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BIOGRAPHIES

Source:
Biographical Record of Wayne & Holmes Co.
Publ. Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co.
1889

(Contributed by Sharon Wick)

A B C D E F G H I J K L M
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  J. R. WACHTEL

Source:  Commemorative Biographical Record of Wayne County, Ohio Publ. Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co. 1889 - Page 459

  JOSEPH WAGNER, a long time resident of Wayne county, was born in Lewistown, Mifflin County, Penn., Feb. 18, 1832.  His father, George Wagner, a farmer by occupation, and upon reaching manhood was married to Susan Shook, daughter of John Shook, and a native of Pennsylvania.  Her family, on both sides, were of German descent.  Joseph Wagner's parents never came to Ohio.  His mother died in 1841, at the age of forty.  She was the mother of nine children, three of whom are now living, two in Pennsylvania, near where they were born and Joseph in Wayne County.  George Wagner died in 1856, aged seventy-three.  He was a Democrat in politics.
     Joseph Wagner was nine years of age when his mother died, and he soon had to look out for himself.  In 1859 he started for Pike's Peak, seeking gold, and was for five years in Minnesota and eight years in California.  In 1867 he returned to Wooster, and in 1869 was married to Miss Elizabeth Albright, daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth (Moor) Albright, and a native of Wooster City.  Her parents came to Wayne County about 1828.  Mr. Albright was a gunsmith, and lived on the lot where the depot now stands.  Later he moved to a farm, and afterward returned to the city, and for a time kept a tavern, later engaging in the grocery business.  In 1857 he left the city and made his home on his farm, one mile south of the city, where he spent the remainder of his life.  In December, 1876, Mrs. Albright died, aged seventy-three years.  She was the mother of eight children, five of whom are now living.  Two of them died in infancy, and the names of the others are Mrs. Mary A. ThompsonO. M. and Elizabeth (Mrs. James Wagner), living in Wayne County; Mrs. John Reamer, who died at the age of thirty-five; Noah, living in Chicago; Andrew, in Wayne County.  Mr. Albright died on the 9th of June, 1884, aged eighty-one years.  He was a self-made man, beginning life a poor boy, and by his own industry won success in life.  His first tax was $30.  He was a stanch Democrat, but was not an aspirant for office.  His daughter, Mary A., was married to J. H. Thompson in 1853, and for eighteen years lived in Kansas, but for the last four years her home has been in Wayne County.  Her children were Mary Ellen, who married Horace Hickenlooper, and died at the age of twenty-eight; Elzie Wynoma; Annie, Mrs. Frank Johnson, of Kansas; Abner Q. and Jacob J. (twins), former in Washington Territory, latter in Kansas; Frank, in Kansas City, Mo.; Sarah F., in Iowa; Gussie, in Maysville.
     Since his marriage Mr. Wagner has made his home on the farm where he now resides, except for about three years.  In 1881 he engaged in the milk business, and is probably the most extensive dealer in the city.  But one child has been born to Mr. and Mrs. Wagner, by name Florence Sadie, born June 2, 1877, now receiving her education.  Mr. Wagner is a stanch Republican, and both he and his wife are members of the English Lutheran Church.  He has been successful in life, a result due to his own exertions.  He stands deservedly high in the estimation of the entire community, as a citizen, business man and neighbor, and is looked upon as one of the most substantial and reliable residents.
Source:  Commemorative Biographical Record of Wayne County, Ohio Publ. Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co. 1889 - Page 441
  JOSHUA WARNER

Source:  Commemorative Biographical Record of Wayne County, Ohio Publ. Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co. 1889 - Page 387

  ROSANNA WARNER

Source:  Commemorative Biographical Record of Wayne County, Ohio Publ. Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co. 1889 - Page 387

