OHIO GENEALOGY EXPRESS

A Part of Genealogy Express

 

Welcome to
Clinton County, Ohio
History & Genealogy

BIOGRAPHIES
Source:
History of Clinton County, Ohio
Its People, Industries and Institutions
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Albert J. Brown, A.M.
Supervising Editor
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With Biographical Sketches of Representative Citizens and
Genealogical Records of Many of the Old Families
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ILLUSTRATED
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B.F. Bowen & Co., Inc.
Indianapolis, Indiana
1915
Contrib. by Sharon Wick
 
A B C D E F G H I J K L M
N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

< CLICK HERE TO RETURN TO 1915 BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX >

 

JOHN WILLIAM VANDERVORT.  In the early days the Middle West was often a tempting field to energetic, ambitious, strong-minded men, and Ohio was filled with them during the time she was struggling to a respectable position in the sisterhood of states.  Many of the families whose progeny has since become prominent in the life of this state were founded in the broad fields and great promise which this newer region presented to activity and which attracted many men, inducing them to brave the discomforts of the early life here for the pleasure and gratification of constructing their fortunes in their own ways and after their own methods.  It is this class of men more than any other which has given shape, direction and character to the great state of Ohio.  J. W. Vandervort, formerly a well-known farmer of Clinton county and a member of the board of county commissioners for two terms, is a member of one of the families which had to do with the early history of this county.
     John William Vandervort, who is now living retired in Wilmington, was born near New Antioch, in Green township, this county, on July 21, 1850, the son of Paul H. and Matilda (McKenzie) Vandervort, the former of whom was born near Starbuck, in Clinton county, on Jan. 1, 1815, the son of Jonah and Jane (Tibbs) Vandervort, and the latter of whom was the daughter of John and Isabelle McKenzie.
    
