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OHIO GENEALOGY EXPRESS


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Logan County, Ohio

History & Genealogy


 


BIOGRAPHIES

Source:
History of Logan County and Ohio
Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers
186 Dearborn Street
1880
w/ some illustrations and portraits
 
A B C D E F G H IJ K L M N OPQ R S T U V W XYZ

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  Jefferson Twp. -
BENJAMIN EASTON, farmer; P. O., Bellefontaine; was born Dec. 4, 1836, in this township; he is the fifth child and fourth son of John Easton.  Began renting land of his father before he attained his majority, and before he attained his 21st eyar he was married to Susannah Leas, who was a daughter of Daniel and Eleanor (Dunston) Leas.  She died Aug. 10, 1873.  She was the mother of nine children, of whom are - John, Charlotte E., Lillian T., Rosa F., Nancy A., Eva C., Lola D. and Benjamin.  Dec. 26, 1874 was married to his present wife, Mrs. Mary A. Roberts, she was a daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth (Vannacka) Lewis, from Virginia, and same to this county in 1835.  Mrs. Easton was born 1832, Sept. 2, in Frederick Co., Va.  Here grandfather, George Vannacka, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war as well as the war of 1812, and lived to the age of 93, and her great-grandfather, John Lewis, survived to the great age of 110.  Mrs. Easton was married Nov. 21, 1853, to Samuel Roberts, he died Feb. 20, 1861.  Of the two children born, but one is living - Smith R., born My 14, 1856.  Sine February, 1875, Mr. Easton has resided on his present farm, located on the Jerusalem pike, two and a half miles east from Bellefontaine, where he has 122 acres of land, which he has adorned with good buildings and greatly improved the tone and character of the land since his occupancy.
(Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 ~ Page 750)
  Jefferson Twp. -
JAMES EASTON, farmer; P. O., Bellefontaine, was born April 3, 1835, on the farm, where William Easton now resides; is the third son and fourth child of John and Charlotte Easton.  At the age of 21, he began farming for himself, renting land of his father for four years, then bought 75 acres, Jan. 1, 1860; he was married to Guillian Tittsworth, who was born in this township in 1849, and is a daughter of William and Sarah Dunston, who were from Virginia.  Has three children - Clara B., born Nov. 15, 1862; Charlotte Emma, July 10, 1864; Sarah Alice, May 1, 1869.  He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  James was out in Co. I., 132nd O. N. G., and served three months.  Has 108 acres of land and resides three miles east of Bellefontaine, in Jefferson twp.
(Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 ~ Page 750)
  Jefferson Twp. -
JOEL EASTON, farmer; P. O., Bellefontaine; was born Aug. 12, 1843, on the farm now owned by his brother, William.  At the age of 19, he was among the number who volunteered their services in the defense of his country, and for three years did he brave the dangers and hardships incident to a protracted campaign.  Co. C., 45 O. V. I., was the command to which he was attached.  He returned home at the close of the war, having escaped the diseases of camp and the mutilations of the battle field, and is ever grateful to the Giver of all good for his preservation.  Soon after his return home, Aug. 17, 1865, he was married to Mary E. Elliott, born in this township, April 10, 1846, and is a daughter of Joseph and Mary (Slater) Elliott, now of Union Co., O. Sine his marriage he has resided on the farm he now owns, situated two miles north of Zanesfield; has two children - Ida M., born March 23, 1867, and Finley B., Dec. 29, 1874; he is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, also his wife and daughter.  He is one of the leaders of his class.
Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880  ~ Page 750

John Easton


Charlotte Easton

 

Jefferson Twp. -
JOHN EASTON, farmer; Bellefontaine, Prominent among the toil-worn veterans and pioneers of this township is  "Uncle John" Easton, of whom, and his wife, portraits appear in this work.  He was born in Shelby Co., Ky., Sept. 24, 1799, born to Redwood and Polly (McMichael) Easton; he was born in Rhode Island several years prior to the Revolution; his wife was born near Richmond, Va.  They emigrated to Kentucky during the early historical events of that State.  John emigrated to this State in 1803, on pack horses, making their way through the pathless forests, occasionally guided by Indian trails and landmarks well-known to those hardy woodmen.  Many times their only guide was the moss on the trees and the course of the sun.  In passing through Cincinnati there were but three or four log cabins of that (to-day) large city.  Their first stopping-place was north of Cincinnati thirty-five miles, at a place called Waynesville; here his father taught school about two years; the family then wended their way northward until they reached Montgomery Co.; here he entered some land, where he stayed but a short time and returned to Waynesville; then to Clarke Co., where they remained until 1825.  John learned the tanner's trade at Urbana, which he afterwards abandoned, and turned his attention to farming pursuits.  After coming to Logan Co., in 1825, he rented land of Isaac Zane for three years; during his sojourn here was married Dec. 7, 1827, to Charlotte Plummer, who was born in Kentucky, Oct. 28, 1803.  She was a daughter of James and Nancy Plummer.  In 1831 he settled on the farm where his son William now lives, remaining about twenty years, and cleared up that farm; in 1851 he located on the farm he now owns, which embraces 490 acres.  When he began for himself his mother gave him a bed; he worked and obtained money to buy him one cow and a horse, the latter died when he went after his license to get married; having a few dollars left after paying for his license, he spent the remainder for a few meagre necessaries to begin keeping house with.  He is, to-day, one of the affluent and prominent farmers in the township, and has raised a family that would be an honor to any man, all of whom are settled about him and are prosperous farmers.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 749
 

Jefferson Twp. -
JOHN W. EASTON, farmer; P. O. Zanesfield; was born Jan. 20, 1832, in this township.  He is the third of a family of six children, born to John and Charlotte (Plummer) Easton.  The Eastons are all farmers and are settled in the same neighborhood, several of them adjoining lands, and are thrifty and prosperous.  At the age of 22, John was married to Harriet Elliott, who was born in Stark Co., Dec. 16, 1835, and is a daughter of Joseph and Mary (Slater) Elliott, who were natives of Pennsylvania.  After John was married he rented land for three years on his father's farm; then located on the farm he now owns, and has now 222 acres of land.  Three children have blessed this union with Harriet Elliott, but one living - Marietta, born Oct. 19, 1862; Abram and Joseph, deceased when young; Joseph A. was born Dec. 12, 1857, died March 3, 1861; Abram, born August, 1855, died April 2, 1861.  He and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  He served in Co. I, O. N. G., 132nd regiment.
Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 ~ Page 749

  Jefferson Twp. -
WILLIAM EASTON, farmer; P. O., New Jerusalem; is the eldest son and child of John and Charlotte Easton; he was born Sept. 10, 1828, in the town of Zanesfield, and was but 4 years and 6 months of age when his father moved to the place he (William) now owns.  At the usual age he launched out to do for himself; he was engaged in farming for several years, renting of his father.  In 1855, Nov. 13, he was united in marriage to Hannah Wickersham, who was born in Columbiana Co., Apr. 4, 1833; is a daughter of Joseph and Margaret Wickersham.   Since their marriage, has been a constant resident of the farm, which is ornamented with excellent buildings, having one of the best barns in the township, a good house and a well kept farm of 100 acres, which is almost a model farm.  All of the buildings are of his own construction and planning.  Eight children have been born unto him; seven of the number are living, of whom are Juliaetta, born July 29, 1856, now the wife of Oliver Corwin; Margaret, died in infancy; John Q., born Dec. 6, 1859; Lloyd W., Dec. 8, 1862; Elmer E., Jan. 26, 1866; Jinnie E., Aug. 16, 1868; Ada M., Sept. 12, 1872; Wellington, Oct. 2, 1875.  Mr. Easton was out in Co. I, 132d O. N. G., serving in the one hundred day service.  Is a member of Rush Creek Grange.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 749
  Harrison Twp. -
JOHN H. EATON, farmer; P. O., Bellefontaine; was born in Jefferson Co., Kentucky, June 14, 1828; is a son of William G. and Elizabeth Eaton, the father is a native of Woodford Co., and the mother of Shelby Co., Ky.; her maiden name was Bridgewater; her father, and also our subject's father, served in the war of 1812, and his grandfathers on both sides served in the Revolutionary war.  In 1831, Mr. Eaton went with his parents to Shelby Co., Ind., and resided here with them until about 1846, at which time he began business for himself.  Starting out at eighteen years of age, and no more of a start in life than his two hands and his thorough willingness to use them, he has been very successful.  He followed various occupations, and of late years has been farming.  He was married Dec. 16, 1858, to Smyra A. Runyan.  She was born in Jennings Co., Ind.  Her mother was a Branam, and a native of Kentucky, and her father was a native of New Jersey, and came to Indiana in a very early day.  From this union there are three children, Charles S., Henry W., and Layton H.  Mr. Eaton's father resided in Indiana until 1856, when he went to Illinois, where he died in 1874.  He was a Baptist preacher, and preached the gospel for more than fifty years.  The mother died in 1877.  Mr. Eaton and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church and aim to lead exemplary lives.
Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 ~ Page
  McArthur Twp. -
WILLIAM EDMISTON, dealer in wool, grain and lumber; Huntsville.  Among the first settlers of this township, who were obliged to forego the advantages of an older and more advanced county by emigrating to one comparatively unsettled, was the Edmiston family, which consisted of Robert and Rebecca Edmiston, with their family, and came here from Ross Co. at a very early day, and settled on the farm now owned by D. B. Harrod  One of their children, whose name was also Robert, was born in 1813, in Ross Co., and was yet in his boyhood when he came to this county; he learned the trade of a cooper, and besides working at this, he also conducted a farm; he was united in marriage to Narcissa Herren in 1836.  She was born in 1818, in Queen Anne's Co., Md., and came to this county a short time previous to her marriage; in 1860 she was deprived of her earthly companion by the hand of death, leaving her with a family of five sons and three daughters, all of whom are yet living.  The eldest son entered the service from this place, and when his time expired enlisted in the 20th Illinois, and for meritorious service was promoted to the office of Mayor; he was at Andersonville a short time.  William, the subject of this sketch, was in the 132nd O. N. G.; he was born Apr. 19, 1845, and was the oldest son at home at the time of his father's death; for several years he conducted the farm, and in 1867 came to Huntsville, where he soon engaged in business for himself; he was in the grain trade at first, and in 1872 went to Franklin Co., where he had a large wood contract, and remained there two years; he then returned to this place, and has been dealing quite largely in grain and wool, and has lately been doing a good business in lumber; he was married Mar. 10, 1868, to Esther, daughter of James Cassil.  Her father was one of the early settlers, and for many years was Justice of the Peace and Postmaster.  William's marriage has been blessed with three children, but one of whom is living.  Her name is Mabel, and, being of buoyant and lively disposition, brings sunshine into their home.  He is a member of the Masonic Order, and a Republican in politics.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 820
  Rush Creek Twp. -
