OHIO GENEALOGY EXPRESS

A Part of Genealogy Express

 

Welcome to
Jackson County, Ohio
History & Genealogy


BIOGRAPHIES

Source:
History of Lower Scioto Co., Ohio
Publ. Chicago: Inter-state Publishing Co.
1884

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
LOT DAVIES, Superintendent of the Buckeye Furnace, Jackson, Ohio, was born Mar. 15, 1830, in Cardiganshire, South Wales, son of John Lot and Anna Davies, who emigrated to the United States in 1841.  His mother died in Pittsburg, Pa., in the fall of 1841, while on their way to Ohio, and the father died in Gallia County, Ohio, in October, 1853.  They were the parents of eight children, five of whom are still living, our subject being the youngest.  He attended school a short time in Wales and also a few winters at the common schools of Gallia County.  His early life was spent on his father's farm and on the farms of his neighbors, and at the age of sixteen he began working among blast furnaces.  His whole business life has been spent in Jackson County.  He has been foundryman at Cambria and Jefferson furnaces, and for the past fifteen years has been General Superintendent and manager of the Buckeye Furnace.  Previous to the failure of the Huron Iron Company Mr. Davies had always been quite successful in business, but being a stockholder and indorser in that company he was a heavy loser.  He was married Aug. 22, 1855, to Laura J. Williams, at Jefferson Furnace, Jackson County.  They have had eight children - John L., E. Cora, I. Newton, F. Charles, Annie, M. Emma, Willie and D. Albert, four of whom are deceased.  In September, 1862, Mr. Davies enlisted as a private in Company H, One Hundred and Seventeenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry.  The regiment was changed to the First Ohio Heavy Artillery.  He received a commission from Governor Tod, Aug. 10, 1863, and served with his regiment till the close of the war, Aug. 1, 1865.  His political affiliations were with the Democratic party until the breaking out of the war, since which he has been a Republican.  He is a member of the Welsh Presbyterian church, in which he is an Elder.  He is a member of the Masonic fraternity.
Source: History of Lower Scioto Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Inter-state Publishing Co. 1884 - Page 552
JOHN DAVIS was born in Fort Cumberland, Md., in 1827, a son of William J. Davis.  His parents came to Ohio in 1840, locating first in Zanesville, but in 1844 removed to Jackson where they both died.  His father was by occupation a miller, and at one time ran the Merchants' Mill at Fort Cumberland.  Our subject's educational advantages were limited, and when fifteen years of age he began working in a mill.  He has studied all branches of the grist and woolen mill, and thoroughly understands everything connected with a mill.  He is now general manager and one of the proprietors of the Franklin Mills, having worked his way up by industry and good judgment.  He married Susan E. Burns.
Source: History of Lower Scioto Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Inter-state Publishing Co. 1884 - Page 553
PATRICK DELANEY is a native of Pennsylvania and of Irish parentage.  He was almost reared in a coal mine, beginning to work in one when only ten years of age.  He came to Ohio in 1856, when twenty-one years of age, and in 1870 came to Jackson.  In 1881 he purchased ten acres of the coal vein on section 7, Coal Township.  The vein is about thirty-four inches thick and of good Jackson Hill coal.
Source: History of Lower Scioto Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Inter-state Publishing Co. 1884 - Page 553
C. S. DICKASON, stock-dealer, Jackson, is a son of Reuben, a grandson of John and great grandson of Jacob Dickason.  The latter was by occupation a farmer, and became an early settler in Fayette County, Ohio, and died near Washington C. H., at an advanced age.  John Dickason was born in Rockingham County, Md., by occupation a farmer, and lived an died in his native State.  He was a patriot in the Revolutionary war, under General Washington, and was a man of strong constitution, and lived to a ripe old age.  His wife was Ann Smith, who was born near Morefield, Va., of Irish parentage, and died in Monroe County, W. Va., nearly 100 years old.  Of their ten children Reuben is the eighth, and the only survivor (one of a pair of twins).  He was born in Monroe County, W. Va., Dec. 2, 1795, and was reared in his native State to farm life, and acquired only a limited education.  