The ancestry of the Vandervort family goes back to Michael Paulus Van Der Voort, who came from East Flanders, region of Dendermonde, prior to the year 1640 and located in New Amsterdam, now New York.  The records show that Michael Paulus Van Der Voort was married to Marie Rapalye on Nov. 18, 1640, their marriage being the fifth recorded in New Amsterdam.  Among their children was Paul Van Der Voort, baptized on Jan. 3, 1649, who married Lysbeth Paulus Dincksenłto which union was born a son, called Paul, who was born at Bedford, Long Island, and was baptized in 1681.  He married Nultze Staats, and they had a son, Nicholas, born at Bedford, Long Island.  Subsequently, the family moved to Orange county, New York, where Nicholas married Abigail Halstead, to which union six children were born, John, Martha, Paul, Peter, William and Jonah, the latter of whom was the grandfather of J. W. Vandervort, the subject of this sketch.  Jonah Vandervort settled in Clinton county, Ohio, in 1810, the year in which the county was organized.  He was born in Shepherdstown, Virginia, on May 30, 1765, and was married to Jane Tibbs on Mar. 29, 1796.  They moved to the Northwest Territory in 1800, and located at Columbia, which is now within the city limits of Cincinnati, Ohio.  Later, in 1810, they came to Clinton county. 
     Nicholas and Abigail (Halstead) Vandervort
, both of whom were natives of New York state, became residents of Virginia after their marriage and emigrated from Virginia about 1800, the objective point being Green river in Kentucky.  On their way down the Ohio river, upon arriving at Columbia, near Cincinnati, they anchored their boat for the night.  A large limb from a tree overhanging the boat broke and fell, damaging the boat so much that it was unfit the further travel with safety.  After some investigation of the surrounding country they became so well pleased with it that they concluded to settle there and it is believed that Nicholas and Abigail (Halstead) Vandervort spent the rest of their lives there.  Jonah Vanderfortís wife, who before marriage was Jane Tibbs, was the daughter of John and Mary Tibbs, natives of Ireland.  The latter, when a girl, was kidnapped and taken on board a vessel and brought to America, where she grew to womanhood and was married, subsequently becoming a resident of Vriginia, whence she emigrated to Columbia, Ohio, where she died.  Jonah and Jane (Tibbs) Vandervort resided at Columbia until 1809, when they came to this county, locating on Toddís fork, where they lived for six years, at the end of which time they removed to near New Antioch, where they spent the remainder of their lives.  They were among the earliest settlers in that region and assisted in the organization and establishment of the first Christian church at Antioch, in which they were leading members and in the good works of which they assisted with their purses and with their influence.  Johan Vandervort became of great strength to the church and was a very upright Christian man.  He was a man of good judgment and one of the first jurymen of Clinton county.  Jonah Vandervort and his wife were the parents of six sons and five daughters.  He died in Jan., 1842, and his widow died three years later, in 1845.
     Paul H. Vandervort, who was one of the six sons and one of the eleven children born to his parents, was two months old when his parents moved to the farm near New Antioch.  It was there he was reared and grew to manhood and spent his entire life until Aug., 1879, when he retired from the farm and located in New Antioch.  He was one of the most prominent and useful citizens of that community and served as commissioner of Clinton county for twelve years.  He was also one of the managers of the Clinton County Agricultural Society for thirteen years and served as president of the same for many years.  He also held other minor offices and was a leading member and supporter of the Christian church.  At the death of his father he was elected to fill the latterís place as deacon in the church, which office he held for a quarter of a century and was then made elder.
