
     Ann Starbuck obtained his education in the Dover district schools in his neighborhood and at Earlham College, where he spent one term, and then spent two years at Franklin College, at Wilmington.  He, therefore, enjoyed superior educational advantages.  After leaving college he worked on his father's farm for a year and then married and rented one of his father's farms for a few years.  In 1876 he purchased one hundred and twenty-two acres from his father and upon this farm he still lives.  In 1892 Mr. Starbuck built his present dwelling.  He raises Shorthorn cattle and Merino sheep.  He is a public-spirited citizen and has helped to build highways, railroads, colleges and churches.  There is a stone quarry on Mr. Starbuck's farm and he sells stone for building macadamized roads.
     On June 25 1868, Asa Starbuck was married to Almira Custis, who was born in Union township, Clinton county, Ohio, on the old Custis homestead, the daughter of John W. and Louisa (Smith) Custis, both deceased.  The father of Mrs. Starbuck was born in Virginia, and the mother in Scioto county, Ohio.  They lived in the eastern part of Union township and were farmers.
     Mr. and Mrs. Asa Starbuck are the parents of eleven children, as follow:  Nettie, married Alpheus Hartman, who died in 1895, since which time she has lived with her parents; they had one child, Alpheus, born on Feb. 2, 1895; Laura, married G. H. Carter, a resident of Wilson township; Charles A., lives on a farm in Union township; Jessie C., lives on a farm in Union township; Sallie, who was born in July, 1875, died in 1890; Cora D., is unmarried and lives at home; Marion R., is a resident of Union township; Amy, is a stenographer and lives in Washington, Ohio; Bertha, is unmarried, and lives at home; Ella, is also unmarried and lives at home; Myra, is a stenographer for the Irwin Auger Bit Company, of Wilmington.
     Mr. and Mrs. Starbuck divide their religious affiliations, he being a member of the Friends church at Dover and she of the Central Christian church at Wilmington.  Since 1879 Mr. Starbuck has been identified with the Prohibition party and is a strong opponent of the traffic in intoxicating liquors.  He has had a most commendable and praise-worth part of every public movement in this county and has lived a life to a very good purpose.  He is popular and well known in this county.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  696
  MARION R. STARBUCK.   The history of every man is an account of what he does, of the people from whom he has sprung and of what he expects or is attempting to accomplish.  Marion R. Starbuck, a splendid young farmer of Union township, this county, belongs to the famous Starbuck family who have had so much to do with the early history and development of this comity.  This family has been noted for Its strong interest in education.  Its high standard of morals and for its culture and refinement.
     Marion R. Starbuck, who represents one of the latest generations of the family in this county, was born on Mar. 8, 1879, the son of Asa and Elmira (Custis) Starbuck, the former of whom is a representative of the eighth generation of the family in America and who was born in Union township, on the old Starbuck homestead on Mar. 3, 1810, the son of Jesse G. and Amy (Cox) Starbuck.  The latter is the daughter of John W. and Louisa (Smith) Custis, the former of whom was born in Virginia and the latter in Ohio.  They lived in the eastern part of Union township and are both deceased.
     The complete history of the Starbuck family in America is contained in the sketch of Asa Starbuck, presented elsewhere in this volume.  Here it may be said, however, that Marion Starbuck's grandfather was born on Oct. 8, 1810, and died on Jan. 4, 1913, and his grandmother was born on Feb. 1, 1823, and died on Apr. 13, 1892.  They had boon married in Hendricks county, Indiana, on Oct. 20, 1842.  Jesse G. Starbuck was the son of Gayer and Susannah (Dillon) Starbuck, the former of whom was born on Aug. 10, 1777, and the latter of whom was the daughter of Jesse and Anna Dillon.  Gayer Starbuck was the son of Hezekiah and Mary (Thurston) Starbuck, who were married on Nov. 19, 1771.  Hezakiah was the son of Thomas and Rachel (Allen) Starbuck, the former of whom was born in 1710 and who died on May 31, 1789.  Thomas was the son of Jethro and Dorcas (Gayer) StarbuckJethro was the son of Nathaniel and Mary (Collin) StarbuckNathaniel was the son of Edward and Catherine (Reynolds) StarbuckEdward Starbuck was born in Derbyshire, England, in 1604, and his wife, Catherine Reynolds, was a native of Wales.  They settled first in Dover, New Hampshire, in 1643.  He was a representative in the Massachusetts Legislature from 1643 to 1646, and was one of nine persons who, in 1659, purchased Nantucket island.  He died on Dec. 4, 1690.
