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OHIO GENEALOGY EXPRESS


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Logan County, Ohio

History & Genealogy


 


BIOGRAPHIES

Source:
History of Logan County and Ohio
Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers
186 Dearborn Street
1880
w/ some illustrations and portraits
 
A B C D E F G H IJ K L M N OPQ R S T U V W XYZ

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GEORGE F. BAILEY (Liberty Twp.) cooper; West Liberty; is the son of James and Catharine (Vandergrift) Bailey; his father was born in Harford Co., Md., Feb. 10, 1795, and his mother in the same county July 7, 1797; they came to Ohio in 1840, settling at Cambridge,, Guernsey Co., and in 1844 came to Licking Co., settling in Alexandria, where the father is still living, the mother having died June 24, 1865; she was the mother of Mary E., George F., Edwin  and Sarah A.; the father was again married; his parents were Presbyterians.  George F. was born Jan. 13, 1826, in Harford Co., Md., where he spent his boyhood days attending school.  At the age of 15 he began learning the cooper's trade with his father, which he continued until he was 21 years old; he then started on his own resources, having a few tools, only, to begin with.  He situated himself at Roscoe, Coshocton Co., where he remained until Nov. 2, 1849, when he went to California, there engaging, during the summer of 1851, in the gold mines, and at his trade in Sacramento City.  In September, 1851, he returned by water, and again worked at his trade at Roscoe.  July 1, 1852, he went to Licking Co. to visit his parents, and on Aug. 20, 1852, he came to West Liberty, where he has since remained.  He was married June 28, 1853, at Alexandria, Licking Co., to Susan Van Buskirk, by whom he had four children, two of whom survive - Oleeta and Donn C.; his wife  died June 12, 1859; was again married July 22, 1860 to Ann M. Van Buskirk; by her he has one child - Van Buskirk.  He enlisted in Co. G, 132 O. V. I., and ranked as Sergeant; was elected to the town council for nine years, and is now serving his third term as Justice of the Peace and Township Trustee.  He was early identified with the Whig party, having voted first for President Taylor, and at the organization o the Republican party he entered its ranks, and has been a valiant soldier in the cause ever since.  He is now a member of the Republican Central Committee, and is now a local member of this township.  Mr. Bailey has a remarkably good memory, and has been for the past few years writing up his trip to California, which is a very fine production.  He was one of the sufferers of the great fire during the summer of 1880, but he is not given to despair, and is now rebuilding some magnificent buildings.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 705
Liberty Twp. -
ENOS BALDWIN, hardware and grocery; West Liberty; was born July 22, 1818, in Champaign Co., O.  He obtained a limited education - as much as was afforded in the log cabin of those days.  At the age of 11 his parents moved to Logan Co., settling in Monroe Twp., where our subject engaged in rural pursuits.  His father, Daniel, was born in 1793, in Tennessee, and came to Highland Co., this State, when a mere boy.  His mother, Hannah (Williams)  was a native of Virginia and emigrated to Logan Co. at an early day.  The parents of Mr. Baldwin remained in Monroe Twp. for seven years, transferring then to Hardin Co., where the mother died in 1848.  The father was again married, to Sallie Stewart, and removed to Logan Co., in 1858 or 1859.  By his former marriage he had eleven children, nine of whom survive - Enos, Mary (deceased); John, who was four years in the 82 O. V. I. during the Civil War; Uriah (was also out in the war), Frances J. (deceased), William H. (was in the 100 days' service), Philander R. (was in the service from Iowa), Richard C. (stock-dealer in Merrick Co., Nebraska), Jesse (was in an Iowa regiment), Nicholas W. (was in the 13th O. V. I.), and Elizabeth A.  The boys who served in the war returned uninjured, save one slight wound, received by Nicholas W., at the battle of Chickamauga.  The father served in the war of 1812; was once Associate Judge of Hardin Co., and some time Justice of the Peace, which positions he filled with credit to himself and to those who chose him; he and his wife were members of the Methodist Church; their parents were raised Quakers.  Enos remained on the farm until he was about 19 years of age, at which time he began teaching school, which he continued but a short time.  In April, 1843, he sought a helpmate in the person of Sarah J., a daughter of Henry and Abigail (Brown) Buckmister, natives of New Hampshire, who came to Wyandot Co., O., in 1828, and afterward to Hardin Co., where the mother died and the father is still living.  Mr. Baldwin had by this Union two children; only one survives - Enos L.  His wife died in 1868, and he was again married, December, 1870, to Margaret Jane, daughter of James and Mary Jones, by whom he had two children - James H. only living.  His present wife was born in 1837.  His life was spent in rural pursuits until 1861, when he entered into the hardware and grocery business at this place, which he continued alone until 1866, when he enlarged by taking in Mr. Elliott as a partner, and since that time has merchandised under the firm name of Baldwin & Elliott, having now a full line of all kinds of hardware and groceries.  He has served as Township Trustee, Councilman and Cemetery Trustee, and has held office in the Presbyterian Church, of which denomination himself and wife are active members, as was also his first consort.  He has always been identified with the Republican party, having cast his first vote for W. H. Harrison. In all the varied experiences of the above hastily sketched life, its  possessor has been particularly fortunate.  He started life with $500, given him by his father, with whom he had remained five years after attaining his majority.  He now possesses, outside of his present large business, 125 acres of well improved land in Logan Co., and 80 acres in Iowa.  Though now his years are nearly three score and ten, he retains the appearance and activity of those twenty years his junior.  The hand of time has touched him lightly.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 706
HENRY BALLINGER (Perry Twp.), farmer; P. O., East Liberty; was born June 17, 1814, in Zane Twp.; is the eldest of a family of two children born to Henry and Patience (Bishop) Ballinger.  His father's name was Joshua, who emigrated to this county during its first settlement, and settled in the woods south of Middleburg.  Henry's father died before he was born, his mother marrying again.  She raised her son to maturity, and Nov. 23, 1837, he was married to Rebecca C. Moore, who was born in New Jersey April 15, 1817, and came west with her parents, Henry and Sarah (Custer) Moore, when she was five years of age.  Her grandfather attained a ripe old age.  Sine Mr. Ballinger's marriage he has resided in Perry Twp.  When he located, it was one dense growth of forest.  Wolves and wild game were in abundance.  He first purchased eighty acres of Duncan McCarthy, of Chillicothe, and the surroundings at the present time give but slight testimony of the inconveniences and obstacles that attended the settlement of these now productive lands that respond annually to the demands of the husbandman.  Mr. Ballinger is now in the decline of life, and is enjoying the fruits of his honest toil in quiet and peaceful retirement.  HE has been for two score of years a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and has endeavored to ornament his profession by a Christian-like walk and conversation.  Four children have been born to him - Mary, Laynon, Thomas and Henry.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 645
JAMES W. BALLINGER, (Zane Twp.) contractor and builder; West Milddleburg; was born at Camden, New Jersey, August 21, 1827, and at the age of 18 came with his parents to Perry Twp.  His father, William, and mother, Beulah (Ward), were natives of New Jersey.  The subject of our sketch received his education partly here, and partly in his native state, but his present broad and liberal culture comes from assiduous reading, and his keen observation of men and facts.  His father by trade was a carpenter, and James when 16 years of age, also began to learn the trade, working for his father for several years after becoming of age.  On November 17, 1850, he married Angeline Curl, a sketch of whose father appears in another portion of these biographies, and from this union there were ten children - Warren, Joseph, Bulah, Lewis, Ulysses, Asa, Ira, Perry, Jose and Maria Gertrude.  Although a carpenter by trade, he owns a farm of 42 acres, good land, well improved, and upon which he makes a speciality of raising fruit; James W. was in the 132nd O. V. I., under Col. Haines.  He is a Mason, Lodge 247, Chapter 60, Logan Council, No. 34; he is at present Township Trustee, and is eminently respected by both parties for his honesty and integrity.  In politics he is a Republican.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 629
L. G. BALLINGER (Perry Twp.), farmer; P. O. West Middleburg; was born March 23, 1843; son of John and Margaret (Daugherty) Ballinger, John Ballinger was born in New Jersey, Oct. 7, 1796, and emigrated to Ohio, locating in Zane Twp.; his wife was born May 29, 1811, and she being his second wife.  They were married on the farm now owned by Levi, whose father died Aug. 14, 1868; and mother, March 29, 1870.  Seven children were born to them.  During his life he was a member of the Free Will Baptist Church.  At the age of seventeen, Levi enlisted in Co. C., 17th O. V. I., and served three years, and was a true and worthy soldier; he was wounded at battle of Chickamauga; was struck in the neck with a Minnie ball.  The Federal army falling back, he was left on the battlefield and fell into the hands of the enemy.  His brother, David D., was in the same company, and was shot dead on the field, and was never seen afterwards.  Levi, after being in the hands of the enemy a short time, was exchanged, and returned to his regiment.  Upon his return home, he resumed farm labor, and was married in 1864 to Mary Sprague, who was born Sept. 9, 1845; she was a daughter of Isaac and Sarah (Green) Sprague.  Mr. Ballinger has 100 acres of land.  Five children have been born unto him - Franklin, Thomas, Delomo, Eda? M. and Louisa.  The Ballingers are true Republicans. 