He married Catharine Miller, daughter of Jacob and Ruth (White) Miller, of German and English descent, respectively.  Reuben and wife, in 1816, moved from Virginia and settled in Madison County, Ohio, two years later in Ross County, and in 1819 moved to Jackson County, Ohio, within three and a half miles of Jackson.  He first entered eighty acres of land, and subsequently added to it until he owned 240 acres, which he cleared and improved, enduring all the hardships connected with pioneer life in a new country.  He followed farming through life, but is now, at the age of eighty-eight, retired with his son C. S. in Jackson.  His wife died Mar. 18, 1865.  She was the mother of six children - John W. (deceased), Ruth, Jacob, T. B., (all three in Kansas, and the latter Probate Judge in Brown County, of that State), Chas. S. and Margaret A.  The latter resides in Pike County, Ohio, but C. S. is the only one living in Jackson County, where he was born June 12, 1830, and has been a resident of the county ever since.  He was reared to farm life and acquired a common-school education.  He followed farming and stock-raising until 1866, when he moved to Jackson.  He then relinquished farming and combined stock-dealing with merchandising, which he conducted jointly until 1881.  Since that time stock-dealing has received his entire attention, and he is now one of the leading dealers of the county in cattle and sheep.  With his long experience in handling cattle, there are few men whose knowledge equals his on this subject, and while he trades close he always thinks of keeping in the bounds of honor and integrity.  He is active in life, plain, unvarnished in his address, yet courteous in its true sense.  In politics he is Democratic, and has accepted a number of offices of honor and trust, but has never been an aspirant.  He has at all times been willing to assist in furthering such enterprises as tend to elevate the community and the upbuilding of the county.  On July 2, 1853, he married Samantha Rice.  The issue of this union is five children, and all have received a good education.
Source: History of Lower Scioto Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Inter-state Publishing Co. 1884 - Page 553
J. M. DOWNEY, attorney at law, Jackson, Ohio, was born in Harrisonville, Scioto County, Ohio, May 29, 1860,, a son of Nathaniel and Sidney (Stephenson) Downey.  His parents removed to Jackson, Ohio, when he was an infant, and are still residents of this city, J. M.  was educated in the Jackson schools, and graduated in 1880.  In the summer of 1879 he began the study of law under John T. Moore, and May 31, 1882, graduated from the Cincinnati Law School.  He was admitted to the bar the following June, and is now one of the promising young attorneys of Jackson.
Source: History of Lower Scioto Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Inter-state Publishing Co. 1884 - Page 555
HON. PORTER DU HADWAY, deceased, was born Apr. 7, 1828, in Jackson County, Ohio, a son of Daniel Du Hadway, who was born in Paris, France, but when he was two years old his father emigrated to the United States and settled near Dover, Del., where his parents died, his mother living to the advanced age of 104 years.  Daniel  was a patriot in the war of 1812, and at its close took up his headquarters at Chillicothe, Ohio.  About 1817 he became a resident of Jackson County, where he spent most of his time at the shoemaker's bench.  His wife was Elizabeth Porter, a native of New York, and at the time of their marriage as a resident of Athens County, Ohio.  She died prematurely in 1835, but Daniel survived until 1875, aged ninety-three years, having spent from 1836 to 1844 in  France, his native land.  Hon. Porter Du Hadway was the sixth of the father's family, and was born Apr. 7, 1828, in Jackson County, but being left motherless at an early age, and his father returning to France, he was left to manage for himself.  At the age of seventeen he commenced learning the trade of his father (shoemaking), to which he gave his attention until 1857, having come to Jackson in 1847, at which time he commenced taking educational instructions under the tutorship of Hon. J. W. Longbon, having up to this time received no education at all.  He applied himself diligently in the shop during the day and at his books at night, hence ere long he had accomplished two important ends - his trade completed and a fair education.  