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OHIO GENEALOGY EXPRESS


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Logan County, Ohio

History & Genealogy


 


BIOGRAPHIES

Source:
History of Logan County and Ohio
Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers
186 Dearborn Street
1880
w/ some illustrations and portraits
 
A B C D E F G H IJ K L M N OPQ R S T U V W XYZ

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Bloomfield Twp. -
DAVID HALL (Bloomfield Twp.), farmer; P. O., Bloom Centre; he is a native of Logan Co.  His father, Samuel Hall, moved from Fairfield Co., O., to Stokes Twp., in 1835, where the subject of this sketch was born on Aug. 4, 1844.  Mr. Hall was raised in this county, and has been an eye witness to the many changes that the civilization of the age has wrought for this county, and was married to Miss Mary A., daughter of Jonathan and Mary (Diesback) Greenwalt, of Fairfield Co., O., on Dec. 28, 1865, and they moved to their present splendid residence, near Bloom Centre, shortly afterwards.  They have two children living, and one in the spirit land - Emma V., born Feb. 3, 1868; Jennie I. L., Aug. 18, 1870, and Clara, Nov. 13, 1866, who died Feb. 3, 1867.  Mr. Hall owns 237 acres of finely improved land, is a member of the German Reformed Church, also of Grange No. 484, and wants it understood that he has always been a Democrat.
Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 ~ Page  730)
Harrison Twp. -
WASHINGTON HAMER, farmer; P. O., DeGraff; was born in Lancaster Co., Pa., in 1820; is a son of William and Margaret Hamer, who were also natives of Pennsylvania.  They came to Green Co., O., in 1825, and in 1831 to Logan Co.  Mr. Hamer remained at home during his youth; he was married Nov. 13, 1845, to Margarie Stewart, who was born in the adjoining county of Champaign.  From this union there were two children, both of whom are now dead.  His father died in 1863, and his mother in 1871.  Mr. Hamer, by hard work and proper economy, has accumulated quite a fortune; he ha always followed farming and stock-growing for a business.
Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 ~ Page 621
Harrison Twp. -
EDWARD HAMSHER, farmer; P. O., Bellefontaine; was born in York State in 1830, is a son of Peter and Abalina Hamsher, who were natives of Pennsylvania.  They went to York State in 1820, and from there they went in 1834 to Michigan, coming to Logan Co., in 1837, where the parents died - the father in 1842, and the mother in 1878.  Mr. Hamsher was raised on a farm, and has always followed farming for a business.  He was married, in 1854, to Margaret Houts, who was born in Logan Co.  Her father was a native of Virginia, and came to the county in a very early day.  From this union there is one child, James.  The mother of this child died in 1855.  Mr. Hamsher never married again.  HE began business for himself a poor man, and by hard work and proper economy has accumulated something of a fortune.  The farm that he now lives on was cleared and improved by himself.
Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 ~ Page  622)
Washington Twp. -
HENRY HANFORD, farmer, late of Washington Tp., was born Dec. 22, 1784, at New Canaan, State of Connecticut; emigrated to Hamilton Co., O., in 1806; made his home with his brother, Thaddeus Hanford, who had preceded him to the then new country, and settled at Columbia, on the Ohio river, the site of Cincinnati, and while living at Columbia he was engaged in running a provision boat from Columbia to Natchez.  In 1810 he married Miss Harriet Chamberlin, daughter of Judah Chamberlin, who had come out to the new country some years previously from Chautauqua Co., N. Y. and settled at Marietta, Ohio.  She was born July 18, 1791.  After their marriage in 1812, he and his father-in-law, with their families, moved to what was then Champaign Co., now Clarke Co., O., settled on Congress land five miles east of Springfield, where they continued to reside until the Indians disposed of their reservation on the Miami river, in Logan Co., Ohio.  Mr. Hanford then sold his farm in Clarke Co., and purchased a large tract of land at the government sales at Wapakanetta, a part of which is now owned by his youngest child, Lottie (Hanford) McKinnon - the homestead - and where Mr. Hanford lived until after the death of his estimable wife, which occurred on the 27th of November, 1865, aged 74 years 4 months and 9 days, after which Mr. H. spent much of his time visiting among his children, and finally died at the house of his son-in-law, Robert Newell, at Lebanon, Indiana, on the 31st day of Dec., 1866, aged  82 years and 9 days.  He never sought for public office, and thoroughly despised the tricks of the professional politician.  He was an "Abolitionist" when the name was odious, and continued to battle against negro slavery till it was abolished.  Then he was conservative, desiring peace between the sections and was in favor of the most liberal terms to those who had rebelled against the government.  His politics consisted only in a desire to see the negro free, and when that was accomplished he said, "There was nothing more in politics worth contending, save the loaves and fishes," for which he cared nothing.
Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 ~ Page  735)
Perry Twp. -
STEPHEN HARRIMAN,
farmer; P. O., North Greenfield; is the second eldest of the Harriman family now living; he was born in Washington Co., Pa., Dec. 29, 1817, and is a son of Simpkin and Sarah (Green) Harriman, who were blessed with a family of thirteen children.  Simpkin's father was David Harriman who was born in Maryland and removed to Washington, Pa., prior to the war of the Revolution, where Simpkin was born, 1788.  He married in 1806, and emigrated west in 1825, locating where David Harriman, Jr., lives; here Simpkin remained until his death, which occurred Feb. 4, 1872, and his wife in October, 1868.  Stephen's grandmother was Phoebe Kirk before marriage, but she afterwards married Nehemiah Green, who served all through the war of the Revolution.  Simpkin Harriman was a graduate, and during his life was mostly engaged in teaching.  Returning to David - he was raised to farming, and at the age of 17 began for himself; at the age of 22, on Jan. 16, 1840, he was united in matrimony to Harriet Watkins, born in Jefferson Tp., Sept. 18, 1816; she is a daughter of James and Nancy (White) Watkins.  The Watkinses are from Sussex Co., Va., and came west in 1816, and located in the southern part of Jefferson Tp.  James W. died in 1862; his wife in 1852.  For a time after Stephen was married, he lived on Harriman farm, but in February, 1845, he moved to the northern part of Perry, where he has since resided, first purchasing sixty acres; he has now 268 acres.  Of five children born to him four are living - William H., born Nov. 9, `830; enlisted in 1861, in Co. A, 15th U. S. Regulars; after serving three yeas in the Chickamauga, and died in Andersonville prison, a martyr to his country; Ann E., born Sept. 20, 1842, now Mrs. John Gwynn; Shepherd, Dec. 22, 1852, now a minister in Kansas; Thomas, Aug. 8, 1854, on home farm.  Mr. Harriman and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 648
Perry Twp. -
HIRAM HARSHFIELD, farmer and stock raiser.  One of the most prominent farmers in the township is Hiram Harshfield, who is prominently identified with the agricultural interests of this township; he was born in Richland Co., Oct. 23, 1834; his parents were David and Elizabeth (Beckley); the former was a native of Germany and emigrated to America to escape empressment in the army; he came to Virginia, and afterwards was married to Miss Beckley.  The family emigrated to this State and located in Richland Co.  Hiram was raised for farming pursuits, and remained with his parents until his marriage to Elizabeth Nash, which event occurred Oct. 23, 1866; she was born in Clinton Co., Ohio, Aug. 29, 1840, and is a daughter of John Nash, one of the highly respected citizens of this township.  Five children have been born to them, who are - Estella, Orlando, Franklin, Omar and Pearl H.  He and his wife are members of the Disciples Church.  His farm, consisting of 375 acres, ranks among the best of the county, 300 acres of which is under cultivation.  Stock-raising is one of the interests in which he is engaged.
xxSource:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 648
Bokes Creek Twp. -
JOHN HATCHER, farmer; P. O., West Mansfield; was born Jan. 1, 1813, in the government fort, Mount Vernon, Knox Co., where his mother, an elder child, and others, had taken refuge during difficulty with the Indians.  At same time his father (William Hatcher) was engaged in the force endeavoring to subdue them; his parents were natives of Virginia, and came to Ohio, locating in his native county in 1811.  His grandfather (Isaac Hatcher) came from Virginia shortly afterward, and purchased about 1,000 acres year East Liberty, in this county, and divided it with his family; this induced William (John's father) to come to Logan when John was about five years old; there the family settled, and also purchased some land besides what he got of the old gentleman's estate, and subsequently sold all and moved with his family to southern Illinois, where he (William) died of cholera in 1855.  When John grew up to manhood he traveled considerable over the Western and Southern States, and saw nothing (considering the condition of health with agricultural interests) that suited him any better than Ohio; he concluded to push his way back, and accordingly arrived in Logan Co. in 1834; here he married Catharine Hess, and shortly after they rented a farm, as he had no means to purchase with; in 1851 his wife died leaving six small children - Rebecca J., Nancy, William H., Lucinda, Sarah A., and Lydia V.  He married his second wife, Ann Peterson, but was unfortunate to lose her by death on Jan. 1, 1869, she also leaving six young children - Cordelia, John H., Abbey, Hopey A., Abel and Elizabeth A.  His third marriage was celebrated with Artlissa (Leonard) Bennett, widow of the late John Bennett; she has one son living by her first husband.  Mr. Hatcher has 130 acres of well improved land, which he has gathered by his own hard work and industry, notwithstanding his many drawbacks by death and the care of a very large family.
Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 ~ Page  661)
Perry Twp. -
SAMUEL N. HATCHER, farmer; P. O., Zanesfield; was born May 23, 1827, on the farm he now owns, which is situated in the west part of the township; he is the eldest son born to Daniel and Hope GarwoodDaniel was born in Loudoun Co., Va., and emigrated to this State with his father Isaac, who finally located permanently in Logan Co., and purchased 500 acres of unimproved land in Perry Twp.  Samuel was married in April, 1848, to Mary Ann Rhodes, who was born in Maryland, 1829, daughter of Henry and Elizabeth (Siddle) Rhodes - locating on the farm he now has, and since lived, with the exception of seven years spent in Montgomery Co., Ind.  He liked the country, and would have remained, but on account of his father's ill health he yielded to his solicitations and returned to the homestead.  His wife died in 1869, leaving nine children, which are - Sarah Ann now Mrs. Aaron Taylor; Elizabeth H., now Mrs. John McAtee; Mary A., now Mrs. Perry Isenhart, of Preble Co., Ohio.; Daniel, Samuel N., Emma J., Carrie, Fannie, Anna Victoria, now Mrs. Jacob Stanley, of Monroe Township.  In February, 1870, he married Sarah Outland, born in this county in 1837.  She was a daughter of Jerry Outland, who married a But_er.  One child, Charley, has been born to them, whose age is now 6 years on the past July 2d.  Mr. Hatcher has 199.10 acres of land, according to the late survey.  The old long house yet remains in the yard, which he assisted in building, and which was his first to keep house in.  He and wife are members of the Free-Will Baptist Church.  In 1872, he was burned out by an accidental fire, in which was lost his house and almost the entire contents.  Politically he is not in the majority in his township, which is strongly Republican.
Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 ~ Page  649
Harrison Twp. -
ALEXANDER B. HAZEL, farmer; P. O., Bellefontaine; was born in Maryland, in 1806; his parents were natives of the same state, and where they died when he was quite young.  He was cast on the charities of the world when he most needed to care that only a parent can give.  He came to Logan Co. with a friend when but 10 years of age, and has resided in the county ever since. The education he received was very limited.  Left wholly upon his own resources in the world, he set diligently to work, and so gained in time something of a fortune.  He began in the woods, and the farm that he now lives on was cleared and improved by him.  He was married, in 1827, to Eliza Powell, who came from the State of Delaware to Logan Co. in a very early day.  They had a family of nine children, five of whom are now dead.  Mr. Hazel is one of the oldest surviving settlers of the county.  He came in 1818, one year before the county was organized, and has seen all the changes that have taken place in the county in that time.  He and his wife are members of the German Baptist Church.
(Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 ~ Page  622)
Perry Twp. -
A. G. HEATH, carpenter, East Liberty; born in Clinton Co., N.Y., Jan. 14, 1834; son of Jesse and Hannah (Allen) Heath.  The former was born in Vermont, June 20, 1810.  His wife is a relative of Ethan Allen of historic fame.  The grandfather of A. G. was born in Hampstead, N. H., Dec. 25, 1782; is name was John, and he married Hannah Darling, who was born Jan. 14, 1790, in the same state as her husband.  A. G. emigrated west with his parents in 1835, to Tuscarawas Co., then to Stark, and while there learned the carpenter's trade with his father.  In 1855, he came to Logan Co., and the year following was married to Mary E. E. Austin, born July 27, 1840, in Perry tp., Ohio.  She was a daughter of Caleb and Ellen (Shanks) Austin.  Allen's father has since married Mrs. Austin, the mother of his (Allen's) wife.  In August, 1862, Allen enlisted in Co. C, 45th O. V. I., serving as mounted infantry for eighteen months; was color sergeant in his regiment, carrying the same the entire term of his service, and flaunted the Stars and Stripes to the gaze of the foe during every battle in which the regiment was engaged.  Upon his return home, eh resumed his trade and run the hotel for twelve years in east Liberty.  He has four children living - Nellie, Ida M., Wilmot and Jonah C.  He is a member of I. O. O. F. and A., F. & M. at East Liberty, and census enumerator for 1880.
Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 649
Perry Twp. -
JOHN HEATH, farmer; P. O., East Liberty; was born Jan 25, 1835, in Cuyahoga Co., Ohio; in early life he attended school, having very good common school advantages afforded him; his parents were Jesse and Hannah (Allen) Heath, who were natives of Vermont; after a sojourn in several of the inland counties, the family came to Logan Co. in 1855; John's father was a carpenter, which business he followed for several years, a vocation which was never patronized by his son John, who for several years clerked in a store at Massillon.  At the age of 28, he was married to Eliza Randall, who was born in this township; she was a daughter of Joseph Randall; she died December, 1875, leaving one child, Cary F., born August, 1870.  His present wife is Hope Hatcher, born in this township 1847; is a daughter of John Hatcher.  since 1870, he has resided on the farm he now owns, located west of East Liberty.  He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 649
Zane Twp. -
THOMAS J. HELLINGS, merchant; West Middleburg; for business enterprise coupled with success, no one deserves more credit in the history of Middleburg than Thomas J. Hellings, who, although a young man, is well known in this part of the county.  n writing the industries of this township it is only just to say, Mr. Hellings' store, for the elegance of the goods, for the carefully selected variety and exquisite taste in the display of everything, has few equals in the county.  This is all the more remarkable when it is known that it is all the growth of the past eight years.  In 1872, Mr. Hellings, in connection with his father, opened a small stock in a part of the room he now occupies, which in connection with his father, and since the latter's death, which occurred Sept. 1, 1878, he has gradually increased the business until his annual sales amount to about $12000 per year, and still increasing.  To those who are acquainted with Tom's careful business habits and his very obliging disposition, treating every customer with the utmost attention and courtesy, his remarkable success is not surprising.  He is the only son of Sarah Ann (Euans) Hellings, and was born in Middleburg, Oct. 8, 1848, and after receiving a common school education, he graduated at Nelson's Business College, Cincinnati, in 1866; his father, Harrison Hellings, was born in Bucks Co., Penn., Dec. 20, 1814, and was the son of John and Margaret (James) Hellings, and came to Ohio in 1833, locating with his parents near Mt. Moriah Church, and a year later in Middleburg, and married Miss Sarah Ann Euans, Apr. 4, 1838; she was born in Zane Tp., Mar. 1, 1820; her parents, Joseph and Rhoda (Heppard) Euans, were among the first settlers in Zane Tp.  From this union there were two children - Catharine Ann, born Oct. 7, 1840, and married to L.M. Sharp, a native of this township, whose family history appears of this township, whose family history appears elsewhere, and Tom J. the subject of this sketch.  For the twenty years succeeding his marriage, Harrison followed the carpenter's trade, which he had learned in Pennsylvania; in 1858 he engaged in the saw-mill business and run a farm, continuing this about twenty eyars; in 1871 he opened a grocery in Bellefontaine, in connection with his son, and after about six months, removed to West Middleburg, where he continued in business as above stated, under the firm name Hellings & Son, until the time of his death.  Thomas J. married Miss Amanda C. Marquis, the history of whose family appears in full elsewhere.  From this union there is a daughter - Edna G., born Mar. 18, 1874.  Should you think our description of Mr. Helling's store the least overdrawn, just drop in and look through  his large stock and get prices, and you will be convinced that the tenth has not been told you.  He is at present the Treasurer of the township; he is also a member of East Liberty Lodge No. 247, A. F. & A. M., Star Chapter No. 126, North Lewisburg, and Logan Council No. 34, R. & S. M.
Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 634
Liberty Twp. -
C. R. HILDEBRAND, farmer; P. O., West Liberty.  The somewhat eventful history of the present subject compels more than the usual brevity.  We can truthfully call him a pioneer here, as well as many other places.  It seems that he has been on the frontier the greater part of the seventy-two years he has sojourned through this country.  He was born in Leboeuf, Erie Co., Pa., on Apr. 8, 1808.  His father, Jacob, was a native of Westmoreland Co., same State, and his mother , Emily Miller, of Baltimore, Md.  They were married in Leboeuf, where they remained until 13, when they went to Erie, where the father was engaged at building the fleets then being fitted out for Commodore Perry.  The mother was also engaged for the troops in making flags and flannel sacks in which to charge their cannons.  The father belonged to the militia under Captain Morrison, and was called into service, during which he contracted a disease, and in 1814 died.  The mother got a land warrant for his services, which she afterward sold to a Mr. Crockett, who located 160 acres in Iowa.  The mother remained with her two sons, C. R.  and Edward, in Erie, and maintained herself and them by plying her needle at whatever she could get to sew.  Her brother Thomas P. Miller, who was living there, had lost his wife, leaving him with two children, and he made a proposition that he would sell out, and himself and children, and Mrs. Hildebrand and sons, would come to Ohio and there make a home together; this she accepted, and a flat boat was constructed by which they were transported to Portsmouth.  The time of landing was 1817.  They did not remain at Portsmouth very long but moved on a farm in a settlement called French Grant.  