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 646
OLIVER S. BALLINGER (Perry Twp.), farmer; P. O., East Liberty; was born Sept. 14, 1839; is the fifth son and seventh child of Joshua and Delilah (Jackson) Ballinger; Joshua was born in February, 1802, in Burlington Co., N. J., and emigrated to this State with his father, Samuel Ballinger, who settled in what is now known as Zane Twp., in 1809, where he remained until his death, which occurred on Sept. 8, 1873.  His wife was born in 1808, in Zane; they were both members of the Protestant Methodist Church.  At the age of 22, Oliver enlisted in Co. C, 17th O. V. I., and served three years, and was a true and valiant soldier, who participated in nearly all the prominent battles in which his regiment was engaged;  he was wounded at the battle of Chickamauga, and was there taken prisoner; he received his discharge, and returning home, engaged in farming pursuits in connection with his brother.  At the age of 29, he was married to Louisa A. Garwood, who was born in November, 1851, in Zane Twp., she is a daughter of Lemuel and Angelina (Warren) Garwood; they have four children - Lydia I., born June 5, 1871; Samuel, June 26, 1873; Augusta, June 28, 1875; Angelina, May 30, 1879.  He is a member of the A. F. & A. M.  He and his brother have 450 acres of choice land.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 646
SAMUEL BALLINGER (Zane Twp.), farmer; P. O., West Middlebury; a son of one of the earliest settlers of Logan Co., was born Nov. 2, 1835.  His grandfather, Samuel Ballinger, was a native of the Old Dominion, and was one of the pioneer settlers of Logan Co., settling in Zane Twp., on the edge of what is now Middleburg, as early as 1810.  He raised a family of nine children.  Joshua, the father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Virginia in February, 1803.  He married Miss Delilah Inskeep, the eldest daughter of John Inskeep.  He first settled on the farm upon which Samuel Ballinger now lives in 1826.  This farm, consisting of 450 acres, is one of the best farms in Logan Co.  Well watered, with an excellent under-drainage consisting 1,200 rods of tile, it is adapted to the raising of all cereals, besides being especially favorable to the propagation of stock.  Samuel Ballinger and his brother Oliver run the farm conjointly, owning and sharing everything in common.  They are farmers in all that that word at present implies.  They are energetic, taking a deep interest in all that appertains to the welfare and growth of agriculture.  In 1861 Samuel married Mary Runyon, who was born in Pennsylvania, April 9, 1839, and came with her parents to Ohio, settling at Troy.  He has a family of six children - two boys and four girls.  Jenny, born in 1862; William, 1863; Edward Everett, 1864; Edith, 1873; Gertrude, 1874; Lydia Jane, 1878.  He has occupied several positions of trust and honor, and in politics is a Republican, having cast his first vote for Fremont.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 630
WILLIAM BARRINGER (Lake Twp.), job printing; Bellefontaine; was born in Pennsylvania, Dec. 25, 1829.  He came to Ohio at an early day, having come to Bellefontaine in 1840, where he was engaged in working at his trade as a printer in the office of the Logan Gazette.  He, in company with Coates Kinney, in 1850 and '51 was engaged in publishing the West Liberty Banner, at West Liberty, Logan Co.  After working at his trade as a printer, Mr. Barringer was, for some seven or eight years, engaged in the photograph business.  He is also known among the professional rope-walkers as being one among the best in the country during his day.  Mr. Barringer followed rope-walking for a number of years, traveling through Indiana and Ohio, walking for agricultural societies at fairs.  His last walk was at Canton, O., where he fell from the rope thirty feet from the ground, breaking his right arm in two places, suffering for some two months.  In 1868 Mr. Barringer commenced his present business of job printing, where he is prepared to do all kinds of work usually done in a job office.  His place of business is located on Main street, opposite the Court House.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 590
Miami Twp. -
H. H. BARR, plasterer; DeGraff; was born in Belmont Co., O., Apr. 14, 1846.  His father, Wm. Barr, was born in Harrison Co., and was a blacksmith by trade, through since 1862 he has been engaged in farming.  At that time he moved to Rush Creek Twp., Logan Co.  Here he remained seven years, when he moved to Missouri, where he still resides.  He is of Scotch Irish descent.  Mr. Barr's life has been full of vicissitudes.  His mother died when he was but six years of age, and during the next dozen years he went with his father into different localities in five counties of this State - Belmont, Morrow, Marion, Guernsey and Clinton.  When but 17 years of age he enlisted into Co. A, 17th Vet. O. V. I.; his regiment formed a part of the Army of the Cumberland, and Thomas' corps of Sherman's army.  He joined his regiment at Chattanooga, Tenn., and was with it through all the Atlanta campaign, the march to the sea, remaining until the close of hte war, through a line of exciting battles, bringing a succession of victories, in many respects the most glorious of the war.  He was in the battles of Peachtree Creek, Buzzard's Roost, Resaca, Kenesaw Mountain, Jonesboro, Bentonville, besides other minor engagements.  During his term of service he was relieved from duty six weeks, thought not in the hospital; other than this he was always ready for duty; he was mustered out at the close of the war and immediately returned to Logan Co.  During the two following years he attended school in Rushsylvania - a union school - in which was taught, part of the time, normal studies.   Since that time he has taught school for about four months of every year.  In 1868 and 1870 he served his apprenticeship as plasterer, and in that trade has always had more than he could do.  Mr. Barr settled in DeGraff in 1876, and the following year was elected Justice of the Peace and Mayor of the village.  To the latter office he was re-elected at the conclusion of his first term of office, and this position he now fills with credit to himself and satisfaction to the community.  HE was married Aug. 14, 1871, to Miss Mary E. Stilwell, of Rush Creek Twp., who died in the month of Sept., 1874, leaving one son, John BarrMr. Barr married again, Dec. 25, 1875, Mrs. Lizzie Ellis, of DeGraff.  They have had two children, though one died in infancy, while the other, Luella, is now about three years of age.  Mr. Barr was also in office before coming to DeGraff, in Rush Creek Twp., Clerk for six years and Trustee for two years.  As a faithful servant of the people he is sure to receive greater honors in the future.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 773
CHARLES E. BARTRAM (Perry Twp.), merchant; was born in Marion Co., O., Aug. 25, 1854, and is the son of J. W. Bartram who was born in Tompkins Co., N. Y., Feb. 25, 1831, and came to Ohio in 1837, located at Marion, and learned the trade of a tailor, which business he has continued in from 1843 till the present time, and to-day is perhaps the oldest tailor at the trade in the city.  Our subject came to Bellefontaine in 1867, entering the merchant-tailoring business, which he has continued ever since, with the exception of a short time that he was in the hat and cap trade.  His place of business and merchant-tailoring establishment is located at No. 7 W. Columbus St.  Here he occupies two rooms on the first floor 18 x 70 feet, where he keeps a full line of gent's furnishing goods, hats, caps, and a complete stock of American and imported cloths, and is recognized as The Tailor.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 590
F. O. BATCH, (Lake Twp.), merchant; Bellefontaine; was born in Marion Co., O., in 1845, and is the son of J. S. Batch, who was a soldier in the late civil war, having enlisted in Co. K., 42nd O. V. I., he died in the service at Ashland, Ky., in 1862, with heart disease.  Our subject commenced to learn his trade of harness-making, in Marion, O.  After learning this trade he worked in several places in Ohio and Indiana.  At the breaking out of the war he enlisted for the three months' service in the 4th O. V. I., but after going to Columbus he was rejected on account of being too young - then only 16 years old; he returned to his work, but re-enlisted in Co. K., 42nd O. V. I., where he served some three years and two months, having participated in most of the leading battles and marches of this regiment.  We may here mention that Mr. Batch had two other brothers in the Rebellion, R. J. was a member of the 13th O. V. I., W. W., a lieutenant in the 191st.  In 1867 Mr. Batch commenced the harness and saddle business in Bellefontaine, and to-day is the oldest in this line of business in the city.  He commenced business a poor boy, but with hard work and attention to his business he has accumulated a good start, and enjoys a leading trade; he is now occupying a room on Columbus street, where he employs some four men in the manufacture of harness and saddlery; he also keeps on sale a full line of trunks and valises.  Mr. Batch is now Adjutant of the 7th Ohio National Guards, he being a member of the Guards for the last five years.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 589
CHRISTIANA BATES, widow; (Bokes Creek Twp.) West Mansfield; was born in Washington Co., Pa., in 1825.  In 1842 she married Gradiner Bates, of Rhode Island; her maiden name was Christiana McDonald; her grandparents were from Scotland, and came to the United States prior to the birth of her father, which occurred in 1778, and his death, in 1844.  Her mother was born in Washington Co., Pa., in 1793; was married in1812, and died in 1863.  The McDonald family consisted of eleven children - eight of whom are now living - George, James, Daniel A., William G., Mary, Christiana, Rachel and Carolina.  The last is the wife of a Mr. Ballinger, of Elkhart, Ind.  Christiana, the widow of Gardiner Bates, is the mother of five children, three of whom are now living, whose names are Clara, Christiana G. and Albert G.  Her eldest daughter, whose marriage occurred in 1862, died, leaving one child, a daughter.  Mrs. Bates is a member of the United Brethren Church, and has sustained a membership for thirty years.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 659
Bloomfield Twp. -
HENRY BAUGHMAN, farmer; P. O., Bloom Centre; was born in Franklin Co., O., Dec. 28, 1807, a son of Samuel Baughman, of Pennsylvania, who was one of the first settlers of Franklin Co., O.  He was united in marriage to Miss Eliza Fip, who was a native of Pennsylvania, on Aug. 28, 1832.  He moved to Bloomfield Twp. in 1836, and bought of the government 400 acres of land, and has devoted his life to the improvement of the same.  Their children are - Gordon, Emma (wife of George Robins, Esq., of Shelby Co., O.); Eliza Ann (wife of John Hosie, Esq., of Logan Co.) Mr. Baughman has, for a number of times, filled the offices of the township, but has always sought retirement.  He has never belonged to any of the different societies or churches, but is one of "God's noblest and best works - an honest man."