     Marion R. Starbuck attended the district school in Union township, known as the "Dutch" school, and later was a student at Wilmington College.  In the meantime, he worked for his father on the farm and after finishing college, returned to the farm, where he worked until his marriage.  After his marriage, Mr. Starbuck rented land in Union township for four years and in 1 0ns purchased one hundred acres out of the old Jesse ft. Starbuck fnrui in Union township.  The same year he built a pretty, modern house und four years Inter erected a large and commodious barn.  Mr. Starbuck is engaged in general farming and has been quite successful.
     On Mar. 1, 1900, Marion R. Starbuck was married to Goldie M. Sharp, who was born on the edge of Liberty township, in Clinton county, the daughter of Elmer W. and Hannah Sharp, both of whom are still living.  The father of Mrs. Starbuck is a farmer in Liberty township, who came to Clinton county from Indiana.  To Mr. and Mrs. Starbuck one child has been born, a son, Maynard, born on Sept. 20, 1909.
     Mr. and Mrs. Starbuck belong to the Dover meeting of the Friends church.  On national Issues Mr. Starbuck is a Republican, but locally he votes for the man he considers best fitted for office, regardless of the ticket upon which he is running.  Mr. Starbuck himself has never taken an active interest in politics.  He is a popular young farmer and very well known in Clinton county.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  572
  WILLIAM A. STARBUCK.  No man living in Clinton county, Ohio, has taken a more sincere and conscientious interest in the work of the Society of Friends than William A. Starbuck, of Union township, who has made church work a chief object of his life.  He is an elder in the Dover meeting of the Friends church and trustee of the yearly meeting, also president of the yearly meeting Bible school, and interested in the public work of the church of whatever nature.  The Society of Friends has had a tremendous influence upon the moral and civil life of Clinton county, and during his day and generation Mr. Starbuck has contributed largely to the influence of this church and to the increase of its influence and sphere of activity.  Like so many members of this great religious organization, he is a well-informed and intelligent farmer.  In fact, the Friends church from the time of its foundation in America has stood for higher education, and members of this church have not only been influential in public life in the Middle West, but they have been influential in the larger affairs of the country as a whole.
     William A. Starbuck, the proprietor of a farm of one hundred and forty acres in Union township, was born in the township where he resides, three miels east of Wilmington, Mar. 4, 1856, and is the son of John T. and Margaret (Shields) Starbuck, the former of whom was born in Union township, Clinton county, Ohio, Oct. 6, 1822, and died in the fall of 1900, and the latter of whom was a native of Union township, born in 1824, and died in the fall of 1913.
     John T. Starbuck, who was the son of Latham and Sarah (Milton) Starbuck, natives of North Carolina, who immigrated to Ohio, and settled in Clinton county in 1811, was a farmer and carpenter by occupation.  He was one of a family of twelve children, sseven sons and five daughters, and the fourth of the family.  He owned at one time two hundred and twenty-two acres of land.  In 1852 he was married to Margaret Shields, the daughter of William and Hannah (Frazier) Shields natives of Tennessee, who came to Clinton county, Ohio, about 1806 and settled in Liberty township, five miles north of Wilmington, on a farm of about one hundred acres, where they lived until their death.  They were members of the Dover meeting of Friends and had a family of two sons and eight daughters.  All of the eight daughters lived to advanced ages.  Many years ago the family inaugurated the custom of holding reunions, a custom which is still continued.
     John T. and Margaret (Shields) Starbuck had five children, namely:  Josephine, married Samuel Compton, a native of New Burlington, Ohio; William A. the subject of this sketch; Thomas, died at the age of twenty-two years; Clara married Jonas Pagett, and since his death she has lived at Wilmington; Albert, who lives at Bradentown, Florida, has been engaged in the saw-mill business, but is contracting at present.