     On Oct. 19, 1896, Paul H. Vandervort was married to Matilda McKenzie, the daughter of John and Isabelle McKenzie, natives of Kentucky, who became residents of Ohio, and who died in Clinton county and were interred in the old burying ground at New Antioch.  To this union four children were born, namely: Mary Emily, the wife of E. W. Marble; Alpheus, who served three years and three months in the Civil War, enlisting in Company B, Fortieth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, in December, 1861, and was engaged in the battles of Chickamauga, Lookout Mountain and others, and served under Gen. Garfield in his celebrated conquest of the Big Sandy and through eastern Kentucky; Samantha, who married Dr. W. W. Canny and with him removed to Camden, Preble county, Ohio, where he died, and J. W., the subject of this sketch.  MRs. Matilda (McKenzie) Vandervort died on June 20, 1876, and three years later, on Aug. 26, 1879, Paul H. Vandervort married, secondly, Mary Ann Mitchell, daughter of James and Mary (Fleming) Mitchell, natives of Pennsylvania, but who, in 1828, settled near Wilmington, in Clinton county, where he died in 1836, his widow living to be eighty years old.
     J. W. Vandervort attended the public schools at New Antioch and subsequently was a student for one year at the Normal school at Lebanon, Warren county.  In the meantime he was engaged in assisting his father on the farm and after his marriage lived on the home place until he retired in 1905, he having purchased the interest of the other heirs when his father died.  He still owns the farm, the farm which his grandfather reclaimed from the wilderness.  It now consists of one hundred and fifty-one acres.  Upon his removal to Wilmington, Mr. Vandervort purchased a home at the corner of Mulberry and Vine streets, where the family now lives.
     On September 24, 1874, J. W. Vandervort was married to Maria E. Walker, who was born in Green township, this county, the daughter of Nathan and Jane (Phillips) Walker, the former of whom was born near Lexington, Kentucky, on February 26, 1806, and died on Sept. 1, 1876, and the latter of whom was born in Bourbon county, Kentucky, July 21, 1816, and died on Feb. 8, 1866.  Nathan Walkerís parents were Robert and Nancy Walker, early settlers in Kentucky, who reared a large family.  Jane (Phillip) Walker parents were Joshua and Lucinda (Irvin) Phillips, who were farmers by occupation and early settlers in Bourbon county, Kentucky.  Nathan Walker married in Kentucky and came to this county, locating in Green township, where he owned a farm.  He belonged to the Christian church, and was a Republican in politics.  He had a family of three daughters and two sons.
     To J. W. and Maria E. (Walker) Vandervort four children have been born, as follow:  Paul H., Jr., who was born on Sept. 10, 1876, teller in the First National Bank of Wilmington, married Mary A. Robbins, and has three children, Mary, Anna and Eleanor; Ada E., Apr. 25, 1881, who died on May 5, 1904; Arthur W., June 20, 1883, a minister in the Christian church at Minneapolis, Minnesota, on June23, 1915, married Anna R. Robinette, of Grand Rapids, Michigan, and Robert D., Dec. 27, 1895, who died in Aug., 1896.
     J. W. Vandervort is a Republican and served two terms as a member of the Clinton county board of commissioners, having been elected on the Republican ticket.  All of the members of the Vandervort family are actively identified with the Christian church.  Mr. Vandervort was identified officially with the church at New Antioch and later with the Central church at Wilmington.  No one can deny that Mr. Vandervort has worthily upheld the traditions of his family, or that, in both public and private life, he has discharged every duty which may reasonably be expected by the public at large.  He is highly respected in Clinton county, where he is well known, having a host of friends in this section of the state.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page 587