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 729
Bloomfield Twp. -
A. M. BAYER, manufacturer of drain tile; Bloom Centre; was born in Maryland, in 1853; he came to Ohio in 1873, and settled in Bellefontaine in 1878, afterwards moving to Bloom Centre, and with his brother, D. B. Bayer, who was also born in Maryland, in 1849, entered into the business of tile-making.  They employ four men, and are manufacturing all sizes of tile at their works, where they are always glad to see their many friends.  He was married to Miss Lucinda Deitrich, daughter of Philip Deitrich, Esq., of Logan Co., O., Dec. 25, 1879.  They own their house and 2 acres of land, tile-kilns, etc.  He is a Democrat in politics.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 729
McArthur Twp. -
WILLIAM W. BEATTY, attorney; Huntsville; was born Sept. 12, 1820, in Loudoun Co., Va.; his father, John H. Beatty, was a native of that state, and served in the war of 1812; he was married to Elender Sutherland, and worked at the trade of carpenter and joiner through life; in 1833 the family moved to this State and settled permanently in Moorefield, Harrison Co., where they remained until 1844, when they moved to this county; the mother died at Bellefontaine, and the father at this place in 1873, being then in his 86th year.  The subject of this sketch received a fair, common school education, and learned the trade with his father and worked at it some time after their removal to this county; however, he commenced the study of law with Allen C. Turner, at Cadiz, before coming here, and did most of the studying after completing his days' labor; he studied eighteen months with the above named gentleman, and after coming here entered the law office of Judge Lawrence, from which he was admitted to the bar; he moved to Belle Centre in 1850 and lived there five years, when he came to this place.  Besides his profession he has several times engaged in mercantile speculations, and each time retired with loss until taught by experience; he now devotes his entire time to his chosen profession; in 1874 he was elected to the Legislature from this county, and two years later to the State Senate; he is a stalwart Republican, and cast his first ballot for Gen. Harrison; in 1838 he was married to Mary Wakins, who bore him four sons and one daughter.  The sons were all in the service of their country, and one, David W., of the 1st Ohio, was killed at Mission Ridge; but one of these sons, John H., is living, he being in the mercantile business in Kansas; the daughter, Kate, is married and lives at Kenton; he was afterwards married to Jane Vansickles, and their union has produced three children - Mary M., Alice and Charles F.; the daughters are married; the family belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 816
Rush Creek Twp. -
BENJAMIN BEAVER, Rushsylvania.  The history of this family runs thus:  Martin Beaver was a native of the State of Maryland, and removed to Licking Co., O., early in the history of that county.  Benjamin Beaver, his son, was born Mar. 5, 1829, and died Aug. 2, 1865.  He was twice married, his first wife being Rachel Ann Pitzer, whom he married Jan. 20, 1850.  The children by this marriage were as follows: Jesse Oliver, born Oct. 23, 1850, and who died Aug. 26, 1865; John Martin, born June 5, 1853, and on Mar. 10, 1880, married Emma Hopkins, of Sunbury, Delaware Co., O.; Manuel Wilber, born Oct. 26, 1854, and who married Susie M. Bridge, daughter of Warner Bridge, of Hardin Co., O., Dec. 21, 1875; Asa Milton, born Oct. 16, 1856; Rosa Arletta, born June 16, 1858, and Mary Liza, born Dec. 21, 1859; she is a teacher, now teaching at Big Springs, with an engagement already made, by which she enters. as teacher, the Union Schools of Kenton, Hardin Co., O., the coming fall.  On the 10th day of Nov., 1861, Rachel Ann, wife of Benjamin Beaver, died and was buried in the cemetery at Kenton.  On  the 24th day of February, 1863, he married Miss Louisa Smith, who was born in Licking Twp., Licking Co., O., on the 10th day of October, 1837.  She was the daughter of James Smith, and Sarah Masters, his wife.  The birth of Francis Emma Beaver, Jan. 26, 1866, completes the record of births of the family, there being but one child born to the last union.  It was on the 15th day of February, 1865, that Benjamin Beaver removed from Hardin Co. to the farm now occupied by his relict, Mrs. Louisa Beaver, called Pleasant View.  The two sons, John Martin and Manuel Wilber, are married; John and Mary Liza are teachers; John is a minister of the gospel as well.  "Pleasant View" is an appropriate name for this place; the beauty of the landscape is indescribable being of unusual variety.  The farm is at present under the management of Asa Milton, the youngest son, who, heretofore, has been engaged in the raising of cattle, sheep and hogs, as a business.  In her 15th year Mrs. Louisa Beaver untied with the Presbyterian Church at Fairmount, Licking Co., O.  After her marriage, in harmony with the religious predilections of her husband, she united herself with the New School Baptist Church, at Kenton, O., making one of its most conscientious and consistent members.  Two sons and a daughter are also members of the same church.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 683
Lake Twp. -
EZRA BENNETT, furniture; Bellefontaine; was born in Cumberland Co., N. J., on the 13th of March, 1812, and is the son of Timothy Bennett, a farmer.  Our subject was born on the farm, where he remained until he was some 14 years of age, when he commenced to learn his trade as a cabinet-maker, in Cincinnati, O., having come to Ohio with his parents in the fall of 1817.  Subsequently he worked at his trade at Cincinnati, Springfield and Xenia.  On teh 10th of July, 1844, he married Miss Mary A. Bryant, in Clarke Co., O.  In his leisure hours he had studied law, and in 1844 was admitted to the bar by the Supreme Court, at Urbana.  In March, 1845, he moved to Bellefontaine, where he engaged in the practice of law, and in the fall of 1847 was elected Prosecuting Attorney of Logan Co., under the new Constitution, in teh fall of 1851, and re-elected in 1854.  Not liking the practice of law as well as he anticipated, Mr. Bennett purchased an interest in a foundry and machine shop, which proved an unsuccessful venture.  Himself and two sons, Lucius C. and John Q. A., and a son-in-law, James Van Eaton, served in the late Rebellion.  Mr. Bennett helped to recruit the 13th Ohio Battery, of which a history will be found in another part of this work.  He enlisted in this Battery as a 1st Lieutenant, and served faithfully.  He was honorably discharged on account of sickness.  After the war Mr. Bennett returned to the furniture business in Bellefontaine, which business he has continued ever since, being now in partnership with his son-in-law, Mr. AdamsBennett & Adams' place of business is located on Columbus Street.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 590

Milton Twp. -
JOHN BICKHAM
, farmer; P. O., Huntsville; is one of the prominent farmers of this township ; he was born May 26, 1841, in McArthur Tp., and has always been a resident of this county. His father, Robert Bickham, was born May 17, 1805, in Bourbon Co., Ky., and served under Gen. Wayne as a spy during the Indian troubles. He came to this county at a very early day, and helped his parents to clear and improve a farm near where Huntsville now stands. He was married to Mary Prater, of West Liberty, who was brought there by her parents when she was 5 years old ;they lived on leased and rented farms for several years, and soon as able bought a farm of new land in this town ship, on which they ever alter lived. She died Nov. 20, 1865, and he was afterwards united to Elizabeth Bennett, of this county; he died June 20, 1879. John commenced for himself when of age, and soon after enlisted in Company I, 96th Reg., O. V. I., and served nearly three years ; he was in nine battles, and on receiving his discharge returned to this county, where he has since been a farmer., He was married Nov. 3, 1865, to Kate H. Bennett, daughter of James and Dolly Bennett; she was born April 17, 1844, in this county. Seven children have blessed their union - Mary E., Dolly E., James R., John R.. Emanuel B., Benjamin L., and Fannie A. Both he and wife are members of the Disciple Church ; he is a member of the Patrons of Husbandry, and has held every office but Secretary ; has always been a Republican and a member of the County Central Committee for fifteen years.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 798

Lake Twp. -