     Latham and Sarah (Milton) Starbuck settled in the extreme northern portion of Union township in 1811.  They had spent a season in Tennessee on the way north, where they raised a crop, and lost a child by death.  They came through from Tennessee in a "Carolina wagon," drawn by one horse, bringing with them their personal effects.  Subsequently, Latham Starbuck revisited his birthplace in North Carolina, and upon his return to Clinton county purchased fifty acres of land in Wilson township.  Four years later he traded it for a farm of one hundred acres in Union township, upon which he spent in remainder of his life, dying about 1871.  Latham Starbuck had a brother, Gayer, who was born on the island of Nantucket in 1777, and who, in 1785, removed with his parents to Guilford county, North Carolina.  In 1799 he married Susanna Dillon, a daughter of Jesse Dillon, with whom he lived nearly sixty-two years, until her death.  They immigrated to Ohio in 1807, and first located in Greene county.  In 1810 they settled on a farm, where they spent the remainder of their lives.  Susanna died in 1861, and her husband in 1866.  Later his farm was owned by his son, Jesse G. Gayer Starbuck was a blacksmith by trade.  His father and the father of Latham Starbuck, Hezekiah, was a native of Nantucket island, born on Apr. 10, 1749.  Hezekiah Starbuck was a sea-faring man and the captain of a whaling vessel for a number of years.  He was married on Nov. 19, 1771.  He was on a cruise when the Revolutionary War broke out and on his return had difficulty in entering the harbor, which was blockaded by the enemy.  His wife, Mary Starbuck, died on June 9, 1806, and he passed away of June 10, 1830.  Hezekiah Starbuck's parents were Thomas and Rachel Starbuck, the former of whom was born on May 12, 1707, on Nantucket Island, and died on Feb. 2, 1777.  Rachel Starbuck was born in 1710, and died on May 31, 1789.
     William A. Starbuck, the subject of this sketch, attended the public schools of Union township, and after finishing the public schools became a student at Wilmington College, and there received a liberal education.  After his marriage he became a land owner and lived on the old Daniel Bailey place, on the Port William pike in Union township, which his wife had acquired.  Mr. Starbuck eventually purchased more land adjoining and they now have a hundred and forty acres.  He has the patent which was originally issued by the government to the Bailey family for the farm which they now own.  He is interested in improving stock and in general agriculture.
     Mr. Starbuck helped to organize the Clinton County Mutual Insurance Company and after its organization was elected a director.  He has served as such ever since.  Mr. Starbuck is also very active in the Clinton County Farmers Institute, and is the present president of that organization, having served in the office several times before.
     On Sept. 8, 1880, William A. Starbuck was married to Marianna Bailey, who is the daughter of Josiah and Mary (Jenkins) Bailey, the former of whom was born in the early days of 1818, and the latter of whom, a Virginian by birth, came when a young woman from Frederick county, Virginia, to Clinton county.  Josiah Bailey was a prominent Abolitionist before the Civil War, who lived a long and useful life and who passed away in 1895.  To Josiah and Mary Bailey were born three children:  Hannah, who married David A. Pigeon; Marianna, the wife of William A. Starbuck; and Albert I., vice-president of the Clinton County National Bank and prominently identified with the Champion Iron Bridge Company and the Irwin Auger Bit Company, who married Mary E. Hussey in September, 1871.  Mr. and Mrs. Starbuck have had four children, as follow:  Maurice B., born on July 25, 1883, married Clara Terrell, and is at present in Kirksville, Missouri, completing a course in osteopathy; Everett J., 1886, and who lives on a farm near his father's home, married Bertha Shupert; Edith M., November, 1890, married Howard McKay, who is principal of the high school at Mt. Pleasant, Ohio; and Albert Franklin, September, 1904.
     Mr. Starbuck is an ardent Republican.  He is a good man and a good citizen, and eminently qualified by training and disposition to carry on the work of his pioneer ancestors.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  573
  HENRY D. STEELE