JOSEPH EDWARDS, physician; Rushsylvania.  Robert Edwards, ancestor of Joseph Edwards, was a native of Wales, and, prior to the Revolution, emigrated to this country and settled in New Jersey.  John Edwards, his son, was a Jerseyman born, and following him, in 1787, was his son, Justice Edwards, who was taken to Philadelphia by his parents, where he attended school under Dr. Benjamin Franklin.  He was educated for a physician, and attended lectures when but 17 years of age, but formed a dislike for the profession, and abandoned it.  He then served an apprenticeship at the saddler's trade, under one McKinzie, and had the honor of making the saddle, bridle and martingale that bedecked the horse of Aaron Burr, so well known in his history, and it was doubtless Burr's glowing account of the Northwest that put Justice Edwards and one Lathrop in motion westward ho! in 1810; they came to Pittsburg by wagons; to Cincinnati by skiff down the Ohio River, and found the village composed of twelve dwellings and a few fur-trading shanties; it was here that Justice Edwards formed the acquaintance of one Leroy, with whom he came to Champaign Co., Ohio, to a point near the waters of Mad River, in the Kavenaugh settlement, four miles south of West Liberty.  The war broke out, and soon after Justice enlisted under Gen. Teipper (Tripper?), Col. Simon Kenton having charge of 1,300 friendly Indians whom he commanded.  Objection was raised to Justice enlisting as a soldier, and he was made Commissary Clerk; the war being over, he was discharged, and came back to Urbana, where he worked at his trade for a time, when he went from there to West Liberty, and after a time to Belleville, one mile south of Bellefontaine, where he formed the acquaintance of Joel Smith and James McPherson, and obtained a school in this neighborhood, where he met Miss Margaret Smith, one of his most amiable scholars, whom he afterwards married. About that that time, William Powell and Major Tillis laid out Bellefontaine, and thither Justice Edwards removed with his young wife, working at his trade and teaching school alternately, teaching in one end of the first jail in the county, and, as a joke, is claimed to have been the second man incarcerated in that jail; with this incident the name of Vachel Blaylock stands connected.  Justice Edwards lived in Bellefontaine and vicinity until his death.  He was a teacher by profession, a saddler by trade, read and prepared for the practice of medicine, and for a time held the office of Justice of the Peace.  His aged widow now resides at Huntsville; she came with her parents from Rockingham Co., Va., to Warren Co., Ohio, afterwards going to Logan, settling on the farm where she now lives - Hopewell.  Dr. Joseph Edwards, eldest son of Justice Edwards, is a physician and traveler, born Sept. 7, 1822, on the site of Hopewell.  He was taken by his grandmother Smith, when 9 months old, and with her remained until his 13th year, when, his father's request, and made an ineffectual attempt to learn the tailor's trade with Samuel Mason, but abandoned it and learned the wagon and plow-making trade with James Walker, and in 1839 worked with James Lemon at West Liberty until the breaking out of the small-pox in the village in 1842, when Joseph, with about ninety-others, contracted that loathsome disease, and came near dying.  Three members of the Lemon family fell victims to the disease, when Lemon became discouraged, broke up business, and Joseph took the shop, tools and materials as his successor.  About this time he formed the acquaintance of Miss Lucinda Byrd; he proposed, was accepted, and, in 1843, she became the wife of Joseph Edwards.  He continued the business of wagon-making at this place for one year, and then removed to Springhill, six miles west of West Liberty, in Champaign Co.; this locality proved very unhealthy, and the prevalence of malarial disorders caused Joseph free access to his fine medical library, a privilege Joseph availed himself of with avidity.  Dr. Pringle removed to Clarke Co., Ohio, and was succeeded by Dr. Clayson, to whose library Joseph also had access.  He remained at Springhill ten years, and then returned to Bellefontaine, still continuing at his trade, with occasional exercise of his medical skill, until the breaking with one Pollack, he started for Lexington, Ky.  Learning at Cynthiana that Kirby Smith had taken Lexington, they took the back-track to Cincinnati, and thence home.  He wrote to Skyles Gardner, commandant at Clarksburg, W. Va., an was invited to that point; about a month thereafter, the small-pox broke out at that point, and Joseph was ordered to examine and report at headquarters, upon which he was ordered to take two nurses and treat those diseased; he treated successfully those cases occurring in the army at that post, and, in addition, volunteered his services to the suffering citizens around Clarksburg.  Capt. Gardner was superseded by Capt. Dodge, and took command at Harper's Ferry, on the Potomac.  After a brief visit home, Joseph went to Harper's Ferry, and took the position of Assistant Surgeon under Dr. Ramsey, the army Surgeon at that point, where he stayed until July 8, 1863.  Here he contracted the camp fever, and received free transportation home, where he lay for six weeks under the care of his old preceptor, Dr. Clayson.  In November of the same year, he went to Camp Nelson, Ky., where he stayed one month, then returned home and remained four days, and started, in company with John Edwards and John Shepler, for the city of Atchison, Kan., to work at his trade for $4 per diem.  The town contained about 1,500 souls, and four days after his arrival the small-pox appeared, and Dr. Edwards having had that disease, on recommendation of Shepler and the solicitation of the City Council, took charge of the city hospital, with some forty cases under his care; he had charge of this department for six weeks, and then entered regularly upon the practice of medicine at this point, and remained for eighteen months, when he returned to Bellefontaine, and, after a brief internal, came to Rushsylvania, in the employ of S. B. Stillwell, and ever sine has remained at this place.  