..


OHIO GENEALOGY EXPRESS


A Part of Genealogy Express
 

Welcome to
Logan County, Ohio

History & Genealogy


 


BIOGRAPHIES

Source:
History of Logan County and Ohio
Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers
186 Dearborn Street
1880
w/ some illustrations and portraits
 
A B C D E F G H IJ K L M N OPQ R S T U V W XYZ

< CLICK HERE TO RETURN TO 1880 BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX >
< CLICK HERE to RETURN to LIST of BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES >

Miami Twp. -
J. H. DACHENBACH, furniture; DeGraff; was born Jan. 1, 1849, in Huntington Co., Penn.  When he arrived at 12 years of age  he commenced working out on the farms near his own home; at the age of 18 years, he came to Logan Co., O., and settled at West Liberty; here he learned the joiner's trade of his brother, and in the summer worked at house carpentering and worked at cabinet making in the winter.  He made his home with his brother, moving with him to Union Tp.  This continued till Feb. 28, 1878, when he married Miss Carrie A. Kinnon, whose home was in Union Tp.  In the following October he joined Mr. Melhorn in the furniture business in DeGraf under the firm name of Melhorn & Dachenbach.  Apr. 15, 1879, his brother, W. P. Dachenbach, bought out Mr. Melhorn's interest in the business, and since that time the business has been carried on by the "Dachenbach Bros."  Having been a worker in wood ever since he was 18 years of age, he is abundantly competent to manufacture anything that may be desired in the furniture line.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 774
Miami Twp. -
W. P. DACHENBACH, cabinet-maker; De Graff; was born Sept. 1837; his parents were born in this country through the maternal descent was German.  At the age of 18 years Mr. Dachenbach engaged in milling, which occupation engaged his attention till the breaking out of the war; he responded to the first call for volunteers, enlisting for three years in the 1st Penn. Reserve Cavalry, 44th Reg. Vol., and connected with the Army of the Potomac.  On the plains of Manassas he was detailed as Sergeant in command of a squad of five men and ordered to report to Gen. Morrell, Div. Com., of Porter's Corps, to serve as "bearers of dispatches."  This position of responsibility and danger he held most of the time during his service.  Just before the battle of Antietam, at Brandy Station, he received a slight flesh wound on his right wrist but still retained his place in the rank during the battle.  After Brandy Station where the color-bearer of his regiment was killed he was appointed to that dangerous post.  On the day before the battle at Gettysburg he was relieved of this duty to bear an important dispatch from Tanneytown to Frederick City, a distance of 21 miles; the dispatch was delivered in two hours and twenty minutes; he mustered out at Philadelphia in 1861.  The following winter he married Miss Eliza J. Fife, of Irish descent.  They have five children - three boys and two girls:  Anna Beatrice, Wm. Cook, Mary Viola, Bayard Taylor and John Sidney.  After his return from the war he engaged in milling for a single year, then for eight  years he worked at cabinet making in the winter and carpentering in the  summer; he sold out and emigrated to Kansas, locating first in Manhattan where he remained for a brief period, when he moved to Pottawattamie to engage in the milling business.  The grasshoppers drove him away from there so that he returned to Manhattan, engaging first in milling and then in cabinet-making.  In June 1874 he returned to Ohio and settled in Union Tp., Logan Co., and for the following five years he worked at the carpenter's trade.  At last, in the spring of 1879, he removed to  De Graff and joined his brother in the furniture business.   They have a full line of furniture constantly on hand and manufacture to order; also have added undertaking.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 774
Jefferson Twp. -
MRS. LYDIA DAUGHHERTY
, farming; P. O. Zanesfield; was born in this township, Mar. 6, 1829; is the eighth child of the family, born to Stephen and Susannah (Gates) Lease who were among the early pioneers of this county.  Mrs. Daughherty was married Dec. 25, 1860, to William whose name she bears.  He was born Apr. 19, 1818, in this township, and is a son of Jarvis and Hannah (Marmon) Daughherty.  Jarvis d. was a native of Emerald Isle, and emigrated to this State at an early time, and purchased 400 acres south of Zanesfield, which he settled upon, and raised a family of six children, of which number William was the eldest.  After the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. William D., they located on part of the homestead farm.  Mar. 7, 1874, her husband was removed by death, leaving three children to mourn his departure, whose names are - Susie, born Aug. 11, 1863; Jennie, Nov. 11, 1865, and Zaccheus, Sept. 7, 1868.  Since his death she has resided on the farm, which is farmed under her supervision.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 747
Monroe Twp. -
JAMES N. DAVIS, farmer; P. O., West Liberty; was born Aug. 24, 1837, on the farm he now owns.  His father was George W. Davis, who was born in Fayette Co., Ohio, and was married to Nancy Williams, whose parents emigrated from Virginia.  George Davis located on this farm about the year 1834, remaining on the same until death, which occurred in May, 1861.  On Feb. 12, 1860, James was married to Elizabeth Ann Williams, who was born in this county, May 11, 1841, and is a daughter of Obadiah and Eliza Williams.  Since the marriage of Mr. Davis he has been a constant resident of this township.  In 1868, he purchased 90 acres where his father settled, which is farmed in the thorough and successful manner.  Four children have been born to him - Henry D., George M., Frankie, and Rosana, who died at the age of 8 years.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 667
Rush Creek Twp. -