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  922


William B. Steele
and Family
WILLIAM B. STEELE

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  884

  DENNIS STEPHENSDennis Stephens, who now owns a good farm of one hundred and fifty-five acres in Liberty township, and who is prominent in the educational affairs of Clinton county, was born on Apr. 10, 1808, in Greene county, Ohio, the son of Lewis A. and Catherine (McDorman) Stephens, the former of whom was born in 1844, in Highland county, Ohio, and the latter in Clinton county, the daughter of Risdon and Tacy McDorman, natives of Virginia, who settled in Clinton county after their marriage, and here owned a small farm.  They were members of the Methodist Protestant church.
     The paternal grandparents of Mr. Stephens were residents of Highland county, Ohio.  John Stephens, the paternal grandfather, was born in Highland county, and lived in that county all his life.  He was a large landholder, owning approximately five hundred acres, altogether.  By his first wife he had seven children,, Lewis A., Casper, Curren, John, Elizabeth, Julla and Mary.  By his second wife there were two children, William and Charles.  The great-grandfather was John Stephens, a native of Virginia, who came on horseback to Ohio and located in Highland county, where he owned a large tract of land.  He had five sons.
     The late Lewis A. Stephens was educated in the common schools, and served valiantly as a Union soldier during the Civil War, a member of Company M. Twelfth Ohio Cavalry, serving two years and eight months.  Later he became active in public affairs in this county, and was a prominent member in the Friends church.  He died on June 30, 1885, and his widow survived him until June 12, 1894.  They were the parents of seven children, of whom Nellie died at the age of eighteen.  Clarence at the age of seven and Roscoe at the age of eighteen months.  The living children are W. O., Dennis, the subject of this sketch, Vivie and Webster, all of whom are married except W. O.  Vivie, who is a resident of Xenia, Ohio, married Harry Higgins, and had one child, Edward Lewis.
     Educated in the common schools of Port William and reared on the farm, Dennis Stephens was married on June 30, 1898, to Nora Hannicutt, who was born in Liberty township, this county, daughter of Wilson and Mary Hunnicutt, to which union five children have been born, Donald Lewis, Thelma H., Mary Leota, Lorena Catharine and Howard Wilson.
     Mr. and Mrs. Stephens are members of the Friends church and attend the Sunday school, Mr. Stephens being a teacher of a class and has been assistant superintendent of the Sunday school.  Fraternally, he is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and has served as trustee of Liberty township for three terms, being active in the local councils of the Republican party.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  806
  JOHN STEPHENS.   A celebrated moralist once remarked that "there has scarcely passed a life of which a Judicious and faithful narrative would not have been useful."  There can be no doubt of the truth of this opinion when expressed by one of the greatest and best of men and it is particularly fitting to present the salient facts in the life of the late John Stephens, of Union township, Clinton county, Ohio.  He was an industrious and successful farmer, an enterprising and public-spirited citizen, who, as a consequence of his industry, perseverance, temperance and integrity, rose to a position of prominence among the hundreds of eminent farmers of this county.  During his long and useful life he was highly esteemed in the locality where he resided.
     John Stephens was born on Mar. 31, 1840, near Waynesville, Ohio, and died on May 2. 1914.  He was the son of Obadiah and Susannah (Ireland) Stephens.