  R. B. WASSON, treasurer of Wayne County, Ohio, is one of its sons, being born in Wayne Township, Mar. 28, 1833.  His father, named David, was a native of the Keystone State, and came when young to Ohio, being one of the early settlers of Wayne Township and County, James Wasson, grandfather of our subject, was an Englishman by birth, and immigrated when young to this country, settling in Pennsylvania, where he was united in marriage with Miss Jane McConaha.  David Wasson spent his youth on his father's farm, and on reaching manhood was married to Margaret, daughter of Thomas Beall.  Of this union seven children were born, two of whom survive:  Mrs. Lydia C. Collins, living on the homestead in Wayne Township, and R. B.  In 1845 death entered the household of the Wassons, claiming the wife and mother, who was then but thirty-five years of age.  Her husband survived her many years, dying in 1882, at the age of seventy-seven years.  He was one of the stanchest Republicans of his township and had held various offices of trust and responsibility, those who knew him having unbounded confidence in his ability and integrity.  He and his wife were both members of the Presbyterian Church.
     R. B. Wasson spent his earlier years on the home farm, getting his education in the log school-house of the period  In 1852 when eighteen years old he joined a party going to California in search of gold.  For six months he drove oxen, sheep, etc., across the plains, and finally reached the haven of his desires.  For eight years he followed mining in California, with the exception of one summer, which he spent upon a ranch.  In 1860 he returned to Wayne County, and the following year he passed as clerk in a dry goods store at Doylestown, giving that up to become a farmer in his native township.  Mar. 23, 1861, Mr. Wasson was married to Miss Lucetta Franks, daughter of Abraham and Lydia (Blocker) Franks, and a native of Doylestown.  Eight children came to bless their union (seven of whom are now surviving):  Abraham, the eldest is deceased; Amanda is wedded to Mr. C. Zimmer, of Wooster; John, Mattie B., Richard, Kate, Thomas and Louis F. are still under the parental roof.
     In 1865 Mr. Wasson began dealing extensively in lumber, shipping from Canada to the United States.  Later he engaged in the saw-mill business in Western, Ohio, and a year thereafter established a saw-mill at Nashville, Mich.  In 1876 he withdrew from the lumber business in Ohio and Michigan, and the following year shipped lumber from Virginia to New York, finally retiring from the business  in 1878, and going onto his farm in Wayne Township where he has spent most of his time since.  Politically Mr. Wasson was classed as an independent until 1872, when he identified himself with the Democratic party, with which he has since continued to act.  He has held many positions of trust and responsibility.  He has been a member of the school board, township trustee, and member of the village council, and was elected to the first council of the village council.  A number of times he has been a candidate for the office of county treasurer, to which he was elected in 1887, and is now filling that responsible position.  In every office that he has been called upon to fill  he has discharged its duties with fidelity and care, and has won the highest regard of all who know him.  Socially he is identified with the Masonic fraternity and with the Knights of Pythias.
Source:
Commemorative Biographical Record of the counties of Wayne and Homes, Ohio Publ. Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co. 1889 - Page 187
  PERRY WEAVER

Source:  Commemorative Biographical Record of Wayne County, Ohio Publ. Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co. 1889 - Page 234

  HENRY H. WEBB

Source:  Commemorative Biographical Record of Wayne County, Ohio Publ. Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co. 1889 - Page 417

  JOHN WEBB

Source:  Commemorative Biographical Record of Wayne County, Ohio Publ. Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co. 1889 - Page 277

  MRS. MARY ANN WEBB

Source:  Commemorative Biographical Record of Wayne County, Ohio Publ. Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co. 1889 - Page 417

  DAVID WEBNER

Source:  Commemorative Biographical Record of Wayne County, Ohio Publ. Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co. 1889 - Page 103

  WILLIAM W. WELDAY

Source:  Commemorative Biographical Record of Wayne County, Ohio Publ. Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co. 1889 - Page 470

  JOHN C. WELKER

Source:  Commemorative Biographical Record of Wayne County, Ohio Publ. Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co. 1889 - Page 387


M. Welker
MARTIN WELKER

Source:  Commemorative Biographical Record of Wayne County, Ohio Publ. Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co. 1889 - Page 26

  WILLIAM P. WHITE

Source:  Commemorative Biographical Record of Wayne County, Ohio Publ. Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co. 1889 - Page 440

 