JOSEPH M. BLACK; Bellefontaine; was born in Mercer Co., Penn., May 21, 1823, and is the son of William and Jane (Bell) Black, both parents of Ireland, having come to America when young.  Joseph, when 14 years of age, with his parents came to Logan Co., O., and located on a farm in Harrison Tp., where he was engaged in farming in Harison and Washington Tps. until 1872.  In 1862 Mr. Black enlisted as a private in Co. I., 96t O. V. I., and served ten months; on account of sickness, he was honorably discharged; in 1864 he recruited Co. E. of the 1322d O. V. I. for 100 day's service, serving as Captain of Co. E, until the expiration of his time after which he returned to Logan Co.; in 1872 he went to Champaign Co., and was engaged in the milling business some two years, when, in 1874, he came to Bellefontaine, entering the grocery business; he is now engaged as salesman in the agricultural business.  Both parents are dead.  Capt. Black has chased wild game in Logan Co., killing the deer and wild turkeys.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 588
ABRAM BLACKBURN, farmer; P. O., Zanesfield; was born Feb. 14, 1819, in Muskingum, O.; his father, Zachariah, was born in Washington Co., Pa., and was the father of twenty-one children, Abram being the fruit of the second marriage to Elizabeth Ansley, his last wife, who was a native of Bedford Co., Pa.; they were married in Westmoreland Co., Pa., and emigrated to Muskingum in 1818, during the month of October and settled on a piece of land before the survey was made; he was among the first settlers in that locality; the neighbors were "few and far between."  He came there poor; the first year he made 1,600 pounds of maple sugar, and the fifth year had several acres cleared and raised 200 bushels of castor beans, for which he realized $1.25 per bushel; this enabled him to pay for his first purchase, and to add another 80 to his original 80 acres.  Abram was not favored with good school advantages, the nearest school building being four miles away, yet he was schooled to hard labor, and early in life learned the value of a dollar; his father died May 26, 1843, and mother sixteen years later.  Abram did not leave home until he was in his 29th year; about this time he was married to Elizabeth Fenton, born 1820 in Ohio, she dying fourteen months after the marriage, leaving him one child, Miles V. Blackburn; was married to his present wife, Lydia Brady, who was born in 1824, in Muskingum Co., and by her had four children - Celestia, Thomas, Cyrus D. and John.  In 1852 moved to Union Co., O., and to this county and township in 1865, where he has since lived, and is among its valued citizens.  He has been a member of the Protestant Methodist Church since he was 22 years of age; is a true Republican in principal, and a man of sound judgment and ripe experience in business matters; has a good farm of 140 acres, the result of his labor and industry. 
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 742
M. V. BLACKBURN, stock dealer; P. O., Zanesfield; is the son of Abraham M. and Elizabeth (Fenton) Blackburn.  M. V. was born Jan. 9, 1848 in Muskingum Co., O., and lived with his parents until April 15, 1865, when he enlisted in the 199th O. V. I., and was transferred back to the 197th O. V. I., and served until August following, when he came to Logan Co., O., whither his parents had come while he was in the army.  Oct. 26, 1875, he married Mrs. Wanzer, formerly Miss Hannah W. Pickrell, daughter of Mahlon and Rachel (Williams) Pickrell.  After the marriage he farmed his father-in-law's farm for two years; they then came to Zanesfield, where he has since lived.  He followed farming and stock dealing, and during the past year he as turned his attention exclusively to stock dealing, and is doing a good and increasing trade.  Mrs. Blackburn's former husband, Abraham Wanzer, was a native of Dutchess Co., N. Y., born Oct. 27, 1834, and came to Logan Co., O., with his parents about 18560.  He married Miss Pickrell Oct. 23, 1856.  He followed teaching a number of years, living in Zanesfield, where he clerked in the stores of Folsom & Kenton and S. D. Elliott, he also served as express messenger from Mansfield to Sandusky and from Union City to Indianapolis.  His health failing he quit the latter job and came home, where he died June 19, 1867, leaving two children - Charles M. and Edwin Peck Wanzer.  Mr. Wanzer's parents were Michael and Levina (Peck) Wanzer.  They were natives of the New England States and moved to Logan Co., O., from New York about 1850, and in 1868 they moved near Adrian, Mich., where they now reside.  Mr. and Mrs. Blackburn are members of the orthodox Society of Friends, in which she is a minister of the gospel.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 742
Zane Twp. -
WILLIAM BLACKBURN, farmer, stock-raiser and shipper; P. O., West Middleburg; came from that beautiful island across the sea, which has sent so many stalwart and progressive sons to Zane Twp.  Ireland, and especially King's County, is well and honorably represented in the farming interests of this section, and the industry and zeal of these sons of Erin speak volumes for the Mother Country.  William was born in County Kings, Parish of Clarrey, Feb. 1, 1819; his parents, William and Ann (Allen) Blackburn, raised a family of nine children of which William was the youngest.  The subject of our sketch received a common school education, but was compelled to remain a large share of his time on his father's farm.  However, he had the good fortune to attend a good agricultural school for two years, and applying himself with the perseverance of one who realized the privilege that he was enjoying, he made most excellent progress, and considers these two years the most beneficial spent while a boy; a short time after he was appointed Superintendent for a rich Quaker, named Robert Goodbody, having from 50 to 100 men under him;  he remained with Mr. Goodbody for two years, when he returned to help his father, remaining with him until he emigrated to America in 1849; he came to Zane Twp., and began to work at the meagre salary of 50 cents per day, and besides not having work more than half the time, he was compelled many times to accept store bills in lieu of payment in cash; he worked in this desultory manner for two years, and then, having accumulated a small sum of money, bought a farm; he continued to add to his original purchase, until he owned at one time some 335 acres, well cultivated, well cleared and well drained, he being the first man in this township to ditch.  Upon his farm, which is well adapted to the raising of stock, he raises corn and wheat to a considerable amount, but pays especial attention to his stock, having very fine sheep and as good cattle as can be found in this locality; he has a camp of 1,300 trees which also add to the value of his farm.  As an incentive to labor and industry be it known that when he commenced he had just $2 in his pocket.  In 1846, he married Miss Maria Wilson, who was born Mar. 3, 1825, and the sketch of whose father appears in another portion of this work.  From this union one son, Talford, was born Aug. 19, 1848.  Talford has followed faithfully in the footsteps of his father, and imitating his industry and prudence, has accumulated considerable property, and with his father does a large agricultural business.  They are both good citizens, and although frequently solicited to hold office, have ever kindly but firmly declined.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 629
Lake Twp. -
STEPHEN R. BLIZZARD, M. D.; Bellefontaine; was born in Bellefontaine, O., Nov. 7, 1832, and is the son of John and Elizabeth (Sharp) Blizzard, both natives of Delaware; leaving their native State in 1832, they came to Ohio, and the same year located in Bellefontaine; here John Blizzard, our subject's father, worked at his trade of carpenter; he engaged in working on the first Court House of Logan Co.; he was a soldier of the war of 1812, and died at Bellefontaine in 1867, near 77 years of age.  Mrs. Elizabeth Blizzard died at Huntsville, in 1878, nearly 78 years of age.  Of this family there are three children living - J. E. Blizzard, practicing physician in Mercer Co., O.  He, after receiving a common school education in the schools of Bellefontaine and West Liberty, commenced the study of medicine; he taught school in the winters of 1861-2-3-4 in order to pay his way in the study of medicine; in 1856 he went to New Hampshire, Auglaize Co., O., and commenced the practice of medicine; attended a course of lectures at the Starling Medical College of Columbus, and then entered the Ohio Medical College of Cincinnati, graduating from there in 1859, when he came to Bellefontaine, where the Doctor has been in the practice of his chosen profession ever since, with the exception of some twelve years practice in Huntsville, Logan Co.  Dr. Blizzard did surgical work in the late war; attended the battle of Shiloh.  He was married in 1856 to Miss Mary Neer, of Licking Co., having moved to Logan Co. with her parents some five years before marriage.  She is the daughter of John and Sarah Neer, who are now living in Harrison Twp., at the good old age - he 80 years, she in her 79th year.  They have seven children, all living, the oldest near 58 years old.  By the marriage of Dr. Blizzard to Miss Mary Neer, they have two children, son and daughter.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 589
Lake Twp. -