In about 1830 Mr. Miller, came to Urbana, O., and Mrs. Hildebrand remained there until 1831, when she came with her sons to West Liberty, where she died in 1868.  She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church of this place.  Our subject's hardships were more than usual, such as going to mill on horseback, etc.  When at Portsmouth a man by the name of Hopkins came from New Jersey and started a paper called the Scioto Telegraph, and Mr. Hildebrand was then about 20 years old, and worked for this editor.  During two days each week he would deliver the papers over the country on horseback.  He and his brother Edward learned tailoring at Portsmouth, and afterward worked at Franklin Furnace at their trade.  He was married in May, 1831, a short time prior to the moving to this county, and when they settled here he engaged for some time at his trade in a small frame house which stood on the southwest corner of the public square, where is now the present site of George Gorton's jewelry store.  This building is now being used by Mr. Brier for a kitchen.  In 1839 he withdrew from this business, and engaged in a grocery in a brick building that was consumed in the fire, but is now being rebuilt by Dr. Ordway.  This he continued for three years, and afterward bought 150 acres of land in Hardin Co., unimproved, and moved on the same.  In 1844, he returned and farmed a short time in Liberty Twp., and then bought a tract of land in Champaign Co., where he farmed until 1851, when he traded for 200 acres where he now resides, getting the amount from T. P. Miller at $15 per acre.  Here he has remained ever since, and has still kept rolling the wheel of improvement.  Sept. 11, 1879, his wife, who had been the companion of his sorrows and joys for over forty-eight years, was stricken from life's roll and gathered into the life eternal.  She had blessed him with eight children, seven of whom are now living - Isabella has taught school at West Liberty for many years; Jacob, married Rebecca Burnside, native of this county, now of Morris Co., Kan.; Charles, married Kate Beemer, of Kenton, residents of this county; Emily; Lucy; Gwenn; Thomas, married Charlotte Mason of this county; Milton died 1864.  Mr. Hildebrand has served as Township Trustee, and other small offices; cast his first vote for J. Q. Adams, and has always been a Whig and Republican.  His grandparents Hildebrand were of German descent, their ancestors coming to America about 1732.  His descendants by his mother (Miller and Pym) were of Irish descent, and belonged to the Quaker denomination.  Their ancestors probably came over with William Penn.  His brother Edward was married and died in West Liberty, leaving a widow and six living children.  She yet resides in this place.  Mr. Hildebrand is now seventy-two years of age, and enjoys uniform health, saying with Job of old, "All the days of my appointed time will I wait till my change come."  He remembers almost everything that happened since he was three years old.  Many of his leisure moments he has spent in catching deer in the rivers, by means of a canoe.  These animals were driven in there for that purpose.  He has in his possession a small dictionary that was given him by Lieutenant Packett, of Perry's crew, of Lake Erie, as a Christmas gift.  He had but little chance of education, but most fortunate has he been in rearing a pleasant, intelligent family, educated and refined.
(Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 ~ Page  713)
Pleasant Twp. -
GEORGE K. HILL, 

Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 ~ Page  835

Jefferson Twp. -
JOHN G. HOGE, retired farmer; P. O., Bellefontaine.  The subject of this sketch, and whose portrait appears in this work, is among the staunch and highly-respected citizens of this county; he was born Mar. 29, 1810, in Loudoun Co., Va.  His father's name was Jesse, and was the father of ten children, of which number John G. was the second; his mother's name was Elizabeth Gregg, also a native of Loudoun Co., Va.  John was but 17 years of age when his father died, and at his request he staid on the farm.  At the age of 20, our subject was married to Nancy Holmes, born in 1814 in Loudoun Co., Va.; she was a daughter of John and Mary (Rodgers) Hoge.  The Hoge family are of Scotch descent; three brothers at the time of "Persecution" left Scotland; one stopped in Ireland, the other two came to America.  The Greggs are of Irish descent.  Solomon Hoge was the grandfather of John, and came West from Pennsylvania, and settled in this county.  John remained on the homestead farm, which his grandfather settled, until 1845, when he moved to the place he now owns, which had been purchased several years previous to its occupancy.  This land was unimproved, and every man that came along and wanted work, he gave him a job of clearing; he was cutting his first crop of wheat when he heard the whistle of an engine, on her maiden trip, as she came into Bellefontaine.  Farming and stock-raising has been the business of his life; his farm of 200 acres is but one mile east from the corporation of Bellefontaine, and is situated on the highest eminence in the State.  In politics he is Republican; was Commissioner at the time the court house was built; has also served as Infirmary Director.  Seven children were born him; four of the number came to maturity, but two living - Sarah E., now Mrs. David Wallace, and Mrs. Mary Ann Green, the wife of Reuben Green of Bellefontaine; his son, John, died in the army.  Mrs. Hoge died in 1849; since 1878, Mr. Hoge has been confined to his home on account of partial paralysis of his limbs, yet is in the enjoyment of his faculties, and is spending the evening of his life in apparent contentment and happiness, having the esteem and confidence of all his friends and acquaintances, of which he has a large number.  Was raised a "Friend," yet is not affiliated with any religious body.
(Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 ~ Page  756)
Perry Twp. -
DAVID HOGUE, farmer; P. O., West Mansfield; was born in Liberty Twp., May 29, 1844, and was a son of George and Jane (Bollinger) Hogue; they were born in Cumberland Co., Pa. and came west about the year 1834, and were parents to the major number of eighteen children, David being the youngest; his father died when David was a lad.  He was thus thrown upon his own resources early in life.  He lived five years with Cyrus Bell, of Bokes Creek Twp., who gave him employment and good counsel.  On Jan. 17, 1863, he was married to Susannah Hamilton, who was born Jan. 17, 1839, in Fayette Co., Pa., and came west in 1860.  Her parents were William and Susannah  (Bear) Hamilton, both natives of the Keystone State.  In 1864, Mr. Hogue came to this farm.  He first bought fifty acres at $24 per acre, and has since augmented his first purchase until he now has 132 acres; the greater portion he has acquired by his own labor, assisted by his faithful wife, who has had the misfortune to lose her hearing from a severe illness since her marriage.  She is a devoted Christian woman, a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  They have four children - Mary J., born Nov. 4, 1864; Emma E., Apr. 23, 1868; Rena V., Dec. 24, 1871; and Robert, Nov. 7, 1874.
(Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 ~ Page  650)
Pleasant Twp. -
JAMES F. HONE, farmer; P. O., Logansville; born in Franklin, O., in 1840, and came to Logan Co. at 3 years of age, and lived in Bloomfield Tp. with his parents until 1861, when he enlisted in the 20th O. V. I., and served till disabled by sickness and hardship, when he was honorably discharged after fifteen months' service; he fought in the battles of Pittsburg Landing and Ft. Donaldson, in the former witnessing the most terrific part of the battle, and participating in the hottest part of the fight.  In 1862 he commence farming for himself in Bloomfield Tp., on 80 acres of land given to him by his father-in-law; in 1865 he sold out and bought 104 acres, which he now occupies.  His father-in-law then gave him, in 1878, 35 acres more.  Mr. Hone then purchased 21 acres more, making him in all 159 acres, which constitutes his present farm, which he has nicely improved.  It borders on the east side of the Miami River, and is considered the best soil in the county.  He was married in 1863 to Jennie Dickson, who was born in Logan Co. in 1844, where she was brought up and has always lived.  They have had six children - Alice A. born April 13, 1864, and died Aug. 20, 1864; John, born June 24, 1865; Willard E., Jan. 5, 1868; Bessie, June 12, 1870; Ossie, April 15, 1872, and died Dec. 25, 1872; Winona, born Sept. 26, 1879.  Mr. Hone has been Township Assessor for nine successive years, and holds the office of Real Estate Assessor for 1880.  He is a member of the Christian Church; also a Democrat.  His land furnishes a beautiful building site upon which his house now stands, and where he contemplates building a spacious house next year.
(Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 ~ Page  836
Harrison Twp. -
JACOB HORN, farmer; P. O., Bellefontaine; was born in Preble Co., Ohio, in 1818; is a son of John and Nancy Horn, who were natives of Virginia, and came to Preble Co. in about 1814, where they resided until 1828, when they came to Logan Co., where the family have ever since resided.  The father died about 1864, and the mother is yet living on the old homestead, north of Bellefontaine.  Mr. Horn was raised on a farm, and has always followed farming and stock-growing for a business.  He has been more fortunate than the majority of people in the way of acquiring wealth; he began for himself, entirely upon his own resources, and is now in good circumstances, and has been able to give his children a good start in life.  He was married Apr. 2, 1844, to Eliza Lang, who was born in Washington Co., Pa., and came to Logan Co. with her parents about 1830.  From this union there were six children, John L., William H., Nancy M., S. L., Columbia A. and Mary E.  The mother of these children died Sept. 30, 1879.  Mr. Horn and his entire family are members of the Lutheran Church.  Politically, he is a Republican.  S. L. Horn, his married son, resides on teh farm with him.  He is a young man of fine abilities, and is much respected by all.  He was married in November, 1877, to Margaret A. Makemson.  Her father was born in Logan Co., and her mother was a native of Virginia.  They have one child, Tiry W.  S. L. has always followed farming for a business; also deals some in stock.
Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 ~ Page 621
Harrison Twp. -
JOSEPH S. HORN, farmer; P. O., Bellefontaine; was born in Logan Co., July 18, 1848; is a son of Henry and Mary Horn.  The father was born in Preble Co., O., and the mother in Pennsylvania.  They came to Logan Co. in a very early day.  Mr. Horn was raised on a farm, and has always followed farming for a business.  He resided with his parents until his marriage, which was Sept. 28, 1871, to Elizabeth Albright.  She was born in Pennsylvania, and came to Logan Co. with her parents when quite young.  They had a family of three children, one of whom is now dead - Dora P., Henry E. and Charley R.  Mr. Horn has been very successful in his business, and is in good circumstances; beginning on his own responsibilities and making most that he now has by his own efforts.  He and his wife are members of the Lutheran Church.
Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 ~ Page 623
Harrison Twp. -
JOHN HOUTS, farmer; P. O., Bellefontaine; was born in Virginia, Jan. 25, 1799.  His father was born in Pennsylvania; went to Virginia when quite a young man, where he raised his family, and in 1816 came to Logan Co., John coming with him.  The father died here in 1824.  Mr. Houts spent his youth and early manhood with his parents, and received such an education as the common schools of those early days afforded. He was married twice; his first marriage was to Catharine Wise, in 1825.  She was born in Switzerland, and came to America when 16 years of age.  From this marriage there were ten children.  She died Mar. 27, 1842.  Mr. Houts was again married, in 1843, to Elizabeth Shawver, who came from Virginia to Logan Co. in a very early day, and from this marriage there were four children.  He yet lives on the farm that his father purchased on coming to the county, and which he cleared and improved.  His second wife died June 15, 1855.  Mr. Houts now is among the oldest settlers of the county, and has vivid recollections of the hardships of the old pioneers.
Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 ~ Page 622
Richland Twp. -
URIAS HOYT, retired farmer; P. O., Belle Centre; was born Sept. 4, 1808, in Stillwater, Rensselaer Co., N. Y.; his parents were native of Westchester Co., that State; his father's name being Jesse and his mother's maiden name Sally Weed.  His father was a shoemaker by trade, and died in that State in 1855.  Urias learned the trade with his father, and when 18 years old commenced for himself; he followed "jour." work till 1839, and then had a shop of his own in connection with a store; he lived in Michigan seven years; one year he was a circuit minister, and six years was engaged in clearing and improving a farm; he has also lived two years in Illinois, where he was engaged in the mercantile business, and from there he moved to Belle Centre, to secure that freedom from care that a lifetime of usefulness has surely earned.  He first married Dec. 29, 1831; this wife died Apr. 29, 1868, having borne one child that died when 17 years old.  He was married Oct. 15, 1868, to Mrs. Sarah A. Weaver, whose maiden name was Sloan; she was born Jan. 5, 1830, in Ireland, and emigrated to this country during her childhood.  By this union two children have been born - Joseph U., born Sept. 3, 1869, and John J., Apr. 10, 1871.  Both he and wife are members of the M. E. Church, in which he has been local preacher forty years, and also an Elder.  He has been Justice of the Peace, and was Postmaster at Walworth, N. Y., for seven years; has always been a Democrat.
Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 ~ Page  803
Harrison Twp. -
JOHN M. HUBER, farmer; P. O., Bellefontaine; was born in Logan Co., Aug. 23, 1834; is a son of Joseph and Barbara A. Huber, the father was born in Baden, Germany, and the mother in Ohio.  The father came to America in 1830, and settled in Logan Co. in 1831; he was a shoemaker by trade, a business he followed for a great many years.  John M. Huber, resided with his parents until of age, learning his father's trade; he followed this business for about eleven years, and then went to farming, and has been farming for the last twenty years.  He was married in 1859 to Sarah C. Moor, she was born in the county, her father was born in Licking Co., O., and the mother in Pennsylvania.  They came to Logan Co. in an early day.  From this union there are eight children.  Mr. Huber, by hard work and economy has gained a competency.  His wife is a member of the Presbyterian Church.
(Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 ~ Page  622)
Harrison Twp. -
JOSEPH HUBER, farmer; P. O. Bellefontaine; was born in Baden, Germany, in 1809; he resided there with his parents until 21 years of age.  He was partly educated for a Priest, but having no taste for the profession, he managed to be released from his studies, and came to America.  His father was a shoemaker, and Joseph had learned the trade of him, and afterward follows that business in Bellefontaine, O., for a great many years; he came to America in 1830 and followed the clock business for several years; he settled in Logan Co. in 1831, and has been in the county ever since; in 1861 he came to the farm that he now resides on; he was married in 1831 to Barbara A. Smith, who was born in Jefferson Co., O.  Her parents were natives of Pennsylvania.  From this union there were eight children, two now dead - John M., Margaret, Catherine, Mary, Sarah, Lydia M.; two died when young.  Mr. Huber began business for himself when he came to America, entirely upon his own resources, and, by hard work and proper economy, has made quite a fortune.  He and wife are members of the Lutheran Church.
(Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 ~ Page  623)
Bloomfield Twp. -
NANCY HUBER, farmer; P. O. Bloom Centre; was born Dec. 7, 1818, in the State of Kentucky, and was a daughter of Thomas Makeinson.  She was married to Capt. Manasas Huber, Nov. 23, 1837.  Capt. Huber was born Aug. 10, 1806, in the State of Kentucky.  Soon after, they moved to Bloomfield Twp., and settled on the banks of the Miami River, where Mrs. Huber still lives.   Mr. Huber was a descendant of some of the best blood of the old Revolutionary period, and for several years he was the popular Captain of the Logan Co. Light Horse Company, of Ohio State Militia.  By industry, economy, and a good, clear head, he accumulated considerable of this world's goods, leaving at his death over 00 acres of good land.  Their house was for many years the "meeting house" of the neighborhood, and has always been considered the "Methodist Preachers' Home."  Mr. and Mrs. Huber were among the first member of the Methodist Church in this county.  They have been blessed with ten children - Marion, born Oct. 4, 1838, died Aug. 27, 1839; Elizabeth, born April 12, 1840; Allen, Sept. 14, 1841; Margaret, July 15, 1843; Thomas W., April 23, 1846, died Nov. 11, 1848; Sarah, now the wife of Noah Miller, Esq., born June 7, 1848; Isaiah, June 24, 1850; John W., May 30, 1852, died Oct. 6, 1855; Tiry A., born Dec. 13, 1854; Elsey L., Feb. 2, 1857.  Capt. Huber died Jan. 31, 1872.  Tiry A. is now the popular Town Clerk of Bloomfield Twp.  The Huber brothers are stock dealers, and have a splendid reputation for dealing on the square, and as business men they stand high.
(Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 ~ Page  730)
Miami Twp. -
B. S. HUNT, M. D., physician; DeGraff; was born in Shelby Co., O., Oct. 11, 1850.  His parents, H. R. Hunt and Ann (Conover) Hunt, were natives of Butler Co., but came to Shelby Co. in 1836.  His paternal ancestry were among the settlers of Vermont, while the maternal forefathers were English.  Both his parents are still living in Shelby Co., on the farm where Dr. Hunt passed his youth.  He had she advantages afforded by the public schools.  He engaged in the occupation of teaching until the year 1874, when he commenced reading medicine, at first with an allopathic physician for nearly a year, then with H. E. Beebe, M. D., of Sidney, O., a physician of the Homeopathic school.  In the fall of 1875 he went to Cincinnati, O., and took three courses of lectures at the Pulte Medical College, graduating Jan. 17, 1875.  Immediately afterward he settled in De Graff to the practice of his chosen profession, with results very flattering, promising much for the future.  Dr. Hunt married Miss Josie Wooley, whose early home was in Champaign Co.  They have one son - Ora by name, at the present writing two years of age.
Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 ~ Page  776
Monroe Twp. -
JOHN HUNT, farmer; P. O., West Liberty; was born Aug. 20, 1820, in Hunterdon Co., N. J., and emigrated to this State in 1835, with his parents, who were Daniel and Nancy (Williams) Hunt; both were natives of New Jersey.  Their place of settlement was the southern part of Monroe Twp., where they purchased 200 acres of land.  Upon the father's side, the family are of English, and on the mother's of Dutch extraction.  The name of John's grandfather was Daniel and he was a cabinet maker by trade, which his son David took up also.  John, not caring to keep up the paternal trade, early in life resolved to become a farmer.  He was united by marriage to Phebe Williamson on June 27, 1850.  She was born Feb. 11, 1828, in Warren Co., N. J., and was a daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth (Fishbaugh) Williamson  After marriage he located on the home farm, remaining there until 1854, when he purchased 133 acres adjoining, and has since made this his permanent place of residence.  Ten children now gather about the festive board, not having had to this date a death in the family.  Their names are: William D., Elizabeth, Martha L., Alice, John W., Nancy A., Henry W., Mary L., Benjamin F. and Sallie.  For many years Mr. Hunt has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which he served as Steward and Trustee, and has endeavored to live a life consistent with his professions.  He has, for some time past, been in poor health, yet is subject to the will of the Master and is ready to go at His bidding.
Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 ~ Page  669
Liberty Twp. -
J. M. HUNTER, dealer in farming implements, West Liberty; was born March 22, 1838, in Champaign Co., where he attended school in the old pioneer log cabin.  He also attended for a while at this place, by riding on horseback.  He was very apt at his studies, and, at the age of 20 years, he taught one term, and then began farming, renting of his father.  He was married Nov. 19, 1862, to Sallie Baldwin, and soon after bought 60 acres of his father, on which he remained two years.  He then went to Urbana, and there engaged under the firm name of Gearheart & Hunter in the grocery business, continuing at it two years.  While thus engaged he was unsuccessful - however, not through his own financiering.  He then returned to his farm, which has been reduced somewhat by the failure previously mentioned, and remained on the same until 1872, when he sold out and purchased 30 acres in Liberty Tp., this county, and has since remained on the same.  In 1878, he began dealing in agricultural implements, which he still continues, making a specialty of buggies and wagons, as well as threshing machines, engines, saw0mills, etc.  He is honest and upright and merits the patronage of the community where he resides.  He has been no office-seeker, hence has not trifled away his useful moments in aspiring for petty offices.  He and his wife are active members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which he has been class-leader and Superintendent of Sunday Schools.  Both positions he is now holding.  His Creator has given him three children by his union - Frank E., Nellie M. and Ralph W.  He has always been an enthusiastic Republican, having cast his first vote for Abraham Lincoln.  He takes deep interest in all temperance movements, and every thing that tends to promote morality.
(Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 ~ Page  715)

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