JOHN WHITMAN is a son of Christian and Mary (Manning) Whitman, and was born May 5, 1832, in Chipewa Twp., Wayne Co., Ohio.  George Whitman, the grandfather of John Whitman, and a native of Pennsylvania, came to Wayne Co., in 1827, and settled in Chippewa Township, and here he passed the rest of his life.
     Christian Whitman, the father, was born in Pennsylvania, and came to Wayne  Co. with his parents; then, after his marriage with Mary Manning, located on a farm adjoining his father, and remained there until 1886, when he retired from the pursuits of the farm, and now lives at Doylestown, Chippewa Township.  He reared nine children (eight of whom are now living), viz.:  George, in Doylestown, Ohio; John, our subject; Catherine, wife of Henry Gardner, in Chippewa Township; Mary C., deceased; William, in Chippewa Township; Franklin, in Doylestown, Ohio; Levi, in Chippewa Township; Elizabeth wife of John Deible, in Chippewa Twp., and Benjamin, on the homestead.  The subject of this sketch attended the township schools, has followed the occupation of a farmer, and has always lived in Wayne County, with the exception of two years spent in Missouri.  In 1882 he purchased his present farm of 160 acres in Milton Township.  In 1863 Mr. Whitman married Miss Catherine, daughter of Joseph Eberhart, of Milton Twp., Wayne Co., and by this union there are seven children, as follows:  Joseph, Mary C., Sarah, Angeline, Clara, Charles and Alfred.  Mr. Whitman has always been an active Democrat, and has served as school director, supervisor, etc.  In 1883 he was elected justice of the peace, which office he now fills.  He and his family are members of the Catholic Church of Doylestown.
Source:  Commemorative Biographical Record of the counties of Wayne and Homes, Ohio Publ. Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co. 1889 - Page 13


Sam'l Whitmore
SAMUEL WHITMORE

Source:  Commemorative Biographical Record of the counties of Wayne and Homes, Ohio Publ. Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co. 1889 - Page 466

  WILLIAM H. WILER.  This well-known citizen of Wooster is a native of teh county, born in Wooster Township, Apr. 18, 1855.  Both of his parents were natives of Pennsylvania, and had migrated to Wayne County early in the thirties.  His father's name was Elizabeth Weirich.  They settled upon a tract of new land in Wooster Township, where he had to clear away the forest to make room for his home.  There they endured the hardships and discomforts of a pioneer life, their labors sweetened by the knowledge that they were creating a comfortable home for the children growing up around their cabin.  Their principal crop, in fact the only one they could turn into ready money, was wheat, and the nearest market for that was Massillon, Ohio.  This home the pioneer occupied with his family until a few years before his death, when he removed to Wooster, dying there in 1880, at the age of seventy years.  The mother and wife is now living in Wooster, aged sixty-nine.  Both were members of the Lutheran Church.  To this worthy couple had been born six children, of whom we make the following record:  Sarah is now Mrs. Christian Shelley, of Plain Township, this county; John is living in Ashtabula County, Ohio; Christiana, now Mrs. Andrew Branstetter, lives near Wooster; Mary died in 1874; Ella is Mrs. James Miller of Wooster; William H. is the youngest of the family.
     William H. Wiler, of whom we write, received his education in Wooster, and learned in his youth the trade of carpentry.  Upon reaching his majority, however, he established himself in the boot and shoe business at Wooster, and has ever since continued therein.  In 1876 he was married, taking for his life partner Miss Mary Lucas, daughter of Josiah and Elizabeth (Ritter) Lucas, and a native of Pennsylvania. Three children came to bless their union, one of whom, Roy, born in 1878, died when six months old; Zella, born in 1880, and Charles, in 1882, are the survivors. 
     Mr. Wiler holds an honored place in the business and social circles of Wooster, and he is justly esteemed as a business man whose word may always be depended upon, and a citizen who takes a pride in and does his share toward the growth and prosperity of his native county.  His first start in the shoe business was in partnership with his father-in-law, Josiah Lucas, which connection continued until 1882, since when our subject has been alone.  In the beneficial and secret fraternities Mr. Wiler takes much interest.  He is a member of the Odd Fellows order, of the Iron Hall, and of the Royal Arcanum. He and his wife are both members of the Lutheran Church of Wooster.