ALBERT BODEY, cigar manufacturer;  Bellefontaine, was born in Crawford Co., O., in 1854; he learned his trade as a cigar maker in Galion; in 1876 he came to Bellefontaine with a small capital, and entered the cigar manufacturing business with Mr. Marsh; Marsh & Bodey started with a meager capital, employing two hands.  Continuing in business until 1878, when Mr. Bodey became sole owner, since which time his trade has gradually grown; that at the present time he is employing four hands in the manufacture of cigars, doing a good business, his goods finding a ready sale where introduced; he manufactures the celebrated "New Coin" five cent cigar, which is perhaps the best five cent cigar in the market; his capacity in the manufacturing of cigars is from 5,000 to 7,000 weekly; finding sales for his cigars in Bellefontaine and neighboring towns.  Mr. Bodey is also doing a retail business, keeping on hand a full lie of smoking and chewing tobaccos; also a complete stock of pipes.  His place of business is Columbus Street, opposite the Miltenberger House.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 590

William Boggs
WILLIAM BOGGS, retired farmer; Miami Twp., P. O., DeGraff, O.  The subject of this sketch, whose portrait appears in this work, was born Sept. 11, 1801.  At that early day, the country was known as Ohio Territory, he being born in that portion now included in Pickaway Co., where he lived for twenty-five years.  His father was a farmer and he was brought up to the same pursuit, and like others in those early days, had few facilities for obtaining an education.  While living with his parents he did some flat-boating, making three trips to New Orleans with flour.  He also spent some time teaming to Portsmouth, Cincinnati, etc.  Mar. 17, 1824, he was married to Miss Jane Britton, a native of Northumberland Co., Pennsylvania.  Mr. Boggs came with his wife and child to Logan Co., O., in 1826, and settled on the banks of the Big Miami, near the mouth of the Buckongahelas creek; at first they lived in their wagon, until he could build a house, which was made of round logs, cut down inside, forming one room, with stick chimney, oiled paper windows, one door, clap-board roof, puncheon floor, etc.; this served as a home for some fifteen or sixteen years, and though vacated and dilapidated, is yet standing.  Upon his settlement here, Mr. Boggs began to clear a farm, and to enjoy the comforts of a pioneer generally, and in 1837 he built a saw ill on the Buckongahelas Creek, near his residence; and in 1840 he built a flour mill in the same locality; this mill is doing service to-day, and is regarded as one of the best in the county.  In August, 1850, Mr. Boggs had the town of DeGraff surveyed on his land, an account of which, together with other matters pertaining to our subject, will be found elsewhere.  Sept. 6, 1868, Mr. Boggs was called to mourn the death of his wife.  They had four children, of whom two are living - Mrs. Lydia Strayer, living on the old homestead, and Mrs. Ann Henderson, living in Illinois, Mr. Boggs' present wife was Miss Leonia Whitzel; she was born in Ross Co., O.  They were married Oct. 17, 1872, and live on the old homestead.  In 1868, shortly after the death of his first wife, Mr. Boggs became paralyzed, and has been an invalid since, having been confined to the house the past eighteen months.  During his residence here, "Uncle Billy" as he was familiarly called, has witnessed many changes.  The town that in 1850 was mere pencil marks on paper, has now risen to the rank of second in the county, and the wild forests have turned to fertile farms.  The iron-horse now speeds in sight of the old cabin, and in every direction a great transformation appears.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 585
Lake Twp. -
REV. HONORATUS F. BOURION, Pastor of the Catholic Church; Bellefontaine.  This gentleman was born in Lorraine, France, June 1, 1840, and is the son of Francis Bourion, who was by profession an architect.  After receiving a good common school education,  Honoratus entered the schools of Paris, and graduated from the leading schools of learning in that city; he came to America and was ordained priest of the Catholic Church by Rt. Rev. Bishop Baraga, of Marquette, Mich.; his first charge was at Negaunee, Mich.; Rev. Bourion was the first regular priest of this place.  Here he found no church, and but few workers; he went to work organizing, and with his faithful work and never tiring energy, he, after remaining there some ten years, had organized and built four churches - two churches in Negaunce, one at a cost of $5,000 and one at $35,000; one at Ishpeming cost $25,000, another in his field of labor at a cost of $5,000, leaving a charge of some 6,000 members.  After remaining in this charge some ten years, almost completely breaking down with his labor, working night and day, he went to Central City, Col., where he remained until 1877, during which time was erected a church at a cost of $20,000, and a school, Sisters' Academy, at a cost of $28,000, he came to Bellefontaine, and found the church in debt some %600; today, 1880, the church is out of debt, and has in its treasury some $2,000.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 588
PETER BOWER, farmer; P. O., Big Springs; Peter Bower, Sr., was a native of Germany, and came to the united States many years ago,  Jacob Bower, Peter's son, is a native of Pennsylvania; his wife's maiden name was Susan Mosier, a Pennsylvanian by birth, and shortly after their marriage they removed to Licking Co., O., where, on the 14th day of December, 1817, Peter Bower, Jr., was born; on the first day of April, 1838, the nuptials of Peter Bower and Amy Rogers were celebrated; she was a native of Delaware Co., O., and was born Dec. 13, 1820.  The names of Peter's children are - Levi, Anderson, Susan, Lucretia, Joseph, James and Mary, seven in all.  Peter's second marriage occurred on Mar. 22, 1865; in this marriage his wife was the daughter of George Heath, and the widow of Joseph Starbuck, her birth occurring on Sept. 28, 1831, in Richland Twp., Logan Co., O.  Peter Bower first settled north of the village of Rushsylvania, on the  farm now occupied by Mrs. Louisa Beaver, and afterwards removed to the pleasant place he now occupies; by handicraft, Peter  is a plasterer, but has made farming a special occupation; like many of his neighbors, his favorite stock is hogs, and his farm products such as further this interest.  In the late civil war Peter was not without representation, his son, Anderson Bower, being a member of Co. I, 13th Regiment, O. V. I.; Mrs. Bower is a member of the Christian Church.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 684
Harrison Twp. -
ANNA BRENNER; P. O. Bellefontaine; was born in Lancaster Co., Penn., in 1818.  She is the daughter of John and Maria Shenk, who were also natives of Pennsylvania.  She resided with her parents until her marriage, which was in 1835, to Christopher Brenner, who was born in Pennsylvania in 1812.  They were both of German descent.  From this union there were ten children - Mary A., Elizabeth, Jacob, Catharine, John, Philip, Romanas, Susan, Garhart and Henry.  The father and four of these children are now dead.  They all died within fifteen months of the death of the first one  The father died Aug. 17, 1876.  Philip was born Aug. 11, 1846, and died Dec. 8, 1875; Garhart, born Apr. 2, 1853, and died Oct. 22, 1875; Henry, born Oct. 23, 1855, died July 20, 1876; Susan, born Apr. 29, 1851, died Jan. 7, 1877.  Mrs. Brenner came to Logan Co. in 1837, with her husband, and settled in Harrison Tp., three miles west of where she now lives, and where they lived until 1864, when tey came to their present home.  The farm that they first settled on was heavily timbered; they cleared and improved it, and afterwards sold it and purchased the farm that Mrs. Brenner now lives on.  They began business for themselves very poor, and by their industry and perseverance gained quite a fortune.  Mrs. Brenner and husband were members of the German Baptist Church, and lived consistent with its teachings.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 619
McArthur Twp. -
CHRIST B. BRESTLE, merchant; Huntsville; is one of the most energetic and thriving business men in this town, and is, withal, quite a remarkable man.  He was born Sept. 16, 1835, in Middletown, Penn., and when scarcely 2 yeas old the family moved to Tiffin, in this State.  His father, John Brestle, was a tanner and currier by trade, and married a lady named Catharine Witz.  When 13 years old Christ took "French leave" of the old home, coming to Urbana and working in an eating house for John Gump.  He had been with him about one year when a show came through the place, and then it was that Christ threw up a good position to follow their varying fortunes.  Being naturally adapted to this kind of business, he soon took a conspicuous place among the curiosity men, and traveled extensively through this country as well as Mexico and the British Dominions.  He took the first curiosity troupe into California, and from there went north over-land to Sitka, returning by vessel to Portland.  He came to this place on a hunting trip in the fall of 1873, and liking the place he determined to make it his future home.  He kept hotel and livery stable two years, when he quit the former and went into the grocery business; he had less than $20 capital, and from that has grown the large stock he now carries, doing a large and rapidly increasing trade. He was married while in Grass Valley, California, to Zibedia Lu_i, who was born in Russia July 15, 1846, and is said to be the first "Circassian beauty" ever exhibited in this country, having been brought here by Barnum.  She is highly educated, and can readily use seven different languages.  They have three children living - Lulu, Tena and Christ B.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 817