GEORGE ORR DAY, miller; Rushsylvania.  The Day family was one of the standard families of New Jersey.  Joseph Day married Susanna White, who was born on Long Island; he removed from New Jersey to Washington Co., Penn., where, during his residence, all of his children were born; their names were Cyrus, Louis, Josiah, John and Mary, five in all.  From Washington Co., Penn., he removed to Jefferson Co., Ohio, where he died and was buried; his widow removed with her son, John Day, to Licking Co., Ohio, where she died and was buried.  The children all, save John, Mary and Louis died in Jefferson Co., Ohio; Mary died in Muskingum Co., Louis removed to Illinois, and John is now a resident of Rushsylvania, Logan Co.  John Day's first wife was Jane Orr, of Jefferson Co., by whom he had two children - Thomas and Martha Jane; his second wife was Margaret Wilkins, by whom he had eight children - Julia Ann, Susanna, Elizabeth, Mary, George Orr, James Renwick, Isabella, Allison and John Cameron.  Margaret Wilkins was the daughter of Matthew Wilkins, of Harrison Co., Ohio.  In 1852, John Day came to Logan co., Ohio; his family are George Orr Day, born May 4, 1829, in Licking Co. and on the 20th day of September, 1851, married to Hannah Mitchell, the daughter of David and Nancy Aikin, likewise of Logan Co., Ohio.  George O. day's family are - David Stewart, born Sept. 1, 1860; John Wylie, Nov. 1, 1864, and Nancy Aletta, Mar. 10, 1867.  The occupation of George O. Day is that of a miller, and he controls the only industry of that kind in the village, and one of  the leading establishments of the kind in that part of the county; its contiguity to the railroad track gives it every facility for trade, and its efficient management renders it one of the most useful institutions of the place.  He is connected with the Reformed Presbyterian Church, of which he is an elder.  His ideas as to what constitutes the true citizen are of a high moral and religious order, and to this end and aim he lives himself.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 685
McArthur Twp. -
CHARLES DEAN
, farmer; P. O., Huntsville; is the eldest child of Linsy and Nancy (Weaver) Dean, and was born June 12, 1842, on John Warwick's plantation , near Lynchburg, Va. According to his will, all were made free at his death, and in 1849, they were brought to Stokes Tp., this county, and colonized on a large tract of new land which was purchased for them.  The Dean family consisted of the father and three children, the wife and mother having died in Virginia.  The father was again married, and is now living at Springfield, O., and works at the carpenter's trade. Charles enlisted in the army and helped make up the quota of Massachusetts, serving in Co. E, 55th Infantry.  After the close of the war he returned to this county, and was married Dec. 9, 1865, to Mrs. Sarah Jane Harvey.  He has devoted his whole attention to agricultural pursuits, and now owns a home of his own.  He has a family of six children Mary Alice, Ida Rosa, Elrena, Maggie, Harvey and NancyMr. Dean and family belong to the United Presbyterian Church.  He has always been a Republican.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 819
Rush Creek Twp. -
JOHN R. DEARDORFF, farmer; P. O., Big Springs.  Henry Deardorff was a German, whose ancestors settled in Virginia, in an early day.  Abraham Deardorff, his son, came from Bedford Co., Va., and settled in Logan Co., in 1831; Henry Deardorff had two other sons, Peter and Jacob Deardorff.  Abraham Deardorff had five children:  Samuel, Abraham, Mary Frances, John R., and Susan Catherine.  Samuel resides in Paulding Co., Ohio; Abraham in Kosciusko Co., Ind.; Mary Frances married George Predmore and resides in Bokes Creek Tp., Logan Co., Ohio.  John R. was born in Rush Creek Tp.; married in that township, and ever since his marriage has resided in that township; Susan Catherine, the wife of Charles Titus, is a resident of Rush Creek Tp.; the wife of John R. Deardorff was one Rebecca Jane Predmore, who was born Nov. 21, 1834, in Guernsey Co., O.  She was the daughter of John and Susannah Predmore, of the State of New Jersey.  Susannah's family name was Duer; her family were of English nativity.  John R. Deardorff was born Jan. 9, 1832, in Logan Co., O., and his marriage occurred Jan. 11, 1855, in Rushsylvania, Logan Co., O.  The names of his family and the dates of their births are:  Nicholas Jasper, born Sept. 16, 1855; died Sept. 24 of the same year.  Ostrella, born Sept. 8, 1856 in Logan Co., O., and married to George Ferguson Feb. 5, 1874.  Littleton, born June 1, 1858; died June 28, 1873.  John Milton born Jan. 3, 1861.  Joseph Henry, born Mar. 15, 1863.  Rosa Ellen, born Feb. 1, 1865.  Charles William Brandon, born Aug. 21, 1868.  Benjamin Stanton Allison, born Sept. 10, 1871.  Samuel Edwin, born Mar. 31,1878, in Logan Co., O.  By handicraft John R. Deardorff is a carpenter, which trade he followed prior to and for some time after his marriage, when he became a farmer and ever since has so continued; he rears all kinds of farm stock, but makes a specialty of cattle at present, and hereafter making sheep husbandry his cardinal aim.  The family's church connections are with the Protestant Methodist Church.  In August, 1862, John R. Deardorff enlisted in Co. K, 121st Regt., O. V. I.; he was in the battle of Perrysville, Ky., so well remembered, and was with the regiment at that point for about a month, when he was removed with the regiment to Lebanon, by a forced march; soon after his arrival he was taken sick, and, on the removal of the regiment, was left in the hospital; after about six weeks, he was sent to Louisville, Ky., and remained there until granted a discharge-furlough; he returned home the latter part of February, 1863, and in May following he received his final discharge.  In 1861 he removed to the farm where he now resides, acting in the double capacity of tenant and agent for Col. C. W. B. Allison, who removed from Bellefontaine to Wheeling, West Va., in 1876, where he has ever since been living.  He has reared and educated his family, purchased and improved a farm of 78 acres in Hardin Co., and thus shown what integrity, industry and energy may accomplish, notwithstanding the disadvantage of bad health.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 686