Source:  Commemorative Biographical Record of Wayne County, Ohio Publ. Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co. 1889 -
Page 229
  ALBERT C. WILES is a son of David and Sevilla (Heckert) Wiles, natives of Preston County, West Virginia.  They came to Wayne County Nov. 4, 1828, and entered the west half of Section 20, in Canaan Township, making the last entry of Government land in the township.  They started in life poor, and by hard work, perseverance and industry accumulated a large property, which they divided among their children.  Mr. David Wiles will be remembered as a benevolent, enterprising man, who always took an active part in public affairs.  His wife died Nov. 15, 1882, and he on Mar. 24, 1886, both being members of the Canaan Methodist Episcopal Church.  Their children who are living are Rebecca, wife of Abraham Deahuff, of Akron, Ind.; Daniel, in Canaan Township, Wayne County; Salinda wife of John Fike, in Canaan Township, Wayne County; Eliza Ann, wife of Abraham Musselmon, of Alma, Neb.; David, in Yorktown, Iowa; Jennie, wife of H. W. Taylor, in Canaan Township, Wayne County; Caroline, wife of Gideon Johnson, in San Francisco, Cal.; Joseph M., in Canaan Township, and Albert C.
    
The subject of this memoir was born Dec. 10, 1847; was educated at the Township schools and Canaan Academy, and for five years taught the township schools; also taught music for seven years.  Since then Mr. Wiles has followed farming, moving onto his present farm in Canaan Township in 1880.  In 1881 he married Miss Kate, daughter of Allen Scott, of Hamilton, Ohio, and they have two children: Lutie Glysem and Gail Scott.  Mr. Wiles, politically,  is a Republican, and has acted as township clerk for ten years.  He is secretary of the Board of Trustees of the Canaan Methodist Episcopal Church, and holds the office of lecturer in Canaan Grange, No. 1280, Patrons of Husbandry.
    
Source:  Commemorative Biographical Record of Wayne County, Ohio Publ. Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co. 1889 - Page 531
  E. P. WILLAMAN

Source:  Commemorative Biographical Record of Wayne County, Ohio Publ. Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co. 1889 - Page 515