     Obadiah Stephens was a well-known farmer and stock raiser of Clinton county, who was born in Morris county, New Jersey, Apr. 22, 1813.  He was the son of Ebenezer and Maria (Phoenix) Stephens, natives of New Jersey and of English and German descent.  His maternal grandfather was a soldier in the War of the Revolution and his father in the War of 1812.  Ebenezer Stephens was a millwright by trade and also a farmer.  His son was a farmer and later a distiller.  At the time of his death, he owned about four hundred and fifty acres in Clinton county.  Obadiah Stephens came to Clinton county in 1847.  On Apr. 13, 1837, he was married in Warren county to Susanna Ireland.  She was a native of Frederick county, Virginia, the daughter of Francis and Sarah (Curl) Ireland, the former of whom was a farmer by occupation and who located in Warren county in 1815, on a farm of sixty acres, where he lived until his death in November, 1817. and the latter of whom was also a native of the Old Dominion. Francis and Sarah (Curl) Ireland had six children: Thomas J., Lucinda, Susannah, John C., Artimesia and James M.
     Obadiah and Susannah Stephens were the parents of four children: Ann, Eliza, Emanueline, Francis I., and John, the subject of this sketch.  Obadiah Stephens was a prominent member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows.  He was a Democrat.  His paternal grandmother, who was a native of Wales and who lived to be ninety-seven years old, left one hundred and forty-four descendants at her death, including in all five generations.  Some years before his death, Obadiah Stephens built a large frame house which still stands.  Of the children born to him and his wife, Ann Eliza married Henry Lewis and they are both deceased; Emmeline is a resident of Wilmington, Ohio, and lives on Rhombach avenue; Francis I., who was born on June 30, 1842, married Sarah Gallaber and died on Sept. 12, 1912.  He was a fanner. The father of these children died in Oct. 1897, at the age of seventy-three and the mother.  Mar. 9, 1895 at the age of seventy-one.
     John Stephens received the rudiments of an education In the public schools of Union township at Burtonvllle.  He lived with his father and mother until his marriage, and in 1870 his father built another house for his son on the same farm and near the public highway.  There he lived and assisted in the operations of the farm until his parents' deaths.  Afterwards he moved into the large old homestead where he lived until his death.  At the death of his father and mother, he received as his inheritance the homestead farm in partnership with his unmarried sister, Emmeline Mrs. John Stephens still lives on the farm and continues Its management.  Altogether the farm now comprises two hundred and thirty-one acres of land.
     On Mar. 2, 1876, John Stephens was married to Alwilda McKenzie, who was born in Henry county, Iowa, the daughter of William and Elizabeth (Morton) McKenzie, both of whom were natives of Clinton county, born near New Antioch, the former of whom died in 1866 at the age of thirty-three and the latter of whom is still living at the age of seventy-seven.  Soon after their marriage William and Elizabeth McKenzie moved to Iowa, where they took up a claim.  Later Mr. McKenzie kept a hotel in Nebraska City, where he died in 1866.  His widow and children returned to Clinton county, Ohio, and she afterwards married Eli Carson.  They now live near Martinsville in Clinton county.
     To the marriage of William and Elizabeth McKenzie, there were born five children, of whom Mrs. Stephens was the eldest.  The others are:  Perry, who lives at Martinsville, Ohio, where he is a carpenter; Stanley, who is a farmer and lives near New Vienna; Geneva, who married Samuel Skimming, a farmer living in Wilmington; and Keith, who died young.  Eli and Elizabeth Carson were the parents of three children: Stella, who married Benson Wert; Bert, who lives at Dayton, Ohio; and Carey, who is a resident of Logan, Ohio.
     Mr. and Mrs. John Stephens had no children but they reared one child, Lola Clevenger, although she was not legally adopted.  She married Matthew Ewbanks, a farmer of Union township.
     Mr. Stephens was a Democrat but one who never aspired to office and one who was never especially active in political matters.  He was a man of quiet and unassuming manners, modest in his claim to greatness but gentle and kind to his wife and to those with whom he was most closely associated.  He was a good man and a good citizen.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  735
  PHILIP A. STEWART