July 8, 1875, in company with his brother, John he visited Canada, via Detroit and Chatham, where he visited the Thames battle-ground; he went from thence eight miles to Comoca, and finding here whole communities bearing the name of Edwards, claiming connection and soliciting further acquaintance, they tarried three weeks and visiting in this community.  It was here he met Dr. John Edwards, professor of medicine, from Wales, from whom he obtained his celebrated cancer and diphtheria cures, which have contributed so much to his notoriety.  His wife, whose name was Lucinda Byrd, was a native of Jefferson Co., Va.; her mother and two sisters died of the cholera; she was brought by her aunt to Champaign Co., Ohio, in 1831; she was then in her ninth year, being born Oct. 13, 1822.  At her marriage, she was the owner of nine slaves, all of whom she liberated by hiring and applying the proceeds of their labor to that purpose.  Dr. Joseph Edwards has two children; his eldest, Angeline, born Oct. 28, 1844, is the wife of Edward Thornton, of the city of Chicago, engaged in the dry goods business.  Rhoda, his second daughter, was born Oct. 31, 1851; she is the wife of John Quigly, of Galion, Ohio, an engineer on the C., C., C. & I. R. R.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 687
  McArthur Twp. -
ABRAHAM ELDER, JR., physician and surgeon; Huntsville; is the oldest practicing physician in this place, and has a large and lucrative practice; he was born Apr. 20, 1821, in Somerset, Perry Co., O.; his father, Abraham Elder, Sr., was a native of Lancaster Co., Pa., and was there married to Jane Johnston (he served in the war of 1812), and moved from there to this State, and lived a while in Perry Co., and came here in 1833; he lived one year in Bellefontaine and then moved on a farm near Huntsville, where he died in1845.  He had always been a heavy dealer in horses, taking them to Philadelphia, and bringing back goods, which his son sold in Bellefontaine.  He was Associate Judge from the time he arrived until his death.  Abraham commenced for himself when 21 years old; he and a brother buying a farm which they conducted two years.  During this time he was studying under Dr. Main at Richland, and then went into the mercantile business in Hardin Co.; while there the B. & I. R. R. was completed, and he built the first store room at what is now known as Ridgeway; he kept drug store there, his partner being Dr. McCandless, with whom he studied until he entered the Starling Medical College, from which he graduated in 1854; he practiced two years at Ridgeway, and since at Huntsville.  He was married Mar. 11, 1845, to Mary A. Wallace; she was born May 13, 1826, in Pennsylvania, and came here when 10 years old; by this union six children have been born, four of whom are living - Arra, Caroline, Vada, and Wallace.  He and wife are consistent members of the United Presbyterian Church.  He voted first for Van Buren on the Free Soil ticket, and has since been a Republican.
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 820
  Rush Creek Twp. -
CULBERTSON ELDER, merchant; Rushsylvania.  We commence this family line with John Elder, who was born in Pennsylvania, and removed from there with his family to Columbiana Co., O., where he died.  Abraham Elder, his son, also a native of Pennsylvania, married Jane Johnson, the daughter of Robert Johnson, and then removed with his family to Perry Co., O., his children were - Culberson, born June 22, 1807, and Jane (now dead), who married John Pollock, of Logan Co., O., John deceased, Margaret, who married John Coulter, now deceased, but whose son, Dr. John Coulter, Jr., is the present Recorder of Logan Co., James, deceased, Robert, who married Martha Keers, of Logan Co., Dr. Abraham, who married Mary Wallace and who is a practicing physician of Huntsville, Logan Co., Maria who married David Torrence, of Greene Co., O., and Rebecca, who married David Laughhead, of Greene Co., she is now deceased.  On the 7th day of May, 1829, Culbertson Elder married Miss Eliza Ann Stewart, whose father, Robert Stewart, came from Ireland in his 19th year, settling in Bucks Co., Pa., and who, with his wife, Mary, removed to Perry Co., O., which will be noticed hereafter.  Eliza Ann was born Oct. 17, 1806.  Culberson Elder's family consists of Milton S., born Mar. 1, 1830, now a dry-goods merchant and postmaster at Mt. Victory, Hardin Co.  He received his appointment as P. M. under James Buchanan, and has retained the appointment ever since.  Sarah Jane, born Jan. 7, 1832, and who was a teacher for a number of years prior to her marriage with James Ray, of Illinois, now deceased, his widow being at this time a resident of Rushsylvania, Logan Co.  Eliza Ann born in Bellefontaine, July 12, 1836, married Milton Smith, of Hardin Co., in 1845, and died about a year after marriage.  Margaret, born June 22, 1848, in Hardin Co., and married to Edward Sebring, of Indiana.  Two unmarried daughters, one of whom is teacher, remain at home.  In 1817 Culbertson Elder became a resident of Somerset, Perry Co., and in his 14th year he entered the dry-goods store of King & Rogers, of Lancaster, Fairfield Co., O., and after remaining in their employ for two years, returned to Somerset, and entered as clerk, the dry-goods store of Jacob Myers, remaining in his employ until the removal of Mr.Myers to Putnam, Muskingum Co.  Culbertson then began in the employ of Judge C. C. Hood, of Somerset, who, at the expiration of eighteen months, sent him to New Lexington, in Perry Co., to open a dry-goods store in that place, and in this he was the first merchant, and also the first postmaster in that place.  It was here that he became acquainted with the amiable and intelligent daughter of Robert Stewart, whom he married on the 7th day of May, 1829.  