Bloomfield Twp. -
RICHARD S. BRIGGS, farmer; P. O., Bloom Centre; was born in Chowan Co., N. C., July 25, 1840, and was a son of Eldred and Rhoda (Holway) Briggs; they moved with their family to Franklin Co. in 1854, and in 1869 came to this county.  Richard S. Briggs was united in matrimony on Jan. 14, 1869, to Miss Susan M. Kneif of Logan Co., O.; they have been blessed with six children - Mary A. E., Angie A., Irena C., Allen L., Fred Tilton, Rosetta M.  Mr. Briggs is one of the most enterprising young farmers of the county, owning a nice little farm of 38 acres.  Mrs. Briggs is a member of the Reformed Church at Bloom Centre.  Mr. Briggs has always voted the straight Democratic ticket, and is a member of Grange No. 484.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 729
FREDERICK BRINSER, farmer; P. O., New Jerusalem; was born May 30, 1827, in Dauphin Co., Penn.  There were eleven children in the family, he being the "middle man" (sixth in order).  His parents were Christian and Mary (Waggoner) Brinser.  Frederick emigrated to this State in 1840, he being a lad of thirteen.  His father located first in Zanesfield, and, after a residence of two years, the family moved to the place now owned by Frederick, located three-fourths of a mile west, on the Jerusalem pike, purchasing the land of Lanson Curtis., Frederick was inclined to farming, and at the age of 22 he engaged in this business, renting land on the homestead - his sister keeping house.  Continuing in this way until June 23, 1853, he then made an exchange of housekeepers by marrying Nancy Easton, who was born in this township.  She is a daughter of John and Charlotte Easton.  Since 1842 Mr. Brinser  has been a constant resident of the place; has a good farm of 144 acres of land.  Three children - Lottie, born Sept. 4, 1855, now the wife of Elmer Elliott - they reside in Perry Township; William, born April 19, 1857, and Alvaretta, May 10, 1862 - are all the members of the family.  During the existence of the Whig party he voted with them; is now Republican.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 743
Lake Twp. -
GURDON N. BROUGHTON, manufacturer; Bellefontaine; was born in Windom Co., Conn., Dec. 30, 1804, and is the son of Nathan and Alida (Cady) Broughton; both parents natives of Connecticut.  When very young, Mr. Broughton, with his parents, moved to Jefferson Co., N. Y., where he remained until 1814, when he moved West to Ohio, first locating in Ashtabula Co., thence to Champaign Co.  Mr. Broughton, in about 1832, came to Logan Co., farming in Liberty Twp. for some fifteen years, when he moved to Bellefontaine, where he has been one of its honored and enterprising citizens ever since, entering the coopering business when he first came here, which he has been engaged in eer since, employing at one time as high as sixteen hands in the cooper shops; Mr. Broughton is the patentee of a churn, known as the "Peerless Churn," which is recognized as one of the best churns now in the market up to date; he has manufactured some 3,400 of these churns, finding sale for his goods in different parts of the Union.  Mr. Broughton was married in Champaign Co., to Miss Mary Miles.  By this union they have seven children.  Coming here, as Mr. Broughton did, at an early day, he had all the trials the old settlers had in a new country; he drove packhorses from Urbana to Ft. Wayne when the Indians were here.  By good management, with hard labor, he has accumulated a fine property.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 588
EZRA BROWN, farmer and stock-raiser; P. O. Zanesfield; is the eldest of two children born ti Ira and Rebecca (Rea) BrownIra Brown is a native of Ohio; his father, Aaron, was a native of North Carolina, and was twice married - first to Mary Howard, by whom he had three children, but one (Horton)  living to maturity; the second marriage was to Annie Stanton by whom there were eleven children.  Aaron Brown came to Ohio in 1802, and to Logan Co., in 1818; he was a member of the Society of Friends, and was a well known and highly respected gentleman; he died in the fall of 1840.  Ira Brown was born Dec. 27, 1806, and his wife, Rebecca, was born Jan. 2, 1809.  She was a native of Virginia.  They were married April 28, 1830, near Zanesfield, whither they came with their parents when young.  After the marriage he farmed his father's farm for three years when he was taken sick and remained in ill health until his death, some two years later, he dying June 1, 1834; by the marriage there were two children, viz: Ezra and Elizabeth.  The former was taken into his grandfather's family where he grew up.  Elizabeth remained with her mother until her death, Oct. 7, 1840, aged 7 years, 9 months and 24 days.  Mrs. Brown remained a widow 12 years; May 21, 1845, she married Mr. Enoch M. Scott, a native of Ohio, born Feb. 28, 1810.  After the marriage they settled on a farm in Rush Creek Tp., where they resided for 25 years; they then moved to Jefferson Tp. where she now resides.  July 20, 1880, Mr. Scott was injured by a runaway team, and died the 22d following.  Of the two children born to this marriage one is living, viz., Mrs. Mary Ann Henry, residing near Zanesfield.  Ezra Brown was born April 30, 1831, in Jefferson Twp., Logan Co., O.  At the age of 22, April 17, 1853, he married Miss Rachel, daughter of John and Sarah A. (Taylor) Outland.  After the marriage Mr. Brown farmed his grandfather's farm for two seasons, he then moved to his father's place, located northeast of Zanesfield, and farmed there for four years.  In 1858 he bought his present place, which he occupied in 1859, and has resided here since; he has 127 acres located 2 miles east of Zanesfield.  By the marriage there were three children, viz., Charley F. born Feb. 22, 1856, died Sept. 22, 1863; Frank S. born Sept. 26, 1861, died Sept. 21, 1863; and Cora E., born Oct. 31, 1864.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 743
IRA BROWN, merchant; Zanesfield; was born May 2, 1840, in this township; son of Zaccheus and Hannah (Marmon) BrownIra was raised to farming pursuits; before attaining his majority, was engaged for a time as clerk, which vocation presented sufficient attraction for him to induce him to engage in the business as a partner, the firm assuming the name of Brown & Bro., which partnership lasted two years.  December, 1863, he enlisted in Co. H, 128th O. V. I., which was stationed at Johnson's Island, and continued with this command until the termination of the war.  Soon after his return home, engaged in the dry goods business, under the firm name of O. Brown & Co., which association lasted until January, 1879; since that, has not been actively engaged in business, yet is indirectly associated with, and carrying on some manufacturing interests in the town in which his capital is being employed.  Having ample means, he is living at his ease and in comparative retirement.  Residing in Zanesfield, he is among its valued citizens, and, though a man quiet and unassuming in his demeanor, yet is ever ready to help aid and assist all worthy enterprises in which the public good is concerned.  Nov. 1, 1860, formed a matrimonial alliance with Heppie Outland, who was born Nov. 17, 1839, in Perry Tp.; she is a daughter of John and Sarah Ann (Taylor) Outland; has two children - Mary E., born July 25, 1861; John T., May 1, 1868.  Mr. Brown and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church; a member, also, of the I. O. O. F., and Bellefontaine Lodge A. F. & A. M.; also, Bellefontaine Chapter, R. A. M., No. 60.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 742
Lake Twp. -