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  855

  WILLIAM I. STEWART

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  734

  DAVID STIERITZ

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  739

  GODFREY STIERITZ

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  739

  HENRY STIERITZ

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  738

  JACOB STIERITZ

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  739

  ALVIN STINGLEY, one of the well-known descendants of John Stingley, who settled in Clinton county, nearly a century ago, son of Gilead E. Stingley and brother of Calvin and J. Albert Stingley, was born on June 5, 1873, on the farm in Chester township, this county, where he now lives.  Gilead E. Stingley was born in Ross county, Ohio, on Nov. 24, 1820, and died in 1909.  His wife was born in Highland county, in 1831, the daughter of Richard and Mary (Curtindoll) Lucas, and is still living.
     Gilead E. Stingley was educated in the common schools of Chester township and was a prominent farmer of this county, owning seven or eight hundred acres of land.  During the five years was a large cattle raiser.  He voted the Democratic ticket and he and his wife and family were members of the Friends church.  To him and his wife eleven children were born, namely:  Eliza, who married John F. Oglesbee; William, who died in March, 1913; Amanda, who married James Bailey, is now deceased; Elizabeth, who married James Swindler; Emma, who died at the age of five years; J. Albert and Calvin, who are referred to elsewhere in this volume; Ada, who married "Lester Oglesbee; Alonzo, who died at the age of two years; Nettie, who married Elijah Turner, and Alvin, the immediate subject of this biographical sketch.
     Gilead E. Stingley was the son of John and Elizabeth (Bush) Stingley, the former of whom was born in Virginia on Aug. 22, 1792, and the latter of whom born on May 21, 1798.  After their marriage on Apr. 16, 1818, they located in Ross county, this state,  and four years later came to Clinton county.  John Slingley had come to Ohio from Virginia originally in 1800.  He owned a farm of two hundred and nine acres in Chester township and was a well-known pioneer citizen.  He and his wife were the parents of four children: Noah B., born on Feb. 24, 1819; Gilead E., Nov. 24, 1820; Talitha, Apr. 27, 1823, and Julian Oct. 7, 1825.  John Stingley died on Sept. 6, 1826 and after his death, his widow married his twin brother, Sebastian Stingley, to which second union there was no issue.  The Stingley family originally came to America from Germany, where George Stingley, the great-grandfather of Alvin L., was born on Sept. 12, 1763.
     Alvin Stingley was educated in the common schools of Chester township and has farmed all his life.  He owns one hundred acres of land in Chester township, and is very well circumstanced.
     In 1896 Alvin L. Stingley was married to Hattie J. Thomas, the daughter of Joshua and Martha Thomas, to which union four children have been born, namely:  Alie L., born in June, 1807; Luther A., in September, 1898; Clarence L., in November, 1900, and Charles T., in May, 1906.
     Mr. Stingley is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, the Knights of the Maccabees, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Daughters of Rebekah, the Knights of Pythias and the Pythian Sisters.  He is independent in politics and he and his family are members of the Methodists church at Lumberton.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  658
  CALVIN STINGLEY.   Chester township owes much to the Stingley family, especially to the sons of Gilead Stingley, who was a well-known farmer of Clinton county, and one of the pioneer pork packers of Wilmington.  The distinguished family in Clinton county, however, goes back to the time when John Stingley, the father of Gilead, purchased a farm of two hundred and nine acres in Chester township, nearly a century ago.  For the most part, later generations of the family have been identified with agriculture and more than this the various members of the family have been good citizens and prominent in the neighborhoods and communities where they have lived.
     Calvin Stingley, the son of Gilead and Nancy (Lucas) Stingley, was born on June 6, 1863, on the old Stingley farm in Chester township, where he now lives.  His father was born on Nov. 24, 1820, in Ross county, the daughter of Richard and Mary (Curtindoll) Lucas, and is still living.
     The paternal grandparents of Calvin Stingley were John and Elizabeth (Bush) Stingley, who were married on Apr. 16, 1818, the former a native of Virginia, born on Aug. 22, 1792, who came to Ohio in 1800, first locating in Ross county, and the latter, born on May 31, 1798.  About 1822 they purchased a farm of two hundred and nine acres in Chester township and there spent the remainder of their lives.  John Stingley was one of the foremost farmers of the township and did much clearing.  John and Elizabeth Stingley were the parents of four children:  Noah B., born on Feb. 24, 1819; Gilead, Nov. 24, 1820; Talitha, Apr. 27, 1823; and Julian, October 7, 1825.  The father of these children died on Sept. 6, 1826, and after his death, his widow married his twin brother, Sebastian, but to this latter union no children were born.  The original home of the Stingley family was in Germany, where John Stingley's father, George Stingley, the great-grandfather of Calvin, was born on Sept. 12, 1763.