 

LORIN A. VANDERVORT.  It is an axiom demonstrated by human experience that a man gets out of this life what he puts into it with a reasonable interest on his investment.  The individual who inherits a large estate and adds nothing to his fortune cannot be called a successful man.  The man who starts in the world unaided and by sheer force of his will, forges ahead and at length attains a position of honor among his fellow citizens, is a success which can hardly be appreciated.  To a considerable extent Lorin A. Vandervort is a creditable example of the man who has succeeded by his own unaided efforts.
     Lorin A. Vandervort was born on Dec. 14, 1860, in Greene twp., Clinton Co., Ohio, and is the son of Thaddeus H. and Minerva (Noble) Vandervort, the former of whom was born on Oct. 30, 1830, in Greene township, near New Antioch and died on July 5, 1900, and the latter of whom was born in 1836, in Greene township, and died in June, 1911.  Thaddeus H. Vandervort was the son of Nicholas and Nancy Vandervort.  Nicholas Vandervort was born at Columbia, near Cincinnati, in 1803, and his wife was born in Warren Co., Ohio, where he grew to manhood and married.  He was an earnest worker in the Christian church and lived a most useful life, at his death having been a resident of Clinton county for sixty-four years.  He passed away on June 23, 1876, and his wife on Jan. 11, 1873.  They had seven children besides Thaddeus H., the father of Lorin A., as follows:  James M., John M., Nicholas W., Jonah S., Paul C., William V. and one unnamed.  Paul C. and William V. were soldiers in the Civil War, having been members of the Company B, Fortieth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry.  The former died of Typhoid fever at Catlettsburg, Kentucky, Feb. 8, 1862.  The latter became a drummer boy and served throughout the war, being discharged at Atlanta, Georgia, in Dec., 1864.  He came home, was married and died on Apr. 14, 1880.
     The ancestry of the Vandervort family goes back to Michael Paulus Van Der Voort, who came from East Flanders, the region of Deudermonde, prior to 1640 and located in New Amsterdam, now New York.  The records show that Michael Paulus Van Der Voort was married to Marie Rapalye on Nov. 18, 1640 and located in New Amsterdam, now New York.  The records sow that Michael Paulus Van Der Voort was married to Marie Rapalye on Nov. 18, 1640, and their marriage is the fifth recorded in New Amsterdam.  Among their children is one son, Paul, who was baptized on Jan. 3, 1649.  He married Lysbeth Paulus Deickson and they had one son, who was called Paul and who was born at Bedford, Long Island, and baptized in 1681.  He married Nultze Staats and they had a son, Nicholas, born at Bedford, Long Island.  Subsequently, the family moved to Orange county, New York, where Nicholas married Abigail Halstead and they had six children: John, Martha, Paul, Peter, William and Jonah.
     Jonah
settled in Clinton county and sat on the first jury impaneled in Clinton county in 1810.  He was born at Shepherdstown, Virginia, May 30, 1765, was married to Jane Tibbs, Mar. 29, 1796, and moved to the Northwest Territory in 1800, locating at Columbia, now within the city limits of Cincinnati.  He died at New Antioch in 1842 and she died in 1845.  Jonah had eleven children, six sons and five daughters, among whom was Nicholas, the father of Thaddeus and grandfather of Lorin A.  The descendants of Jonah now number about four hundred souls scattered over eight different states.
     Mr. Vandervortís maternal grandfather, Elisha Noble, who married a Miss Matthews, was one of the contractors who assisted in the erection of the present courthouse at Wilmington, about 1838.  He lived on a farm near New Vienna, in Green township.  Minerva Noble was one of eight children born to her parents: Elisha and John M., the two eldest, now deceased; Mrs. Vandervort; Mrs. Melinda Elliot; Mrs. Emily Slocum; Mrs. Spear; Mrs. Williams and Mrs. Bowers.  When a child Minerva Noble made her home with Doctor Runnells at New Antioch and was living with them at the time of her marriage to Thaddeus H. Vandervort.
     Thaddeus H. Vandervort
grew up on a farm in Green township and attended the public schools at New Antioch.  After his marriage he drove a huckster wagon for Wilsonís store at New Antioch, but subsequently rented a farm at Snow Hill.  Later he purchased a farm two and one-half miles north of New Antioch in Green township, where he lived until his death.  He added to his farm from time to time until he owned two hundred acres.  He was a Republican and served several years as township trustee.  He was well known in Clinton county as a hog raiser.  Mr. and Mrs. Thaddeus H. Vandervort belonged to the Christian church at New Antioch.  They had eight children: Andrew R., who married Alice Devers and lives on a farm in Washington township; William, who lives in Trumbull county, Ohio, where he is a farmer; Lorin A., the subject of this sketch; Nannie J., who married B. B. Vandervort, a distance cousin, and lives near Jamestown, Ohio, where he is a fruit grower; Mary E., who married Frank Hare, and lives on a farm in Jefferson township; E. Bert, who lives on his fatherís place, in Green township; James S., who is a farmer in Trumbull county, Ohio; and Nettie who married Samuel Traum, a minister in the Christian church at Meadville, Pennsylvania.
     Lorin A. Vandervort was educated in the public schools of Green township, assisting his father on the farm until he was twenty-one years old, at which time he was married.  After his marriage he lived on his father-in-lawís farm in Union township for ten years, and, in 1892, purchased one hundred acres of land from the Catherine Glass farm.  Since that time he has added fifty-one acres, the farm now consisting of one hundred and fifty-one acres altogether.  The house in which Mr. and Mrs. Vandervort live was built in 1891.
     On Dec. 29, 1882, Lorin A. Vandervort was married to Alice C. Wilson, a native of Union township, daughter of James and Mary (Custis) Wilson, both of whom are deceased.  Mr. and Mrs. Vandervort have had two children, Lloyd and Augusta.   Lloyd, who was born September, 1883, died on Apr. 25, 1899.  Augusta, who was born in October, 1890, married M. R. Snyder and lives on the James Wilson homestead in Union township.
     Mr. and Mrs. Vandervort belong to the Walnut Street Christian church in Wilmington, where Mr. Vandervort has served as a deacon.  Mr. Vandervort is a Republican.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page 433