McArthur Twp. -
JOHN DENNY
, farmer; P. O., Huntsville; is the eldest child and only son of three children, and was born July 14, 1802, near Alleghany City, Penn.  His father, Dennis Denny, was born in county Donegal, Ireland, and was there married, and after having been blessed with two children he emigrated, in 1784 to the New World, with the intention of sending for his family, if favorably impressed with the country.  His wife soon died, however, and he returned and brought over his two sons.  He was here married to Eunice McLaughlin, a native of the Emerald Isle, and in 1814 moved to Warren Co., O., where he lived five years, and then came to Clarke Co., where he died Oct. 29, 1826.  The mother and one sister always made their home with John from that time, and he supported them until their death; the mother departing this life Aug. 18, 1844.  He bought a farm there on which he lived until 1837, when he came to this county and bought a tract of land, mostly new.  He has from time to time added to this, and also bought in other localities.  He has not neglected improvements, and, without doubt, he the finest house in this part of the county, as well as other valuable and tasty buildings.  He was married Jan. 1, 1833, to Lucinda James; she was born Nov. 12, 1810, and died May 24, 1845, having borne six children, only two of whom are living - Dennis, who is married to Sally A. Nichols, and is living on the old homestead; and Sarah, now the wife of William McKinnon.  Mr. Denny was married Sept. 18, 1856, to Mrs. Rebecca Robertson.  She died Apr. 25, 1859, and he has since been a member of his son's family.  He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in which he held the office of Steward for forty years.  He is a Republican, and cast his first vote for Henry Clay.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 819
Harrison Twp. -
JOHN DETRICK, farmer; P. O., Bellefontaine; was born in Logan Co., June 26, 1830.  His parents, Peter and Sarah Detrick, came from Hardy Co., Va., to Logan Co. in 1829, settling in Harrison Tp., where they resided about three years, when they went to the adjoining township of Union, where they died.  The father died in 1868 and the mother in 1878.  John  was raised on a farm, received a common school education, and at the age of 21, began business for himself, with a pair of willing hands for his capital, and by using them to good advantage, has accumulated quite a fortune.  He was married Nov. 27, 1855, to Prudence J. Cummins, daughter of George and Sarah Cummins, who came to Logan Co., previous to the war of 1812.  From this union there are four children, Benjamin E., James O., Anis A. and Peter A.  Mr. Detrick was in the late rebellion.  He went out May 2, 18643,,, and received his discharge Sept. 2, of the same year.  He was in Co. B, 136 O. V. I.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 620
Jefferson Twp. -
GEORGE W. DICKINSON, miller, Zanesfield; is the second of a family of fifteen children, whose parents were Joseph and Mary Ann (Corwin) Dickinson who were residing in Rush Creek Tp. at the time our subject was born, Mar. 16, 1841.  George was raised to farming pursuits, which business he engaged in up to the time of his enlistment in the service of his country, Dec. 8, 1861, at the age of 20, when he enlisted for three years in Co. D., 13th Reg't., O. V. I., and served his full time of enlistment, and was engaged in nearly all the battles in which his command participated; was always at the front, losing but eighteen days in the time (being then detained in his quarters on account of sickness); was in some of the mot hotly contested battles of the war.  During the latter part of his service was with Sherman on his march to the sea.  His regiment, going out with 1,075 men at the beginning, was augmented by recruits at different times, making the entire number 1,875 men in all; only 325 of the number returned home.  Upon his return to Hardin Co., he engaged in farming.  Oct. 13, 1865, was married to Matilda Lake, who was born Apr. 14, 1846, in Hardin Co., O.; she was a daughter of Harrison and Elizabeth (Day) Lake, both of whom were native of Kentucky.  January, 1879, he sold his farm to his brother and removed to this township.  The following March, the ninth day, he had the misfortune to lose his wife by lung fever, who left to his care five children - Della A., Thomas H., Martha E.., Effie M. and Joseph H.  Apr. 27, 1880, he was married to his present wife, Martha J. Neeper, who was born in Rush Creek Tp., Mar. 28, 1838; her parents, William and Martha (Moore) Neeper, are natives of this State.  April, 1880, Mr. Dickinson located at the Baldwin Mills, and is now engaged in running the same.  Having contracted rheumatism in the service, renders him unable for active farming, and was compelled to change his business in consequence.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 747
Lake Twp. -
HENRY C. DICKINSON, attorney at law; Bellefontaine; was born in Rush Creek Tp., Logan Co., O., June 30, 1839, and is the son of Robert and Rebecca (Stephenson) Dickinson old pioneers of Logan Co.  Our subject moved from Rush Creek Tp. to Perry Tp., where he remained until 1861, during which time he was engaged in farming and attending the district schools.  In 1861 he moved to Union Co., O., where he remained ten years, engaged in farming, when he returned to Perry Tp.  Here he devoted part of his time to reading law, and, in 1873, he was admitted to the Bar; in 1875 he moved to Bellefontaine and began the practice of his chosen profession; in 1877 and 1878 he was associated in the practice of law with Mr. Sheen, the firm being Steen & Dickinson.  With this exception, Mr. Dickinson has been alone in the practice of law, and today ranks among the successful lawyers of the Logan Co. Bar.  Mr. Dickinson was for a short time in the livery business in Bellefontaine, which is the only other business he has been in since his residence in this city.  He is a Republican.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 597
Jefferson Twp. -