  BENJAMIN WILSON was born in Franklin County, Penn., Jan. 28, 1825.  His grandfather, John Wilson, was a native of Ireland, as was born in 1792, and who at the age of eight years came to America with his parents.  The family made their home in Cumberland County, Penn., where both grandparents died.  James Wilson learned the trade of a wheelwright, and carried on the furniture business also, in Concord, Franklin County, making wheels, bedsteads and chairs, and was also an undertaker.  He was married to Mary Ann, daughter of James Wallace, and a native of Ireland.  Her parents came to America in 1812, and died in Juniata County, Penn.  After their marriage James and Mary Ann Wilson remained in Pennsylvania until 1833, when the mother died, at the age of thirty-eight.  She was the mother of eight children, seven boys and one girl, of whom five are still living, Benjamin being the only one in Wayne County.  Mr. Wilson, previous to his marriage with Mary Ann Wallace, was married to Mary Rhea, who bore him one child, John, who lived and died in Wooster.  After the death of his second wife Mr. Wilson married Mrs. Devor, who bore him five children, and died in 1862.  Two of these five children are now living: Mrs. Sarah Anderson, of Orrville, and Samuel H., of Findlay, Ohio.  James Wilson died in 1869, aged seventy-seven years.  In politics he was a Democrat.  He served for years as a postmaster in Concord, Penn.  He was a strong Presbyterian. Of his family three sons are physicians, one a minister (United Presbyterian) in Nebraska.  One son, William, was State Senator in Iowa, elected as a Democrat.  Benjamin was the only farmer.
     When Benjamin Wilson was eleven years of age his uncle, Benjamin Wallace, induced him to come to Wayne County, where he arrived in December, 1835.  The country was yet comparatively new and rough.  Young Wilson's life was like that of farm boys generally, and he made his home with his uncle until he was twenty years of age.  He married Miss Margaret McCoy, daughter of Alexander and Elizabeth (Black) McCoy, who was a native of Juanita County, Penn., and was taken to Wayne County when an infant.  She lived until 1852, when she died, aged twenty-seven years, leaving two children, James W., living in Plain Township, and Alexander I., M. D., of Colorado.  Mr. Wilson afterward married Mary S. Alexander, a native of Juniata County, Penn., who died in June, 1809, leaving one child, Margaret Alice, now Mrs. S. P. Gill, of Orrville.  In 1871 Mr. Wilson was married to Miss Isabella Rose, daughter of James Rose, of whom a biographical sketch appears below.  Miss Rose inherited from her father her sympathy for the poor and oppressed.  In 1803 she went to Memphis to teach the freedmen.  She was there for three years, and then went to Washington, Iowa, where she remained until her marriage, in 1871.  By this marriage one daughter was born, Florence Rose, now at home.  Mr. Wilson for a number of years made his home near Mechanicsburg, and in 1853 came to his present place, where he has made all the improvements, and cleared the greater part of the farm.  The home is one of the finest in the township.  Both he and his wife are members of the United Presbyterian Church of Wooster, and the family is recognized as one of the most progressive in the county, well deserving the respect and esteem of all who know them.  Mr. Wilson began life a poor boy, and has won success by his own exertions.
     Mrs. Wilson's mother was Martha Boyd, who came from Ireland with her father when she was sixteen years old, and settled in Columbiana County, where she remained until her marriage.  She was a woman of good mind, a great reader, and a stanch Abolitionist, as was her husband.  She was also a strong temperance woman.
    