Nicholas S. Vandervort


Rate W. Vandervort
  NICHOLAS W. VANDERVORT.  Few men were better known in Clinton county, Ohio, during the period in which he lived and labored than the late Nicholas W. Vandervort, for more than a quarter of a century a teacher in the public schools of this county. In his personal characteristics he combined the qualities which go to make up a scholar and a public-spirited man of affairs. He made his influence felt in the educational life of Clinton county, and was not unknown at the time of his death In the wider educational circles of the state. During the last six or eight years of his life he was engaged in farming in this county and made a commendable success of this vocation.
     The late Nicholas W. Vandervort was born on May 31, 1835, near New Antioch, Clinton county, Ohio, and died on Sept. 10, 1884. He was a son of Nicholas and Nancy Vandervort, the former of whom was born at Columbia, near Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1803, and the latter of whom was born in Warren county, Ohio. Nicholas Vandervort, Sr., was six years old when brought by his parents to Clinton county, where he grew to manhood, married and devoted his life to farming. Like his father before him, he was an earnest worker in the Christian church, and lived a truly useful life. He died on June 23, 1876, at the age of sixty-four years, his beloved wife having preceded him to the grave on Jan. 11, 1873. They were the parents of eight children, of whom Nicholas W. was the fourth in order of birth. Among the others were James M., Thaddeus H., John M., Jonas S., Paul C. and William B.
     The late Nicholas W. Vanderfort was brought up to farm labor. He received a good common-school education and had some extraordinary advantages in the high school at New Vienna, Ohio. At the age of eighteen he began teaching school, and in the fall of 1855 went to Illinois, where he taught near the city of Bloomington until the summer of 1857, at which time he returned to Ohio. In 1858 he attended a select school in New Vienna, qualifying himself for the teaching of higher branches. He continued teaching until 1878, having been during that time employed in the schools of Wilmington, Sabina, New Antioch and other places, embracing a period of twenty-five years. From 1878 until the time of his death, in 1884, he devoted his time and energies to farming.
     On Dec. 31, 1863, Nicholas W. Vandervort was married to Rate Winpiglar, an accomplished lady, who was also for many years a teacher In the public schools of Clinton county, and who was born at Martinsville, Clinton county, Ohio, on Aug. 13, 1845, a daughter of Isaac and Myra (Hanley) Winpiglar, the former of whom was a native of Virginia, and the latter of Clermont county, Ohio. Isaac Winpiglar became an early settler in Ohio, married and located in Martinsville, where his death occurred In 1848. He had five children, two of whom, Helen, the wife of G. W. Robinett, and Mrs. Nicholas W. Vandervort, are surviving. After the death of her husband, Mrs. Winplglar married a second time, her second husband being John Hyatt, and by this second marriage had three children, Louis H., Barnett B. and Clara E., the last named being the widow of L. D. Hodgson, by whom she had one son, Carey Vandervort Hodgson, who was educated by Mrs. Vandervort and is now in the service of the United States with the coast and geodetic survey. He spent some time in the Philippines and is now in Utah. He Is a man of thirty-five, a credit to the name of Vandervort.  Mr. Hyatt died in October, 1876, and his widow died in 1894.
     Mrs. Vandervort's maternal grandparents were James Comstock and Hannah (Brunson) Hanley, both natives of New York state and early settlers in Clermont county, Ohio, where for many years the former was a school teacher.
     The late Nicholas W. Vandervort served Clinton county long and faithfully in an educational way. For many years he was a prominent teacher in the public schools. He was also a member of the county board of examiners for several years. He was an ardent member and earnest worker in the Christian church at New Antioch and was undoubtedly one of Clinton county's most useful citizens.
Of Nicholas W. Vandervort's grandparents it may be said that his grandfather, Paul H. Vandervort, was born on Jan. 1, 1815, near Starbuck Town, this county, the son of Josiah and Jane Vandervort. Josiah and Jane Vandervort resided at Columbia until 1809, when they moved to this county, and located at Todd's Fork, where they lived for three years, afterwards removing to near New Antioch, where they spent the remainder of their lives. They were among the earliest settlers of that community and were prominent in the organization and establishment of the early Christian church at New Antioch, in which they were among the leading members, and on account of their Christian and moral influence, they became factors of great strength in the progress of the church. Josiah Vandervort was an upright and industrious man of sound judgment, and was one of the first jurymen in Clinton county. He and his wife were the parents of six sons and five daughters, of whom Paul H. Is the only one surviving. Mr. Vandervort died in 1842, and his widow in 1845.
     Paul H. Vandervort, the uncle of the late Nicholas Vandervort, was two years old when his parents moved, in 1815, to near New Antioch, where he was reared and where lie grew to manhood, and spent his life until August, 1879, when he retired from the farm and located in New Antioch, where he spent the rest of his days. He was one of the most prominent and useful citizens of Clinton county, and for twelve years served as a member of the board of commissioners. He was a member of the Clinton County Agricultural Society for thirteen years, and served as president of that organization for several years. He also held other minor offices. He, too, was a leading member of the Christian church, and upon the death of his father, was elected to fill the place as deacon In the church made vacant by his father's death. This office he filled for a quarter of a century and was then made elder. Paul H. Vandervort was twice married, the first time on October 19, 1836, to Matilda McKenzie, the daughter of John and Isabelle McKenzie, natives of Kentucky, and to this union four children were born: Mary Emily, who was the wife of E. W. Marble; Alpheus, who served three years in the Union army during the Civil War; Samantha, the wife of Dr. W. W. Canny, of Camden, Preble county, Ohio, and John W. Mrs. Vandervort died on June 20, 1876, and about three years later, on Aug. 26, 1879, Paul H. Vandervort was married to Mrs. Mary Ann Mitchell, a daughter of James and Mary (Fleming) Mitchell.
The widow of the late Nicholas W. Vandervort removed to Wilmington some sixteen years after his death, in 1884, and there she devotes a great deal of her time to charity work. She taught school in Wilmington before her marriage and continued her work of teaching some time after her marriage. She and her husband both taught in the schools of that city, and many of their pupils are prominent business men and are very proud to remember them- as their former teachers, Mrs. Vandervort being held in the highest respect not only by her former pupils, but by the entire community, to which her life has been so unselfishly and ungrudgingly devoted.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page 372