JOSEPH N. DICKINSON, farming, stock-raising and milling; P. O., Zanesfield.  Among the prominent men in Jefferson tp. that have worked their way from poverty to wealth and affluence, solely by their own exertions, is J. N. Dickinson, who was born in this township, Mar. 27, 1816, on what is now known as the Shoot's property, situated one-half mile south of the town of Zanesfield.  His father, Thomas Dickinson, was born in Berks Co., Penn., Nov. 13, 1788, and emigrated to this locality prior to the war of 1812.  His wife was Maria Lowe, born 1789, a native of Virginia, and bore her husband fifteen children, Joseph being the fifth child and the second son of this number; the major portion of them lived to maturity.  Thomas, the father of Joseph was a constant resident of this township up to the time of his decease, which was in his 91st year, May 17, 1879.  His wife's death occurred in 1867.  The year after Joseph was of age, he hired to his father, applying his earnings as a payment upon 75 acres which he had purchased in Rush Creek Tp., which was nearly all unimproved.  Jan. 21, 1838, he was married to Mary Ann Corwin who is a native of Monroe Tp., where she was born Feb. 5, 1820, on the banks of the Mackschack.  Locating on his land after marriage, he remained until 1841, when he moved to the place he now owns, stayed one year, and removed to Andrew Co., Mo., where he engaged in farming and stock-raising for six years, and returned to this county.  The following spring, purchased 196 acres of land in Bokes Creek Tp., where he moved and soon added 500 acres to his first purchase, where he farmed, raised stock and run a saw-mill until 1860, when he moved into Hardin Co., where he owned at one time 1,700 acres of land; during his eight years residence, wishing to curtail his business, he disposed of his interests, and moved into Monroe Tp., where he purchased 159 acres of land, and the Jeffrey Williams mill property, which he carried on until 1876, when he moved one-half mile north of Zanesfield, and purchased the Folsom mill property and 471 acres of land.  Has since traded for the Baldwin mills, a short distance south, and now controls and runs both mills, which are among the bet in the State for size and location - the Folsom mill having a fall of thirty feet.  This mill has an extended reputation, custom reaching them thirty miles distant.  They are prepared to do both custom and merchant work; can run the year round either by steam or water power.  Mr. Dickinson has now 550 acres of land, which, in connection with his mills, represent a large amount of capital, all of which Mr. Dickinson has attained solely through his own merits.  Of the fifteen children born to him, twelve are living - Hannah (Mrs. Ben Bruce), George, John, Thomas, Mary (Mrs. Randall), Ellen (Mrs. George Henry), Laura (Mrs. John P. Williams), Gardner, Amanda, Charles, Benjamin and Joseph at home.  Though Republican, he is not an extremist in politics, nor in religion.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 746
Lake Twp. -
JOSHUA M. DICKINSON, proprietor of the Logan House; Bellefontaine; was born one mile east of Zanesfield, Logan Co., O., Feb. 18, 1824, and is the son of Thomas and Maria (Lowe) Dickinson.  His mother was born ill West Virginia, and his father in Pennsylvania; they were married in West Virginia, and in 1810 came to Logan Co., and located in Jefferson Tp.; they came here very poor; they had but one horse and a few necessaries of life; after remaining in Jefferson Tp., some three years, they moved near East Liberty, where Thomas Dickinson was employed by Duncan McArthur, who was a large land speculator, and remained in his service a short time.  Duncan McArthur placed the family of Dickinsons on 100 acres of land near Zanesfield, which afterwards belonged to them, and they, in 1832, sold the same for $4 per acre; they then moved to Rush Creek Tp., where the father, Thomas Dickinson, died May 19, 1879, at 90 years of age, a respected and honored man, being a member of the Quaker Church; he was a soldier of the war of 1812.  His wife died in 1865.  Our subject moved with his parents to Rush Creek in 1832.  When he was 21 years of age he, in company, purchased 150 150 acres of land; this is the first land that Mr. Dickinson owned; it was located in Jefferson Tp.; this land was paid for at $5 per acre, and Mr. Dickinson paid for the same in manufacturing maple sugar.  At 24 years of age, he married Miss Martha Brunson.  At this marriage he was worth some $600.  By this marriage they had four children.  After marrying, he lived on a rented farm for a number of years; he farmed near Rushsylvania from 1846 to 1854, when he moved to Perry Tp., near East Liberty, where he remained until 1876, during which time he was engaged in farming and stock-raising, in which business he has been very successful, making a specialty in raising mules, and was the largest dealer in mules in Logan Co., having sold from his farm at one time, $9,000 worth of mules.  To-day Mr. Dickinson owns 970 acres of land, and valuable city property in Bellefontaine; he is proprietor of the Logan House, which is a neat three-story brick building located in the central part of the city, and is recognized as one of the leading $2 houses of Central Ohio.  Mr. Dickinson donated largely money to carry on the late civil war; his township never had a man drafted; he again married, his present wife being Ellen Armstrong, by whom there are three children.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 596
Bokes Creek Twp. -
LEWIS DICKINSON, farmer; P. O., Ridgeway; is a native of Logan Co., born Nov. 20, 1827; he has twice been married, his first marriage occurring on March 4, 1852; by this union there were six children - Joshua N., Delilah A., Lydia M., Henry E., St. Leger and Mary C.  By his second marriage he has three children - Minnie, Ella and RobertMr. Dickinson is a farmer by pursuit and one of the sons of honest toil and industry.  In the raising of stock his attention is more particularly directed to that of sheep, but includes the usual stock of all well-to-do agriculturists.  He is a member of the Protestant Methodist Church, Ridgeway Circuit.
Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 ~ Page 660
Perry Twp. -
ROBERT DICKINSON, farmer; P. O., North Greenfield; was born in Jefferson Township, Mar. 15, 1812, and is the eldest of a family of fifteen children, who were born to Thomas and Maria (Lowe) Dickinson, who came to what is now Logan Co., about the year 1810, locating south of Zanesfield, and raised a large family.  He was engaged in running one of the first saw-mills that was erected in that part of the country.  As a business man he was not considered a marked success, yet his sons have arisen from poor boys to wealth and affluence, and are now among the most successful in the country.  Having little or no school advantages, yet they managed to secure enough to enable them to transact any business that comes in their line, and as "garners-up" of this world's goods, they have few superiors in the county.  Robert was married Jan. 24, 1833, to Rebecca Stevenson, who was born Feb.b 20, 1813, in Lake Tp.; she is a daughter of John and Jennie (Hatfield) Stevenson; she was a native of Virginia, he from Kentucky, and they came to this county before the war of 1812, and were among the number who sought refuge in the block house from the Indians.  Shortly after Mr. Dickinson was married, he settled in Rush Creek, near the lake; he afterwards came to Jefferson and settled at the head of Mad River, purchasing 103 acres; this he soon traded for land in Perry Tp., on the Grubb's place.  In 1865, he moved to North Greenfield, where he now resides.  After years of hard labor and pioneer life, he is in possession of 640 acres of land.  Of the ten children born to him, eight are living - Ruth Jane, (Mrs. A. Grubbs), Susannah, (Mrs. Isaac Henry), Henry C. (attorney at law), George, Eliza A. (Mrs. E. Powers), Deliverance, Elliott and JoshuaMr. Dickinson and wife were members of hte Methodist Episcopal Church.  His father was a member of the "Friends."
Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 ~ Page 646
Liberty Twp. -
I. N. DILLE,
farmer; P. O., West Liberty; was born Sept. 10, 1827, in Richland Co., O.  His father, Amos, was born in Washington Co., Pa., and his mother, Anna De Camp, in New Jersey.  They came to Ohio in 1816, and settled in Richland Co., where the father entered 160 acres of land, getting his patent from Thomas Jefferson.  In the fall of 1834, they sold out and removed to Hardin Co., and there bought 100 acres.  In 1836, they came to Logan Co., and settled where our subject now lives.  Here they bought 160 acres.  The father died in 1845, and was buried in this township; the mother has remained single since, and is now 89 years old.  She has had eight children - John M., Martha, Sarah, Hannah, I. N., Josephus, Emma J. and Zenas.  She is a member of the Christian Church, I. N. traveled along with the family in the hardships that the pioneers had to encounter.  He was married Feb. 17, 1853, to Rachel, a daughter of David and Amelia (Holliday) Williams, natives of Berkeley Co., Va.  They came to Champaign Co. in 1830, and to Logan Co. in 1836, on  the hill where Robert Parks now lives, buying first 160 acres, and afterwards another tract of 124 acres.  The father died in 1844, and the mother six years prior to him.  They had nine children, four of whom are living - Rachel, David, James and Mary.  Her father was Township Trustee for many years before his decease.  The mother was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  Mr. and Mrs. Dille settled on their present farm of 101 acres immediately after marriage, and have since remained.  He was elected Township Trustee in 1874, and is the present incumbent; he has also served in other minor offices.  His amiable companion holds a membership in the Methodist Episcopal Church.  They have had nine children, six of whom are living - Gilbert B., Martha, Mary A., Laura, Ida and Belle.  Those deceased are Ara F., Lucy J. and Carrie M.  He has always been identified with the Republican party.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 707
JAMES DILLON, (Bloomfield Twp.) farmer; P. O., Bloom Centre.  Among the many grand old men of this county, none are grander than James Dillon; he was born in Clark Co., O., in April, 1811; he was early inured to the hardships of a frontier life; his grandfather was a Revolutionary soldier, and his father, William Dillon, was in the war of 1812.  James came to Bloomfield in Sept. 1833, and moved his family to his present residence Nov. 1833; he built his own house without nails or brick, and was now 80 acres of good land, well improved; he has one child living - Thomas Waite Dillon - and a daughter, who was the wife of Edwin West, died Dec. 6, 1874; he belongs to the Baptist Church, and is Republican in politics.