JAMES ROSE, who was the father of Mrs. Benjamin Wilson, was born in Scotland, in 1784.  Charles Rose, his father, was a Highlander, and came to America in 1804, settling near Wellsville, Columbiana Co., Ohio, where both he and his wife died.  James Rose was twenty years of age when he came with his parents to this country, and for a time he worked in Baltimore.
     About 1810 he immigrated to Wayne County with his brother, John, and entered what is now known as the Jones farm, about two miles west of Wooster, living there one year.  They then disposed of the farm in Wooster Township, and went to Wayne Township, where their father had entered a farm, but, it being in hte time of the war with England, and Indian troubles seeming imminent they both (John Rose and his brother, James) moved to the block-house in Wooster, and there remained for one year.  James, having in the meantime married, returned with his wife to Wayne County, and settled on this farm in Wayne Township, on which they erected a little cabin, the door of which was only a suspended quilt, which served but poorly to keep out the wolves, which at night howled around the house.  Their father the next year disposed of this farm, and John then entered a farm one mile south, in Wayne Township, and James entered one in Canaan Township, near Golden Corners, which is now owned by Calvin Armstrong.  In 1852 they disposed of this farm, and came to Wooster, where they remained one summer, when they removed to Hayesville, where Mr. Rose had purchased a farm.  Here, in the fall of 1858, the wife and mother died, aged sixty-six years.  She was the mother of eleven children, Mrs. Benjamin Wilson being the only one now residing in Wayne County.  The names of the children are as follows: Charles, who went to Northern Illinois, and is now dead; Nancy, who died at eighteen; Robert, in Texas; Catherine, Mrs. Isaac Van Nostran, in Kansas; Margery, deceased; John, in California; Mary Jane, who died at the age of eighteen; Isabella, Mrs. Benjamin Wilson; Hannah Martha, died at the age of one year; Martha, died in 1878, at Oskaloosa, Iowa; Sarah F., Mrs. Josiah Lowes, of Omaha, Neb.
     In 1863 Mr. Rose sold his farm, and removed to Washington, Iowa, where he passed the remainder of his days, and where he died, Mar. 30, 1873, at the age of eighty-nine and one-fourth years.  In politics Mr. Rose was first a Jackson Democrat, but afterward became a Whig, and in l840 voted for Gen. Harrison.  When the slavery question began to be agitated Mr. Rose took a firm stand in favor of the oppressed negro, and cast the first and only abolition vote in Canaan Township.  He was laughed at by his neighbors, who told him that he was throwing away his vote, to which he replied: "Mine will live, while yours will rot."  His home became a "station" on the "underground railroad," and many were the poor fugitives whom he helped on the way to Canada and freedom.  On one occasion he had as a "passenger" a poor slave who had lost both feet by freezing, and was walking on his knees.  Mr. Rose bad formerly helped the man's family on their way, as he did this crippled sufferer.  Mr. Rose was a stanch member of the Presbyterian Church.
Source:  Commemorative Biographical Record of the counties of Wayne and Homes, Ohio Publ. Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co. 1889 - Page  436
  WILLIAM WILSON, son of James and Jane (Fife) Wilson, natives of Allegheny County, Penn., was born on the homestead in Sugar Creek Township, Wayne Co., Ohio, Jan. 24, 1830.  His parents came to Wayne County, Ohio, in 1822, and settled on the farm now owned by their son William, which land was entered by William Wilson, the grandfather of our subject.  James Wilson died in 1872, and his widow in 1874.  Five children were born to this couple, viz.: John, who was murdered in Kansas; Isabella, who died in 1847; William; Mary, wife of John Weaver, of Richland County, Ohio; Sarah Jane, wife of Jonah Creits, of Ashtabula, Ohio.
     Of these, William, whose name heads this sketch, attended the common schools, and has always followed farming in Sugar Creek Township, Wayne County.  In 1864 he enlisted in Company E, One Hundred and Sixty-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and served one hundred days.  In 1874 he married Miss Letitia, daughter of Jonah Fife, of Columbiana County, Ohio, and they have one child, Emerson S., residing at home.  Mr. Wilson is a member of the Republican party, and has served as school director, supervisor, etc., of the township.  He and his wife are members of the Dalton Presbyterian Church.
Source:  Commemorative Biographical Record of the counties of Wayne and Homes, Ohio Publ. Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co. 1889 - Page 65
  WILLIAM R. WILSON.     Among the prominent and representative farmers of Chippewa Township, Wayne County, is the subject of this sketch, who was born in Cecil County, Md., Oct. 13, 1809, a son of Thomas and Mary (Wilson) Wilson and of Scotch-Irish stock.  He was reared in his native county,and learned tlie blacksmith's trade at Charleston, Md., at the head of Chesapeake Bay.  In 1832 he came to Ohio, and settled in Chippewa Township, Wayne County, on the farm he now occupies, which he cleared and improved, and where he has since resided.  In 1835 he married Margaret, daughter of Michael Franks, a pioneer of Chippewa Township, and granddaughter of Michael and Amy (Furst) Franks, of Fayette County, Penn., and a great-granddaughter of Michael Franks, a native of Alsace-Lorraine, Germany, who, with his father, Jacob, was among the pioneers of Fayette County, Penn.  To Mr. and Mrs. William R. Wilson six children were born, who grew to maturity: Leonard W. (a prominent clergyman of the Methodist Episcopal Church), Fletcher, Martha (Mrs. Jacob Lehman), Franks, John M., and Martin, a Methodist divine.   Mr. Wilson has always been a farmer, and a successful one.  He is a member of the United Brethren Church.   He has represented Wayne County in the State Legislature two terms, with credit to himself and the county; was formerly a Democrat, but is now an advocate of prohibition.
Source:  Commemorative Biographical Record of Wayne County, Ohio Publ. Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co. 1889 - Page 527
  CALVIN G. WINEBRENNER

Source:  Commemorative Biographical Record of Wayne County, Ohio Publ. Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co. 1889 - Page 409

  MRS. HARRIET WINEBRENNER

Source:  Commemorative Biographical Record of Wayne County, Ohio Publ. Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co. 1889 - Page 409


Anthony Wright
ANTHONY WRIGHT

 


Source:  Commemorative Biographical Record of Wayne County, Ohio Publ. Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co. 1889 - Page 62

 



 
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