Mr. & Mrs.
Charles W. Van Pelt
CHARLES WESLEY VAN PELT

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page 688


Mr. & Mrs.
James Villars
JAMES VILLARS - See CHARLES PIERSON RICHARDSON

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page 385

  J. OSCAR VILLARS.  Among the oldest families of Clinton County, Ohio, are the Villars, whose ancestral home was established in this county early in the last century, when James Villars, the great-grandfather of J. Oscar Villars, the subject of this sketch, emigrated from Greene county, Pennsylvania.
     For a little more than a century, therefore, the family has been established in Clinton county, and the late generations of the family, especially, have been prominent in the educational life of this section of Ohio.  The healthful growth of this family is due in part, no doubt, to the high standard of morality and of Christian living which the various generations have maintained.  Several members of the family have enjoyed a college education.  Others have been leading farmers and stockmen, but almost without exception, they have been prominent in the religious life of the county.
     J. Oscar Villars, who represents the fourth generation of the Villars family in Clinton county, was born near Clarksville, in this county, July 3, 1873, and is the son of John W. and Kezia (Penquite) Villars, the former of whom was born, Oct. 3, 1833, in Vernon township, Clinton county, Ohio, and died on Sept. 20, 1885, and the latter of whom was born in 1835, in Washington township, Warren county, Ohio, and who died on Dec. 25, 1877.
     Mr. Villars' paternal grandparents were James and Frances (Gregg) Villars, the former of whom was born on Oct. 28, 1800, and when six years of age accompanied his father, James Villars, to Ohio, from Greene county, Pennsylvania.  The family had come from Virginia originally.  In 1813 James Villars came with his family to Clinton county, and purchased a farm in what is now known as Vernon township.  His son, James, finally owned sixteen hundred acres of land in Clinton county, and divided his time between farming and preaching.  The pioneer preacher was called a circuit rider, and James Villars was a circuit rider, or itinerant preacher, in the Methodist Protestant church, and founded Villars chapel, in Vernon township, in 1868.  This church was not essentially sectarian, but was dedicated to the use of any Christian religion.  James Villars, before the formation of the Republican party, was a Whig, but afterwards identified himself with the party of Lincoln.  He and his wife had twelve children.
     Mr. Villars
' maternal grandfather, William Penquite, was an early settler in the eastern part of Warren County, Ohio.  The Penquites came from Cornwall, England, where they were living as early as 1600.  The earliest history of the family, in America, begins with that of Mary Penquite, who was born on Oct. 25, 1719, and died on Jan. 21, 1818.  Her son, William, was born on Sept. 11, 1756, and died on Mar. 28, 1839.  His son, William, was born on Sept. 30, 1786, and died on Sept. 20, 1865.  His daughter, Kezia, was the mother of J. Oscar Villars.
    