In 1855 he commenced reading law under Hon. Levi Dungan (deceased), and in 1857 he was elected Clerk of the Court, which office he held until 1860.  In that year he was examined by the Supreme Court of Ohio and admitted to the bar.  He at once commenced the practice of his chosen profession in Jackson, which he followed exclusively until 1873.  In the fall of this year he was elected Judge of the Common Pleas Court from the Seventh Judicial District on the Democratic ticket, although it was a strong Republican district, composed of Jackson, Vincent, Pike and Scioto counties.  Upon the expiration of his term he resumed the practice of law, but failing health soon caused him to relinquish it, and on Nov. 9, 1880, he passed away.  Beside the offices mentioned the Judge held many others of honor and trust which his honor and integrity brought him, as he never solicited any office save that to which he was elected in 1857.  In religion the Judge was not circumscribed to any creed or church.  The life of the Judge was one of activity.  He possessed some remarkable traits of character.  Without an academic education, he yet acquired a reputation as a jurist.  His aptitude to judge of men and things stood him instead of scholastic training.  The Judge was married Sept. 10, 1850, to Mary, daughter of Eli Moore, of Jackson County.  She died in 1853 leaving two children, one of whom still lives.  In December, 1857, he married Mrs. Mary A. Bennett, by whom he had six children; four are still living.  At a meeting of the members of the bar of Jackson County to consider the proper action to take concerning the death of Judge Du Hadway, the following resolutions were adopted:
     Resolved, That in the death of Judge Porter Du Hadway the community has lost one in whom high trust and confidence have been often reposed, the bar, one of its ablest members, and his family, a husband and father, whose memory they now cherish as dear to them.
     Resolved, That to his family, and especially to his widow, we extend our cordial sympathy.
     Resolved, That this memorial and accompanying resolution be entered upon the journals of this court.
     Resolved, That a copy be furnished to each newspaper in the town of Jackson for publication; and that all the papers of this, the Seventh Judicial District, be requested to copy the same.  Also, that a copy be furnished the family of the deceased.
Source: History of Lower Scioto Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Inter-state Publishing Co. 1884 - Page 555
DAVID D. DUNGAN was born in Beaver County, July 18, 1833, the youngest of nine children of Levi and Margaret (Cameron) Dungan.  His grandfather, Levi Dungan, was of English birth, and married a Welsh lady.  His maternal grandfather was of Irish birth, and married a Scotch lady.  His father was born in Beaver County, Pa.; his mother was a native of the same State.  In 1844 they removed to Muskingum County, where they both died - past fourscore years of age.  David D. received a common-school education.  He remained with his parents till 1856, when he came to Jackson County and was engaged in selling goods at the Old Cincinnati Furnace.  In 1862 he became established in general merchandising, and has since carried on a prosperous business with the exception of two years he was at Star Furnace.  He now has the leading grocery and provision store in Jackson.  Politically Mr. Dungan favors the Democratic party.  He is a member of the Presbyterian church.  He was married in December, 1860, to Mary A., daughter of George W. Hale.  They have had five children, only four now living - A. M., wife of Morris Sternberger; Ralph H., Ernest L. and ClydeMr. Dungan owns 108 acres of good pasture and mineral land where he resides, near the city.
Source: History of Lower Scioto Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Inter-state Publishing Co. 1884 - Page 555