     Gilead Stingley received his education in the common schools of Chester township and, having taken up agriculture as a life vocation, became the owner of about eight hundred acres in this county.  He was an extensive cattle raiser and about 1875 entered the pork-packing business at Wilmington and was thus engaged for five years.  He was a member of the Friends church and voted the Democratic ticket.  Gilead and Nancy Stingley were the parents of eleven children, namely:  Eliza, who married John F. Oglesbee; William, who died in March, 1913; Amanda (deceased), who was the wife of James Bailey; Elizabeth, who married James Swindler; Emma, who died at the age of five years; J. Albert, who is referred to elsewhere in this volume; Calvin, who is the subject of this biographical sketch; Ada, who married Lester Oglesbee; Alonzo, who died at the age of two years; Nettie, who married Elijah Turner, and Alvin, who is referred to elsewhere in this volume.
     Calvin Stingley, who was educated in the common schools of Chester township, began farming when a young man on the land where he now lives.  Except for three years during which he lived in Dayton, Ohio, he has lived on the farm all of his life.  In September, 1904, he went to Dayton, where, during the first year, he worked for the Dayton & Xenia Traction Company.  The next year he was a merchant policeman and February, 1907, he returned to the farm, where he has since resided.
     On Aug. 1, 1886, Calvin Stingley was married to Mary Hurley, the daughter of Henry and Lauretta (Colvin) Hurley, to which union two children have been born, Verna, who is still at home, and Velmer, who married Eva Hurley and has one child, Donald.
     Mr. Stingley
is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias and the Knights of the Maccabees.  Nominally, he is identified with the Democratic party but is independent in local politics.  The Stingley family are members of the Friends church and are held in high regard in the community in which they live.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  659
  J. ALBERT STINGLEY, who comes of an old and long established family of Clinton county, and one which has been prominent in the agricultural life of the county for nearly a century, was born in Chester township, this county, on May 31, 1861, the son of Gilead and Nancy (Lucas) Stingley, and the grandson of John and Elizabeth (Bush) Stingley.
     Gilead Stingley
was born on Nov. 4, 1820, in Ross County, Ohio, the son of John and Elizabeth (Bush) Stingley, and died in 1900.  His wife, Nancy Lucas, was born in Highland county in 1831, the daughter of Richard and Mary (Curtindoll) Lucas, and is still living.  Educated in the common schools of Chester township, Gilead Stingley was a farmer during almost his entire life and owned seven or eight hundred acres of land.  For about five years, following 1875, he was engaged in the pork-packing business in Wilmington and was for many years a large cattle raiser.  Eleven children were born to Gilead and Nancy Stingley, as follows:  Eliza, who married John F. Oglesbee; William, who died in March, 1913; Amanda (deceased), who married James Bailey; Elizabeth, who married James Swindler; Emma, who died at the age of five years; J. Albert, the subject of this sketch; Calvin, who is referred to elsewhere in this volume; Ada, who married Lester Oglesbee; Alonzo, who died at the age of two years; Nettie, who married Elijah Turner, and Alvin, who is referred to elsewhere in this volume.  Gilead Stingley and wife were members of the Friends church and he voted the Democratic ticket.
     John Stingley, grandfather of J. Albert Stingley, was born in Virginia on Aug. 22, 1792, and came to Ohio in 1800, first locating in Ross county, where, on Apr. 16, 1818, he married Elizabeth Bush, who was born on May 31, 1798.  Four years later they purchased a farm of two hundred and nine acres in Clinton county and ever since that time the family has been established here.  Four children were born to John and Elizabeth Stingley; Noah B., Feb. 24, 1819; Gilead, Nov. 24, 1820; Talitha, Apr. 27, 1823; and Julian, Oct. 7, 1825.  The father of these children died on Sept. 6, 1826, and after his death, his widow married Sebastian Stingley, the twin brother of her first husband.  The Stingley family in America dates from the coming of George Stingley, a native of Germany, who was born on Sept. 12, 1763, and who was the great-grandfather of J. Albert Stingley, the subject of this sketch.
     Like his other brothers, J. Albert Stingley was educated in the common schools of Chester township and has farmed in that township practically all of his life, except for one year which he spent in Wilmington, during which brief period he conducted a butcher shop on West Main street.  For seven years prior to his marriage, Mr. Stingley dealt largely in stock and is one of the well-known stock buyers of Clinton county today.  In February, 1894, he purchased a farm of seventy-two acres, where he has since lived.