The late John William Villars, son of James Villars grew up on his father's farm in Vernon township, and attended  Yellow Springs College.  During the Civil War he as the captain of a company of "Squirrel hunters."  He was given a farm by his father and later purchased additional acreage, living one mile east of Clarksville, Ohio, where he owned three hundred and thirty-three acres.  This was his home at the time of his death.  Like his father before him, he was an ardent Republican.  His wife was a member of the so-called Campbellite church, better known today as the Christian church.  Mrs. Kezia (Penquite) Villars, the mother of J. Oscar, died when he was four years old, leaving four sons and one daughter.  The daughter, Jennie, died the following summer, but the four boys are yet living.  William, the eldest, lives near Clarksville, in Warren county; Horace Finley, in Little Rock, Arkansas, and Charles Edwin, in Chicago, Illinois.
     The father died when J. Oscar was twelve years old, after which he lived with his brother, William, in Warren county, Ohio.  During this period he attended the public schools of Clarksville, subsequently entering Wilmington College, where he was a student for four year, graduating in 1894.  In Wilmington College he won a fellowship to Haverford College, and the next year after his graduation from Wilmington College was a student at Haverford, where he received his Master degree in 1895.
     Mr. Villars, upon his graduation from Haverford, taught in the Wilmington high school for three years, and then taught ten years in the Williamson Free School of Mechanical Trades, near Philadelphia.  For six years he was instructor in mechanical drawing and for six years he was assistant superintendent of his school endowed with one million, five hundred thousand dollars by the late Isaiah V. Williamson, of Philadelphia.  After this he migrated to Montana, where he remained three years at Great Falls.  After the death of his father-in-law, he returned to Wilmington, since which he has been teaching and attending to business interests.  He and his family belong to the Methodist Episcopal church and, fraternally, he is a member of the Masonic lodge and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows.  He lives on Xenia avenue, in Wilmington.
     On Aug. 11, 1897, J. Oscar Villars was married to Lula Cecilia Statler, who was born in Vernon township, this county, Aug. 28, 1875, the daughter of George Henry and Mary M. (McCray) Statler, the former of whom is deceased.  The latter lives in Wilmington.
     Professor and Mrs. Villars have two sons, Donald Statler, born on Dec. 21, 1900, and Roger Merrill, Oct. 3, 1904.
     Of Mrs. Villars' parentage, it may be said that her father, George Henry Statler, was born near Little East fork, in Vernon township, this county, on June 10, 1849, and died in Wilmington on Sept. 20, 1912.  The Statler family were all members of the Methodist Episcopal church and stanch Republicans.
     George Henry Statler was the son of Samuel and Mary (Harris) Statler, the former of whom was born in Loudon county, Virginia, Dec. 25, 1799, and died on Apr. 12, 1868.  The latter was born in the same county in Virginia, Sept. 18, 1803, and died on Sept. 15, 1884.  John Statler, the father of Samuel, was a native of Germany, who emigrated to Virginia and became a planter and slave-holder.  He enlisted and served in the patriot army during the Revolutionary War and, with his two brothers, was discharged where Washington City now stands and afterward purchased one thousand acres of land in Clinton county, Ohio, for the benefit of his three children.
     Samuel Statler, grandfather of Mrs. Villars, grew up in Virginia and spoke no language save the German until he was eight year of age.  At the age of nineteen he came to Ohio, and made his home with his brother-in-law, Dr. Asael Tribbey.  He soon erected a cabin on the land his father had purchased, and, as he was a man of ability and thrift, soon enjoyed great prosperity.  He died in 1868, leaving has nine children very well circumstanced.
     Mrs. Mary (Harris) Statler, grandmother of Mrs. Villars, was the daughter of James and Mary (Cherry) Harris, both of whom came from Loudoun county, Virginia, and were of Welsh descent.  In 1806 James Harris located in Vernon township, where he became a wealthy farmer.  As a member of the Whig party, he served in the state Legislature of Ohio.  He and his wife came to this county at a time when there were no roads hereabout, but only "blazed" trails.
     The late George Henry Statler was the youngest of nine children, of whom only four are living.  Of his father's estate, he inherited the homestead house, which was built in 1860, together with about two hundred acres of land, which now belongs to his daughter, Mrs. Villars.  He lived upon the farm until 1904, at which time he retired and moved to Wilmington, where his last days were spent.  He was a strong Republican, quiet and retiring in his home life; a man of even temperament, good business ability, thrifty and prosperous.
     On Sept. 11, 1873, George Henry Statler was married to Mary Melissa McCray, who was born in Warren county, this state, near Clarksville, on Feb. 16, 1853, and who is still living in Wilmington.  She is the daughter of Samuel C. and Sarah Elizabeth (Humphreys) McCray, the former of whom was born in Salem township, Warren county, Feb. 14, 1831, and died on June 21, 1909, and the latter of whom was born in the same county on May 28, 1836, and died on Sept. 9, 1906.  Samuel C. McCray was the son of Daniel and Harriett (Skinner) McCray, both natives of Loudon county, Virginia, very early settlers of Warren county, this state.  They were farmers and members of the Methodist Episcopal church.  Harriet (Skinner) McCray was the daughter of a colonel of Virginia troops, who served during the Revolutionary War.
     Elizabeth (Humphreys) McCray's parents were James and Elizabeth (Lange) Humphreys, the former of whom was born in New Jersey and the latter, on the ocean en route to America from Germany.  James Humphreys was a "bound boy" to Colonel Rose, who lived in New Jersey and was a soldier during the Revolutionary War.  He later married Colonel Rose's daughter and after her death, married Elizabeth Lange  and came on horseback to Ohio, where he purchased a farm in Warren county and became well to do.  He died in 1893 at an advanced age.
     Samuel C. McCray was a farmer and respected for his honest dealings.  During his latter years, broken in health, he lived with a son of Cincinnati, where he died in 1909.  The late George Henry and Melissa (McCray) Statler had only two children, Maude Marie, who was born on June 17, 1874, and Lula Cecilia the wife of Professor Villars.
    
The present generation can never repay those old heroes of a past century who blazed the trails through the wilderness, established homes, cleared the forest, and reared children to honorable and useful lives.  It was their work which has made this country the richest on earth and the inestimable heritage of the present generation is the result of their labors.  The ancestors of both Professor and Mrs. Villars had a large part in the great work of pioneer development, especially in Clinton county.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Publ. 1915 by B. F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. - Page 789

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