*Page 730
McArthur Twp. -
M. DUDLEY DITZLER, physician and surgeon; Huntsville; is the fourth of a family of five children, and was born Oct. 12, 1853, in this township.  His father, John Y. Ditzler son of David and Anna M. Ditzler, was born in Adams Co., Pa., Mar. 14, 1815, and reared to the occupation of farming; he studied medicine, however, and graduated from the Jefferson Medical College, and many years after at the Sterling Medical College, at Columbus, O.; on receiving his first diploma he came West, seeking a location, and stopped first at Kenton, and then at Marseilles; he was married Apr. 25, 1843, to Jane Dudley, and soon after same to this place, where he ever after lived; he had a large practice, and was loved and respected by all with whom he came in contact; he died June 26, 1878.  Mr. Dudley clerked in the drug store, which belonged to his father, and there studied medicine; he graduated from the Cincinnati Medical College in June, 1876, and is now practicing his chosen profession; he was married Oct. 11, 1877, to Ida M., daughter of J. H. and Emma Harrod.  She was born Oct. 23, 1855, and is now conducting a millinery store at this place.  One child has blessed their union, Ida M.  He is a stalwart Republican, and cast his first vote for R. B. Hayes.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 819
Miami Twp. -
LYMAN A. DOAN, P. O., De Graff; was born in Miami Tp., Logan, Co., O., Dec., 16, 1843.  His father, Lyman Doan, was born in Connecticut, and in early life came with his parents to Washington Co., O., and later to Logan Co.  His mother, Martha (Campbell) Doan, was born in Washington Co., but her parents were native of Ireland.  Mr. Doan ahs passed the major part of his life on a farm - he remained on his father's farm until 19 years of age, when he enlisted in Co., E. 45th O. V. I., in the army of the Cumberland, and was through the war.  He was at the siege at Knoxville, and at Nashville.  His regiment was soon detailed under Col. Woolford, to hold in check Morgan's raiders.  He was taken prisoner by that force at Mt. Sterling, Ky.  The place was surrounded, and after fighting, and under truce, surrender was demanded, but refused.  The town was fired, and they were driven into closer quarters and compelled to surrender.   The raiders now stole their suits and arms, and started with them to Charleston, S.C.  After marching nearly a whole day, he was taken sick, and put in a wagon, and when the trains were doubling up a hill he stole two revolvers, and some ammunition, and escaped to the woods.  The rebs. pursued, but missed him.  He was cared for by some negroes, till Union troops arrived, and thus was saved from the horrors of Libby and starvation, whither the rest of the force went; at Resaca  he was wounded when on skirmish line, and lay in hospital till his regiment was discharged in the fall of 1864; when he returned to Miami Tp., to work upon the home place, and here built himself a home.  In 1866 Nov. 20, he married Miss Mollie E. Lamphier, and they now have four children - John Sherman, 1879 he sold the farm, and moved to De Graff to reside, at the same time purchasing another farm in Pleasant Tp., which he controls.  He is held in esteem by his fellow citizens as a man of sterling worth.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 774
Rush Creek Twp. -
DR. ISAAC A. DORAN, physician; Rushsylvania.  The Doran family was one of the French Huguenot families who came over before the Revolution and settled in America, in the State of New Jersey.  Thomas Doran, Sr., was one of the first American descendants of this family born in New Jersey.  Thomas Doran, Jr., was a Jerseyman, likewise, who married Jane Hayes, the daughter of James Hayes, an Irish emigrant, who settled in Beaver Co., Pa.; from Beaver Thomas moved to Westmoreland Co., Pa.; James had two sons born in Pennsylvania - Dr. I. A. Doran, born July 23, 1826, in Greensburg, Pa., and James H. Doran.  The family then removed to Ohio in 1829, and settled in Butler Co., in the village of Bethany, twenty miles from Cincinnati.  Here the remainder of the children, Thomas S., and Hannah Doran, were born; in 1833 the family came to Shelby Co., near Sidney, where the father, mother and James H. Doran all died; James' death, however, did not occur until Mar. 12, 1877.  Hannah married Joseph Johnson who resides four miles east of Sidney; Thomas lives twelve miles west of the same place, and Dr. I. A. Doran resides in Rushsylvania.  Dr. I. A. Doran has twice been married; his first wife was Sarah J. Elam, whom he married Jan. 16, 1851; she was the daughter of James Elam, the first white child born in Greene Co., Ohio; she died June 1877.  The children by this union were - Thomas, born June 14, 1852; Elam, born July 30, 1857, and Della, born Dec. 31, 1863, and who died Mar. 31, 1870.  His second marriage was Feb. 19, 1878, with Miss Elizabeth Stephenson, daughter of John and Elizabeth Stephenson, of Darke Co., near Greenville; she was born Feb. 5, 1837.  In 1849 Dr. I. A. Doran settled in Rushsylvania, in the practice of medicine, when the village contained but seventy-five inhabitants; he was the first druggist in the place; has erected five buildings in the village, dug four cellars, four wells and four cisterns, put down the first permanent pavement in 1853, planted the first evergreen trees, the first shade trees in the streets; has always been an advocate for public improvements, such as railroads, turnpikes, school buildings, etc., three of which have been erected since his residence in the village.  He was the first eclectic physician in the county and has steadfastly adhered to his profession and his practice, in one instance walking thirty times to Ridgeway and back again, a round trip of fourteen miles each time.  The village at that time continued one cabin, the only building in the place.  He has held the office of postmaster since 1854, being the fourth appointed in the place.  During his term of twenty-six years he has handled about 800,000 letters.  At his residence and on his grounds abound fruit trees and ornamental shrubbery in great profusion.  He has a large collection of relics, notwithstanding his having already given sixty pieces to the State Geologist.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 686
Lake Twp. -
DUNCAN DOW, attorney at law, Bellefontaine; was born in Harrison Tp., Logan Co., O., Mar. 13, 1843, and is the son of Robert and Harriet (Brewster) Dow; his mother is a native of Pennsylvania, and his father of Scotland, he having emigrated to America when very young, locating in Lake Tp., Logan Co., in about 1825, he was Colonel of the Militia, and during the late civil war, he recruited Co. D, of the 45th O. V. I., serving in that regiment for one year, when he resigned, and returned to Logan county, and is now living in Harrison Tp.; our subject remained a resident of his native township until 1864, during which time he was engaged in farming and attending school.  In 1864 he came to Bellefontaine, and was appointed Deputy Auditor of Logan county, under Thos. Miltenberger, (then Deputy County Clerk), and filling this office with the marked ability during this time as Deputy.  Mr. Dow was engaged in the study of law with Judge Wm. Lawrence.  In 1869 he graduated from Cincinnati Law School of Cincinnati, O.  In 1869 he entered into partnership in the practice of law with J. B. McLaughlin, which partnership continued until the death of Mr. McLaughlin in 1878, when Mr. Dow formed a partnership with J. D. McLaughlin, firm name, McLaughlin & Dow, one of the strongest law firms of the Logan County Bar, enjoying a leading practice.  Mr. Dow in 1869 was elected to the office of Prosecuting Attorney of Logan County, being re-elected to the same office in 1871, filling this office for four years.  In 1875 he was selected a member of  the Ohio State Legislature from Logan county, being re-elected in 1877; he has given entire satisfaction, having proven himself a gentleman of acknowledged ability.  Mr. Dow is a Republican, and a member of the U. P. Church, of which he is one of its honored Elders; he married in 1875 Miss Maggie A. Gregg, of Philadelphia, Pa., by whom he has two children, both are daughters.  Mr. Dow is a director of the Firts National Bank of Bellefontaine.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 596