     On Dec. 18, 1887, J. Albert Stingley was married to Rosa M. Fudge, daughter of H. C. and Emeline Fudge, to which union have been born two children, Hazel, who married Foy Powers and has one child, Dorothy Lucille and Oscar L.
     Mr. and Mrs. Stingley
are members of the Friends church and are highly esteemed in their neighborhood.  Mr. Stingley is a member of the Knights of Pythias and of the Knights of the Maccabees.  He is independent in politics, believing that local government is more effectually served outside the realm of partisanship.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  670
  WILLIAM A. STINGLEY.  One of the prominent old families of Chester township, this county, is that of William A. Stingley, an enterprising and prosperous farmer, who owns two hundred and seventy acres of land, and who, like his father and grandfather before him, has been very successful in agricultural pursuits.  The Stingley family was established in America by George Stingley, the great-grandfather of William A., who was born in Germany on Sept. 12, 1763.
     William A. Stingley, the son of Noah and Sarah (Jones) Stingley, and the cousin of Calvin, Alvin and J. Albert Stingley, referred to elsewhere in this volume, was born on the farm where he now lives, in Chester township, on Jan. 18, 1863.  His father was a native of Ross county, Ohio, who died on Apr. 8, 1894, and his mother, the daughter of Lewis Jones, who married a Miss DeMoss, was born on Sept. 8, 1822.  Noah Stingley was the eldest of four children born to John and Elizabeth (Bush) StingleyJohn Stingley was a native of Virginia, born on Aug. 22, 1792.  He came to Ohio in 1800, and located first in Ross county, where, on Apr. 16, 1818, he married Elizabeth Bush, who was born on May 31, 1798.  In 1822, they removed to a farm in Chester township, this county, where they spent the remainder of their lives.  John Stingley was one of the foremost farmers of Chester township, and he and his wife were the parents of four children, namely: Gilead, born on Nov. 24, 1820; Tabitha, Apr. 27, 1823; Julian, Oct. 7, 1825, and Noah, the father of William A., Feb. 24, 1819.  John Stingley died on Sept. 6, 1826, and after his death his widow married Sebastian Stingley, the twin brother of her first husband.
     The late Noah Stingley was educated in the common schools of Chester township and was engaged in farming all his life, having been the owner of about six hundred acres of land, and was an extensive breeder of cattle.  On Jan. 27, 1848, Noah Stingley was united in marriage to Sarah Jones who which union nine children were born, as follows:  Tabitha, born on Dec. 4, 1848; Martha, Dec. 5, 1849; Elizabeth, Jan. 17, 1851, who died early in life; Arvilla, Dec. 10, 1852; John, Mar. 10, 1854; Lewis, Sept. 19, 1857; Lawson, Apr. 22, 1859; William A., the immediate subject of this review, and Ida, Apr. 17, 1865.  Noah Stingley's family were all members of the Methodist church, and he was a Democrat.
     William A. Stingley, like his grandfather and father, received most of his education in the district schools of Chester township, but his early education has been supplemented by wide reading and diligent home study.  He has been a farmer all his life, and has been very successful because he has paid close attention to modern developments in agriculture.
     On Mar. 4, 1896, William A. Stingley was married to Elizabeth Martindale, who was born on Oct. 25, 1863, the daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth (Rouch) Martindale, and to this union two children have been born, Russell N. and Raymond T., the former born on Jan. 11, 1898, and the latter on May 20, 1902.  Mr. and Mrs. Stingley are earnest and faithful members of the Friends church, and fraternally, Mr. Stingley is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, the Knights of the Maccabees, the Fraternal Order of Eagles and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows.  In politics, he is an independent voter, casting his ballot for men rather than for party platforms.  H and his family are held in high esteem among their neighbors and enjoy the confidence and respect of all.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  772
  FRED STOLTZ

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  431

  JACOB STOLTZ

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  956


Elijah P. Stotler
ELIJAH P. STOTLER

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  600

  JOHN H. STROUP

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  698

  HARRY STUNTZ, M. D.

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  514

  DAVID E. SUMMERS

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  713

  ISAAC R. SUMMERS

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  726

  HENRY L. SWINGLEY

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  963

  JOHN SYMONS

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page  829

 



 

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