A year after marriage he brought a stock of goods to Bellefontaine, and commenced business at that place, where he continued for nine years.  At the time of his removal of the deposits from the United States Bank by President Jackson Culbertson had to take fifty-two head of horses from Bellefontaine to Philadelphia, and saw his prospects blighted by the withering effects of the President's action on the markets, and the consequent financial crash which followed.  He returned to his home, succumbed to fate, and after utter failure removed to Hardin Co. and took up his abode in the wilderness, to commence as a backwoods farmer; here fame, if not fortune, followed him, and two years after his arrival he was clothed with the dignity of Esquire, which mantle he laid not aside for twenty-one consecutive years.  In 1864, he removed from his farm to Mt. Victory, in Hardin Co., again engaging in the dry-goods business and continuing therein until his removal to Rushsylvania, in 1873, where he again engaged in the dry-goods business and continued in it for two years, when he sold out.  On the 27th day of June, 1878, he again entered the arena of public business by opening a grocery and notion store, since which time he has steadily advanced in business and, although he has passed through the trials and vicissitudes of 73 years, yet he evinces the vigor and energy of those many years his junior, a man of conscientious scruples and generous impulses.  The Church of his adoption is the United Presbyterian, of which his household are all members.  Prior to the formation of the U. P. Church, he was an elder in the Seceder Church at Kenton, O., and after the union of the two ecclesiastical bodies which composed the U. P. Church, he continued as elder until his removal to Rushsylvania.  For half a century he has witnessed the progress of events in Logan Co., and the changes wrought by the onward flight of time
Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 688
  Richland Twp. -
JAMES K. ELDER, farmer; P. O., Huntsville; is one of the prominent and rising young farmers of Richland Township, and is a son of Robert J. and Martha (Keers) Elder.  He was born Apr. 27, 1846, in McArthur Twp., and has always been a resident of this county.  His father's a son of Abraham Elder, Sr., mentioned elsewhere in this work, and was born at Somerset, Perry Co., in 1818.  When 10 years of age he came to this county with his parents.  He was born Apr. 27, 1846, in McArthur Twp., and has always been a resident of this county.  His father's  a son of Abraham Elder, Sr., mentioned elsewhere in this work, and was born at Somerset, Perry Co., in 1818.  When 10 years of age he came to this county with his parents.  He was reared to and has always followed agricultural pursuits, and his only capital when he commenced in life was willing hands and a determination to succeed.  The results show for themselves, as he now owns two good farms, the product of his own industry and good management, besides other possessions that make him comfortable for life.  Mr. Elder lost his only daughter - Mary E., Feb. 7, 1876.  She was a gifted and much esteemed young lady, and her premature death, undoubtedly hastened the departure of her feeble mother, who died the following March.  Mr. Elder resided at Huntsville at the time of this double affliction, but now lives alternately with his two sons.  James K. worked out by the month in early life, but for a number of years has been farming for himself.  He has already secured a pleasant little farm, and is one of the largest and most successful grain growers of the township.  He was married Jan. 19, 1871, to Anna C., daughter of John W. and Elizabeth Dyche. She was born Sept. 13, 1853, in Morgan Co., now West Virginia.  Her parents lived here a short time, but are now in Kansas.  Three children have blessed this union - Mary L., James K. and Robert F.  Both he and his wife are members of the United Presbyterian Church.  Mr. Elder has always been a stalwart member of the Republican party, and takes an active interest in their proceedings.  He is a gentleman of decided worth, and whose purity and integrity of character are above reproach.
(Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 ~ Page 801)
  ABRAHAM ELLIOTT, (Jefferson Twp.) farmer; P. O. New Jerusalem; was born Jan. 21, 1828, in Stark Co., O.  His father's name was Isaac, and was thrice married, Abraham being the fruit of the last union.  His wife was a Mrs. Dwyer, whose maiden name was Rebecca Greer, and was a native of Maryland; he, of Pennsylvania.  At the age of 19 he launched out for himself; began work by the month on a farm, giving his father one-half of his earnings.  At the age of 22, April 10, 1850, he was married to Mary Wickersham, was was born 1826, in Columbiana Co., O., and is a daughter of Joseph and Margaret Wickersham.  For five years after their marriage he lived on the farm now owned by Esquire Slonecker, when he purchased 26 acres and was engaged in farming.  For several years he was engaged in stock trading, and while the war was in progress he purchased a large number of horses for the government, and all along his life, from the first, has been successful; has about 300 acres of land, upon which is located the much visited "Jerusalem Falls," which has become quite noted as a place of resort to visit the falls and its romantic surroundings.  Has five children - Asa, Emer, Emily, Agnes and Oliver.  He has some very desirable property in Rice Co., Kan., amounting to 320 acres, 150 of which is in cultivation.  Mr. Elliott's home farm is situated about one-half of a mile east of New Jerusalem, on the pike extension.   
(Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 ~ Page 751)
  BENJAMIN ELLIOTT (Liberty Twp.), hardware; West Liberty; was born Feb. 4, 1825, in Chester Co., Penn.  His father, John, was born Nov. 2, 1795, and died Sept. 8, 1828, in the same county, as was also his mother, Mary Brogan Elliott, her birthday being Feb. 28, 1796; she died Mar. 22, 1831.  The father died when Benjamin  was three years old, and in two years the mother, too, "followed that beckoning hand to the shore: of that cold, dark river, leaving five children to fight life's battle alone - Mifflin, born Feb. 6, 1815; Wilson, April 14, 1817; Hannah, Sept. 7, 1819; Eliza, June 17, 1822; Benjamin and Sarah died Apr. 26, 1828.  Benjamin lived with his uncle, Daniel Elliott, for two years, and then made a home with George Hoopes until 16 years old; during this time he took advantage of the cabin schools; he began then to learn the carpenter's trade with Charles Sloane, with whom he continued for three eyras, getting board and clothing for his labor, and two weeks during harvest, transferring thence to the employ of James B. Gibson for one year, at the expiration of which he worked at the same for John Davis, a brother-in-law; at the age of 21 he went to work at his trade at Mingo with his uncle, William Elliott, for eighteen months; he then, in company with Jab Salkeld, took a steamer at Cincinnati, O., after having worked at that place a short time.  They landed first at Vicksburg, and worked a short time at carpentering, and thence to Natchez, Miss., and there witnessed the reception of Gens. Taylor and Quitman, who were just returning from the Mexican war; they then went to New Orleans, and in a short time took ship for Galveston, Texas, where they stopped but a short time, and, finding business dull, they soon sailed for Port Lavaco, which then contained about thirty log houses but they did not unload their baggage, but returned to New Orleans, and thence to Natchez, where they resumed their trade, afterward engaging at Vicksburg; from there they transferred to Greenville, Miss., where they worked until the spring of 1849; they then took steamer for St. Louis, Mo., there engaging a short time, and then returned to Ohio, finally stopping at Urbana, where our subject continued his trade, making his home with William Thomas, in Logan Co.  He soon after sought a companion in the person of Rebecca Wierman, the marriage taking place May 27, 1852.  Her parents, John and Jane Moorehead Wierman, were natives of Pennsylvania, and came to Champaign Co., O., in 1835.  They had nine children, of whom six survive.  Mr. Elliott farmed for some time in Champaign Co. after his marriage, and then went to Kansas, but in six months returned to West Liberty, and engaged at carpentering, which he continued until 1868, when he abandoned it, and his since devoted his attention to his partnership business with Enos Baldwin. His marriage blessed him with six children - Addie, Willis, Eva, Nellie, Maud and Benjamin.  Himself and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church of West Liberty.  When Mr. Elliott was 21 years old he started to Ohio, taking the cars at Penningtonville, Penn., and at Holliday's Ferry took a stage, and about midnight they run into a big snow-drift, and the passengers were compelled to wade the deep snow to a tavern a mile off.  In teh morning the state came up and they started on for Pittsburg.  There he took a steamboat for Cincinnati, O., and from there took a stage for Dayton.  The next morning after arriving, he started on foot for Mingo Valley, a distance of fifty miles.  At the end of the second day he landed at his Uncle William Elliott's, with a $5 gold piece.  It is the privilege of but few to witness the varied scenes that have made up the life of Benjamin Elliott.  The disadvantages of his youth made him energetic and a close thinker, of vigorous frame and an active, investigating turn of mind.  His varied experiences have been treasured up for future profit.  He has always been active, and is honored for his unwavering adhesion to principle, and for his zeal and liberality in the promotion of all worthy objects.  Benjamin's father was one of seven children - Mary, born May 13, 1795; Martha, June, 16, 1797; Daniel, Jan. 15, 1795; Benjamin, May 16, 1802; Ann, Dec. 13, 1804, and Robert, Feb. 1, 1807.
(Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880  ~ Page 708)
  Bokes Creek Twp. -
H. H. ELLIOTT, farmer; P. O., Rushsylvania; was born Nov. 29, 1837, in Stark Co., Ohio; he is the son of Joseph and Mary (Slater) Elliott, who were natives of Pennsylvania, and came to Stark Co. when young, where they were married, and reared five children: they all moved to Logan Co. in 1839.  H. H. lived with his parents until of age, and was engaged in farm pursuits.  His marriage was celebrated Aug. 17, 1865, with Nancy, daughter of Moses Bell; she was born in this county June 29, 1843.  They are members of the Congregation of Friends at Zanesfield.  They have four children - Lena V., Carrie B., Lucy E. and Murtie M., and one deceased, William L.  Mr. Elliott enlisted in the late rebellion Aug. 11, 18652, in Co. H, 96th O. V. I., and participated in many severe conflicts during his three years' service, of which we mention the following: Arkansas Post, Chickasaw Bayou, Port Gibson, Raymond, Jackson, Champion Hills, Black River, Siege of Vicksburg, Jackson (again), Grand Coteau, Fort Gaines, Fort Morgan, Spanish Fort, Fort Blakely and capture of Mobile: Throughout the campaign, in all these engagements, he was singularly fortunate, as he never received a scratch, with the exception of a slight bruise (but not sufficient to cut) by a piece of shell; and being of a strong and hardy constitution, he was not sick a single day, and never took three doses of medicine during his three years' service; the war being closed, he got an honorable discharge, and returned home July 27, 1865.  They own a well-improved farm of 100 acres, with good buildings, all of which he has made by his own economy and industry.
(Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 ~ Page 660)
  Jefferson Twp. -
JOHN J. ELLIOTT, farmer; P. O. Zanesfield, was born April 20 1809, in Washington Co., Penn.; his parents were Joseph and Elizabeth (John) Elliott.  She was a native of Pennsylvania, he of Ireland.  They moved to Stark Co., O., 1810, where John J. was raised.  His father run a mill and carried on a farm, and was quite a successful man.  At the age of 22 John was united by marriage to Mary S. Stanley, who was born July, 1812, in Columbiana Co., this State, and was a daughter of Garland and Sarah (Purdon) Stanley, both natives of Virginia.  In 1841 Mr. and Mrs. Elliott located in Jefferson Twp., where he had purchased 100 acres, which he improved.  He had learned the carpenter's trade, and he plied hits vocation quite successfully for several years in connection with his farming, finally adding to his first purchase 75 acres more.  Three children have been born to them, but two are living - Garland, born Dec. 18, 1832, and married Matilda Dunlap, a native of Ohio; he died May 8, 1874.  She and four children live in this township on the property he left.  James, born Aug. 8, 1835, and married Caroline East, a native of Indiana; they live in Cass Co., Mich.; Joseph, born Aug. 11, 1837, married Ann Lemmont, a native of Maryland; they live on their farm adjoining the homestead.  June 28, 1879, Mr. and Mrs. Elliott celebrated their golden wedding, having worn the matrimonial yoke pleasantly for one-half a century.  Four hundred and eighty-five guests were among the number of congratulate this venerable couple.  Mrs. Elliott has for twenty-five years been an acknowledged minister of the gospel, according to the rules of the Quaker Church, and has traveled over 100,000 miles, visiting twenty-seven States, and has attended all the yearly meetings on the Continent, except North Carolina, and has been a guest at the White House during Gen. Grant's administration; in short, she has been instrumental in doing much good, and doubtless will have many stars in her crown in the day of her rejoicing.  This honorable couple are spending the evening of their life on the home farm in peace and quiet, enjoying the esteem and love of their many friends.
(Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 ~ Page 750)
  Jefferson Twp. -
THOMAS ELLIOTT, farmer; P. O. Zanesfield; is a grandson of Isaac Elliott, whose son, Isaac, Jr., was likewise the father of Thomas (whose name heads this sketch). Isaac, Jr., was born in York Co., Penn., June 13, 1787, and emigrated with his parents to Stark Co., O., in 1816.  Here Thomas was born, Jan. 3, 1826, and came to Logan Co., in 1839 with his parents, who settled on a piece of land near Jerusalem, which had been formerly occupied by Simon Kenton.  Thomas was raised to farming.  By steady attention to his books he was enabled to obtain an education sufficient to enable him to teach.  Commencing at 17, he taught several terms; afterwards clerked in a store some times.  At the age of 26 he was married (May 27, 1851) to Caroline Brown, who was born in this township, June 11, 1830; she was a daughter of Zaccheus and Hannah (Marmon) Brown.  After marriage located on a part of the homestead farm, where they lived until 1859; then moved to their present place of residence; have four children living- Thomas E., Isaac D., Zaccheus O. and Anna V.  Has 147 acres of land.  Isaac Elliott, the father of Thomas, died April 4, 1859; his wife was Rebecca Greer, born in Maryland, June 23, 1791, and died June 18, 1857.  The Elliott family are members of Friends.
(Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 ~ Page 752)
  Richland Twp. -
PRESTON O. ELLIS, retired merchant; Belle Centre, is the oldest of a family of twelve children, and was born July 31, 1822, in Greene Co., O.; his father, Samuel Ellis, was born in the year 1800 in what is now West Virginia, and when 9 years old accompanied his parents to this State, where his father bought 1500 acres of military land, being one of the first settlers of Greene Co.  He has never left the county of his adoption, but was there married to Elizabeth Oglesbee, who was also born in Virginia, in the year 1802, and came to this State at an early day.  He has always lived on the old homestead, which has grown dear to him as it has slowly but surely changed from its primitive state to a beautiful and highly cultivated farm.  His earthly companion departed this life more than forty years ago, but he is still living in the full possession of all his faculties; was united in wedlock Feb. 3, 1844, to Lucy A., daughter of Hiram and Henrietta (Crow) Dakin; she was born Dec. 28, 1824,  in Clinton Co., O.  They lived successively in Greene, Clinton, Warren and Franklin Co's., but most of the time in Warren, and for perhaps sixteen years he has engaged in lumbering, and previous to that was a farmer.  In 1866 he bought a farm of 700 acres east of Belle Centre, partly in Hardin and partly in this county.  It was a large forest and on that he ran a saw-mill for two years, when he moved to Belle Centre and engaged in the mercantile business which he followed ten years with fair success; he now superintends the 300 acres of land, which he yet retains, and is a contractor on pikes.  By his marriage four children have been born - Mary E., Elizabeth A., Lewis M., and Edwin F.  All are married.  He has held the offices of Treasurer, Mayor and Councilman, and has been Republican since the organization of that party.
(Source: History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 801)
  Rush Creek Twp. -
GEORGE WASHINGTON ELLSWORTH, farmer; P. O., Big Springs, Jacob Ellsworth was a native of the State of Delaware and came from thence to Clark Co., O.; his wife was one of the celebrated "Fletcher family" of that State.  Isaac Ellsworth was born in Clark Co., Apr. 15, 1802; he married Lovina Garfield (a cousin of the present nominee, James A. Garfield), the nuptials being celebrated June 19, 1843, in his own house, fitted up especially for the occasion.  She was the daughter of Thomas Garfield, of Massachusetts.  Fourteen years after marriage, Isaac Ellsworth removed to Cass Co., Mo., and remained there until his violent death at the hands of the guerillas; he was compelled to kneel in his own door-yard to be shot in the back of the head.  His death occurred May 10, 1865.  The children are - Thomas Jefferson, born Apr. 14, 1844, in Clark Co., died Nov. 21, 1846; William Enos, born Oct. 12, 1846, died Jan. 1, 1849; Tabitha Melissa, "infant," died Aug. 14, 1856; Angeline, born Dec. 6, 1849; George Washington, born Jan. 10, 1856, and Benjamin Franklin, born Feb. 9, 1859.  Isaac Ellsworth was twice married; his first wife, Rachel Ellsworth, was born Mar. 16, 1830.   By occupation G. W. Ellsworth is a farmer, who raises horses, cattle, hogs, and the usual farm productions.  He is a second cousin to the late lamented Col. Ellsworth, who fell at the hand of an assassin, whilst hauling down the rebel flag at Alexandria, Va., May 24, 1861.
(Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 - Page 690)
  Jefferson Twp. -
JOSEPH ELY, SR. farmer; P. O. New Jerusalem; born Sept. 14, 1805, in Harford Co., Md.; his parents were Joseph Ann (Jones) Ely; the former was born in Berks Co., Penn., Mar. 17, 1757; his father's name was Thomas.  Ann Jones was born in York Co., Pa., Mar. 7, 1772; nine children were born to them.  Thomas being the sixth; he came to Belmont Co., this State in 1831 and followed the carpenter's trade for several years.  In October, 1842, he came to Logan Co., locating in the northeastern part of the township, where he rented land for several years, then purchased 100 acres where he now resides, which has been his constant abiding-place since.  Mr. Ely has been twice married.  At the age of 23 he was married to Ann P. Lemmon, born Dec. 29, 1806 and was a daughter of James and Ann Lemmon; she died Aug. 30, 1848, leaving eight children - Joseph, Ann M., Isaac, John, James, Rebecca, Hulda and Drusilla; all of them are now scattered in different parts of the country.  June 30, 1850, was married to his present wife, Phebe Henry, born in November, 1819, in Jefferson Twp.; she was a daughter of William and Nancy (Stephenson) Henry; he was born in Culpepper Co., Va.; she was a native of Kentucky. After Mr. and Mrs. Henry were married they resided in Zanesfield for several years, and moved to Monroe Tp. about en years before his death.  Nine children have crowned the union of Mr. and Mrs. Ely, of whom are - William H., born April 14, 1851; Elma J., Mar. 1, 1853, now Mrs. A. Arbegast; Thomas C. Oct. 10, 1861; the deceased are - Albert B., Amanda and infant.  Mr. and Mrs. Ely are both members of the Missionary Baptist Church; he has been for thirty years a worker in the cause.
(Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 ~ Page 751)
  Lake Twp. -
G. W. EMERSON, attorney-at-Law; Bellefontaine.  Among the successful attorneys of the Logan Co. Bar, we may mention the above-named gentleman, who was born in Logan Co., Ohio, Dec. 19, 1849, and is the son of Moses Emerson, one of the oldest settlers of Logan Co., a farmer and a strong temperance advocate.  Our subject graduated from the Hillsdale College, in the classical course, in 1870.  He then engaged in teaching school and in surveying Government land in the West.  He read law in the office of West, Walker & Kennedy; in 1875, was admitted to the bar, and in 1876 he commenced the practice of his chosen profession, entering into partnership with E. H. HOWENSTINE, which continued up to 1877, since which time Mr. Emerson has been alone in the practice of law.  In 1877, he was elected to the office of Prosecuting Attorney of Logan Co., and re-elected in 1879; this office he has filled with acknowledged ability.
(Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 ~ Page 597)
  Harrison Twp. -
GEORGE E. EMERY
, farmer; P. O., Bellefontaine; was born in Chester Co., Penn., in 1846; is a son of James and Eliza A. Emery, who were natives of the same county in Pennsylvania; they came to Logan Co. in 1854.  Mr. Emery was raised on a farm, and has followed farming principally for a business; he taught school four winters previous to his marriage; he took a commercial course and graduated at Poughkeepsie, N. Y.; was married in 1872 to Nancy Horn she was born and raised in Logan Co.; from this union there is one child, Effie A.  He has followed farming and stock-growing for a business since his marriage, and has been very successful; his wife is a member of the Lutheran Church, as are all her folks.  Mr. E. is a Republican.
Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 ~ Page 621
  LEWIS T. EMERY, farmer; P. O., New Richland; is one of the most promising and energetic young farmers of this township, and was born Dec. 11, 1850, i Lancaster Co., Pa.  His father, James Emery, was born in that county and married Eliza A. Eagle, a native of Chester Co.  Farming has been his only occupation, and in March, 1854, he moved to this county, settling in Harrison Twp., where he lived until 1878, and has since been in Bellefontaine.  He owns several farms in this county, which are conducted by his sons.  His wife died Sept. 20, 1867, and he has since married Mary J. ArrowsmithLewis graduated at Eastman's Business College March 22, 1872, and refused several business positions for the more congenial pursuit of farming.  Lewis was married Oct. 7, 1875 to Columbia A., daughter of Jacob and Eliza (Laney) Horn.  She was born Aug. 11, 1856, in this county.  Their union has been blessed with one child, Nellie E., born Aug. 25, 1879.  He and his brother own the farm on which he lives, and this he manages as well as the farm adjoining which belongs to his father.  He and his wife are members of the Presbyterian Church, and he also belongs  to the Knights of Pythias, Independent Order of Red Men, Commercial Council and Patrons of Husbandry.  He has always been a Republican.
Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 ~ Page 800 ~ Richland Twp.
  CHARLES E. EVANS (Zane Township), farmer; P. O. North Lewisburg; was born in Franklin County, Ohio, March 26, 1839; his parents, Isaac Evans and Mehala (Gray) Evans, were natives of Maryland; he remained on the farm until he was sixteen years of age, when his father having died at the advanced age of eighty-seen, he came to Logan county, and immediately went to work for ten dollars a month; a year or two after coming to this county, he began to learn the tinner's trade at Quincy, working at the same some time in DeGraff; in 1858, having served his apprenticeship, he opened a shop in Lewisburg, and by prudence and economy he was able to add to his stock, until he had a fine store and an excellent line of hardware; he continued in this business until 1878, when not being able to withstand the strong influence of his earlier training, he traded his stock for the farm upon which he now resides, however, he worked at his trade and remained with his successor for some time.  In the spring of 1880, he moved on his farm, and is at presently busily engaged in its improvement.  On Sept. 19, 1862, he married Miss Frances J. Underwood, a native of Ohio, born May 29, 1844; from this union there were eight children - Sarah Etta, Amos, Emma, Catherine, Leroy, Fannie, Henry and Edna; of these, Amos, Emma and Catherine are dead.  The subject of this sketch served in the 132nd O. V. I., and did garrison duty at Bermuda Hundred, and also participated in the siege before Petersburg.  All he is, and all that he possessed, comes from his own individual exertions.  A careful business man - he has done much to promote the interests of his community.
Source:  History of Logan County and Ohio - Chicago: O. L. Basking & Co., Historical Publishers, 186 Dearborn Street. - 1880 ~ Page 632

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