Richland Twp. -
LYMAN DOW, physician and surgeon; Belle Centre; is one of the best known and thoroughly respected men in this township, although he has been among us but a few years; he was born in this county Aug. 21, 1843.  His father, Peter Dow, was born in Scotland, and emigrated to this country when 12 years of age; he was married to Sally Campbell, a native of Washington Co., O., and always followed farming until 1855, when he moved to Bellefontaine; he was engaged in the drug business for some time, but is now living a retired life; he is one of the School Examiners for this county, and has held that position many years.  Lyman commenced clerking in the drug store in 1861, and at the same time studied medicine; he graduated at the Cincinnati Medical College in March, 1865, and immediately enlisted in the U. S. N. as assistant surgeon; at the close of the war he commenced practicing in Bell Centre, and remained two years, when he engaged in the drug business at Bellefontaine, and then at Wooster; he returned to this place in 1875, and has built up a good practice; he was married May 17, 1866, to Martha J., daughter of J. B. and Hannah McCracken, of Urbana.  Their union has been blessed with six children - James A., Jessie E., Samuel W., Nellie A., Charles T. and Sallie H.  Both he and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church.  He has always been a Republican.
(Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 800)
Jefferson Twp. -
LEVENTON DOWNING, farmer; Zanesfield.  Born Sept. 9, 1820, son of Bezaleel and Matilda (Jones) Downing, who were from Maryland, and emigrated to Harrison Co.  Leventon remained with his parents as long as they lived.  They came to this township in 1833; at the age of 26 he was married to Mary Ann Hill, who was born in Monroe Tp. in 1829; she was a daughter of John and Mary (Smith) Hill.  The Hills and Smiths are from Virginia.  Mr. Downing has 136  acres of land, and farms quite successfully.  Five children have been born to him, but only two are living, Margaret R., born May 4, 1860; John L., March 10, 1863.  His father, Bazaleel, was born 1777, his mother in 1787, and were honored and respected citizens in the community in which they lived.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 748
Zane Twp. -
JORDON DOWNS,
retired farmer; P. O. North Lewisburg; was born Oct. 26, 1824; his father, Joseph Downs, was born in New Jersey, Jan. 23, 1795, and his father's name was Samuel, and his mother's name Abigail DownsJoseph Downs came to Ohio in 1818, and located on Kings Creek, Champaign Co.; on Mar. 25, 1819, he married Esther Williams, who was born Apr. 20, 1797, and came to the North Fork of Kings Creek with her parents in 1814; her parents were Silas and Mary (Hunt) Williams, the latter being of Scotch extraction.  Joseph Downs was a farmer by occupation, but by trade was a spinner, and assisted in establishing probably the first carding and spinning mill in either Champaign or Logan Co., and resided in the vicinity until his death.  The subject of our sketch remained with his father until his 24th year, when he "struck out" for himself.  At the age of 25 he had but $500 to invest in land in Zane Tp.; he continued to work earnestly and faithfully until he possessed 202 acres of land on the Limestone Belt, a part of the rich wheat and corn land of Zane Tp., a worthy tribute to his integrity and hard work.  He is now a farmer in excellent circumstances, surrounded with all the comforts of life, and living in the light of a Christian gentleman who has identified himself with the progress and improvement of his township.  Feb. 5, 1852, he married Miss Hester Inskeep, daughter of John Inskeep; she was born Dec. 31, 1828, and has materially assisted him by her counsel and prudence.  They now reside in North Lewisburg, in an elegant home, enjoying the fruits of a life of industry, surrounded by all the comforts to which such a life entitles them. They are members of the Methodist Protestant Church.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 632
THOMAS DOWNS, farmer; P. O. Lewistown; was born in Champaign Co., O., Oct. 18, 1827; was the son of Capt. Daniel Downs and Mary (Fitzpatrick) Downs, who came from Delaware to Ohio in 1806, and settled in Champaign Co.  Capt. Downs was commissioned Captain of a Company, and led them all through the war of 1812, after which he again went back to his former vocation - that of farming - and in 1833 moved to Washington Twp., and entered the land now owned by his son, where he lived till 1860.  Mrs. Downs died 1848.  Thomas Downs spent his boyhood days here, and has often seen the deer running through the woods, thirty or forty in one drive; at the breaking out of the late war, he left his farm and enlisted in Co. F, 119th O. V. I., and was with the army at the time of the great surrender at Appomattox; was married in 1853, to Miss Eliza McFarland, of Hardin Co., O.  They have four children - Mary R., W. H., Alice A., Elizabeth E.  Mr. and Mrs. Downs are both members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
Jefferson Twp. -
VALENTINE DUNLAP
, farmer; P. O., Zanefield; born in Carroll Co., O., July 12, 1829, the fourth child of Samuel and Hannah DunlapValentine was raised to agricultural pursuits, and came with his parents to this county in 1830; lived with his father until he was 30 years of age, at which time he wooed and won the hand of Lucinda Farrington who was born in Stark Co., O., July 12, 1846.  She was a daughter of Jesse K. and Elizabeth (Richardson) Farrington.  He was born in Massachusetts, 1803.  His wife, Elizabeth, was born in Ireland, 1805, and came to this country when she was 18 years of age.  March, 1865 was the date of the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Dunlap, and three children have blessed this union, who are Abner Lawrence, born Jan. 19, 1866, Ivy Florence, Nov. 5, 1869, and Hannah Bertha, Sept. 5, 1875.  Fifty-four acres compose his farm which he has earned by his own labor; is not a man that is grasping in his desires after this world's goods, but is mainly content, with his interesting family about him, to have a home and sufficiency, to meet his present demands, and is endeavoring to live, more to lay up treasure above than here on earth.  He and wife are members of the "Friends."