MARTHA R. BROWN; Bellefontaine, is the wife of the late Dr. M. D. Brown who was born in Loudoun Co., Va., Sept. 23, 1837, and is the son of John and Susan G. Brown, of Virginia, who were members of the Quaker Church, consequently Dr. Brown was brought up in the Quaker Church.  After remaining in Virginia until about 1858, he came to Ohio and was engaged in going to school for about one year, when he returned to Virginia and remaining there until the breaking out of the late civil war, he in 1861 left his native State and came to Ohio, where he soon after began the study of medicine, under Dr. W. D. Scarff of Bellefontaine, and afterwards attended Medical lectures at the Cincinnati Medical College, also the Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia, Penn., graduating from the latter in 1866; he returned to Logan Co., and commenced the practice of medicine at DeGraff, where he remained until 1875, during which time he had built up a lucrative business.  Coming to Bellefontaine in 1875, he continued the practice of his chosen profession until his death, which occurred Nov. 23, 1879, when after visiting one of his patients he went hunting, and the next found of him was three and one-half miles west of Bellefontaine, dead, where it is supposed he had died of heart disease.  Thus passed away a man respected and loved by his fellow man, leaving a wife and two children to mourn his loss.  Dr. Brown came to Logan Co. a poor boy, and taught school in order to pay his way in the study of medicine, but with his never-tiring energy and attention to his practice of medicine, he had built up a leading practice.  He was married, Oct. 25, 1869, to Miss Martha Rodgers, of Belmont Co., O.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 588
OMAR BROWN, merchant; Zanesfield; is among the staunch business men in the town of Zanesfield.  Early in the year of 1864, he began business at this place, under the firm name of Sands, Brown & Co., which partnership was of short duration.  The longest partnership association was known as O. Brown & Co., continuing until 1879.  Since that time he has been conducting the business himself.  His honest dealings with his numerous patrons have secured for him a thriving and prosperous trade.  On June 3, 1843, near the little town of Jerusalem he was born.  His parents were Asa and Hannah (Sands) Brown, Asa being born near Mt. Pleasant, in Jefferson Co., this State, June 3, 1809, and was nine years of age when he emigrated to this county with his father, Aaron Brown, who was a native of North Carolina, and settled in Marmon valley, this township, where he remained until his death, and was one of the county's valued citizens and pioneers.  Omar was a constant member of the household until he was sixteen years of age, at which time he entered Antioch College, attending two years, and after a two year's course at Union College at Schenectady, N. Y., on account of poor health, was compelled to abandon his school before graduation.  During the fall of 1864 he was married to Olive Ingham, who was born in Champaign Co.  She died in 1865, leaving one child, Fred W., born Sept. 27, 1865.  April 4, 1872 he was married to Mary Thomas, who was born July 13, 1845, and is a daughter of Jonathan T. and Sarah (Cowgill) Thomas.  Two children have crowned this union - Jessie, born March 25, 1874, and Iantha, March 30, 1880.  He is a member of Wapatomica Lodge No. 424, I. O. O. F., also of Bellefontaine Lodge and Chapter, A. F. and A. M. and R. A. M.  He has a farm consisting of 360 acres, situated in the Marmon Bottom.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 741
Lake Twp. -
THOMAS SANDS BROWN, lawyer and farmer; Bellefontaine, is the youngest child of Ana and Hannah (Sands) Brown, who were residing in Zanesfield at the time our subject was born, June 5, 1852.  Three years later, the family moved on a farm one mile and a half east of Zanesfield.  Thomas's early boyhood was spent at home; after attending the public schools, and receiving all the benefits that could be acquired there, he entered Earlham College, Sept. 1, 1868, while in his sixteenth year, entering the senior preparatory year, graduating with honors in 1873.  In September, same year, he married M. Eliza Knight, who was born in Gray Co., Canada, May 16, 1855, daughter of Benjamin and Ann Knight, who are of English birth, and parentage.  After their marriage he located on the homestead farm, consisting of 220 acres; 150 acres of this land was embraced in a deed, the first recorded in the county.  In November, 1879, he began the study of law with West,  Walker & West, attorneys in Bellefontaine.  Since October, 1880, Mr. Brown has been a resident of Bellefontaine, having rented his farm, he purposes remaining with a view to enter the practice of law in 1882, and to affiliate himself permanently with the place and its interests.  He and wife have three children - Lola F., born Nov. 1, 1874; Benjamin S., July 22, 1876, and Arthur C., Sept. 18, 1879.  He is a member of Wapatomica Lodge, I. O. O. F., No. 424.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 591
Rush Creek Twp. -
WILLIAM BRUCE
, farmer; P. O., Rushsylvania.  Thomas Bruce, Sr., was born in Scotland and emigrated to America.  Thomas Bruce, Jr., was born in Harrison Co., Va.; his wife's maiden name was Mary Coon, and she was born in Harrison Co., Va.  William Bruce, son of Thomas Bruce, Jr., was born Oct. 9, 1824, in Harrison Co., Va., and came to McArthur Tp., Logan Co., O., in 1831; on April 10,1844, he married Mary Frances Bales of Virginia; by this marriage his children were - Sarah Ann, born June 21, 1845, and who died Aug. 28, 1872; John Henry born Feb. 2, 1847, and died Sept. 15, 1866, at Ft. Riley, Kansas, a member of Co. G., 7th Cavalry, U. S. A.; Lewis Leander, born Aug. 21, 1848; George Nace (named for his grandfather), born Apr. 11, 1843, died Oct. 23, 1850; Joshua Copeland, born Mar. 24, 1852, died Dec. 13, 1853; Mary Malinda, born Jan. 28, 1854, died Nov. 10, 1869; George Nace, Jr., born Aug. 28, 1856 (called for the George deceased).  Mary Frances, wife of William Bruce, died July 25, 1857.  On Oct. 27, 1857, he married Elizabeth Ann Huntington, who was killed by a runaway horse on Sept. 19, 1859; on June 19, 1860, he married his third wife, Mary L. Selders.  The children were - Elizabeth Frances, born Mar. 11, 1861, died Apr. 4, 1879; she was the wife of Elias Rumer; Mary L., wife of William Bruce, died Mar. 30, 1879.  On Feb. 19, 1880, William Bruce married his fourth wife in the person of Emma Adelaide Canaan.  By occupation William is a farmer, stock-breeder and shipper, devoting his attention more particularly to hogs.  He is a member of the Disciples' Church; has been a member of the Order of Masons, and of the Odd Fellows; of the Sons of Temperance; of the Union League, and lastly a member of the Patrons of Husbandry.  During the war of the Rebellion, he and two of his sons served in Co. F., 23rd O. V. I.  William served under Gen. Phil Sheridan, was wounded in the battle of Cloyd Mountain, and captured by Gen. John Morgan, May 9, 1853; he was in captivity three months, and escaped in August, 1864.  As a civilian he had held several offices, and was the first commissioned officer in the county, being commissioned a lieutenant of militia.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 684
WILLIAM BRUNSON, farmer; P. O. Lewistown.  Among the many wide-awake and enterprising farmers of Logan Co., Mr. Brunson ranks A. 1; he was born in Kentucky, Dec. 2, 1822; son of John Brunson and Elizabeth (Ellis). John Brunson was in this county during the Indian war of 1812, and, after peace was declared, moved to the county in 1823, where the subject of this sketch was raised; he has lived in the county fifty-seven years, and remembers when the old Long's Mill was built and says it ground so slow that the dogs would bark at the meal as it came out; he was married in 1847 to Miss Madge, daughter of Michael Kearns, one of the first settlers of this county.  They have been blessed with the following children- John J., George W., and Jonathan L., Louisa J. and Milton R. are living; Hannah E. and Sarah died in infancy.  He owns 212 acres of good land, all well improved, and has lived in Washington Twp. twenty-seven years; he belongs to the Christian Church, an has been a representative to the General Conference for twenty years; he is Republican in politics.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 733
Monroe Twp. -
ANDREW BURNSIDE, farmer; P. o., West Liberty; was born Sept. 17, 1805, in Pocahontas, Va.; son of Alexander and Elizabeth (Gillaud) Burnside; his father's name was John.  The Burnside family emigrated west to Ohio in 1817, locating in Monroe Twp., near the place where Donn Piatt resides.  Here the family remained for several years.  Alexander, sr., died at the ripe age of 90.  Our subject, being raised up to hard labor, began for himself at the age of 20, having no patrimony or financial aid.  Among the first enterprises in which he was engaged was a contract for building the mill-race leading to A. S. Piatt's; also the Williams race.  The cutting of the brush and timber, in the first one built, lost him money, but in the completion of the second he earned enough money to purchase the land where he now lives, for which he paid $4 per acre.  He was the chainman at the time the original Lodlow road was laid out.  He raised wheat on the Enoch bottom, hauling the same to Sandusky, for which he received 30 and 40 cents per bushel, selling his corn at 10 cents per bushel.  At the age of 25 he was married to Anna Ewing, who was born in 1812, in Virginia.  In 1830, he purchased 174 acres of land, where he now resides.  His wife died in November, 1879.  The children living are Andrew, Alexander, Samuel, Franklin, Rebecca, Sarah J. and Cardia.  He has 160 acres of land in Kansas; yet, since his arrival in this State, he has been a constant resident of Monroe Twp.  He is a Democrat of the Jackson type.

Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 666
Bokes Twp. -
MILTON BUSHONG, farmer; P. O., West Mansfield; was born Oct. 22, 1826, in Perry Twp., this county; his father James Bushong, was born in Ross Co., O., but his mother came from South Carolina with her father's family when she was about 13 years old; they settled near Chillicothe.  Shortly after their marriage Mr. Bushong and his young wife moved to Logan Co., and settled on Mill Creek, Perry Twp., in 1821; and there Mr. Bushong died, leaving a widow and three children, besides Milton, who was born a short time after his father's death; here the widow and fond mother clung to her home and children as none but a mother could, and supported and educated them as well as circumstances would permit; soon as the older ones became of age and married they sold out their interests in the estate, but Milton kept his, and with him their mother always made her home until the time of her death, which occurred Nov. 25, 1869.  While Milton was living on the old homestead he learned the carpenter's trade and worked at it, as well as conducting his farm; and at his trade he procured means enough to purchase 12 acres, which is now in the corporation of West Mansfield.  Subsequently he purchased 18 acres more and then sold the 30 acres of the old homestead and bought a piece of unimproved land in the northern part of the township, all of which he traded for the farm of 118 acres where he now resides, which is a beautiful location and well improved; adjoining and partly in the corporation of West Mansfield; to which he moved April, 1861.  He has been twice married; first with Louisa Moore, June 22, 1850.  She was born Mar. 9, 1832, in Carroll Co., O.; her death occurred Sept. 12, 1877, leaving five of her eleven children: William and Samuel C. (deceased); Mary C., married Jas. M. Ruehlen, of this township, Dec. 25, 1873, and died Feb. 15, 1878, leaving one child, Chloe E.; Milton T. (deceased); Emma L. (is now Mrs. Wm. Ballinger, of Union Co.; they were married Mar. 11, 1877); Clinton and John W. (deceased); Sarah E., Charles W., Edwin L., at home with their father; Albert J. (deceased).  His second marriage was celebrated Mar. 18, 1878, with Almira Hathaway.  She was born Sept. 27, 1832, in Dighton, Mass., and was a widow of the late John Elliott; he left three children: Elmer W., N. V., and Flora S.  Mr. Bushong was elected Justice of the Peace April, 1865, and served continuously until this spring; making 15 years in that office.  With the exception of the 30 acres, which he got out of the old homestead, he has made all the rest of his comfortable home by his own industry and economy.  He has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church since 1850 - as is also his wife a member of the same Church.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 659
C. W. BUTLER, (Perry Twp.) Superintendent of the Public Schools; Bellefontaine; was born in Marion Co., O., Dec. 9, 1853, and is the son of Dr. W. A. and Martha (McElvy) Butler, both parents are natives of Marion Co., O., their parents having located in that county at an early day.  Mr. Butler, after receiving a common school education in his native county, entered the Northwestern Normal School of Ada, O., graduating from this place of learning in 1874, when he received a call from Patterson, O., where he was Superintendent of the Public Schools of that place, for one year; thence to Plymouth, filing a similar position until 1879, when he was made Superintendent of the Public Schools of Bellefontaine, which position he has been filling ever since, proving himself a gentleman of acknowledged ability.  Mr. Butler is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 589
Union Twp. -
JOHN BYLER (deceased); West Liberty; was born in Mifflin Co., Penn., Oct. 23, 1809; he was reared to farm life, and lived with his parents until 21 years of age, and, being the eldest of a family of twelve children - nine boys and three girls - he had to do for himself soon as he was of age; he began to work by the month on a farm, and spent five years, working by the month, with several parties.  His marriage was celebrated in January, 1836, with Miss Fannie Zook.  She was a daughter of Joseph Zook and a native of the same county as her husband, and was born Jan. 22, 1813.  Shortly after their marriage they moved onto a farm of his father-in-law's, in Juniata Co., Tuscarora Valley, where they lived thirteen years.  They then moved back to Mifflin Co., and lived with her father two years, and in the spring of 1852 Mr. Byler came out to this county and bought a farm, and then returned to Pennsylvania and prepared for moving out here.  Accordingly they started with their family of seven children, and arrived here in Aug., 1852; that fall and winter they passed in a house west of where they now reside, and moved to their own farm in the spring of 1853.  Their children were all born in Pennsylvania; Christopher was born Jan. 2, 1837, and died here Oct. 30, 1860; Martha was married to Daniel Yoder; she died, leaving two children - Christopher and John; next were Joseph, Levi, Mary, Fannie and John.  Joseph and Levi are both married, the former living on part of the estate in this township; Mary and John are still living with their mother on the old homestead; Fannie married Christopher King, and resides on her part of the old homestead; they have five children - Mary A., Sarah B., Andrew, Shem and a baby.  Mr. Byler owned, at the time of his death, 317 acres of well-improved land, whereon he had good home at which he died June 9, 1875.  Mrs. Byler is healthy and young looking for one of her age, who has done so much hard work in her early life; is both hospitable and pleasant, and is very capable of attending to her own business affairs.  The family belong to the "Walnut Grove" Ormish Church.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 786
Union Twp. -
JOSEPH C. BYLER, farmer; P. O., West Liberty; was born Oct. 19, 1841, in Mifflin Co., Penn.  He is the son of John and Fannie (Zook) Byler, whose sketch appears in this work.  He came here with his parents in 1852, and lived with them until 28 years of age.  He then married Sarah E. Stutzman, Feb. 28, 1870.  She was born May 25, 1851, in Fairfield Co., Ohio, but came here in 1869, then returned to her home in Fairfield Co., where they were married; shortly after their marriage they moved to the farm where they are now residing.  Mrs. Byler's parents, Solomon S. and Lydia (Byler) Stutzman, were natives of Pennsylvania, and moved from Mifflin Co. into Fairfield Co., O., where they were married and remained until 1876, when they moved to Champaign Co.  they had been there only a few months when Mr. Stutzman died, leaving his wife, one boy and girl; of their family of eight children only those two and Mrs. Byler survive.  Both Mr. and Mrs. Byler are members of the South Union Ormish Church.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 787
Union Twp. -
LEVI Z. BYLER
, farmer; P. O., West Liberty; was born Sept. 24 1844, in Juniata Co., Penn., and came here with his parents - John and Fannie (Zook) Byler, whose sketch appears in this work.  When 21 years of age, Levi began to work at home by the month, which he continued to do until 1874; and on Jan. 16, of that year, he started for Missouri, and took a tour through that as well as the states of Kansas, Iowa, Illinois, besides spending a short time in Michigan and Indiana; he then returned to his father's in this county Mar. 24, 1875, and one year later he went to Wayne Co., where he worked about a year; in the fall of 1876 he visited the Centennial Exhibition, and returned to Wayne Co., where he married Harriet Yoder, Jan. 30, 1877; she was born Mar. 29, 1858, in La Grange Co., Ind.; is the daughter of Israel Yoder, who was born Aug. 7, 1817, in Tuscarawas Co., O., (and moved to Indiana, but returned to Ohio, settling in Wayne Co., in 1863); Mrs. Yoder's maiden name was Fannie Yoder; she was born July 15, 1825; they were married June 5, 1845, and had ten children - Yost, born May 23, 1849; Rachel, Dec. 3, 1851; Ephraim, July 28, 1854; Magdalene (deceased) Aug. 27, 1856; Harriet, Mar. 29, 1858; Leah, Nov. 29, 1860; Atina, Jan. 21, 1863; Abner (deceased) Mar. 3, 1864; Lucy Ann, Sept. 18, 1865; Rudolph, Dec. 5, 1867.  In a few weeks after marriage Mr. Byler and his wife moved to this county, Feb. 19, 1877; they lived one year in Champaign Co., and the rest of the time in Logan Co.  He is now a tenant on the "Joel Zook" farm.  Mr. and Mrs. Byler are members of the Walnut Grove Ormish Church in this township.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 786
Monroe Twp. -
WILLIAM H. BYRD
, farmer; P. O., Pickereltown; was born Aug. 28, 1832, in Northampton Co., N. C.; his father was Owen Byrd, who married Jennie Manly, and to them seven children have been born, William H. being the senior member of this number; his parents were both natives of North Carolina, and emigrated to this State in 1834, during the fall of that year, first locating on "Bristle Ridge," in Jefferson Tp., on the farm where Lemuel Watkins now lives, and afterward took a seven-year lease of K. Artis, finally making a purchase of fifty acres, then unimproved, of Walter Dunn, in this township, afterwards adding to it fifty acres more.  William H. Byrd began for himself, at 21, and visited service States.  In 1864, he enlisted in the service of the country, was with Sherman's army at the taking of Fort Fisher, and was discharged after one year's service.  In 1874, he was married to Eliza Mendenhall who was born in servitude in Guilford Co., N. C.; she was the daughter of Wiley and Eliza Mendenhall, who were born in bondage.  Mr. Mendenhall was born in Randolph Co., N. C.; he was a slave for sixty-five years and came West to Ohio in 1854.  Since 1874, the father of William has been a resident of West Liberty, and the farm has been in his charge.  He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 666

NOTES:

 

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