IRVINE DUNGAN, attorney at law, Jackson, Ohio, was born in Cannonsburg, Washington Co., Pa., May 29, 1844, a son of William H. and Jane Dungan, of Irish and Scotch descent, his grandmother being Margaret Cameron.  The family on first coming to America settled in Philadelphia.  His parents were married in Beaver County, Pa., in 1842.  They subsequently removed to Ohio, locating first in Muskingum County, and afterward in Jefferson County.  In 1854 they removed to Salem, Henry Co., Iowa, where his mother died in 1855 of cholera.  Irvine then lived at his grandfather's, in Muskingum County, Ohio, two years, when his father married again and took him to Iowa.  He attended the Denmark Academy, Iowa, two yeas, when his father failed in business and removed to a farm near Crawfordsville, Iowa, but allowed him his time.  He worked his way through Washington County, being in the senior year when the war broke out.  He volunteered in the Nineteenth Iowa Infantry, which took part in the Missouri and Arkansas campaigns, and at Vicksburg, Sept. 29, 1863, in the battle at Morganza, he was captured and remained a prisoner ten months.  He made two efforts to escape traveling over 800 miles in the two attempts, but was re-captured both times.  He was finally exchanged in July 1864, at the mouth of Red River.  He was afterward at Fort Gaines and Morgan and in the fighting around the bay at Mobile, where the rebel General Richard Taylor at last surrendered, May 4, 1865.  After the war Mr. Dungan came to Ohio and taught in the grammar department of the Jackson schools and was Superintendent one year.  In the meantime he studied law with Levi Dungan and in September, 1867, was admitted to the bar, and has since been engaged in the practice of his profession.  In 1868, 1870 and 1872 he was a candidate for Prosecuting Attorney but was defeated each time by John L. Jones.  In 1868 he was elected Mayor of Jackson.  In 1877 he was elected Senator from the Seventh District by 948 majority.  He served on the Judiciary and Finance committees, the two chief committees of the Senate; also on the committees on Geological Survey, Mines and Mining, Girls' Reform School, and was Chairman of the committees on "Corporations other than Municipal," Universities and Colleges, and Enrollment.  He was regarded as one of the hardest workers in the Senate.  He took special interest in reforming the abuses of what is known as the truck system, and procured the passage of laws against paying labor in scrip.  He was the author of a bill to prevent unjust discrimination by railroads in freights, and procured numerous reforms in legislation, among them being the reduction of penalty for delinquent taxes from fifty and twenty-five per cent to twenty-five and fifteen per cent.  He has been attorney of the First National Bank of Jackson thirteen years, and is the local attorney of the Ohio Southern and C., W. & B. Railroad.  Politically he has always been a Democrat and has taken an active interest in the success of that party.  Mr. Dungan's ancestors were Presbyterians and he also adheres to the doctrines of that church.  He has three children - Irvine Laird, Nellie Margaret and Emma Corinne, aged fourteen, eleven and seven years respectively.
Source: History of Lower Scioto Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Inter-state Publishing Co. 1884 - Page 555
HON. LEVI DUNGAN was born in Beaver County, Pa., July 18, 1833, the youngest of nine children of Levi and Margaret (Cameron) Dungan.  His grandfather, Levi Dungan, was of English birth, and married a Welsh lady.  His maternal grandfather was of Irish birth, and married a Scotch lady.  His father was born in Beaver County, Pa.; his mother was a native of the same State.  In 1844 they removed to Muskingum County, where they both died- past fourscore years of age.  David D. received a common-school education.  He remained with his parents till 1856, when he came to Jackson County and was engaged in selling goods at the Old Cincinnati Furnace.  In 1862 he became established in general merchandising, and sine carried on a prosperous business with the exception of two years he was a Starr Furnace.  He now has the leading grocery and provision store in Jackson.  Politically Mr. Dungan favors the Democratic party.  He is a member of the Presbyterian church.  He was married in December, 1860, to Mary A., daughter of George W. Hale.  They have had five children, only four now living - A. M., wife of Morris Sternberger; Ralph H., Ernest L. and Clyde.   Mr. Dungan owns 108 acres of good pasture and mineral land where he resides, near the city.
Source: History of Lower Scioto Co., Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Inter-state Publishing Co. 1884 - Page 556

NOTES:

CLICK HERE to RETURN to
JACKSON COUNTY, OHIO
INDEX PAGE
CLICK HERE to RETURN to
OHIO GENEALOGY EXPRESS
INDEX PAGE
FREE GENEALOGY RESEARCH is My MISSION
GENEALOGY EXPRESS
This Webpage has been created by Sharon Wick exclusively for Genealogy Express  2008
Submitters retain all copyrights