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 747
Jefferson Twp. -
WILLIAM DUNLAP, farmer; P. O., New Jerusalem; was born Mar. 2, 1824, in Carroll Co., O., and is the second of the family born to Samuel and Hannah DunlapSamuel was born in Westmoreland Co., Penn., Sept., 1790; his wife was Hannah Greer, and was born in the same county, Aug. 24, 1795.  They were married, May 10, 1821.  In his younger days Samuel was engaged in teaming across the mountains, subsequently was engaged in the manufacture of edge tools.  Emigrating to Carroll Co., he remained until 1839, and came to Logan Co. and lived in Jefferson Tp. until his death, which occurred June 16, 1871 - his wife "passed over," Feb. 4, 1856.  They were both members of the M. E. Church for many years; he was an ardent and enthusiastic worker in the Lord's vineyard; was for many years a class leader, and his life ws ornamented with Christian virtues.  In the early part of his life he was many years Justice of the peace, and his advice and decisions were always regarded as just and final; during the latter part of his life, while in this county, he lived mostly a retired life; he was an old line Whig, and went out as Captain during the war of 1812.  William, early in life, learned the plasterer's trade; remained with his father  until he was 27 years of age; June 12, 1851, was married to Mary M. Ball, who was born in Columbiana Co., Nov. 24, 1830.  She died May 2, 1863, leaving four children, viz: Oliver F., Sarah M., John P. and William Asa; was married to his present wife, Susan Farrington, July 30, 1864; she was born Mar. 31, 1841, in Stark Co., O., daughter of Jesse K. and Elizabeth (Richardson) Farringdon.  Two children have crowned the union - Samuel C., born Sept. 13, 1855, and Myrta E., Apr. 14, 1871.  Mr. Dunlap and wife are members of the "Friends" or Quakers; Mr. D. began poor in early life, has been successful in his operations and has 288 acres of land.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 748
Harrison Twp. -
PHOEBA DUNSON, Bellefontaine, was born in Logan Co., O., in 1829; is daughter of Joel and Elizabeth Thomas.  She resided with her parents until her marriage, which was about 1849, to Benjamin Deerwester, who was born in Licking Co., Ohio.  From their union there were ten children, four of whom are now dead - Mary J., Louis, Sarah E., Elisa, Phoeba A., George, Joel, Rachel F.; two also died in infancy.  Mr. Deerwester died in 1863, and she was again married in 1875 to William Dunson, she being his third wife.  They lived together about four years, when he died and she was for the second time left a widow.  Her last husband was born in Logan Co., in 1806.  He was father of eleven children by his first wives.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 620
Lake Twp. -
LEVI DURINGER, brick manufacturer; Bellefontaine.  Of the leading brickyards of Bellefontaine, we mention that owned and operated by Mr. Duringer, who began the manufacture of brick upon the present site in 1874, making that year 300,000 brick.  Since that time they have made as high as 800,000 brick in one year; finding sale for them in Bellefontaine and vicinity.  Mr. Duringer has, perhaps, traveled as much as any young man in Logan Co.; he was born in California in 1854, where he remained until he was 13 years of age, then, with his parents, he made six ocean voyages, visiting the Sandwich Islands, Cuba, Vancouver's Island, Mexico, and several other prominent places on the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans.  His father, John O. Duringer, is a native of Germany, where he learned the brewer's trade.  Coming to America at an early day, he was for a short tiem a resident of New York, New Orleans, Cincinnati, St. Louis, Peoria, St. Joseph, and thenceto California.  In 1874 the family came to Bellefontaine, where they have remained ever since.  Mr. Duringer is meeting with fair success in the manufacture of bricks, of which he makes a superior article.
(Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 597)

NOTES:

 

CLICK HERE to Return to
LOGAN COUNTY, OHIO
CLICK HERE to Return to
OHIO GENEALOGY EXPRESS
FREE GENEALOGY RESEARCH is My MISSION
GENEALOGY EXPRESS
This Webpage has been created by Sharon Wick exclusively for Genealogy Express  2008
Submitters retain all copyrights